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Titles Actions Overview All Actions Cosponsors Committees Related Bills Subjects Latest Summary All Summaries

Titles (2)

Short Titles

Short Titles - Senate

Short Titles as Introduced

Drug Free Commercial Driver Act of 2013

Official Titles

Official Titles - Senate

Official Titles as Introduced

A bill to amend section 31306 of title 49, United States Code, to recognize hair as an alternative specimen for preemployment and random controlled substances testing of commercial motor vehicle drivers and for other purposes.


Actions Overview (1)

Date Actions Overview
10/30/2013Introduced in Senate

All Actions (1)

Date All Actions
10/30/2013Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
Action By: Senate

Cosponsors (1)

* = Original cosponsor
CosponsorDate Cosponsored
Sen. Boozman, John [R-AR]* 10/30/2013

Committees (1)

Committees, subcommittees and links to reports associated with this bill are listed here, as well as the nature and date of committee activity and Congressional report number.

Committee / Subcommittee Date Activity Related Documents
Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation10/30/2013 Referred to

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Latest Summary (1)

There is one summary for S.1625. View summaries

Shown Here:
Introduced in Senate (10/30/2013)

Drug Free Commercial Driver Act of 2013 - Revises regulations that require motor carriers to conduct preemployment, reasonable suspicion, random, and post-accident testing of commercial motor vehicle operators for controlled substances or alcohol.

Allows motor carriers to use hair testing as an acceptable alternative to urinalysis for detecting use of controlled substances by an operator, but only for preemployment testing and random testing (but the latter only if the motor carrier tested the operator at preemployment using the same method).

Requires the Secretary of Transportation (DOT) to develop requirements for laboratories and testing procedures for controlled substances that include mandatory guidelines that establish, among other things, laboratory protocols and cut-off levels for hair testing to detect the use of such substances.

Allows any motor carrier that demonstrates it has consistently carried out a generally applicable hair testing program during the most recent one-year period to apply to the Administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration for exemption from mandatory urinalysis testing.