Text: S.2722 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in Senate (07/31/2014)


113th CONGRESS
2d Session
S. 2722


To facilitate identification and dissemination of evidence-informed recommendations for addressing maternal addiction and neonatal abstinence syndrome and to provide for studies with respect to neonatal abstinence syndrome.


IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

July 31, 2014

Mr. McConnell introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions


A BILL

To facilitate identification and dissemination of evidence-informed recommendations for addressing maternal addiction and neonatal abstinence syndrome and to provide for studies with respect to neonatal abstinence syndrome.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Protecting Our Infants Act of 2014”.

SEC. 2. Evidence-informed recommendations with respect to maternal addiction and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

(a) In general.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services (referred to in this section as the “Secretary”) shall coordinate and facilitate the—

(1) identification and compilation of evidence-informed recommendations for physicians, nurses, and hospital facilities with respect to neonatal abstinence syndrome; and

(2) identification of any gaps, as appropriate, in such evidence-informed recommendations that may require additional research or analysis with respect to—

(A) screening and intervention for maternal substance abuse, including the misuse or abuse of prescription drugs in women of childbearing age and pregnant women;

(B) treatment for pregnant and post­par­tum women with a substance use disorder, including the misuse or abuse of prescription drugs;

(C) screening of infants for neonatal abstinence syndrome and for the risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome;

(D) treatment for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome, including evidence-informed recommendations surrounding evaluation and treatment with pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions; and

(E) ongoing treatment, services, and supports for postpartum women with a substance use disorder, including misuse or abuse of prescription drugs, and infants and children with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

(b) Input.—In carrying out subsection (a), the Secretary shall consider input from stakeholders, such as health professionals, public health officials, and law enforcement.

(c) Dissemination of information.—The Secretary shall disseminate to appropriate stakeholders in States and local communities the evidence-informed recommendations identified under subsection (a).

(d) Addressing Research Needs for Maternal Addiction and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.—The Secretary shall conduct a study to evaluate—

(1) factors related to the increased prevalence of maternal opiate misuse and abuse;

(2) factors related to maternal misuse and abuse of opiates, including—

(A) barriers to identifying and treating maternal misuse and abuse of opiates; and

(B) the most effective prevention and treatment strategies for pregnant women and other women of childbearing age who are at risk for or dependent on opiates; and

(3) factors related to neonatal abstinence syndrome, including—

(A) epidemiological studies concerning neonatal abstinence syndrome;

(B) the most effective methods to diagnose and treat neonatal abstinence syndrome; and

(C) the long-term effects of neonatal abstinence syndrome and the need for a longer-term study on infants and children at risk for developing neonatal abstinence syndrome or diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

(e) Report.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall provide to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives the findings from the study under subsection (d) and a report that identifies the gaps in evidence-informed recommendations that require additional research or analysis, and priority areas for additional research.

SEC. 3. Improving data on neonatal abstinence syndrome.

The Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall provide technical assistance to States to improve the availability and quality of data collection and surveillance activities regarding neonatal abstinence syndrome, including—

(1) incidence and prevalence of neonatal abstinence syndrome;

(2) the identification of causes for neonatal abstinence syndrome, including new and emerging trends; and

(3) the identification of demographics and other relevant information associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

SEC. 4. Pain management alternatives.

It is the sense of Congress that the Director of the National Institutes of Health should continue research with respect to pain management, including for women of childbearing age.

SEC. 5. GAO study.

Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall conduct a study evaluating—

(1) the availability and effectiveness of federally facilitated substance abuse treatment programs for pregnant women and their children;

(2) the availability and effectiveness of Federal programs that encourage State adoption and implementation of programs to ensure—

(A) the safety and health of mothers who have a substance use disorder; and

(B) the safety and health of children with neonatal abstinence syndrome;

(3) the effectiveness of Federal data systems and surveillance programs used to monitor or track drug utilization and resulting trends, including whether information on neonatal abstinence syndrome is incorporated into such data systems; and

(4) the identification of the use of all discretionary funds to address maternal substance abuse, including the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs.