Text: H.R.2146 — 114th Congress (2015-2016)All Bill Information (Except Text)

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Public Law No: 114-26 (06/29/2015)

 
[114th Congress Public Law 26]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]



[[Page 129 STAT. 319]]

Public Law 114-26
114th Congress

                                 An Act


 
    To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to allow Federal law 
enforcement officers, firefighters, and air traffic controllers to make 
 penalty-free withdrawals from governmental plans after age 50, and for 
         other purposes. <<NOTE: June 29, 2015 -  [H.R. 2146]>> 

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, <<NOTE: Defending Public 
Safety Employees' Retirement Act. 26 USC 1 note.>> 
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Defending Public Safety Employees' 
Retirement Act''.
SEC. 2. EARLY RETIREMENT DISTRIBUTIONS TO FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT 
                    OFFICERS, FIREFIGHTERS, AND AIR TRAFFIC 
                    CONTROLLERS IN GOVERNMENTAL PLANS.

    (a) In General.--Section 72(t)(10)(B) of the Internal Revenue Code 
of 1986 <<NOTE: 26 USC 72.>>  is amended--
            (1) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``, 
        or'';
            (2) by striking ``means any employee'' and inserting the 
        following: ``means--
                          ``(i) any employee''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new clause:
                          ``(ii) any Federal law enforcement officer 
                      described in section 8331(20) or 8401(17) of title 
                      5, United States Code, any Federal customs and 
                      border protection officer described in section 
                      8331(31) or 8401(36) of such title, any Federal 
                      firefighter described in section 8331(21) or 
                      8401(14) of such title, or any air traffic 
                      controller described in 8331(30) or 8401(35) of 
                      such title.''.

    (b) Application to Defined Contribution Plans.--Section 72(t)(10)(A) 
of such Code is amended by striking ``which is a defined benefit plan''.
    (c) Distributions Not Treated as Modification of Substantially Equal 
Payments.--Section 72(t)(4)(A)(ii) of such Code is amended by inserting 
``or a distribution to which paragraph (10) applies'' after ``other than 
by reason of death or disability''.
    (d) Effective Date.--The <<NOTE: Applicability. 26 USC 72 
note.>> amendments made by this section shall apply to distributions 
after December 31, 2015.
SEC. 3. BUDGETARY EFFECTS.

    The budgetary effects of this Act shall not be entered on either 
PAYGO scorecard maintained pursuant to section 4(d) of the Statutory 
Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010.

[[Page 129 STAT. 320]]

  TITLE I--TRADE <<NOTE: Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and 
Accountability Act of 2015. 19 USC 4201 note.>> PROMOTION AUTHORITY
SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015''.
SEC. 102. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4201.>> TRADE NEGOTIATING OBJECTIVES.

    (a) Overall Trade Negotiating Objectives.--The overall trade 
negotiating objectives of the United States for agreements subject to 
the provisions of section 103 are--
            (1) to obtain more open, equitable, and reciprocal market 
        access;
            (2) to obtain the reduction or elimination of barriers and 
        distortions that are directly related to trade and investment 
        and that decrease market opportunities for United States exports 
        or otherwise distort United States trade;
            (3) to further strengthen the system of international trade 
        and investment disciplines and procedures, including dispute 
        settlement;
            (4) to foster economic growth, raise living standards, 
        enhance the competitiveness of the United States, promote full 
        employment in the United States, and enhance the global economy;
            (5) to ensure that trade and environmental policies are 
        mutually supportive and to seek to protect and preserve the 
        environment and enhance the international means of doing so, 
        while optimizing the use of the world's resources;
            (6) to promote respect for worker rights and the rights of 
        children consistent with core labor standards of the ILO (as set 
        out in section 111(7)) and an understanding of the relationship 
        between trade and worker rights;
            (7) to seek provisions in trade agreements under which 
        parties to those agreements ensure that they do not weaken or 
        reduce the protections afforded in domestic environmental and 
        labor laws as an encouragement for trade;
            (8) to ensure that trade agreements afford small businesses 
        equal access to international markets, equitable trade benefits, 
        and expanded export market opportunities, and provide for the 
        reduction or elimination of trade and investment barriers that 
        disproportionately impact small businesses;
            (9) to promote universal ratification and full compliance 
        with ILO Convention No. 182 Concerning the Prohibition and 
        Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child 
        Labor;
            (10) to ensure that trade agreements reflect and facilitate 
        the increasingly interrelated, multi-sectoral nature of trade 
        and investment activity;
            (11) to recognize the growing significance of the Internet 
        as a trading platform in international commerce;
            (12) to take into account other legitimate United States 
        domestic objectives, including, but not limited to, the 
        protection of legitimate health or safety, essential security, 
        and consumer interests and the law and regulations related 
        thereto; and

[[Page 129 STAT. 321]]

            (13) to take into account conditions relating to religious 
        freedom of any party to negotiations for a trade agreement with 
        the United States.

    (b) Principal Trade Negotiating Objectives.--
            (1) Trade in goods.--The principal negotiating objectives of 
        the United States regarding trade in goods are--
                    (A) to expand competitive market opportunities for 
                exports of goods from the United States and to obtain 
                fairer and more open conditions of trade, including 
                through the utilization of global value chains, by 
                reducing or eliminating tariff and nontariff barriers 
                and policies and practices of foreign governments 
                directly related to trade that decrease market 
                opportunities for United States exports or otherwise 
                distort United States trade; and
                    (B) to obtain reciprocal tariff and nontariff 
                barrier elimination agreements, including with respect 
                to those tariff categories covered in section 111(b) of 
                the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3521(b)).
            (2) Trade in services.--(A) The principal negotiating 
        objective of the United States regarding trade in services is to 
        expand competitive market opportunities for United States 
        services and to obtain fairer and more open conditions of trade, 
        including through utilization of global value chains, by 
        reducing or eliminating barriers to international trade in 
        services, such as regulatory and other barriers that deny 
        national treatment and market access or unreasonably restrict 
        the establishment or operations of service suppliers.
            (B) Recognizing that expansion of trade in services 
        generates benefits for all sectors of the economy and 
        facilitates trade, the objective described in subparagraph (A) 
        should be pursued through all means, including through a 
        plurilateral agreement with those countries willing and able to 
        undertake high standard services commitments for both existing 
        and new services.
            (3) Trade in agriculture.--The principal negotiating 
        objective of the United States with respect to agriculture is to 
        obtain competitive opportunities for United States exports of 
        agricultural commodities in foreign markets substantially 
        equivalent to the competitive opportunities afforded foreign 
        exports in United States markets and to achieve fairer and more 
        open conditions of trade in bulk, specialty crop, and value 
        added commodities by--
                    (A) securing more open and equitable market access 
                through robust rules on sanitary and phytosanitary 
                measures that--
                          (i) encourage the adoption of international 
                      standards and require a science-based 
                      justification be provided for a sanitary or 
                      phytosanitary measure if the measure is more 
                      restrictive than the applicable international 
                      standard;
                          (ii) improve regulatory coherence, promote the 
                      use of systems-based approaches, and appropriately 
                      recognize the equivalence of health and safety 
                      protection systems of exporting countries;
                          (iii) require that measures are transparently 
                      developed and implemented, are based on risk 
                      assessments that take into account relevant 
                      international guidelines

[[Page 129 STAT. 322]]

                      and scientific data, and are not more restrictive 
                      on trade than necessary to meet the intended 
                      purpose; and
                          (iv) improve import check processes, including 
                      testing methodologies and procedures, and 
                      certification requirements,
                while recognizing that countries may put in place 
                measures to protect human, animal, or plant life or 
                health in a manner consistent with their international 
                obligations, including the WTO Agreement on the 
                Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures 
                (referred to in section 101(d)(3) of the Uruguay Round 
                Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3511(d)(3)));
                    (B) reducing or eliminating, by a date certain, 
                tariffs or other charges that decrease market 
                opportunities for United States exports--
                          (i) giving priority to those products that are 
                      subject to significantly higher tariffs or subsidy 
                      regimes of major producing countries; and
                          (ii) providing reasonable adjustment periods 
                      for United States import sensitive products, in 
                      close consultation with Congress on such products 
                      before initiating tariff reduction negotiations;
                    (C) reducing tariffs to levels that are the same as 
                or lower than those in the United States;
                    (D) reducing or eliminating subsidies that decrease 
                market opportunities for United States exports or 
                unfairly distort agriculture markets to the detriment of 
                the United States;
                    (E) allowing the preservation of programs that 
                support family farms and rural communities but do not 
                distort trade;
                    (F) developing disciplines for domestic support 
                programs, so that production that is in excess of 
                domestic food security needs is sold at world prices;
                    (G) eliminating government policies that create 
                price depressing surpluses;
                    (H) eliminating state trading enterprises whenever 
                possible;
                    (I) developing, strengthening, and clarifying rules 
                to eliminate practices that unfairly decrease United 
                States market access opportunities or distort 
                agricultural markets to the detriment of the United 
                States, and ensuring that such rules are subject to 
                efficient, timely, and effective dispute settlement, 
                including--
                          (i) unfair or trade distorting activities of 
                      state trading enterprises and other administrative 
                      mechanisms, with emphasis on requiring price 
                      transparency in the operation of state trading 
                      enterprises and such other mechanisms in order to 
                      end cross subsidization, price discrimination, and 
                      price undercutting;
                          (ii) unjustified trade restrictions or 
                      commercial requirements, such as labeling, that 
                      affect new technologies, including biotechnology;
                          (iii) unjustified sanitary or phytosanitary 
                      restrictions, including restrictions not based on 
                      scientific principles in contravention of 
                      obligations in the Uruguay

[[Page 129 STAT. 323]]

                      Round Agreements or bilateral or regional trade 
                      agreements;
                          (iv) other unjustified technical barriers to 
                      trade; and
                          (v) restrictive rules in the administration of 
                      tariff rate quotas;
                    (J) eliminating practices that adversely affect 
                trade in perishable or cyclical products, while 
                improving import relief mechanisms to recognize the 
                unique characteristics of perishable and cyclical 
                agriculture;
                    (K) ensuring that import relief mechanisms for 
                perishable and cyclical agriculture are as accessible 
                and timely to growers in the United States as those 
                mechanisms that are used by other countries;
                    (L) taking into account whether a party to the 
                negotiations has failed to adhere to the provisions of 
                already existing trade agreements with the United States 
                or has circumvented obligations under those agreements;
                    (M) taking into account whether a product is subject 
                to market distortions by reason of a failure of a major 
                producing country to adhere to the provisions of already 
                existing trade agreements with the United States or by 
                the circumvention by that country of its obligations 
                under those agreements;
                    (N) otherwise ensuring that countries that accede to 
                the World Trade Organization have made meaningful market 
                liberalization commitments in agriculture;
                    (O) taking into account the impact that agreements 
                covering agriculture to which the United States is a 
                party have on the United States agricultural industry;
                    (P) maintaining bona fide food assistance programs, 
                market development programs, and export credit programs;
                    (Q) seeking to secure the broadest market access 
                possible in multilateral, regional, and bilateral 
                negotiations, recognizing the effect that simultaneous 
                sets of negotiations may have on United States import 
                sensitive commodities (including those subject to tariff 
                rate quotas);
                    (R) seeking to develop an international consensus on 
                the treatment of seasonal or perishable agricultural 
                products in investigations relating to dumping and 
                safeguards and in any other relevant area;
                    (S) seeking to establish the common base year for 
                calculating the Aggregated Measurement of Support (as 
                defined in the Agreement on Agriculture) as the end of 
                each country's Uruguay Round implementation period, as 
                reported in each country's Uruguay Round market access 
                schedule;
                    (T) ensuring transparency in the administration of 
                tariff rate quotas through multilateral, plurilateral, 
                and bilateral negotiations; and
                    (U) eliminating and preventing the undermining of 
                market access for United States products through 
                improper use of a country's system for protecting or 
                recognizing geographical indications, including failing 
                to ensure transparency and procedural fairness and 
                protecting generic terms.

[[Page 129 STAT. 324]]

            (4) Foreign investment.--Recognizing that United States law 
        on the whole provides a high level of protection for investment, 
        consistent with or greater than the level required by 
        international law, the principal negotiating objectives of the 
        United States regarding foreign investment are to reduce or 
        eliminate artificial or trade distorting barriers to foreign 
        investment, while ensuring that foreign investors in the United 
        States are not accorded greater substantive rights with respect 
        to investment protections than United States investors in the 
        United States, and to secure for investors important rights 
        comparable to those that would be available under United States 
        legal principles and practice, by--
                    (A) reducing or eliminating exceptions to the 
                principle of national treatment;
                    (B) freeing the transfer of funds relating to 
                investments;
                    (C) reducing or eliminating performance 
                requirements, forced technology transfers, and other 
                unreasonable barriers to the establishment and operation 
                of investments;
                    (D) seeking to establish standards for expropriation 
                and compensation for expropriation, consistent with 
                United States legal principles and practice;
                    (E) seeking to establish standards for fair and 
                equitable treatment, consistent with United States legal 
                principles and practice, including the principle of due 
                process;
                    (F) providing meaningful procedures for resolving 
                investment disputes;
                    (G) seeking to improve mechanisms used to resolve 
                disputes between an investor and a government through--
                          (i) mechanisms to eliminate frivolous claims 
                      and to deter the filing of frivolous claims;
                          (ii) procedures to ensure the efficient 
                      selection of arbitrators and the expeditious 
                      disposition of claims;
                          (iii) procedures to enhance opportunities for 
                      public input into the formulation of government 
                      positions; and
                          (iv) providing for an appellate body or 
                      similar mechanism to provide coherence to the 
                      interpretations of investment provisions in trade 
                      agreements; and
                    (H) ensuring the fullest measure of transparency in 
                the dispute settlement mechanism, to the extent 
                consistent with the need to protect information that is 
                classified or business confidential, by--
                          (i) ensuring that all requests for dispute 
                      settlement are promptly made public;
                          (ii) ensuring that--
                                    (I) all proceedings, submissions, 
                                findings, and decisions are promptly 
                                made public; and
                                    (II) all hearings are open to the 
                                public; and
                          (iii) establishing a mechanism for acceptance 
                      of amicus curiae submissions from businesses, 
                      unions, and nongovernmental organizations.
            (5) Intellectual property.--The principal negotiating 
        objectives of the United States regarding trade-related 
        intellectual property are--
                    (A) to further promote adequate and effective 
                protection of intellectual property rights, including 
                through--

[[Page 129 STAT. 325]]

                          (i)(I) ensuring accelerated and full 
                      implementation of the Agreement on Trade-Related 
                      Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights referred 
                      to in section 101(d)(15) of the Uruguay Round 
                      Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3511(d)(15)), 
                      particularly with respect to meeting enforcement 
                      obligations under that agreement; and
                          (II) ensuring that the provisions of any trade 
                      agreement governing intellectual property rights 
                      that is entered into by the United States reflect 
                      a standard of protection similar to that found in 
                      United States law;
                          (ii) providing strong protection for new and 
                      emerging technologies and new methods of 
                      transmitting and distributing products embodying 
                      intellectual property, including in a manner that 
                      facilitates legitimate digital trade;
                          (iii) preventing or eliminating discrimination 
                      with respect to matters affecting the 
                      availability, acquisition, scope, maintenance, 
                      use, and enforcement of intellectual property 
                      rights;
                          (iv) ensuring that standards of protection and 
                      enforcement keep pace with technological 
                      developments, and in particular ensuring that 
                      rightholders have the legal and technological 
                      means to control the use of their works through 
                      the Internet and other global communication media, 
                      and to prevent the unauthorized use of their 
                      works;
                          (v) providing strong enforcement of 
                      intellectual property rights, including through 
                      accessible, expeditious, and effective civil, 
                      administrative, and criminal enforcement 
                      mechanisms; and
                          (vi) preventing or eliminating government 
                      involvement in the violation of intellectual 
                      property rights, including cyber theft and piracy;
                    (B) to secure fair, equitable, and nondiscriminatory 
                market access opportunities for United States persons 
                that rely upon intellectual property protection; and
                    (C) to respect the Declaration on the TRIPS 
                Agreement and Public Health, adopted by the World Trade 
                Organization at the Fourth Ministerial Conference at 
                Doha, Qatar on November 14, 2001, and to ensure that 
                trade agreements foster innovation and promote access to 
                medicines.
            (6) Digital trade in goods and services and cross-border 
        data flows.--The principal negotiating objectives of the United 
        States with respect to digital trade in goods and services, as 
        well as cross-border data flows, are--
                    (A) to ensure that current obligations, rules, 
                disciplines, and commitments under the World Trade 
                Organization and bilateral and regional trade agreements 
                apply to digital trade in goods and services and to 
                cross-border data flows;
                    (B) to ensure that--
                          (i) electronically delivered goods and 
                      services receive no less favorable treatment under 
                      trade rules and commitments than like products 
                      delivered in physical form; and

[[Page 129 STAT. 326]]

                          (ii) the classification of such goods and 
                      services ensures the most liberal trade treatment 
                      possible, fully encompassing both existing and new 
                      trade;
                    (C) to ensure that governments refrain from 
                implementing trade-related measures that impede digital 
                trade in goods and services, restrict cross-border data 
                flows, or require local storage or processing of data;
                    (D) with respect to subparagraphs (A) through (C), 
                where legitimate policy objectives require domestic 
                regulations that affect digital trade in goods and 
                services or cross-border data flows, to obtain 
                commitments that any such regulations are the least 
                restrictive on trade, nondiscriminatory, and 
                transparent, and promote an open market environment; and
                    (E) to extend the moratorium of the World Trade 
                Organization on duties on electronic transmissions.
            (7) Regulatory practices.--The principal negotiating 
        objectives of the United States regarding the use of government 
        regulation or other practices to reduce market access for United 
        States goods, services, and investments are--
                    (A) to achieve increased transparency and 
                opportunity for the participation of affected parties in 
                the development of regulations;
                    (B) to require that proposed regulations be based on 
                sound science, cost benefit analysis, risk assessment, 
                or other objective evidence;
                    (C) to establish consultative mechanisms and seek 
                other commitments, as appropriate, to improve regulatory 
                practices and promote increased regulatory coherence, 
                including through--
                          (i) transparency in developing guidelines, 
                      rules, regulations, and laws for government 
                      procurement and other regulatory regimes;
                          (ii) the elimination of redundancies in 
                      testing and certification;
                          (iii) early consultations on significant 
                      regulations;
                          (iv) the use of impact assessments;
                          (v) the periodic review of existing regulatory 
                      measures; and
                          (vi) the application of good regulatory 
                      practices;
                    (D) to seek greater openness, transparency, and 
                convergence of standards development processes, and 
                enhance cooperation on standards issues globally;
                    (E) to promote regulatory compatibility through 
                harmonization, equivalence, or mutual recognition of 
                different regulations and standards and to encourage the 
                use of international and interoperable standards, as 
                appropriate;
                    (F) to achieve the elimination of government 
                measures such as price controls and reference pricing 
                which deny full market access for United States 
                products;
                    (G) to ensure that government regulatory 
                reimbursement regimes are transparent, provide 
                procedural fairness, are nondiscriminatory, and provide 
                full market access for United States products; and
                    (H) to ensure that foreign governments--

[[Page 129 STAT. 327]]

                          (i) demonstrate that the collection of 
                      undisclosed proprietary information is limited to 
                      that necessary to satisfy a legitimate and 
                      justifiable regulatory interest; and
                          (ii) protect such information against 
                      disclosure, except in exceptional circumstances to 
                      protect the public, or where such information is 
                      effectively protected against unfair competition.
            (8) State-owned and state-controlled enterprises.--The 
        principal negotiating objective of the United States regarding 
        competition by state-owned and state-controlled enterprises is 
        to seek commitments that--
                    (A) eliminate or prevent trade distortions and 
                unfair competition favoring state-owned and state-
                controlled enterprises to the extent of their engagement 
                in commercial activity, and
                    (B) ensure that such engagement is based solely on 
                commercial considerations,
        in particular through disciplines that eliminate or prevent 
        discrimination and market-distorting subsidies and that promote 
        transparency.
            (9) Localization barriers to trade.--The principal 
        negotiating objective of the United States with respect to 
        localization barriers is to eliminate and prevent measures that 
        require United States producers and service providers to locate 
        facilities, intellectual property, or other assets in a country 
        as a market access or investment condition, including indigenous 
        innovation measures.
            (10) Labor and the environment.--The principal negotiating 
        objectives of the United States with respect to labor and the 
        environment are--
                    (A) to ensure that a party to a trade agreement with 
                the United States--
                          (i) adopts and maintains measures implementing 
                      internationally recognized core labor standards 
                      (as defined in section 111(17)) and its 
                      obligations under common multilateral 
                      environmental agreements (as defined in section 
                      111(6)),
                          (ii) does not waive or otherwise derogate 
                      from, or offer to waive or otherwise derogate 
                      from--
                                    (I) its statutes or regulations 
                                implementing internationally recognized 
                                core labor standards (as defined in 
                                section 111(17)), in a manner affecting 
                                trade or investment between the United 
                                States and that party, where the waiver 
                                or derogation would be inconsistent with 
                                one or more such standards, or
                                    (II) its environmental laws in a 
                                manner that weakens or reduces the 
                                protections afforded in those laws and 
                                in a manner affecting trade or 
                                investment between the United States and 
                                that party, except as provided in its 
                                law and provided not inconsistent with 
                                its obligations under common 
                                multilateral environmental agreements 
                                (as defined in section 111(6)) or other 
                                provisions of the trade agreement 
                                specifically agreed upon, and

[[Page 129 STAT. 328]]

                          (iii) does not fail to effectively enforce its 
                      environmental or labor laws, through a sustained 
                      or recurring course of action or inaction,
                in a manner affecting trade or investment between the 
                United States and that party after entry into force of a 
                trade agreement between those countries;
                    (B) to recognize that--
                          (i) with respect to environment, parties to a 
                      trade agreement retain the right to exercise 
                      prosecutorial discretion and to make decisions 
                      regarding the allocation of enforcement resources 
                      with respect to other environmental laws 
                      determined to have higher priorities, and a party 
                      is effectively enforcing its laws if a course of 
                      action or inaction reflects a reasonable, bona 
                      fide exercise of such discretion, or results from 
                      a reasonable, bona fide decision regarding the 
                      allocation of resources; and
                          (ii) with respect to labor, decisions 
                      regarding the distribution of enforcement 
                      resources are not a reason for not complying with 
                      a party's labor obligations; a party to a trade 
                      agreement retains the right to reasonable exercise 
                      of discretion and to make bona fide decisions 
                      regarding the allocation of resources between 
                      labor enforcement activities among core labor 
                      standards, provided the exercise of such 
                      discretion and such decisions are not inconsistent 
                      with its obligations;
                    (C) to strengthen the capacity of United States 
                trading partners to promote respect for core labor 
                standards (as defined in section 111(7));
                    (D) to strengthen the capacity of United States 
                trading partners to protect the environment through the 
                promotion of sustainable development;
                    (E) to reduce or eliminate government practices or 
                policies that unduly threaten sustainable development;
                    (F) to seek market access, through the elimination 
                of tariffs and nontariff barriers, for United States 
                environmental technologies, goods, and services;
                    (G) to ensure that labor, environmental, health, or 
                safety policies and practices of the parties to trade 
                agreements with the United States do not arbitrarily or 
                unjustifiably discriminate against United States exports 
                or serve as disguised barriers to trade;
                    (H) to ensure that enforceable labor and environment 
                obligations are subject to the same dispute settlement 
                and remedies as other enforceable obligations under the 
                agreement; and
                    (I) to ensure that a trade agreement is not 
                construed to empower a party's authorities to undertake 
                labor or environmental law enforcement activities in the 
                territory of the United States.
            (11) Currency.--The principal negotiating objective of the 
        United States with respect to currency practices is that parties 
        to a trade agreement with the United States avoid manipulating 
        exchange rates in order to prevent effective balance of payments 
        adjustment or to gain an unfair competitive advantage over other 
        parties to the agreement, such as through cooperative

[[Page 129 STAT. 329]]

        mechanisms, enforceable rules, reporting, monitoring, 
        transparency, or other means, as appropriate.
            (12) Foreign currency manipulation.--The principal 
        negotiating objective of the United States with respect to 
        unfair currency practices is to seek to establish accountability 
        through enforceable rules, transparency, reporting, monitoring, 
        cooperative mechanisms, or other means to address exchange rate 
        manipulation involving protracted large scale intervention in 
        one direction in the exchange markets and a persistently 
        undervalued foreign exchange rate to gain an unfair competitive 
        advantage in trade over other parties to a trade agreement, 
        consistent with existing obligations of the United States as a 
        member of the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade 
        Organization.
            (13) WTO and multilateral trade agreements.--Recognizing 
        that the World Trade Organization is the foundation of the 
        global trading system, the principal negotiating objectives of 
        the United States regarding the World Trade Organization, the 
        Uruguay Round Agreements, and other multilateral and 
        plurilateral trade agreements are--
                    (A) to achieve full implementation and extend the 
                coverage of the World Trade Organization and 
                multilateral and plurilateral agreements to products, 
                sectors, and conditions of trade not adequately covered;
                    (B) to expand country participation in and 
                enhancement of the Information Technology Agreement, the 
                Government Procurement Agreement, and other plurilateral 
                trade agreements of the World Trade Organization;
                    (C) to expand competitive market opportunities for 
                United States exports and to obtain fairer and more open 
                conditions of trade, including through utilization of 
                global value chains, through the negotiation of new WTO 
                multilateral and plurilateral trade agreements, such as 
                an agreement on trade facilitation;
                    (D) to ensure that regional trade agreements to 
                which the United States is not a party fully achieve the 
                high standards of, and comply with, WTO disciplines, 
                including Article XXIV of GATT 1994, Article V and V bis 
                of the General Agreement on Trade in Services, and the 
                Enabling Clause, including through meaningful WTO review 
                of such regional trade agreements;
                    (E) to enhance compliance by WTO members with their 
                obligations as WTO members through active participation 
                in the bodies of the World Trade Organization by the 
                United States and all other WTO members, including in 
                the trade policy review mechanism and the committee 
                system of the World Trade Organization, and by working 
                to increase the effectiveness of such bodies; and
                    (F) to encourage greater cooperation between the 
                World Trade Organization and other international 
                organizations.
            (14) Trade institution transparency.--The principal 
        negotiating objective of the United States with respect to 
        transparency is to obtain wider and broader application of the 
        principle of transparency in the World Trade Organization, 
        entities established under bilateral and regional trade 
        agreements, and other international trade fora through seeking--

[[Page 129 STAT. 330]]

                    (A) timely public access to information regarding 
                trade issues and the activities of such institutions;
                    (B) openness by ensuring public access to 
                appropriate meetings, proceedings, and submissions, 
                including with regard to trade and investment dispute 
                settlement; and
                    (C) public access to all notifications and 
                supporting documentation submitted by WTO members.
            (15) Anti-corruption.--The principal negotiating objectives 
        of the United States with respect to the use of money or other 
        things of value to influence acts, decisions, or omissions of 
        foreign governments or officials or to secure any improper 
        advantage in a manner affecting trade are--
                    (A) to obtain high standards and effective domestic 
                enforcement mechanisms applicable to persons from all 
                countries participating in the applicable trade 
                agreement that prohibit such attempts to influence acts, 
                decisions, or omissions of foreign governments or 
                officials or to secure any such improper advantage;
                    (B) to ensure that such standards level the playing 
                field for United States persons in international trade 
                and investment; and
                    (C) to seek commitments to work jointly to encourage 
                and support anti-corruption and anti-bribery initiatives 
                in international trade fora, including through the 
                Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public 
                Officials in International Business Transactions of the 
                Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 
                done at Paris December 17, 1997 (commonly known as the 
                ``OECD Anti-Bribery Convention'').
            (16) Dispute settlement and enforcement.--The principal 
        negotiating objectives of the United States with respect to 
        dispute settlement and enforcement of trade agreements are--
                    (A) to seek provisions in trade agreements providing 
                for resolution of disputes between governments under 
                those trade agreements in an effective, timely, 
                transparent, equitable, and reasoned manner, requiring 
                determinations based on facts and the principles of the 
                agreements, with the goal of increasing compliance with 
                the agreements;
                    (B) to seek to strengthen the capacity of the Trade 
                Policy Review Mechanism of the World Trade Organization 
                to review compliance with commitments;
                    (C) to seek adherence by panels convened under the 
                Dispute Settlement Understanding and by the Appellate 
                Body to--
                          (i) the mandate of those panels and the 
                      Appellate Body to apply the WTO Agreement as 
                      written, without adding to or diminishing rights 
                      and obligations under the Agreement; and
                          (ii) the standard of review applicable under 
                      the Uruguay Round Agreement involved in the 
                      dispute, including greater deference, where 
                      appropriate, to the fact finding and technical 
                      expertise of national investigating authorities;
                    (D) to seek provisions encouraging the early 
                identification and settlement of disputes through 
                consultation;

[[Page 129 STAT. 331]]

                    (E) to seek provisions to encourage the provision of 
                trade-expanding compensation if a party to a dispute 
                under the agreement does not come into compliance with 
                its obligations under the agreement;
                    (F) to seek provisions to impose a penalty upon a 
                party to a dispute under the agreement that--
                          (i) encourages compliance with the obligations 
                      of the agreement;
                          (ii) is appropriate to the parties, nature, 
                      subject matter, and scope of the violation; and
                          (iii) has the aim of not adversely affecting 
                      parties or interests not party to the dispute 
                      while maintaining the effectiveness of the 
                      enforcement mechanism; and
                    (G) to seek provisions that treat United States 
                principal negotiating objectives equally with respect 
                to--
                          (i) the ability to resort to dispute 
                      settlement under the applicable agreement;
                          (ii) the availability of equivalent dispute 
                      settlement procedures; and
                          (iii) the availability of equivalent remedies.
            (17) Trade remedy laws.--The principal negotiating 
        objectives of the United States with respect to trade remedy 
        laws are--
                    (A) to preserve the ability of the United States to 
                enforce rigorously its trade laws, including the 
                antidumping, countervailing duty, and safeguard laws, 
                and avoid agreements that lessen the effectiveness of 
                domestic and international disciplines on unfair trade, 
                especially dumping and subsidies, or that lessen the 
                effectiveness of domestic and international safeguard 
                provisions, in order to ensure that United States 
                workers, agricultural producers, and firms can compete 
                fully on fair terms and enjoy the benefits of reciprocal 
                trade concessions; and
                    (B) to address and remedy market distortions that 
                lead to dumping and subsidization, including 
                overcapacity, cartelization, and market access barriers.
            (18) Border taxes.--The principal negotiating objective of 
        the United States regarding border taxes is to obtain a revision 
        of the rules of the World Trade Organization with respect to the 
        treatment of border adjustments for internal taxes to redress 
        the disadvantage to countries relying primarily on direct taxes 
        for revenue rather than indirect taxes.
            (19) Textile negotiations.--The principal negotiating 
        objectives of the United States with respect to trade in 
        textiles and apparel articles are to obtain competitive 
        opportunities for United States exports of textiles and apparel 
        in foreign markets substantially equivalent to the competitive 
        opportunities afforded foreign exports in United States markets 
        and to achieve fairer and more open conditions of trade in 
        textiles and apparel.
            (20) Commercial partnerships.--
                    (A) In general.--With respect to an agreement that 
                is proposed to be entered into with the Transatlantic 
                Trade and Investment Partnership countries and to which 
                section 103(b) will apply, the principal negotiating 
                objectives of the United States regarding commercial 
                partnerships are the following:

[[Page 129 STAT. 332]]

                          (i) To discourage actions by potential trading 
                      partners that directly or indirectly prejudice or 
                      otherwise discourage commercial activity solely 
                      between the United States and Israel.
                          (ii) To discourage politically motivated 
                      actions to boycott, divest from, or sanction 
                      Israel and to seek the elimination of politically 
                      motivated nontariff barriers on Israeli goods, 
                      services, or other commerce imposed on the State 
                      of Israel.
                          (iii) To seek the elimination of state-
                      sponsored unsanctioned foreign boycotts against 
                      Israel or compliance with the Arab League Boycott 
                      of Israel by prospective trading partners.
                    (B) Definition.--In this paragraph, the term 
                ``actions to boycott, divest from, or sanction Israel'' 
                means actions by states, non-member states of the United 
                Nations, international organizations, or affiliated 
                agencies of international organizations that are 
                politically motivated and are intended to penalize or 
                otherwise limit commercial relations specifically with 
                Israel or persons doing business in Israel or in 
                Israeli-controlled territories.
            (21) Good governance, transparency, the effective operation 
        of legal regimes, and the rule of law of trading partners.--The 
        principal negotiating objectives of the United States with 
        respect to ensuring implementation of trade commitments and 
        obligations by strengthening good governance, transparency, the 
        effective operation of legal regimes and the rule of law of 
        trading partners of the United States is through capacity 
        building and other appropriate means, which are important parts 
        of the broader effort to create more open democratic societies 
        and to promote respect for internationally recognized human 
        rights.

    (c) <<NOTE: President.>>  Capacity Building and Other Priorities.--
In order to address and maintain United States competitiveness in the 
global economy, the President shall--
            (1) direct the heads of relevant Federal agencies--
                    (A) to work to strengthen the capacity of United 
                States trading partners to carry out obligations under 
                trade agreements by consulting with any country seeking 
                a trade agreement with the United States concerning that 
                country's laws relating to customs and trade 
                facilitation, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, 
                technical barriers to trade, intellectual property 
                rights, labor, and the environment; and
                    (B) to provide technical assistance to that country 
                if needed;
            (2) seek to establish consultative mechanisms among parties 
        to trade agreements to strengthen the capacity of United States 
        trading partners to develop and implement standards for the 
        protection of the environment and human health based on sound 
        science;
            (3) promote consideration of multilateral environmental 
        agreements and consult with parties to such agreements regarding 
        the consistency of any such agreement that includes trade 
        measures with existing environmental exceptions under Article XX 
        of GATT 1994; and

[[Page 129 STAT. 333]]

            (4) <<NOTE: Reports.>>  submit to the Committee on Ways and 
        Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
        Finance of the Senate an annual report on capacity-building 
        activities undertaken in connection with trade agreements 
        negotiated or being negotiated pursuant to this title.
SEC. 103. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4202.>>  TRADE AGREEMENTS AUTHORITY.

    (a) Agreements Regarding Tariff Barriers.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President. Determination.>>  In general.--
        Whenever the President determines that one or more existing 
        duties or other import restrictions of any foreign country or 
        the United States are unduly burdening and restricting the 
        foreign trade of the United States and that the purposes, 
        policies, priorities, and objectives of this title will be 
        promoted thereby, the President--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Deadlines.>>  may enter into trade 
                agreements with foreign countries before--
                          (i) July 1, 2018; or
                          (ii) July 1, 2021, if trade authorities 
                      procedures are extended under subsection (c); and
                    (B) may, subject to paragraphs (2) and (3), 
                proclaim--
                          (i) such modification or continuance of any 
                      existing duty,
                          (ii) such continuance of existing duty free or 
                      excise treatment, or
                          (iii) such additional duties,
                as the President determines to be required or 
                appropriate to carry out any such trade agreement.
        Substantial modifications to, or substantial additional 
        provisions of, a trade agreement entered into after July 1, 
        2018, or July 1, 2021, if trade authorities procedures are 
        extended under subsection (c), shall not be eligible for 
        approval under this title.
            (2) <<NOTE: President.>>  Notification.--The President shall 
        notify Congress of the President's intention to enter into an 
        agreement under this subsection.
            (3) Limitations.--No proclamation may be made under 
        paragraph (1) that--
                    (A) reduces any rate of duty (other than a rate of 
                duty that does not exceed 5 percent ad valorem on the 
                date of the enactment of this Act) to a rate of duty 
                which is less than 50 percent of the rate of such duty 
                that applies on such date of enactment;
                    (B) reduces the rate of duty below that applicable 
                under the Uruguay Round Agreements or a successor 
                agreement, on any import sensitive agricultural product; 
                or
                    (C) increases any rate of duty above the rate that 
                applied on the date of the enactment of this Act.
            (4) Aggregate reduction; exemption from staging.--
                    (A) Aggregate reduction.--Except as provided in 
                subparagraph (B), the aggregate reduction in the rate of 
                duty on any article which is in effect on any day 
                pursuant to a trade agreement entered into under 
                paragraph (1) shall not exceed the aggregate reduction 
                which would have been in effect on such day if--
                          (i) a reduction of 3 percent ad valorem or a 
                      reduction of \1/10\ of the total reduction, 
                      whichever is greater,

[[Page 129 STAT. 334]]

                      had taken effect on the effective date of the 
                      first reduction proclaimed under paragraph (1) to 
                      carry out such agreement with respect to such 
                      article; and
                          (ii) a reduction equal to the amount 
                      applicable under clause (i) had taken effect at 1-
                      year intervals after the effective date of such 
                      first reduction.
                    (B) Exemption from staging.--No staging is required 
                under subparagraph (A) with respect to a duty reduction 
                that is proclaimed under paragraph (1) for an article of 
                a kind that is not produced in the United States. The 
                United States International Trade Commission shall 
                advise the President of the identity of articles that 
                may be exempted from staging under this subparagraph.
            (5) <<NOTE: President. Determination.>>  Rounding.--If the 
        President determines that such action will simplify the 
        computation of reductions under paragraph (4), the President may 
        round an annual reduction by an amount equal to the lesser of--
                    (A) the difference between the reduction without 
                regard to this paragraph and the next lower whole 
                number; or
                    (B) \1/2\ of 1 percent ad valorem.
            (6) Other limitations.--A rate of duty reduction that may 
        not be proclaimed by reason of paragraph (3) may take effect 
        only if a provision authorizing such reduction is included 
        within an implementing bill provided for under section 106 and 
        that bill is enacted into law.
            (7) Other tariff modifications.--Notwithstanding paragraphs 
        (1)(B), (3)(A), (3)(C), and (4) through (6), and subject to the 
        consultation and layover requirements of section 115 of the 
        Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3524), the President may 
        proclaim the modification of any duty or staged rate reduction 
        of any duty set forth in Schedule XX, as defined in section 2(5) 
        of that Act (19 U.S.C. 3501(5)), if the United States agrees to 
        such modification or staged rate reduction in a negotiation for 
        the reciprocal elimination or harmonization of duties under the 
        auspices of the World Trade Organization.
            (8) Authority under uruguay round agreements act not 
        affected.--Nothing in this subsection shall limit the authority 
        provided to the President under section 111(b) of the Uruguay 
        Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3521(b)).

    (b) Agreements Regarding Tariff and Nontariff Barriers.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President. Determination.>>  In general.--(A) 
        Whenever the President determines that--
                    (i) 1 or more existing duties or any other import 
                restriction of any foreign country or the United States 
                or any other barrier to, or other distortion of, 
                international trade unduly burdens or restricts the 
                foreign trade of the United States or adversely affects 
                the United States economy, or
                    (ii) the imposition of any such barrier or 
                distortion is likely to result in such a burden, 
                restriction, or effect,
        and that the purposes, policies, priorities, and objectives of 
        this title will be promoted thereby, the President may enter 
        into a trade agreement described in subparagraph (B) during the 
        period described in subparagraph (C).
            (B) The President may enter into a trade agreement under 
        subparagraph (A) with foreign countries providing for--

[[Page 129 STAT. 335]]

                    (i) the reduction or elimination of a duty, 
                restriction, barrier, or other distortion described in 
                subparagraph (A); or
                    (ii) the prohibition of, or limitation on the 
                imposition of, such barrier or other distortion.
            (C) <<NOTE: Deadlines.>>  The President may enter into a 
        trade agreement under this paragraph before--
                    (i) July 1, 2018; or
                    (ii) July 1, 2021, if trade authorities procedures 
                are extended under subsection (c).
        Substantial modifications to, or substantial additional 
        provisions of, a trade agreement entered into after July 1, 
        2018, or July 1, 2021, if trade authorities procedures are 
        extended under subsection (c), shall not be eligible for 
        approval under this title.
            (2) Conditions.--A trade agreement may be entered into under 
        this subsection only if such agreement makes progress in meeting 
        the applicable objectives described in subsections (a) and (b) 
        of section 102 and the President satisfies the conditions set 
        forth in sections 104 and 105.
            (3) Bills qualifying for trade authorities procedures.--(A) 
        The <<NOTE: Applicability.>>  provisions of section 151 of the 
        Trade Act of 1974 (in this title referred to as ``trade 
        authorities procedures'') apply to a bill of either House of 
        Congress which contains provisions described in subparagraph (B) 
        to the same extent as such section 151 applies to implementing 
        bills under that section. A bill to which this paragraph applies 
        shall hereafter in this title be referred to as an 
        ``implementing bill''.
            (B) The provisions referred to in subparagraph (A) are--
                    (i) a provision approving a trade agreement entered 
                into under this subsection and approving the statement 
                of administrative action, if any, proposed to implement 
                such trade agreement; and
                    (ii) if changes in existing laws or new statutory 
                authority are required to implement such trade agreement 
                or agreements, only such provisions as are strictly 
                necessary or appropriate to implement such trade 
                agreement or agreements, either repealing or amending 
                existing laws or providing new statutory authority.

    (c) Extension Disapproval Process for Congressional Trade 
Authorities Procedures.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in section 106(b)--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Applicability.>>  the trade authorities 
                procedures apply to implementing bills submitted with 
                respect to trade agreements entered into under 
                subsection (b) before July 1, 2018; and
                    (B) the trade authorities procedures shall be 
                extended to implementing bills submitted with respect to 
                trade agreements entered into under subsection (b) after 
                June 30, 2018, and before July 1, 2021, if (and only 
                if)--
                          (i) <<NOTE: President.>>  the President 
                      requests such extension under paragraph (2); and
                          (ii) neither House of Congress adopts an 
                      extension disapproval resolution under paragraph 
                      (5) before July 1, 2018.
            (2) Report to congress by the president.--If the President 
        is of the opinion that the trade authorities procedures

[[Page 129 STAT. 336]]

        should be extended to implementing bills described in paragraph 
        (1)(B), the President shall submit to Congress, not later than 
        April 1, 2018, a written report that contains a request for such 
        extension, together with--
                    (A) a description of all trade agreements that have 
                been negotiated under subsection (b) and the anticipated 
                schedule for submitting such agreements to Congress for 
                approval;
                    (B) a description of the progress that has been made 
                in negotiations to achieve the purposes, policies, 
                priorities, and objectives of this title, and a 
                statement that such progress justifies the continuation 
                of negotiations; and
                    (C) a statement of the reasons why the extension is 
                needed to complete the negotiations.
            (3) Other reports to congress.--
                    (A) <<NOTE: President.>>  Report by the advisory 
                committee.--The President shall promptly inform the 
                Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiations 
                established under section 135 of the Trade Act of 1974 
                (19 U.S.C. 2155) of the decision of the President to 
                submit a report to Congress under paragraph (2). The 
                Advisory Committee shall submit to Congress as soon as 
                practicable, but not later than June 1, 2018, a written 
                report that contains--
                          (i) its views regarding the progress that has 
                      been made in negotiations to achieve the purposes, 
                      policies, priorities, and objectives of this 
                      title; and
                          (ii) a statement of its views, and the reasons 
                      therefor, regarding whether the extension 
                      requested under paragraph (2) should be approved 
                      or disapproved.
                    (B) Report by international trade commission.--The 
                President <<NOTE: President.>>  shall promptly inform 
                the United States International Trade Commission of the 
                decision of the President to submit a report to Congress 
                under paragraph (2). The International Trade Commission 
                shall submit to Congress as soon as practicable, but not 
                later than June 1, 2018, a written report that contains 
                a review and analysis of the economic impact on the 
                United States of all trade agreements implemented 
                between the date of the enactment of this Act and the 
                date on which the President decides to seek an extension 
                requested under paragraph (2).
            (4) Status of reports.--The reports submitted to Congress 
        under paragraphs (2) and (3), or any portion of such reports, 
        may be classified to the extent the President determines 
        appropriate.
            (5) <<NOTE: Definition.>>  Extension disapproval 
        resolutions.--(A) For purposes of paragraph (1), the term 
        ``extension disapproval resolution'' means a resolution of 
        either House of Congress, the sole matter after the resolving 
        clause of which is as follows: ``That the ____ disapproves the 
        request of the President for the extension, under section 
        103(c)(1)(B)(i) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities 
        and Accountability Act of 2015, of the trade authorities 
        procedures under that Act to any implementing bill submitted 
        with respect to any trade agreement entered into under section 
        103(b) of that Act after June 30,

[[Page 129 STAT. 337]]

        2018.'', with the blank space being filled with the name of the 
        resolving House of Congress.
            (B) Extension disapproval resolutions--
                    (i) may be introduced in either House of Congress by 
                any member of such House; and
                    (ii) shall be referred, in the House of 
                Representatives, to the Committee on Ways and Means and, 
                in addition, to the Committee on Rules.
            (C) <<NOTE: Applicability.>>  The provisions of subsections 
        (d) and (e) of section 152 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 
        2192) (relating to the floor consideration of certain 
        resolutions in the House and Senate) apply to extension 
        disapproval resolutions.
            (D) It is not in order for--
                    (i) the House of Representatives to consider any 
                extension disapproval resolution not reported by the 
                Committee on Ways and Means and, in addition, by the 
                Committee on Rules;
                    (ii) the Senate to consider any extension 
                disapproval resolution not reported by the Committee on 
                Finance; or
                    (iii) either House of Congress to consider an 
                extension disapproval resolution after June 30, 2018.

    (d) <<NOTE: President.>>  Commencement of Negotiations.--In order to 
contribute to the continued economic expansion of the United States, the 
President shall commence negotiations covering tariff and nontariff 
barriers affecting any industry, product, or service sector, and expand 
existing sectoral agreements to countries that are not parties to those 
agreements, in cases where the President determines that such 
negotiations are feasible and timely and would benefit the United 
States. Such sectors include agriculture, commercial services, 
intellectual property rights, industrial and capital goods, government 
procurement, information technology products, environmental technology 
and services, medical equipment and services, civil aircraft, and 
infrastructure products. In so doing, the President shall take into 
account all of the negotiating objectives set forth in section 102.
SEC. 104. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4203.>>  CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT, 
                        CONSULTATIONS, AND ACCESS TO INFORMATION.

    (a) Consultations With Members of Congress.--
            (1) Consultations during negotiations.--In the course of 
        negotiations conducted under this title, the United States Trade 
        Representative shall--
                    (A) meet upon request with any Member of Congress 
                regarding negotiating objectives, the status of 
                negotiations in progress, and the nature of any changes 
                in the laws of the United States or the administration 
                of those laws that may be recommended to Congress to 
                carry out any trade agreement or any requirement of, 
                amendment to, or recommendation under, that agreement;
                    (B) upon request of any Member of Congress, provide 
                access to pertinent documents relating to the 
                negotiations, including classified materials;
                    (C) consult closely and on a timely basis with, and 
                keep fully apprised of the negotiations, the Committee 
                on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and 
                the Committee on Finance of the Senate;

[[Page 129 STAT. 338]]

                    (D) consult closely and on a timely basis with, and 
                keep fully apprised of the negotiations, the House 
                Advisory Group on Negotiations and the Senate Advisory 
                Group on Negotiations convened under subsection (c) and 
                all committees of the House of Representatives and the 
                Senate with jurisdiction over laws that could be 
                affected by a trade agreement resulting from the 
                negotiations; and
                    (E) with regard to any negotiations and agreement 
                relating to agricultural trade, also consult closely and 
                on a timely basis (including immediately before 
                initialing an agreement) with, and keep fully apprised 
                of the negotiations, the Committee on Agriculture of the 
                House of Representatives and the Committee on 
                Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate.
            (2) Consultations prior to entry into force.--Prior to 
        exchanging notes providing for the entry into force of a trade 
        agreement, the United States Trade Representative shall consult 
        closely and on a timely basis with Members of Congress and 
        committees as specified in paragraph (1), and keep them fully 
        apprised of the measures a trading partner has taken to comply 
        with those provisions of the agreement that are to take effect 
        on the date that the agreement enters into force.
            (3) Enhanced coordination with congress.--
                    (A) Written guidelines.--The United States Trade 
                Representative, in consultation with the chairmen and 
                the ranking members of the Committee on Ways and Means 
                of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
                Finance of the Senate, respectively--
                          (i) <<NOTE: Deadline.>>  shall, not later than 
                      120 days after the date of the enactment of this 
                      Act, develop written guidelines on enhanced 
                      coordination with Congress, including coordination 
                      with designated congressional advisers under 
                      subsection (b), regarding negotiations conducted 
                      under this title; and
                          (ii) may make such revisions to the guidelines 
                      as may be necessary from time to time.
                    (B) Content of guidelines.--The guidelines developed 
                under subparagraph (A) shall enhance coordination with 
                Congress through procedures to ensure--
                          (i) timely briefings upon request of any 
                      Member of Congress regarding negotiating 
                      objectives, the status of negotiations in progress 
                      conducted under this title, and the nature of any 
                      changes in the laws of the United States or the 
                      administration of those laws that may be 
                      recommended to Congress to carry out any trade 
                      agreement or any requirement of, amendment to, or 
                      recommendation under, that agreement; and
                          (ii) the sharing of detailed and timely 
                      information with Members of Congress, and their 
                      staff with proper security clearances as 
                      appropriate, regarding those negotiations and 
                      pertinent documents related to those negotiations 
                      (including classified information), and with 
                      committee staff with proper security clearances as 
                      would be appropriate in the light of the 
                      responsibilities of that committee over the trade 
                      agreements programs affected by those 
                      negotiations.

[[Page 129 STAT. 339]]

                    (C) Dissemination.--The United States Trade 
                Representative shall disseminate the guidelines 
                developed under subparagraph (A) to all Federal agencies 
                that could have jurisdiction over laws affected by trade 
                negotiations.

    (b) Designated Congressional Advisers.--
            (1) Designation.--
                    (A) House of representatives.--In each Congress, any 
                Member of the House of Representatives may be designated 
                as a congressional adviser on trade policy and 
                negotiations by the Speaker of the House of 
                Representatives, after consulting with the chairman and 
                ranking member of the Committee on Ways and Means and 
                the chairman and ranking member of the committee from 
                which the Member will be selected.
                    (B) Senate.--In each Congress, any Member of the 
                Senate may be designated as a congressional adviser on 
                trade policy and negotiations by the President pro 
                tempore of the Senate, after consultation with the 
                chairman and ranking member of the Committee on Finance 
                and the chairman and ranking member of the committee 
                from which the Member will be selected.
            (2) Consultations with designated congressional advisers.--
        In the course of negotiations conducted under this title, the 
        United States Trade Representative shall consult closely and on 
        a timely basis (including immediately before initialing an 
        agreement) with, and keep fully apprised of the negotiations, 
        the congressional advisers for trade policy and negotiations 
        designated under paragraph (1).
            (3) Accreditation.--Each Member of Congress designated as a 
        congressional adviser under paragraph (1) shall be accredited by 
        the United States Trade Representative on behalf of the 
        President as an official adviser to the United States 
        delegations to international conferences, meetings, and 
        negotiating sessions relating to trade agreements.

    (c) Congressional Advisory Groups on Negotiations.--
            (1) <<NOTE: Deadlines.>>  In general.--By not later than 60 
        days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and not later 
        than 30 days after the convening of each Congress, the chairman 
        of the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of 
        Representatives shall convene the House Advisory Group on 
        Negotiations and the chairman of the Committee on Finance of the 
        Senate shall convene the Senate Advisory Group on Negotiations 
        (in this subsection referred to collectively as the 
        ``congressional advisory groups'').
            (2) Members and functions.--
                    (A) Membership of the house advisory group on 
                negotiations.--In each Congress, the House Advisory 
                Group on Negotiations shall be comprised of the 
                following Members of the House of Representatives:
                          (i) The chairman and ranking member of the 
                      Committee on Ways and Means, and 3 additional 
                      members of such Committee (not more than 2 of whom 
                      are members of the same political party).
                          (ii) The chairman and ranking member, or their 
                      designees, of the committees of the House of 
                      Representatives that would have, under the Rules 
                      of the House of Representatives, jurisdiction over 
                      provisions of law

[[Page 129 STAT. 340]]

                      affected by a trade agreement negotiation 
                      conducted at any time during that Congress and to 
                      which this title would apply.
                    (B) Membership of the senate advisory group on 
                negotiations.--In each Congress, the Senate Advisory 
                Group on Negotiations shall be comprised of the 
                following Members of the Senate:
                          (i) The chairman and ranking member of the 
                      Committee on Finance and 3 additional members of 
                      such Committee (not more than 2 of whom are 
                      members of the same political party).
                          (ii) The chairman and ranking member, or their 
                      designees, of the committees of the Senate that 
                      would have, under the Rules of the Senate, 
                      jurisdiction over provisions of law affected by a 
                      trade agreement negotiation conducted at any time 
                      during that Congress and to which this title would 
                      apply.
                    (C) Accreditation.--Each member of the congressional 
                advisory groups described in subparagraphs (A)(i) and 
                (B)(i) shall be accredited by the United States Trade 
                Representative on behalf of the President as an official 
                adviser to the United States delegation in negotiations 
                for any trade agreement to which this title applies. 
                Each member of the congressional advisory groups 
                described in subparagraphs (A)(ii) and (B)(ii) shall be 
                accredited by the United States Trade Representative on 
                behalf of the President as an official adviser to the 
                United States delegation in the negotiations by reason 
                of which the member is in one of the congressional 
                advisory groups.
                    (D) Consultation and advice.--The congressional 
                advisory groups shall consult with and provide advice to 
                the Trade Representative regarding the formulation of 
                specific objectives, negotiating strategies and 
                positions, the development of the applicable trade 
                agreement, and compliance and enforcement of the 
                negotiated commitments under the trade agreement.
                    (E) Chair.--The House Advisory Group on Negotiations 
                shall be chaired by the Chairman of the Committee on 
                Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the 
                Senate Advisory Group on Negotiations shall be chaired 
                by the Chairman of the Committee on Finance of the 
                Senate.
                    (F) Coordination with other committees.--Members of 
                any committee represented on one of the congressional 
                advisory groups may submit comments to the member of the 
                appropriate congressional advisory group from that 
                committee regarding any matter related to a negotiation 
                for any trade agreement to which this title applies.
            (3) Guidelines.--
                    (A) Purpose and revision.--The United States Trade 
                Representative, in consultation with the chairmen and 
                the ranking members of the Committee on Ways and Means 
                of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
                Finance of the Senate, respectively--
                          (i) <<NOTE: Deadline.>>  shall, not later than 
                      120 days after the date of the enactment of this 
                      Act, develop written guidelines

[[Page 129 STAT. 341]]

                      to facilitate the useful and timely exchange of 
                      information between the Trade Representative and 
                      the congressional advisory groups; and
                          (ii) may make such revisions to the guidelines 
                      as may be necessary from time to time.
                    (B) Content.--The guidelines developed under 
                subparagraph (A) shall provide for, among other things--
                          (i) detailed briefings on a fixed timetable to 
                      be specified in the guidelines of the 
                      congressional advisory groups regarding 
                      negotiating objectives and positions and the 
                      status of the applicable negotiations, beginning 
                      as soon as practicable after the congressional 
                      advisory groups are convened, with more frequent 
                      briefings as trade negotiations enter the final 
                      stage;
                          (ii) access by members of the congressional 
                      advisory groups, and staff with proper security 
                      clearances, to pertinent documents relating to the 
                      negotiations, including classified materials;
                          (iii) the closest practicable coordination 
                      between the Trade Representative and the 
                      congressional advisory groups at all critical 
                      periods during the negotiations, including at 
                      negotiation sites;
                          (iv) after the applicable trade agreement is 
                      concluded, consultation regarding ongoing 
                      compliance and enforcement of negotiated 
                      commitments under the trade agreement; and
                          (v) the timeframe for submitting the report 
                      required under section 105(d)(3).
            (4) <<NOTE: President.>>  Request for meeting.--Upon the 
        request of a majority of either of the congressional advisory 
        groups, the President shall meet with that congressional 
        advisory group before initiating negotiations with respect to a 
        trade agreement, or at any other time concerning the 
        negotiations.

    (d) Consultations With the Public.--
            (1) Guidelines for public engagement.--The United States 
        Trade Representative, in consultation with the chairmen and the 
        ranking members of the Committee on Ways and Means of the House 
        of Representatives and the Committee on Finance of the Senate, 
        respectively--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Deadline.>>  shall, not later than 120 
                days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
                develop written guidelines on public access to 
                information regarding negotiations conducted under this 
                title; and
                    (B) may make such revisions to the guidelines as may 
                be necessary from time to time.
            (2) Purposes.--The guidelines developed under paragraph (1) 
        shall--
                    (A) facilitate transparency;
                    (B) encourage public participation; and
                    (C) promote collaboration in the negotiation 
                process.
            (3) Content.--The guidelines developed under paragraph (1) 
        shall include procedures that--
                    (A) provide for rapid disclosure of information in 
                forms that the public can readily find and use; and
                    (B) provide frequent opportunities for public input 
                through Federal Register requests for comment and other 
                means.

[[Page 129 STAT. 342]]

            (4) Dissemination.--The United States Trade Representative 
        shall disseminate the guidelines developed under paragraph (1) 
        to all Federal agencies that could have jurisdiction over laws 
        affected by trade negotiations.

    (e) Consultations With Advisory Committees.--
            (1) Guidelines for engagement with advisory committees.--The 
        United States Trade Representative, in consultation with the 
        chairmen and the ranking members of the Committee on Ways and 
        Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
        Finance of the Senate, respectively--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Deadline.>>  shall, not later than 120 
                days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
                develop written guidelines on enhanced coordination with 
                advisory committees established pursuant to section 135 
                of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2155) regarding 
                negotiations conducted under this title; and
                    (B) may make such revisions to the guidelines as may 
                be necessary from time to time.
            (2) Content.--The guidelines developed under paragraph (1) 
        shall enhance coordination with advisory committees described in 
        that paragraph through procedures to ensure--
                    (A) timely briefings of advisory committees and 
                regular opportunities for advisory committees to provide 
                input throughout the negotiation process on matters 
                relevant to the sectors or functional areas represented 
                by those committees; and
                    (B) the sharing of detailed and timely information 
                with each member of an advisory committee regarding 
                negotiations and pertinent documents related to the 
                negotiation (including classified information) on 
                matters relevant to the sectors or functional areas the 
                member represents, and with a designee with proper 
                security clearances of each such member as appropriate.
            (3) Dissemination.--The United States Trade Representative 
        shall disseminate the guidelines developed under paragraph (1) 
        to all Federal agencies that could have jurisdiction over laws 
        affected by trade negotiations.

    (f) Establishment of Position of Chief Transparency Officer in the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative.--Section 141(b) of the 
Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2171(b)) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating paragraph (3) as paragraph (4); and
            (2) by inserting after paragraph (2) the following:

    ``(3) There shall be in the Office one Chief Transparency Officer. 
The Chief Transparency Officer shall consult with Congress on 
transparency policy, coordinate transparency in trade negotiations, 
engage and assist the public, and advise the United States Trade 
Representative on transparency policy.''.
SEC. 105. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4204.>>  NOTICE, CONSULTATIONS, AND 
                        REPORTS.

    (a) Notice, Consultations, and Reports Before Negotiation.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President.>>  Notice.--The President, with 
        respect to any agreement that is subject to the provisions of 
        section 103(b), shall--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Time period.>>  provide, at least 90 
                calendar days before initiating negotiations with a 
                country, written notice to Congress of the President's 
                intention to enter into the negotiations

[[Page 129 STAT. 343]]

                with that country and set forth in the notice the date 
                on which the President intends to initiate those 
                negotiations, the specific United States objectives for 
                the negotiations with that country, and whether the 
                President intends to seek an agreement, or changes to an 
                existing agreement;
                    (B) before and after submission of the notice, 
                consult regarding the negotiations with the Committee on 
                Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the 
                Committee on Finance of the Senate, such other 
                committees of the House and Senate as the President 
                deems appropriate, and the House Advisory Group on 
                Negotiations and the Senate Advisory Group on 
                Negotiations convened under section 104(c);
                    (C) upon the request of a majority of the members of 
                either the House Advisory Group on Negotiations or the 
                Senate Advisory Group on Negotiations convened under 
                section 104(c), meet with the requesting congressional 
                advisory group before initiating the negotiations or at 
                any other time concerning the negotiations; and
                    (D) <<NOTE: Time period. Web posting.>>  after 
                consulting with the Committee on Ways and Means and the 
                Committee on Finance, and at least 30 calendar days 
                before initiating negotiations with a country, publish 
                on a publicly available Internet website of the Office 
                of the United States Trade Representative, and regularly 
                update thereafter, a detailed and comprehensive summary 
                of the specific objectives with respect to the 
                negotiations, and a description of how the agreement, if 
                successfully concluded, will further those objectives 
                and benefit the United States.
            (2) Negotiations regarding agriculture.--
                    (A) Assessment and consultations following 
                assessment.--Before <<NOTE: President.>> initiating or 
                continuing negotiations the subject matter of which is 
                directly related to the subject matter under section 
                102(b)(3)(B) with any country, the President shall--
                          (i) assess whether United States tariffs on 
                      agricultural products that were bound under the 
                      Uruguay Round Agreements are lower than the 
                      tariffs bound by that country;
                          (ii) consider whether the tariff levels bound 
                      and applied throughout the world with respect to 
                      imports from the United States are higher than 
                      United States tariffs and whether the negotiation 
                      provides an opportunity to address any such 
                      disparity; and
                          (iii) consult with the Committee on Ways and 
                      Means and the Committee on Agriculture of the 
                      House of Representatives and the Committee on 
                      Finance and the Committee on Agriculture, 
                      Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate concerning 
                      the results of the assessment, whether it is 
                      appropriate for the United States to agree to 
                      further tariff reductions based on the conclusions 
                      reached in the assessment, and how all applicable 
                      negotiating objectives will be met.
                    (B) Special consultations on import sensitive 
                products.--(i) Before initiating negotiations with 
                regard to agriculture and, with respect to agreements 
                described in paragraphs (2) and (3) of section 107(a), 
                as soon as

[[Page 129 STAT. 344]]

                practicable after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
                the United States Trade Representative shall--
                          (I) identify those agricultural products 
                      subject to tariff rate quotas on the date of 
                      enactment of this Act, and agricultural products 
                      subject to tariff reductions by the United States 
                      as a result of the Uruguay Round Agreements, for 
                      which the rate of duty was reduced on January 1, 
                      1995, to a rate which was not less than 97.5 
                      percent of the rate of duty that applied to such 
                      article on December 31, 1994;
                          (II) consult with the Committee on Ways and 
                      Means and the Committee on Agriculture of the 
                      House of Representatives and the Committee on 
                      Finance and the Committee on Agriculture, 
                      Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate concerning--
                                    (aa) whether any further tariff 
                                reductions on the products identified 
                                under subclause (I) should be 
                                appropriate, taking into account the 
                                impact of any such tariff reduction on 
                                the United States industry producing the 
                                product concerned;
                                    (bb) whether the products so 
                                identified face unjustified sanitary or 
                                phytosanitary restrictions, including 
                                those not based on scientific principles 
                                in contravention of the Uruguay Round 
                                Agreements; and
                                    (cc) whether the countries 
                                participating in the negotiations 
                                maintain export subsidies or other 
                                programs, policies, or practices that 
                                distort world trade in such products and 
                                the impact of such programs, policies, 
                                and practices on United States producers 
                                of the products;
                          (III) <<NOTE: Assessment.>>  request that the 
                      International Trade Commission prepare an 
                      assessment of the probable economic effects of any 
                      such tariff reduction on the United States 
                      industry producing the product concerned and on 
                      the United States economy as a whole; and
                          (IV) upon complying with subclauses (I), (II), 
                      and (III), notify the Committee on Ways and Means 
                      and the Committee on Agriculture of the House of 
                      Representatives and the Committee on Finance and 
                      the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
                      Forestry of the Senate of those products 
                      identified under subclause (I) for which the Trade 
                      Representative intends to seek tariff 
                      liberalization in the negotiations and the reasons 
                      for seeking such tariff liberalization.
                    (ii) If, after negotiations described in clause (i) 
                are commenced--
                          (I) the United States Trade Representative 
                      identifies any additional agricultural product 
                      described in clause (i)(I) for tariff reductions 
                      which were not the subject of a notification under 
                      clause (i)(IV), or
                          (II) any additional agricultural product 
                      described in clause (i)(I) is the subject of a 
                      request for tariff reductions by a party to the 
                      negotiations,
                the Trade Representative shall, as soon as practicable, 
                notify the committees referred to in clause (i)(IV) of 
                those products and the reasons for seeking such tariff 
                reductions.

[[Page 129 STAT. 345]]

            (3) <<NOTE: President.>>  Negotiations regarding the fishing 
        industry.--Before initiating, or continuing, negotiations that 
        directly relate to fish or shellfish trade with any country, the 
        President shall consult with the Committee on Ways and Means and 
        the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of 
        Representatives, and the Committee on Finance and the Committee 
        on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, and 
        shall keep the Committees apprised of the negotiations on an 
        ongoing and timely basis.
            (4) <<NOTE: President.>>  Negotiations regarding textiles.--
        Before initiating or continuing negotiations the subject matter 
        of which is directly related to textiles and apparel products 
        with any country, the President shall--
                    (A) assess whether United States tariffs on textile 
                and apparel products that were bound under the Uruguay 
                Round Agreements are lower than the tariffs bound by 
                that country and whether the negotiation provides an 
                opportunity to address any such disparity; and
                    (B) consult with the Committee on Ways and Means of 
                the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
                Finance of the Senate concerning the results of the 
                assessment, whether it is appropriate for the United 
                States to agree to further tariff reductions based on 
                the conclusions reached in the assessment, and how all 
                applicable negotiating objectives will be met.
            (5) Adherence to existing international trade and investment 
        agreement obligations.--In <<NOTE: President.>> determining 
        whether to enter into negotiations with a particular country, 
        the President shall take into account the extent to which that 
        country has implemented, or has accelerated the implementation 
        of, its international trade and investment commitments to the 
        United States, including pursuant to the WTO Agreement.

    (b) Consultation With Congress Before Entry Into Agreement.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President.>>  Consultation.--Before entering 
        into any trade agreement under section 103(b), the President 
        shall consult with--
                    (A) the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of 
                Representatives and the Committee on Finance of the 
                Senate;
                    (B) each other committee of the House and the 
                Senate, and each joint committee of Congress, which has 
                jurisdiction over legislation involving subject matters 
                which would be affected by the trade agreement; and
                    (C) the House Advisory Group on Negotiations and the 
                Senate Advisory Group on Negotiations convened under 
                section 104(c).
            (2) Scope.--The consultation described in paragraph (1) 
        shall include consultation with respect to--
                    (A) the nature of the agreement;
                    (B) how and to what extent the agreement will 
                achieve the applicable purposes, policies, priorities, 
                and objectives of this title; and
                    (C) the implementation of the agreement under 
                section 106, including the general effect of the 
                agreement on existing laws.

[[Page 129 STAT. 346]]

            (3) Report regarding united states trade remedy laws.--
                    (A) <<NOTE: President. Time period.>>  Changes in 
                certain trade laws.--The President, not less than 180 
                calendar days before the day on which the President 
                enters into a trade agreement under section 103(b), 
                shall report to the Committee on Ways and Means of the 
                House of Representatives and the Committee on Finance of 
                the Senate--
                          (i) the range of proposals advanced in the 
                      negotiations with respect to that agreement, that 
                      may be in the final agreement, and that could 
                      require amendments to title VII of the Tariff Act 
                      of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1671 et seq.) or to chapter 1 
                      of title II of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 
                      2251 et seq.); and
                          (ii) how these proposals relate to the 
                      objectives described in section 102(b)(16).
                    (B) <<NOTE: Applicability.>>  Resolutions.--(i) At 
                any time after the transmission of the report under 
                subparagraph (A), if a resolution is introduced with 
                respect to that report in either House of Congress, the 
                procedures set forth in clauses (iii) through (vii) 
                shall apply to that resolution if--
                          (I) no other resolution with respect to that 
                      report has previously been reported in that House 
                      of Congress by the Committee on Ways and Means or 
                      the Committee on Finance, as the case may be, 
                      pursuant to those procedures; and
                          (II) no procedural disapproval resolution 
                      under section 106(b) introduced with respect to a 
                      trade agreement entered into pursuant to the 
                      negotiations to which the report under 
                      subparagraph (A) relates has previously been 
                      reported in that House of Congress by the 
                      Committee on Ways and Means or the Committee on 
                      Finance, as the case may be.
                    (ii) <<NOTE: Definition.>>  For purposes of this 
                subparagraph, the term ``resolution'' means only a 
                resolution of either House of Congress, the matter after 
                the resolving clause of which is as follows: ``That the 
                ____ finds that the proposed changes to United States 
                trade remedy laws contained in the report of the 
                President transmitted to Congress on ____ under section 
                105(b)(3) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
                Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 with respect 
                to ____, are inconsistent with the negotiating 
                objectives described in section 102(b)(16) of that 
                Act.'', with the first blank space being filled with the 
                name of the resolving House of Congress, the second 
                blank space being filled with the appropriate date of 
                the report, and the third blank space being filled with 
                the name of the country or countries involved.
                    (iii) Resolutions in the House of Representatives--
                          (I) may be introduced by any Member of the 
                      House;
                          (II) shall be referred to the Committee on 
                      Ways and Means and, in addition, to the Committee 
                      on Rules; and
                          (III) may not be amended by either Committee.
                    (iv) Resolutions in the Senate--
                          (I) may be introduced by any Member of the 
                      Senate;

[[Page 129 STAT. 347]]

                          (II) shall be referred to the Committee on 
                      Finance; and
                          (III) may not be amended.
                    (v) It is not in order for the House of 
                Representatives to consider any resolution that is not 
                reported by the Committee on Ways and Means and, in 
                addition, by the Committee on Rules.
                    (vi) It is not in order for the Senate to consider 
                any resolution that is not reported by the Committee on 
                Finance.
                    (vii) <<NOTE: Applicability.>>  The provisions of 
                subsections (d) and (e) of section 152 of the Trade Act 
                of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2192) (relating to floor 
                consideration of certain resolutions in the House and 
                Senate) shall apply to resolutions.
            (4) Advisory committee reports.--The report required under 
        section 135(e)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 
        2155(e)(1)) regarding any trade agreement entered into under 
        subsection (a) or (b) of section 103 shall be provided to the 
        President, Congress, and the United States Trade Representative 
        not later than 30 days after the date on which the President 
        notifies Congress under section 103(a)(2) or 106(a)(1)(A) of the 
        intention of the President to enter into the agreement.

    (c) International Trade Commission Assessment.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President. Deadline.>>  Submission of 
        information to commission.--The President, not later than 90 
        calendar days before the day on which the President enters into 
        a trade agreement under section 103(b), shall provide the 
        International Trade Commission (referred to in this subsection 
        as the ``Commission'') with the details of the agreement as it 
        exists at that time and request the Commission to prepare and 
        submit an assessment of the agreement as described in paragraph 
        (2). Between the time the President makes the request under this 
        paragraph and the time the Commission submits the assessment, 
        the President shall keep the Commission current with respect to 
        the details of the agreement.
            (2) <<NOTE: Deadline.>>  Assessment.--Not later than 105 
        calendar days after the President enters into a trade agreement 
        under section 103(b), the Commission shall submit to the 
        President and Congress a report assessing the likely impact of 
        the agreement on the United States economy as a whole and on 
        specific industry sectors, including the impact the agreement 
        will have on the gross domestic product, exports and imports, 
        aggregate employment and employment opportunities, the 
        production, employment, and competitive position of industries 
        likely to be significantly affected by the agreement, and the 
        interests of United States consumers.
            (3) Review of empirical literature.--In preparing the 
        assessment under paragraph (2), the Commission shall review 
        available economic assessments regarding the agreement, 
        including literature regarding any substantially equivalent 
        proposed agreement, and shall provide in its assessment a 
        description of the analyses used and conclusions drawn in such 
        literature, and a discussion of areas of consensus and 
        divergence between the various analyses and conclusions, 
        including those of the Commission regarding the agreement.
            (4) <<NOTE: President.>>  Public availability.--The 
        President shall make each assessment under paragraph (2) 
        available to the public.

[[Page 129 STAT. 348]]

    (d) <<NOTE: President.>>  Reports Submitted to Committees With 
Agreement.--
            (1) Environmental reviews and reports.--The President 
        shall--
                    (A) conduct environmental reviews of future trade 
                and investment agreements, consistent with Executive 
                Order No. 13141 (64 Fed. Reg. 63169), dated November 16, 
                1999, and its relevant guidelines; and
                    (B) <<NOTE: Records.>>  submit a report on those 
                reviews and on the content and operation of consultative 
                mechanisms established pursuant to section 102(c) to the 
                Committee on Ways and Means of the House of 
                Representatives and the Committee on Finance of the 
                Senate at the time the President submits to Congress a 
                copy of the final legal text of an agreement pursuant to 
                section 106(a)(1)(E).
            (2) Employment impact reviews and reports.--The President 
        shall--
                    (A) review the impact of future trade agreements on 
                United States employment, including labor markets, 
                modeled after Executive Order No. 13141 (64 Fed. Reg. 
                63169) to the extent appropriate in establishing 
                procedures and criteria; and
                    (B) submit a report on such reviews to the Committee 
                on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and 
                the Committee on Finance of the Senate at the time the 
                President submits to Congress a copy of the final legal 
                text of an agreement pursuant to section 106(a)(1)(E).
            (3) Report on labor rights.--The President shall submit to 
        the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives 
        and the Committee on Finance of the Senate, on a timeframe 
        determined in accordance with section 104(c)(3)(B)(v)--
                    (A) a meaningful labor rights report of the country, 
                or countries, with respect to which the President is 
                negotiating; and
                    (B) a description of any provisions that would 
                require changes to the labor laws and labor practices of 
                the United States.
            (4) Public availability.--The President shall make all 
        reports required under this subsection available to the public.

    (e) Implementation and Enforcement Plan.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President.>>  In general.--At the time the 
        President submits to Congress a copy of the final legal text of 
        an agreement pursuant to section 106(a)(1)(E), the President 
        shall also submit to Congress a plan for implementing and 
        enforcing the agreement.
            (2) Elements.--The implementation and enforcement plan 
        required by paragraph (1) shall include the following:
                    (A) Border personnel requirements.--A description of 
                additional personnel required at border entry points, 
                including a list of additional customs and agricultural 
                inspectors.
                    (B) Agency staffing requirements.--A description of 
                additional personnel required by Federal agencies 
                responsible for monitoring and implementing the trade 
                agreement, including personnel required by the Office of 
                the United States Trade Representative, the Department 
                of Commerce, the Department of Agriculture (including 
                additional personnel required to implement sanitary and

[[Page 129 STAT. 349]]

                phytosanitary measures in order to obtain market access 
                for United States exports), the Department of Homeland 
                Security, the Department of the Treasury, and such other 
                agencies as may be necessary.
                    (C) Customs infrastructure requirements.--A 
                description of the additional equipment and facilities 
                needed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
                    (D) Impact on state and local governments.--A 
                description of the impact the trade agreement will have 
                on State and local governments as a result of increases 
                in trade.
                    (E) Cost analysis.--An analysis of the costs 
                associated with each of the items listed in 
                subparagraphs (A) through (D).
            (3) <<NOTE: President.>>  Budget submission.--The President 
        shall include a request for the resources necessary to support 
        the plan required by paragraph (1) in the first budget of the 
        President submitted to Congress under section 1105(a) of title 
        31, United States Code, after the date of the submission of the 
        plan.
            (4) <<NOTE: President.>>  Public availability.--The 
        President shall make the plan required under this subsection 
        available to the public.

    (f) Other Reports.--
            (1) <<NOTE: Applicability. President.>>  Report on 
        penalties.--Not later than one year after the imposition by the 
        United States of a penalty or remedy permitted by a trade 
        agreement to which this title applies, the President shall 
        submit to the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committee on Finance of the Senate a 
        report on the effectiveness of the penalty or remedy applied 
        under United States law in enforcing United States rights under 
        the trade agreement, which shall address whether the penalty or 
        remedy was effective in changing the behavior of the targeted 
        party and whether the penalty or remedy had any adverse impact 
        on parties or interests not party to the dispute.
            (2) Report on impact of trade promotion authority.--Not 
        later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
        and not later than 5 years thereafter, the United States 
        International Trade Commission shall submit to the Committee on 
        Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee 
        on Finance of the Senate a report on the economic impact on the 
        United States of all trade agreements with respect to which 
        Congress has enacted an implementing bill under trade 
        authorities procedures since January 1, 1984.
            (3) Enforcement consultations and reports.--(A) The United 
        States Trade Representative shall consult with the Committee on 
        Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee 
        on Finance of the Senate after acceptance of a petition for 
        review or taking an enforcement action in regard to an 
        obligation under a trade agreement, including a labor or 
        environmental obligation. During such consultations, the United 
        States Trade Representative shall describe the matter, including 
        the basis for such action and the application of any relevant 
        legal obligations.
            (B) <<NOTE: President.>>  As part of the report required 
        pursuant to section 163 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 
        2213), the President shall report annually to Congress on 
        enforcement actions taken pursuant to a trade agreement to which 
        the United States

[[Page 129 STAT. 350]]

        is a party, as well as on any public reports issued by Federal 
        agencies on enforcement matters relating to a trade agreement.

    (g) Additional Coordination With Members.--Any Member of the House 
of Representatives may submit to the Committee on Ways and Means of the 
House of Representatives and any Member of the Senate may submit to the 
Committee on Finance of the Senate the views of that Member on any 
matter relevant to a proposed trade agreement, and the relevant 
Committee shall receive those views for consideration.
SEC. 106. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4205.>>  IMPLEMENTATION OF TRADE 
                        AGREEMENTS.

    (a) In General.--
            (1) <<NOTE: President. Deadlines.>>  Notification and 
        submission.--Any agreement entered into under section 103(b) 
        shall enter into force with respect to the United States if (and 
        only if)--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Federal Register, publication.>>  the 
                President, at least 90 calendar days before the day on 
                which the President enters into the trade agreement, 
                notifies the House of Representatives and the Senate of 
                the President's intention to enter into the agreement, 
                and promptly thereafter publishes notice of such 
                intention in the Federal Register;
                    (B) the President, at least 60 days before the day 
                on which the President enters into the agreement, 
                publishes the text of the agreement on a publicly 
                available Internet website of the Office of the United 
                States Trade Representative;
                    (C) within 60 days after entering into the 
                agreement, the President submits to Congress a 
                description of those changes to existing laws that the 
                President considers would be required in order to bring 
                the United States into compliance with the agreement;
                    (D) the President, at least 30 days before 
                submitting to Congress the materials under subparagraph 
                (E), submits to Congress--
                          (i) <<NOTE: Draft.>>  a draft statement of any 
                      administrative action proposed to implement the 
                      agreement; and
                          (ii) <<NOTE: Records.>>  a copy of the final 
                      legal text of the agreement;
                    (E) <<NOTE: Records.>>  after entering into the 
                agreement, the President submits to Congress, on a day 
                on which both Houses of Congress are in session, a copy 
                of the final legal text of the agreement, together 
                with--
                          (i) <<NOTE: Draft.>>  a draft of an 
                      implementing bill described in section 103(b)(3);
                          (ii) a statement of any administrative action 
                      proposed to implement the trade agreement; and
                          (iii) the supporting information described in 
                      paragraph (2)(A);
                    (F) the implementing bill is enacted into law; and
                    (G) <<NOTE: Notification.>>  the President, not 
                later than 30 days before the date on which the 
                agreement enters into force with respect to a party to 
                the agreement, submits written notice to Congress that 
                the President has determined that the party has taken 
                measures necessary to comply with those provisions of 
                the agreement that are to take effect on the date on 
                which the agreement enters into force.
            (2) Supporting information.--

[[Page 129 STAT. 351]]

                    (A) In general.--The supporting information required 
                under paragraph (1)(E)(iii) consists of--
                          (i) an explanation as to how the implementing 
                      bill and proposed administrative action will 
                      change or affect existing law; and
                          (ii) a statement--
                                    (I) asserting that the agreement 
                                makes progress in achieving the 
                                applicable purposes, policies, 
                                priorities, and objectives of this 
                                title; and
                                    (II) setting forth the reasons of 
                                the President regarding--
                                            (aa) how and to what extent 
                                        the agreement makes progress in 
                                        achieving the applicable 
                                        purposes, policies, and 
                                        objectives referred to in 
                                        subclause (I);
                                            (bb) whether and how the 
                                        agreement changes provisions of 
                                        an agreement previously 
                                        negotiated;
                                            (cc) how the agreement 
                                        serves the interests of United 
                                        States commerce; and
                                            (dd) how the implementing 
                                        bill meets the standards set 
                                        forth in section 103(b)(3).
                    (B) <<NOTE: President.>>  Public availability.--The 
                President shall make the supporting information 
                described in subparagraph (A) available to the public.
            (3) Reciprocal benefits.--In order to ensure that a foreign 
        country that is not a party to a trade agreement entered into 
        under section 103(b) does not receive benefits under the 
        agreement unless the country is also subject to the obligations 
        under the agreement, the implementing bill submitted with 
        respect to the agreement shall provide that the benefits and 
        obligations under the agreement apply only to the parties to the 
        agreement, if such application is consistent with the terms of 
        the agreement. The implementing bill may also provide that the 
        benefits and obligations under the agreement do not apply 
        uniformly to all parties to the agreement, if such application 
        is consistent with the terms of the agreement.
            (4) Disclosure of commitments.--Any agreement or other 
        understanding with a foreign government or governments (whether 
        oral or in writing) that--
                    (A) relates to a trade agreement with respect to 
                which Congress enacts an implementing bill under trade 
                authorities procedures; and
                    (B) is not disclosed to Congress before an 
                implementing bill with respect to that agreement is 
                introduced in either House of Congress,
        shall not be considered to be part of the agreement approved by 
        Congress and shall have no force and effect under United States 
        law or in any dispute settlement body.

    (b) Limitations on Trade Authorities Procedures.--
            (1) For lack of notice or consultations.--
                    (A) <<NOTE: Time period.>>  In general.--The trade 
                authorities procedures shall not apply to any 
                implementing bill submitted with respect to a trade 
                agreement or trade agreements entered into under section 
                103(b) if during the 60-day period beginning on the date 
                that one House of Congress agrees to a procedural 
                disapproval resolution for lack of notice or

[[Page 129 STAT. 352]]

                consultations with respect to such trade agreement or 
                agreements, the other House separately agrees to a 
                procedural disapproval resolution with respect to such 
                trade agreement or agreements.
                    (B) <<NOTE: Definition.>>  Procedural disapproval 
                resolution.--(i) For purposes of this paragraph, the 
                term ``procedural disapproval resolution'' means a 
                resolution of either House of Congress, the sole matter 
                after the resolving clause of which is as follows: 
                ``That the President has failed or refused to notify or 
                consult in accordance with the Bipartisan Congressional 
                Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 on 
                negotiations with respect to ________ and, therefore, 
                the trade authorities procedures under that Act shall 
                not apply to any implementing bill submitted with 
                respect to such trade agreement or agreements.'', with 
                the blank space being filled with a description of the 
                trade agreement or agreements with respect to which the 
                President is considered to have failed or refused to 
                notify or consult.
                    (ii) For purposes of clause (i) and paragraphs 
                (3)(C) and (4)(C), the President has ``failed or refused 
                to notify or consult in accordance with the Bipartisan 
                Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                2015'' on negotiations with respect to a trade agreement 
                or trade agreements if--
                          (I) the President has failed or refused to 
                      consult (as the case may be) in accordance with 
                      sections 104 and 105 and this section with respect 
                      to the negotiations, agreement, or agreements;
                          (II) guidelines under section 104 have not 
                      been developed or met with respect to the 
                      negotiations, agreement, or agreements;
                          (III) the President has not met with the House 
                      Advisory Group on Negotiations or the Senate 
                      Advisory Group on Negotiations pursuant to a 
                      request made under section 104(c)(4) with respect 
                      to the negotiations, agreement, or agreements; or
                          (IV) the agreement or agreements fail to make 
                      progress in achieving the purposes, policies, 
                      priorities, and objectives of this title.
            (2) Procedures for considering resolutions.--(A) Procedural 
        disapproval resolutions--
                    (i) in the House of Representatives--
                          (I) may be introduced by any Member of the 
                      House;
                          (II) shall be referred to the Committee on 
                      Ways and Means and, in addition, to the Committee 
                      on Rules; and
                          (III) may not be amended by either Committee; 
                      and
                    (ii) in the Senate--
                          (I) may be introduced by any Member of the 
                      Senate;
                          (II) shall be referred to the Committee on 
                      Finance; and
                          (III) may not be amended.
            (B) The provisions of subsections (d) and (e) of section 152 
        of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2192) (relating to

[[Page 129 STAT. 353]]

        the floor consideration of certain resolutions in the House and 
        Senate) apply to a procedural disapproval resolution introduced 
        with respect to a trade agreement if no other procedural 
        disapproval resolution with respect to that trade agreement has 
        previously been reported in that House of Congress by the 
        Committee on Ways and Means or the Committee on Finance, as the 
        case may be, and if no resolution described in clause (ii) of 
        section 105(b)(3)(B) with respect to that trade agreement has 
        been reported in that House of Congress by the Committee on Ways 
        and Means or the Committee on Finance, as the case may be, 
        pursuant to the procedures set forth in clauses (iii) through 
        (vii) of such section.
            (C) It is not in order for the House of Representatives to 
        consider any procedural disapproval resolution not reported by 
        the Committee on Ways and Means and, in addition, by the 
        Committee on Rules.
            (D) It is not in order for the Senate to consider any 
        procedural disapproval resolution not reported by the Committee 
        on Finance.
            (3) Consideration in senate of consultation and compliance 
        resolution to remove trade authorities procedures.--
                    (A) Reporting of resolution.--If, when the Committee 
                on Finance of the Senate meets on whether to report an 
                implementing bill with respect to a trade agreement or 
                agreements entered into under section 103(b), the 
                committee fails to favorably report the bill, the 
                committee shall report a resolution described in 
                subparagraph (C).
                    (B) Applicability of trade authorities procedures.--
                The trade authorities procedures shall not apply in the 
                Senate to any implementing bill submitted with respect 
                to a trade agreement or agreements described in 
                subparagraph (A) if the Committee on Finance reports a 
                resolution described in subparagraph (C) and such 
                resolution is agreed to by the Senate.
                    (C) Resolution described.--A resolution described in 
                this subparagraph is a resolution of the Senate 
                originating from the Committee on Finance the sole 
                matter after the resolving clause of which is as 
                follows: ``That the President has failed or refused to 
                notify or consult in accordance with the Bipartisan 
                Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                2015 on negotiations with respect to _____ and, 
                therefore, the trade authorities procedures under that 
                Act shall not apply in the Senate to any implementing 
                bill submitted with respect to such trade agreement or 
                agreements.'', with the blank space being filled with a 
                description of the trade agreement or agreements 
                described in subparagraph (A).
                    (D) Procedures.--If the Senate does not agree to a 
                motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to a 
                resolution described in subparagraph (C), the resolution 
                shall be committed to the Committee on Finance.
            (4) Consideration in the house of representatives of a 
        consultation and compliance resolution.--
                    (A) Qualifications for reporting resolution.--If--

[[Page 129 STAT. 354]]

                          (i) the Committee on Ways and Means of the 
                      House of Representatives reports an implementing 
                      bill with respect to a trade agreement or 
                      agreements entered into under section 103(b) with 
                      other than a favorable recommendation; and
                          (ii) a Member of the House of Representatives 
                      has introduced a consultation and compliance 
                      resolution on the legislative day following the 
                      filing of a report to accompany the implementing 
                      bill with other than a favorable recommendation,
                then the Committee on Ways and Means shall consider a 
                consultation and compliance resolution pursuant to 
                subparagraph (B).
                    (B) Committee consideration of a qualifying 
                resolution.--(i) Not <<NOTE: Deadline.>> later than the 
                fourth legislative day after the date of introduction of 
                the resolution, the Committee on Ways and Means shall 
                meet to consider a resolution meeting the qualifications 
                set forth in subparagraph (A).
                    (ii) After consideration of one such resolution by 
                the Committee on Ways and Means, this subparagraph shall 
                not apply to any other such resolution.
                    (iii) If the Committee on Ways and Means has not 
                reported the resolution by the sixth legislative day 
                after the date of its introduction, that committee shall 
                be discharged from further consideration of the 
                resolution.
                    (C) Consultation and compliance resolution 
                described.--A consultation and compliance resolution--
                          (i) is a resolution of the House of 
                      Representatives, the sole matter after the 
                      resolving clause of which is as follows: ``That 
                      the President has failed or refused to notify or 
                      consult in accordance with the Bipartisan 
                      Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability 
                      Act of 2015 on negotiations with respect to _____ 
                      and, therefore, the trade authorities procedures 
                      under that Act shall not apply in the House of 
                      Representatives to any implementing bill submitted 
                      with respect to such trade agreement or 
                      agreements.'', with the blank space being filled 
                      with a description of the trade agreement or 
                      agreements described in subparagraph (A); and
                          (ii) shall be referred to the Committee on 
                      Ways and Means.
                    (D) Applicability of trade authorities procedures.--
                The trade authorities procedures shall not apply in the 
                House of Representatives to any implementing bill 
                submitted with respect to a trade agreement or 
                agreements which are the object of a consultation and 
                compliance resolution if such resolution is adopted by 
                the House.
            (5) <<NOTE: Deadline. Consultation. Reports.>>  For failure 
        to meet other requirements.--Not later than December 15, 2015, 
        the Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with the Secretary of 
        State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attorney General, and 
        the United States Trade Representative, shall transmit to 
        Congress a report setting forth the strategy of the executive 
        branch to address concerns of Congress regarding whether dispute 
        settlement panels and the Appellate Body of the World Trade 
        Organization have added to obligations, or diminished rights, of 
        the United States, as

[[Page 129 STAT. 355]]

        described in section 102(b)(15)(C). Trade authorities procedures 
        shall not apply to any implementing bill with respect to an 
        agreement negotiated under the auspices of the World Trade 
        Organization unless the Secretary of Commerce has issued such 
        report by the deadline specified in this paragraph.
            (6) Limitations on procedures with respect to agreements 
        with countries not in compliance with trafficking victims 
        protection act of 2000.--
                    (A) In general.--The trade authorities procedures 
                shall not apply to any implementing bill submitted with 
                respect to a trade agreement or trade agreements entered 
                into under section 103(b) with a country to which the 
                minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking are 
                applicable and the government of which does not fully 
                comply with such standards and is not making significant 
                efforts to bring the country into compliance (commonly 
                referred to as a ``tier 3'' country), as determined in 
                the most recent annual report on trafficking in persons 
                submitted under section 110(b)(1) of the Trafficking 
                Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7107(b)(1)).
                    (B) Minimum standards for the elimination of 
                trafficking defined.--In this paragraph, the term 
                ``minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking'' 
                means the standards set forth in section 108 of the 
                Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 
                7106).

    (c) Rules of House of Representatives and Senate.--Subsection (b) of 
this section, section 103(c), and section 105(b)(3) are enacted by 
Congress--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the House of 
        Representatives and the Senate, respectively, and as such are 
        deemed a part of the rules of each House, respectively, and such 
        procedures supersede other rules only to the extent that they 
        are inconsistent with such other rules; and
            (2) with the full recognition of the constitutional right of 
        either House to change the rules (so far as relating to the 
        procedures of that House) at any time, in the same manner, and 
        to the same extent as any other rule of that House.
SEC. 107. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4206.>>  TREATMENT OF CERTAIN TRADE 
                        AGREEMENTS FOR WHICH NEGOTIATIONS HAVE 
                        ALREADY BEGUN.

    (a) <<NOTE: Applicability.>>  Certain Agreements.--Notwithstanding 
the prenegotiation notification and consultation requirement described 
in section 105(a), if an agreement to which section 103(b) applies--
            (1) is entered into under the auspices of the World Trade 
        Organization,
            (2) is entered into with the Trans-Pacific Partnership 
        countries with respect to which notifications have been made in 
        a manner consistent with section 105(a)(1)(A) as of the date of 
        the enactment of this Act,
            (3) is entered into with the European Union,
            (4) is an agreement with respect to international trade in 
        services entered into with WTO members with respect to which a 
        notification has been made in a manner consistent with section 
        105(a)(1)(A) as of the date of the enactment of this Act, or
            (5) is an agreement with respect to environmental goods 
        entered into with WTO members with respect to which a

[[Page 129 STAT. 356]]

        notification has been made in a manner consistent with section 
        105(a)(1)(A) as of the date of the enactment of this Act,

and results from negotiations that were commenced before the date of the 
enactment of this Act, subsection (b) shall apply.
    (b) <<NOTE: President.>>  Treatment of Agreements.--In the case of 
any agreement to which subsection (a) applies, the applicability of the 
trade authorities procedures to implementing bills shall be determined 
without regard to the requirements of section 105(a) (relating only to 
notice prior to initiating negotiations), and any resolution under 
paragraph (1)(B), (3)(C), or (4)(C) of section 106(b) shall not be in 
order on the basis of a failure or refusal to comply with the provisions 
of section 105(a), if (and only if) the President, as soon as feasible 
after the date of the enactment of this Act--
            (1) <<NOTE: Notification.>>  notifies Congress of the 
        negotiations described in subsection (a), the specific United 
        States objectives in the negotiations, and whether the President 
        is seeking a new agreement or changes to an existing agreement; 
        and
            (2) <<NOTE: Consultation.>>  before and after submission of 
        the notice, consults regarding the negotiations with the 
        committees referred to in section 105(a)(1)(B) and the House and 
        Senate Advisory Groups on Negotiations convened under section 
        104(c).
SEC. 108. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4207.>>  SOVEREIGNTY.

    (a) United States Law To Prevail in Event of Conflict.--No provision 
of any trade agreement entered into under section 103(b), nor the 
application of any such provision to any person or circumstance, that is 
inconsistent with any law of the United States, any State of the United 
States, or any locality of the United States shall have effect.
    (b) Amendments or Modifications of United States Law.--No provision 
of any trade agreement entered into under section 103(b) shall prevent 
the United States, any State of the United States, or any locality of 
the United States from amending or modifying any law of the United 
States, that State, or that locality (as the case may be).
    (c) Dispute Settlement Reports.--Reports, including findings and 
recommendations, issued by dispute settlement panels convened pursuant 
to any trade agreement entered into under section 103(b) shall have no 
binding effect on the law of the United States, the Government of the 
United States, or the law or government of any State or locality of the 
United States.
SEC. 109. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4208.>>  INTERESTS OF SMALL BUSINESSES.

    (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the United States Trade Representative should facilitate 
        participation by small businesses in the trade negotiation 
        process; and
            (2) the functions of the Office of the United States Trade 
        Representative relating to small businesses should continue to 
        be reflected in the title of the Assistant United States Trade 
        Representative assigned the responsibility for small businesses.

    (b) Consideration of Small Business Interests.--The Assistant United 
States Trade Representative for Small Business, Market Access, and 
Industrial Competitiveness shall be responsible for ensuring that the 
interests of small businesses are considered in all trade negotiations 
in accordance with the objective described in section 102(a)(8).

[[Page 129 STAT. 357]]

SEC. 110. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS; APPLICATION OF CERTAIN 
                        PROVISIONS.

    (a) Conforming Amendments.--
            (1) Advice from united states international trade 
        commission.--Section 131 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 
        2151) is amended--
                    (A) in subsection (a)--
                          (i) in paragraph (1), by striking ``section 
                      2103(a) or (b) of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion 
                      Authority Act of 2002'' and inserting ``subsection 
                      (a) or (b) of section 103 of the Bipartisan 
                      Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability 
                      Act of 2015''; and
                          (ii) in paragraph (2), by striking ``section 
                      2103(b) of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion 
                      Authority Act of 2002'' and inserting ``section 
                      103(b) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
                      Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015'';
                    (B) in subsection (b), by striking ``section 
                2103(a)(3)(A) of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion 
                Authority Act of 2002'' and inserting ``section 
                103(a)(4)(A) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
                Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015''; and
                    (C) in subsection (c), by striking ``section 2103 of 
                the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority Act of 2002'' 
                and inserting ``section 103(a) of the Bipartisan 
                Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                2015''.
            (2) Hearings.--Section 132 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 
        U.S.C. 2152) is amended by striking ``section 2103 of the 
        Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority Act of 2002'' and inserting 
        ``section 103 of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities 
        and Accountability Act of 2015''.
            (3) Public hearings.--Section 133(a) of the Trade Act of 
        1974 (19 U.S.C. 2153(a)) is amended by striking ``section 2103 
        of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority Act of 2002'' and 
        inserting ``section 103 of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
        Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015''.
            (4) Prerequisites for offers.--Section 134 of the Trade Act 
        of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2154) is amended by striking ``section 2103 
        of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority Act of 2002'' each 
        place it appears and inserting ``section 103 of the Bipartisan 
        Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015''.
            (5) Information and advice from private and public 
        sectors.--Section 135 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2155) 
        is amended--
                    (A) in subsection (a)(1)(A), by striking ``section 
                2103 of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority Act of 
                2002'' and inserting ``section 103 of the Bipartisan 
                Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                2015''; and
                    (B) in subsection (e)--
                          (i) in paragraph (1)--
                                    (I) by striking ``section 2103 of 
                                the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority 
                                Act of 2002'' each place it appears and 
                                inserting ``section 103 of the 
                                Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
                                Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                                2015''; and

[[Page 129 STAT. 358]]

                                    
                                (II) <<NOTE: Deadline. Notification.>>  
                                by striking ``not later than the date on 
                                which the President notifies the 
                                Congress under section 2105(a)(1)(A) of 
                                the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority 
                                Act of 2002'' and inserting ``not later 
                                than the date that is 30 days after the 
                                date on which the President notifies 
                                Congress under section 106(a)(1)(A) of 
                                the Bipartisan Congressional Trade 
                                Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                                2015''; and
                          (ii) in paragraph (2), by striking ``section 
                      2102 of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority 
                      Act of 2002'' and inserting ``section 102 of the 
                      Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and 
                      Accountability Act of 2015''.
            (6) Procedures relating to implementing bills.--Section 151 
        of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2191) is amended--
                    (A) in subsection (b)(1), in the matter preceding 
                subparagraph (A), by striking ``section 2105(a)(1) of 
                the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority Act of 2002'' 
                and inserting ``section 106(a)(1) of the Bipartisan 
                Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 
                2015''; and
                    (B) in subsection (c)(1), by striking ``section 
                2105(a)(1) of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion Authority 
                Act of 2002'' and inserting ``section 106(a)(1) of the 
                Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and 
                Accountability Act of 2015''.
            (7) Transmission of agreements to congress.--Section 162(a) 
        of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2212(a)) is amended by 
        striking ``section 2103 of the Bipartisan Trade Promotion 
        Authority Act of 2002'' and inserting ``section 103 of the 
        Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act 
        of 2015''.

    (b) <<NOTE: 19 USC 4209.>>  Application of Certain Provisions.--For 
purposes of applying sections 125, 126, and 127 of the Trade Act of 1974 
(19 U.S.C. 2135, 2136, and 2137)--
            (1) any trade agreement entered into under section 103 shall 
        be treated as an agreement entered into under section 101 or 102 
        of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2111 or 2112), as 
        appropriate; and
            (2) any proclamation or Executive order issued pursuant to a 
        trade agreement entered into under section 103 shall be treated 
        as a proclamation or Executive order issued pursuant to a trade 
        agreement entered into under section 102 of the Trade Act of 
        1974 (19 U.S.C. 2112).
SEC. 111. <<NOTE: 19 USC 4210.>>  DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Agreement on agriculture.--The term ``Agreement on 
        Agriculture'' means the agreement referred to in section 
        101(d)(2) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 
        3511(d)(2)).
            (2) Agreement on safeguards.--The term ``Agreement on 
        Safeguards'' means the agreement referred to in section 
        101(d)(13) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 
        3511(d)(13)).
            (3) Agreement on subsidies and countervailing measures.--The 
        term ``Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures'' 
        means the agreement referred to in section

[[Page 129 STAT. 359]]

        101(d)(12) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 
        3511(d)(12)).
            (4) Antidumping agreement.--The term ``Antidumping 
        Agreement'' means the Agreement on Implementation of Article VI 
        of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 referred to 
        in section 101(d)(7) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 
        U.S.C. 3511(d)(7)).
            (5) Appellate body.--The term ``Appellate Body'' means the 
        Appellate Body established under Article 17.1 of the Dispute 
        Settlement Understanding.
            (6) Common multilateral environmental agreement.--
                    (A) In general.--The term ``common multilateral 
                environmental agreement'' means any agreement specified 
                in subparagraph (B) or included under subparagraph (C) 
                to which both the United States and one or more other 
                parties to the negotiations are full parties, including 
                any current or future mutually agreed upon protocols, 
                amendments, annexes, or adjustments to such an 
                agreement.
                    (B) Agreements specified.--The agreements specified 
                in this subparagraph are the following:
                          (i) The Convention on International Trade in 
                      Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, done 
                      at Washington March 3, 1973 (27 UST 1087; TIAS 
                      8249).
                          (ii) The Montreal Protocol on Substances that 
                      Deplete the Ozone Layer, done at Montreal 
                      September 16, 1987.
                          (iii) The Protocol of 1978 Relating to the 
                      International Convention for the Prevention of 
                      Pollution from Ships, 1973, done at London 
                      February 17, 1978.
                          (iv) The Convention on Wetlands of 
                      International Importance Especially as Waterfowl 
                      Habitat, done at Ramsar February 2, 1971 (TIAS 
                      11084).
                          (v) The Convention on the Conservation of 
                      Antarctic Marine Living Resources, done at 
                      Canberra May 20, 1980 (33 UST 3476).
                          (vi) The International Convention for the 
                      Regulation of Whaling, done at Washington December 
                      2, 1946 (62 Stat. 1716).
                          (vii) The Convention for the Establishment of 
                      an Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission, done 
                      at Washington May 31, 1949 (1 UST 230).
                    (C) Additional agreements.--Both the United States 
                and one or more other parties to the negotiations may 
                agree to include any other multilateral environmental or 
                conservation agreement to which they are full parties as 
                a common multilateral environmental agreement under this 
                paragraph.
            (7) Core labor standards.--The term ``core labor standards'' 
        means--
                    (A) freedom of association;
                    (B) the effective recognition of the right to 
                collective bargaining;
                    (C) the elimination of all forms of forced or 
                compulsory labor;
                    (D) the effective abolition of child labor and a 
                prohibition on the worst forms of child labor; and

[[Page 129 STAT. 360]]

                    (E) the elimination of discrimination in respect of 
                employment and occupation.
            (8) Dispute settlement understanding.--The term ``Dispute 
        Settlement Understanding'' means the Understanding on Rules and 
        Procedures Governing the Settlement of Disputes referred to in 
        section 101(d)(16) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 
        U.S.C. 3511(d)(16)).
            (9) Enabling clause.--The term ``Enabling Clause'' means the 
        Decision on Differential and More Favourable Treatment, 
        Reciprocity and Fuller Participation of Developing Countries (L/
        4903), adopted November 28, 1979, under GATT 1947 (as defined in 
        section 2 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3501)).
            (10) Environmental laws.--The term ``environmental laws'', 
        with respect to the laws of the United States, means 
        environmental statutes and regulations enforceable by action of 
        the Federal Government.
            (11) GATT 1994.--The term ``GATT 1994'' has the meaning 
        given that term in section 2 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act 
        (19 U.S.C. 3501).
            (12) General agreement on trade in services.--The term 
        ``General Agreement on Trade in Services'' means the General 
        Agreement on Trade in Services (referred to in section 
        101(d)(14) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 
        3511(d)(14))).
            (13) Government procurement agreement.--The term 
        ``Government Procurement Agreement'' means the Agreement on 
        Government Procurement referred to in section 101(d)(17) of the 
        Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3511(d)(17)).
            (14) ILO.--The term ``ILO'' means the International Labor 
        Organization.
            (15) Import sensitive agricultural product.--The term 
        ``import sensitive agricultural product'' means an agricultural 
        product--
                    (A) with respect to which, as a result of the 
                Uruguay Round Agreements, the rate of duty was the 
                subject of tariff reductions by the United States and, 
                pursuant to such Agreements, was reduced on January 1, 
                1995, to a rate that was not less than 97.5 percent of 
                the rate of duty that applied to such article on 
                December 31, 1994; or
                    (B) which was subject to a tariff rate quota on the 
                date of the enactment of this Act.
            (16) Information technology agreement.--The term 
        ``Information Technology Agreement'' means the Ministerial 
        Declaration on Trade in Information Technology Products of the 
        World Trade Organization, agreed to at Singapore December 13, 
        1996.
            (17) Internationally recognized core labor standards.--The 
        term ``internationally recognized core labor standards'' means 
        the core labor standards only as stated in the ILO Declaration 
        on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work and its Follow-Up 
        (1998).
            (18) Labor laws.--The term ``labor laws'' means the statutes 
        and regulations, or provisions thereof, of a party to the 
        negotiations that are directly related to core labor standards 
        as well as other labor protections for children and minors

[[Page 129 STAT. 361]]

        and acceptable conditions of work with respect to minimum wages, 
        hours of work, and occupational safety and health, and for the 
        United States, includes Federal statutes and regulations 
        addressing those standards, protections, or conditions, but does 
        not include State or local labor laws.
            (19) United states person.--The term ``United States 
        person'' means--
                    (A) a United States citizen;
                    (B) a partnership, corporation, or other legal 
                entity that is organized under the laws of the United 
                States; and
                    (C) a partnership, corporation, or other legal 
                entity that is organized under the laws of a foreign 
                country and is controlled by entities described in 
                subparagraph (B) or United States citizens, or both.
            (20) Uruguay round agreements.--The term ``Uruguay Round 
        Agreements'' has the meaning given that term in section 2(7) of 
        the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3501(7)).
            (21) World trade organization; wto.--The terms ``World Trade 
        Organization'' and ``WTO'' mean the organization established 
        pursuant to the WTO Agreement.
            (22) WTO agreement.--The term ``WTO Agreement'' means the 
        Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization entered into 
        on April 15, 1994.
            (23) WTO member.--The term ``WTO member'' has the meaning 
        given that term in section 2(10) of the Uruguay Round Agreements 
        Act (19 U.S.C. 3501(10)).

    Approved June 29, 2015.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY--H.R. 2146:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 161 (2015):
            May 12, considered and passed House.
            June 4, considered and passed Senate, amended.
            June 18, House concurred in Senate amendment with an 
                amendment. Senate considered concurring in House 
                amendment.
            June 23, 24, Senate considered and concurred in House 
                amendment.
DAILY COMPILATION OF PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS (2015):
            June 29, Presidential remarks.

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