Text: H.R.4003 — 114th Congress (2015-2016)All Bill Information (Except Text)

There is one version of the bill.

Text available as:

Shown Here:
Introduced in House (11/16/2015)


114th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 4003


To require reports on agency rules with criminal penalties for the violation thereof, to evaluate the necessity and prudence of such rules remaining in effect.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

November 16, 2015

Mrs. Mimi Walters of California (for herself, Mr. Goodlatte, Mr. Conyers, Mr. Buck, Mr. Bishop of Michigan, and Ms. Jackson Lee) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary


A BILL

To require reports on agency rules with criminal penalties for the violation thereof, to evaluate the necessity and prudence of such rules remaining in effect.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Regulatory Reporting Act of 2015”.

SEC. 2. Report to Congress on regulations with criminal penalties.

Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the head of each Federal agency, in consultation with the Attorney General, shall submit to the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate a report that lists each rule of that agency that, if violated, may be punished by criminal penalties. The report shall include, for each such rule, a justification as to why those criminal penalties are necessary based on the following criteria:

(1) Why civil penalties are inadequate to deter the regulated behavior.

(2) What mens rea or criminal intent is required for criminal liability arising from a violation of the rule.

(3) What notice is provided to persons subject to the rule that a violation of the rule may result in criminal penalties.

(4) If the rule applies to all persons, including natural persons as well as corporations and other business associations.

(5) If a violation of the rule is likely to result in any of the following (and if so, how):

(A) Substantial bodily injury or death to another person.

(B) Property damage or destruction.

(C) Harm to public safety.

(D) Harm to national security.

(E) Fraud against the United States.