Text: S.1635 — 114th Congress (2015-2016)All Information (Except Text)

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Engrossed in Senate (04/28/2016)


114th CONGRESS
2d Session
S. 1635


AN ACT

To authorize the Department of State for fiscal year 2016, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title; table of contents.

(a) Short title.—This Act may be cited as the “Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016”.

(b) Table of contents.—The table of contents for this Act is as follows:


Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2. Definitions.

Sec. 101. American spaces review.

Sec. 102. Identifying bilateral investment treaty opportunities.

Sec. 103. Reinstatement of Hong Kong report.

Sec. 104. Interagency hostage recovery coordinator.

Sec. 105. United States-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue review.

Sec. 106. Report on human rights violations in Burma.

Sec. 107. Combating anti-semitism.

Sec. 108. Biotechnology grants.

Sec. 109. Definition of “use” in passport and visa offenses.

Sec. 110. Science and technology fellowships.

Sec. 111. Name changes.

Sec. 112. Anti-piracy information sharing.

Sec. 113. Report reform.

Sec. 114. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with Japan.

Sec. 115. Sense of Congress on the defense relationship between the United States and the Republic of India.

Sec. 116. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with the Republic of Korea.

Sec. 117. Sense of Congress on the relationship between the United States and Taiwan.

Sec. 118. Report on political freedom in Venezuela.

Sec. 119. Strategy for the Middle East in the event of a comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran.

Sec. 120. Department of State international cyberspace policy strategy.

Sec. 121. Waiver of fees for renewal of immigrant visa for adopted child in certain situations.

Sec. 122. Sense of Congress on anti-Israel and anti-Semitic incitement within the Palestinian Authority.

Sec. 123. Support for the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and inviolability of post-Soviet countries in light of Russian aggression and interference.

Sec. 124. Russian propaganda report.

Sec. 125. Approval of export licences and letters of request to assist the Government of Ukraine.

Sec. 131. Atrocities prevention board.

Sec. 132. United States engagement in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 133. Joint action plan to combat prejudice and discrimination and to foster inclusion.

Sec. 134. Report on developing country debt sustainability.

Sec. 135. United States strategy to prevent and respond to gender-based violence globally.

Sec. 136. International corruption and accountability.

Sec. 137. Quadrennial diplomacy and development review.

Sec. 138. Disappeared persons in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.

Sec. 139. Report on implementation by the Government of Bahrain of recommendations from the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry.

Sec. 140. Report on United States humanitarian assistance to Haiti and whether recent elections in Haiti meet international election standards.

Sec. 141. Sense of Congress with respect to the imposition of additional sanctions against the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Sec. 201. Rightsizing accountability.

Sec. 202. Integration of foreign economic policy.

Sec. 203. Review of Bureau of African Affairs and Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs jurisdictions.

Sec. 204. Special envoys, representatives, advisors, and coordinators.

Sec. 205. Conflict prevention, mitigation and resolution, and the inclusion and participation of women.

Sec. 206. Information technology system security.

Sec. 207. Analysis of embassy cost sharing.

Sec. 208. Parent advisory committee to the Interagency Working Group to Prevent International Parental Child Abduction.

Sec. 209. Improving research and evaluation of public diplomacy.

Sec. 210. Enhanced institutional capacity of the Bureau of African Affairs.

Sec. 211. Review of Foreign Service Officer compensation.

Sec. 212. Repeal of recertification requirement for senior Foreign Service.

Sec. 213. Compensatory time off for travel.

Sec. 214. Certificates of demonstrated competence.

Sec. 215. Foreign Service assignment restrictions.

Sec. 216. Security clearance suspensions.

Sec. 217. Economic statecraft education and training.

Sec. 218. Report on diversity recruitment, employment, retention, and promotion.

Sec. 219. Expansion of the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program, and the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program.

Sec. 220. Retention of mid- and senior-level professionals from underrepresented groups.

Sec. 221. Review of jurisdictional responsibilities of the Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan and the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs.

Sec. 222. Congressional notification of countries compliance with minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

Sec. 223. International religious freedom training program.

Sec. 301. Reports concerning the United Nations.

Sec. 302. Annual report on financial contributions to international organizations.

Sec. 303. Report on peacekeeping arrears, credits, and contributions.

Sec. 304. Assessment rate transparency.

Sec. 311. Preventing abuse in peacekeeping.

Sec. 312. Inclusion of peacekeeping abuses in country report on human rights practices.

Sec. 313. Evaluation of United Nations peacekeeping missions.

Sec. 321. Encouraging employment of United States citizens at the United Nations.

Sec. 322. Ensuring appropriate United Nations personnel salaries.

Sec. 401. Visa ineligibility for international child abductors.

Sec. 402. Presumption of immigrant intent for H and L visa classifications.

Sec. 403. Visa information sharing.

Sec. 501. Worldwide security protection.

Sec. 502. Embassy security, construction and maintenance.

Sec. 511. Local guard contracts abroad under diplomatic security program.

Sec. 512. Disciplinary action resulting from unsatisfactory leadership in relation to a security incident.

Sec. 513. Management and staff accountability.

Sec. 514. Security enhancements for soft targets.

Sec. 521. Additional reports on expansion and enhancement of Marine Corps Security Guard Program.

Sec. 531. Designation and reporting for high threat, high risk posts.

Sec. 532. Designation and reporting for high-risk counterintelligence threat posts.

Sec. 533. Enhanced qualifications for Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for high threat, high risk posts.

Sec. 534. Security environment threat list briefings.

Sec. 535. Comptroller General of the United States report on implementation of Benghazi Accountability Review Board recommendations.

Sec. 536. Foreign Affairs Security Training Center.

Sec. 537. Language training.

Sec. 541. Provision of copies of accountability review board reports to Congress.

Sec. 542. Staffing.

Sec. 601. Short title.

Sec. 602. Competitive hiring status for former employees of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.

Sec. 603. Assurance of independence of IT systems.

Sec. 604. Protecting the integrity of internal investigations.

Sec. 605. Report on Inspector General inspection and auditing of Foreign Service posts and bureaus and operating units Department of State.

SEC. 2. Definitions.

In this Act:

(1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.—The term “appropriate congressional committees” means—

(A) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;

(B) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;

(C) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and

(D) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives.

(2) DEPARTMENT.—The term “Department” means the Department of State.

(3) PEACEKEEPING CREDITS.—The term “peacekeeping credits” means the amounts by which United States assessed peacekeeping contributions exceed actual expenditures, apportioned to the United States, of peacekeeping operations by the United Nations during a United Nations peacekeeping fiscal year.

(4) SECRETARY.—The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of State.

SEC. 101. American spaces review.

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes—

(1) the full costs incurred by the Department to provide American Spaces, including—

(A) American Centers, American Corners, Binational Centers, Information Resource Centers, and Science Centers; and

(B) the total costs of all associated—

(i) employee salaries, including foreign service, American civilian, and locally employed staff;

(ii) programming expenses;

(iii) operating expenses;

(iv) contracting expenses; and

(v) security expenses;

(2) a breakdown of the total costs described in paragraph (1) by each space and type of space;

(3) the total fees collected for entry to, or the use of, American Spaces and related resources, including a breakdown by the type of fee for each space and type of space; and

(4) the total usage rates, including by type of service, for each space and type of space.

SEC. 102. Identifying bilateral investment treaty opportunities.

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes a detailed description of—

(1) the status of all ongoing investment treaty negotiations, including a strategy and timetable for concluding each such negotiation;

(2) a strategy to expand the investment treaty agenda, including through—

(A) launching new investment treaty negotiations with foreign partners that are currently capable of entering into such negotiations; and

(B) building the capacity of foreign partners to enter into such negotiations, including by encouraging the adoption of best practices with respect to investment; and

(3) an estimate of any resources that will be needed, including anticipated staffing levels—

(A) to conclude all ongoing negotiations described in paragraph (1);

(B) to launch new investment treaty negotiations, as described in paragraph (2)(A); and

(C) to build the capacity of foreign partners, as described in paragraph (2)(B).

SEC. 103. Reinstatement of Hong Kong report.

(a) In general.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter through 2020, the Secretary shall submit the report required under section 301 of the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 5731) to the appropriate congressional committees.

(b) Public disclosure.—The report submitted under subsection (a) should be unclassified and made publicly available, including through the Department’s public website.

(c) Treatment of Hong Kong under United States law.—

(1) SECRETARY OF STATE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENT.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary shall certify to Congress whether Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is sufficiently autonomous to justify different treatment for its citizens from the treatment accorded to other citizens of the People’s Republic of China in any new laws, agreements, treaties, or arrangements entered into between the United States and Hong Kong after the date of the enactment of this Act.

(B) FACTOR FOR CONSIDERATION.—In making a certification under subparagraph (A), the Secretary should consider the terms, obligations, and expectations expressed in the Joint Declaration with respect to Hong Kong.

(C) EXCEPTION.—A certification shall not be required under this subsection with respect to any new laws, agreements, treaties, or arrangements that support human rights, rule of law, or democracy in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

(2) WAIVER AUTHORITY.—The Secretary may waive the application of paragraph (1) if the Secretary—

(A) determines that such a waiver is in the national interests of the United States; and

(B) on or before the date on which such waiver would take effect, submits a notice of, and justification for, the waiver to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 104. Interagency hostage recovery coordinator.

(a) In general.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the President shall designate an existing Federal officer to coordinate efforts to secure the release of United States persons who are hostages of hostile groups or state sponsors of terrorism. For purposes of carrying out the duties described in paragraph (2), such officer shall have the title of “Interagency Hostage Recovery Coordinator”.

(2) DUTIES.—The Coordinator shall have the following duties:

(A) Coordinate and direct all activities of the Federal Government relating to each hostage situation described in paragraph (1) to ensure efforts to secure the release of all hostages in the hostage situation are properly resourced and correct lines of authority are established and maintained.

(B) Establish and direct a fusion cell consisting of appropriate personnel of the Federal Government with purview over each hostage situation described in paragraph (1).

(C) Develop a strategy to keep family members of hostages described in paragraph (1) informed of the status of such hostages and inform such family members of updates, procedures, and policies that do not compromise the national security of the United States.

(b) Limitation on authority.—The authority of the Interagency Hostage Recovery Coordinator shall be limited to hostage cases outside the United States.

(c) Quarterly report.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—On a quarterly basis, the Coordinator shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and the members of Congress described in paragraph (2) a report that includes a summary of each hostage situation described in sub-section (a)(1) and efforts to secure the release of all hostages in such hostage situation.

(2) MEMBERS OF CONGRESS DESCRIBED.—The members of Congress described in this subparagraph are, with respect to a United States person hostage covered by a report under paragraph (1), the Senators representing the State, and the Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner of the House of Representatives representing the district, where a hostage described in subjection (a)(1) resides.

(3) FORM OF REPORT.—Each report under this subsection may be submitted in classified or unclassified form.

(d) Rule of construction.—Nothing in this section shall be construed as authorizing the Federal Government to negotiate with a state sponsor of terrorism or an organization that the Secretary has designated as a foreign terrorist organization pursuant to section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1189) or any other hostage-takers.

(e) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) HOSTILE GROUP.—The term “hostile group” means—

(A) a group that is designated as a foreign terrorist organization under section 219(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1189(a));

(B) a group that is engaged in armed conflict with the United States; or

(C) any other group that the President determines to be a hostile group for purposes of this paragraph.

(2) STATE SPONSOR OF TERRORISM.—The term “state sponsor of terrorism”—

(A) means a country the government of which the Secretary has determined, for purposes of section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act of 1979, section 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, section 40 of the Arms Export Control Act, or any other provision of law, to be a government that has repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism; and

(B) includes North Korea.

SEC. 105. United States-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue review.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of the Treasury, and in consultation with other departments and agencies, as appropriate, shall—

(1) conduct a review of the United States-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (referred to in this section as the “Dialogue”); and

(2) submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that contains the findings of such review.

(b) Contents.—The report described in subsection (a) shall include—

(1) a list of all commitments agreed to by the United States and China at each of the first 6 rounds of meetings;

(2) an assessment of the status of each commitment agreed to by the United States and China at each of the first 6 rounds of meetings, including a detailed description of—

(A) any actions that have been taken with respect to such commitments;

(B) any aspects of such commitments that remain unfulfilled; and

(C) any actions that remain necessary to fulfill any unfulfilled commitments described in subparagraph (B);

(3) an assessment of the effectiveness of the Dialogue in achieving and fulfilling significant commitments on United States priorities in the bilateral relationship, including—

(A) the security situation in the East and South China Seas, including a peaceful resolution of maritime disputes in the region;

(B) denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula;

(C) cybertheft of United States intellectual property;

(D) the treatment of political dissidents, media representatives, and ethnic and religious minorities;

(E) reciprocal treatment of United States journalists and academics in China, including issuance of visas;

(F) expanding investment and trade opportunities for United States businesses;

(G) repatriation of North Korean refugees from China to North Korea; and

(H) promoting and protecting rule of law and democratic institutions in Hong Kong; and

(4) recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of the Dialogue in achieving and fulfilling significant commitments on United States priorities described in paragraph (3), including consideration of the use of predetermined benchmarks for assessing whether the commitments achieved are significantly furthering such priorities.

SEC. 106. Report on human rights violations in Burma.

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the majority leader of the Senate, the minority leader of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the majority leader of the House of Representatives, the minority leader of the House of Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives that—

(1) describes in detail all known widespread or systematic civil or political rights violations, including violations that may constitute crimes against humanity against ethnic, racial, or religious minorities in Burma, including the Rohingya people; and

(2) provides recommendations for holding perpetrators of the violations described in paragraph (1) accountable for their actions.

SEC. 107. Combating anti-semitism.

Of the amount authorized to be appropriated for Diplomatic and Consular Programs, $500,000 shall be made available to the Bureau for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, to be used in support of efforts by American and European Jewish and other civil society organizations, focusing on youth, to combat anti-Semitism and other forms of religious, ethnic, or racial intolerance in Europe.

SEC. 108. Biotechnology grants.

Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.), is amended by adding at the end the following:

“SEC. 63. Biotechnology grants authorized.

“(a) In general.—The Secretary of State is authorized to support, through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, outreach, and public diplomacy activities, activities promoting the benefits of agricultural biotechnology, biofuels, science-based regulatory systems, and the application of such technologies for trade and development.

“(b) Limitation.—The total amount of grants provided pursuant to subsection (a) shall not exceed $500,000 in any fiscal year.”.

SEC. 109. Definition of “use” in passport and visa offenses.

(a) In general.—Chapter 75 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting before section 1541 the following:

“SEC. 1540. Definition of ‘use’ and ‘uses’.

“In this chapter, the terms ‘use’ and ‘uses’ shall be given their plain meaning, which shall include use for identification purposes.”.

(b) Clerical amendment.—The table of sections for chapter 75 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting before the item relating to section 1541 the following:


“1540. Definition of ‘use’ and ‘uses”.’.”.”.

SEC. 110. Science and technology fellowships.

Section 504 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1979 (22 U.S.C. 2656d) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(e) Grants and cooperative agreements related to science and technology fellowship programs.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary is authorized to provide grants or enter into cooperative agreements for science and technology fellowship programs of the Department of State.

“(2) RECRUITMENT; STIPENDS.—Assistance authorized under paragraph (1) may be used—

“(A) to recruit fellows; and

“(B) to pay stipends, travel, and other appropriate expenses to fellows.

“(3) CLASSIFICATION OF STIPENDS.—Stipends paid under paragraph (2)(B) shall not be considered compensation for purposes of section 209 of title 18, United States Code.

“(4) LIMITATION.—The total amount of assistance provided under this subsection may not exceed $500,000 in any fiscal year.”.

SEC. 111. Name changes.

(a) Public Law 87–195.—Section 607(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2357(d)) is amended by striking “Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs” and inserting “Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans, Environment, and Science”.

(b) Public Law 88–206.—Section 617(a) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7671p(a)) is amended by striking “Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs” and inserting “Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans, Environment, and Science”.

(c) Public Law 93–126.—Section 9(a) of the Department of State Appropriations Authorization Act of 1973 (22 U.S.C. 2655a) is amended—

(1) by striking “Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs” and inserting “Bureau of Oceans, Environment, and Science”; and

(2) by striking “Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs” and inserting “Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans, Environment, and Science”.

(d) Public Law 106–113.—Section 1112(a) of the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 (22 U.S.C. 2652c(a)) is amended by striking “Verification and Compliance.” and inserting “Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance (referred to in this section as the ‘Assistant Secretary’).”.

SEC. 112. Anti-piracy information sharing.

The Secretary is authorized to provide for the participation of the United States in the Information Sharing Centre located in Singapore, as established by the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery Against Ships in Asia, done at Singapore November 11, 2004.

SEC. 113. Report reform.

(a) Human rights report.—Section 549 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347h) is repealed.

(b) Rough diamonds annual report.—Section 12 of the Clean Diamond Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 3911) is amended to read as follows:

“SEC. 12. Reports.

“For each country that, during the preceding 12-month period, exported rough diamonds to the United States, the exportation of which was not controlled through the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, and if the failure to do so has significantly increased the likelihood that those diamonds not so controlled are being imported into the United States, the President shall submit a semi-annual report to Congress that explains what actions have been taken by the United States or such country since the previous report to ensure that diamonds, the exportation of which was not controlled through the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, are not being imported from that country into the United States. A country shall be included in the report required under this section until the country is controlling the importation and exportation of rough diamonds through the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme.”.

SEC. 114. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with Japan.

It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) the alliance between the United States and Japan is a cornerstone of peace, security, and stability in the Asia-Pacific region and around the world;

(2) Prime Minister Shiuzo Abe’s visit to the United States in April 2015 and historic address to a Joint Session of Congress symbolized the strength and importance of ties between the United States and Japan;

(3) in 2015, which marks 70 years since the end of World War II, the United States and Japan continue to strengthen the alliance and work together to ensure a peaceful and prosperous future for the Asia-Pacific region and the world;

(4) the Governments and people of the United States and Japan share values, interests, and capabilities that have helped to build a strong rules-based international order, based on a commitment to rules, norms and institutions;

(5) the revised Guidelines for United States-Japan Defense Cooperation and Japan’s policy of “Proactive Contribution to Peace” will reinforce deterrence, update the roles and missions of the United States and Japan, enable Japan to expand its contributions to regional and global security, and allow the United States Government and the Government of Japan to enhance cooperation on security issues in the region and beyond;

(6) the United States remain resolute in its commitments under the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security to respond to any armed attack in the territories under the administration of Japan;

(7) although the United States Government does not take a position on the ultimate sovereignty of the Senkaku Islands, the United States Government acknowledges that they are under the administration of Japan and opposes any unilateral actions that would seek to undermine such administration;

(8) the United States Government reaffirms that the unilateral actions of a third party will not affect the United States acknowledgment of the administration of Japan over the Senkaku Islands;

(9) the United States Government and the Government of Japan continue to work together on common security interests, including to confront the threat posed by the nuclear and ballistic missile programs of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea;

(10) the United States Government and the Government of Japan remain committed to ensuring maritime security and respect for international law, including freedom of navigation and overflight; and

(11) the United States Government and the Government of Japan continue to oppose the use of coercion, intimidation, or force to change the status quo, including in the East and South China Seas.

SEC. 115. Sense of Congress on the defense relationship between the United States and the Republic of India.

(a) Findings.—Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The United States has an upgraded, strategic-plus relationship with India based on regional cooperation, space science cooperation, and defense cooperation.

(2) The defense relationship between the United States and the Republic of India is strengthened by the common commitment of both countries to democracy.

(3) The United States and the Republic of India share a common and long-standing commitment to civilian control of the military.

(4) The United States and the Republic of India have increasingly worked together on defense cooperation across a range of activities, exercises, initiatives, and research.

(b) Sense of Congress.—It is the sense of Congress that the United States should—

(1) continue to expand defense cooperation with the Republic of India;

(2) welcome the role of the Republic of India in providing security and stability in the Indo-Pacific region and beyond;

(3) work cooperatively with the Republic of India on matters relating to our common defense;

(4) vigorously support the implementation of the United States-India Defense Framework Agreement; and

(5) support the India Defense Trade and Technology Initiative.

SEC. 116. Sense of Congress on the United States alliance with the Republic of Korea.

It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) the alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea has served as an anchor for stability, security, and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula, in the Asia-Pacific region, and around the world;

(2) the United States and the Republic of Korea continue to strengthen and adapt the bilateral, regional, and global scope of the comprehensive strategic alliance between the 2 nations, to serve as a linchpin of peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region, recognizing the shared values of democracy, human rights, free and open markets, and the rule of law, as reaffirmed in the May 2013 “Joint Declaration in Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the Alliance between the Republic of Korea and the United States of America”;

(3) the United States and the Republic of Korea continue to broaden and deepen the alliance by strengthening the combined defense posture on the Korean Peninsula, enhancing mutual security based on the Republic of Korea-United States Mutual Defense Treaty, and promoting cooperation for regional and global security in the 21st century;

(4) the United States and the Republic of Korea share deep concerns that the nuclear, cyber, and ballistic missiles programs of North Korea and its repeated provocations pose grave threats to peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and Northeast Asia and recognize that both nations are determined to achieve the peaceful denuclearization of North Korea and remain fully committed to continuing close cooperation on the full range of issues related to North Korea;

(5) the United States and the Republic of Korea are particularly concerned that the nuclear and ballistic missile programs of North Korea, including North Korean efforts to miniaturize their nuclear technology and improve the mobility of their ballistic missiles, have gathered significant momentum and are poised to expand in the coming years;

(6) the Republic of Korea has made progress in enhancing future warfighting and interoperability capabilities by taking steps toward procuring Patriot Advanced Capability missiles, F–35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft, and RQ–4 Global Hawk Surveillance Aircraft;

(7) the United States supports the vision of a Korean Peninsula free of nuclear weapons, free from the fear of war, and peacefully reunited on the basis of democratic and free market principles, as articulated in President Park's address in Dresden, Germany; and

(8) the United States and the Republic of Korea share the future interests of both nations in securing peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in Northeast Asia.

SEC. 117. Sense of Congress on the relationship between the United States and Taiwan.

It is the sense of the Congress that—

(1) the United States policy toward Taiwan is based upon the Taiwan Relations Act (Public Law 96–8), which was enacted in 1979, and the Six Assurances given by President Ronald Reagan in 1982;

(2) provision of defensive weapons to Taiwan should continue as mandated in the Taiwan Relations Act; and

(3) enhanced trade relations with Taiwan should be pursued to mutually benefit the citizens of both countries.

SEC. 118. Report on political freedom in Venezuela.

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes—

(1) an assessment of the support provided by the United States to the people of Venezuela in their aspiration to live under conditions of peace and representative democracy (as defined by the Inter-American Democratic Charter of the Organization of American States, done at Lima September 11, 2001);

(2) an assessment of work carried out by the United States, in cooperation with the other member states of the Organization of American States and countries of the European Union, to ensure—

(A) the peaceful resolution of the current political situation in Venezuela; and

(B) the immediate cessation of violence against antigovernment protestors;

(3) a list of the government and security officials in Venezuela who—

(A) are responsible for, or complicit in, the use of force in relation to antigovernment protests and similar acts of violence; and

(B) have had their financial assets in the United States frozen or been placed on a visa ban by the United States; and

(4) an assessment of United States support for the development of democratic political processes and independent civil society in Venezuela.

SEC. 119. Strategy for the Middle East in the event of a comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran.

(a) Strategy required.—The Secretary of State shall, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense, other members of the National Security Council, and the heads of other appropriate departments and agencies of the United States Government, develop a strategy for the United States for the Middle East.

(b) Elements.—The strategy shall include the following:

(1) Efforts to counter Iranian-sponsored terrorism in Middle East region.

(2) Efforts to reassure United States allies and partners in Middle East.

(3) Efforts to address the potential for a conventional or nuclear arms race in the Middle East.

(c) Submission to Congress.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit the strategy developed under subsection (a) to—

(1) the majority leader, the minority leader, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate; and

(2) the Speaker, the majority leader, the minority leader, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 120. Department of State international cyberspace policy strategy.

(a) In general.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall produce a comprehensive strategy, with a classified annex if necessary, relating to United States international policy with regard to cyberspace.

(b) Elements.—The strategy required in subsection (a) shall include:

(1) A review of actions and activities undertaken by the Secretary of State to date to support the goal of the President’s International Strategy for Cyberspace, released in May 2011, to “work internationally to promote an open, interoperable, secure, and reliable information and communications infrastructure that supports international trade and commerce, strengthens international security, and fosters free expression and innovation”.

(2) A plan of action to guide the Secretary's diplomacy with regard to nation-states, including conducting bilateral and multilateral activities to develop the norms of responsible international behavior in cyberspace, and status review of existing discussions in multilateral fora to obtain agreements on international norms in cyberspace.

(3) A review of the alternative concepts with regard to international norms in cyberspace offered by other prominent nation-state actors, including China, Russia, Brazil, and India.

(4) A detailed description of threats to United States national security in cyberspace from other nation-states, state-sponsored actors and private actors, to United States Federal and private sector infrastructure, United States intellectual property, and the privacy of United States citizens.

(5) A review of policy tools available to the President of United States to deter nation-states, state-sponsored actors, and private actors, including, but not limited to, those outlined in Executive Order 13694, released on April 1, 2015.

(6) A review of resources required by the Secretary, including the Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues, to conduct activities to build responsible norms of international cyber behavior.

(c) Consultation.—The Secretary shall consult with other United States Government agencies, including the intelligence community, and, as appropriate, the United States private sector, and United States nongovernmental organizations with recognized credentials and expertise in foreign policy, national security, and cybersecurity.

(d) Release.—The Secretary shall publicly release the strategy required in subsection (a) and brief the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives upon its release, including on the classified annex, should the strategy include such an annex.

SEC. 121. Waiver of fees for renewal of immigrant visa for adopted child in certain situations.

Section 221(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1201(c)) is amended to read as follows:

“(c) Period of validity; renewal or replacement.—

“(1) IMMIGRANT VISAS.—An immigrant visa shall be valid for such period, not exceeding 6 months, as shall be by regulations prescribed, except that any visa issued to a child lawfully adopted by a United States citizen and spouse while such citizen is serving abroad in the United States Armed Forces, or is employed abroad by the United States Government, or is temporarily abroad on business, shall be valid until such time, for a period not to exceed 3 years, as the adoptive citizen parent returns to the United States in due course of his service, employment, or business.

“(2) NONIMMIGRANT VISAS.—A nonimmigrant visa shall be valid for such periods as shall be prescribed by regulations. In prescribing the period of validity of a nonimmigrant visa in the case of nationals of any foreign country who are eligible for such visas, the Secretary of State shall, insofar as practicable, accord to such nationals the same treatment upon a reciprocal basis as such foreign country accords to nationals of the United States who are within a similar class, except that in the case of aliens who are nationals of a foreign country and who either are granted refugee status and firmly resettled in another foreign country or are granted permanent residence and residing in another foreign country, the Secretary of State may prescribe the period of validity of such a visa based upon the treatment granted by that other foreign country to alien refugees and permanent residents, respectively, in the United States.

“(3) VISA REPLACEMENT.—An immigrant visa may be replaced under the original number during the fiscal year in which the original visa was issued for an immigrant who establishes to the satisfaction of the consular officer that the immigrant—

“(A) was unable to use the original immigrant visa during the period of its validity because of reasons beyond his control and for which he was not responsible;

“(B) is found by a consular officer to be eligible for an immigrant visa; and

“(C) pays again the statutory fees for an application and an immigrant visa.

“(4) FEE WAIVER.—If an immigrant visa was issued, on or after March 27, 2013, for a child who has been lawfully adopted, or who is coming to the United States to be adopted, by a United States citizen, any statutory immigrant visa fees relating to a renewal or replacement of such visa may be waived or, if already paid, may be refunded upon request, subject to such criteria as the Secretary of State may prescribe, if—

“(A) the immigrant child was unable to use the original immigrant visa during the period of its validity as a direct result of extraordinary circumstances, including the denial of an exit permit; and

“(B) if such inability was attributable to factors beyond the control of the adopting parent or parents and of the immigrant.”.

SEC. 122. Sense of Congress on anti-Israel and anti-Semitic incitement within the Palestinian Authority.

(a) Findings.—Congress finds that the 1995 Interim Agreement on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, commonly referred to as Oslo II, specifically details that Israel and the Palestinian Authority shall “abstain from incitement, including hostile propaganda, against each other and, without derogating from the principle of freedom of expression, shall take legal measures to prevent such incitement by any organizations, groups or individuals within their jurisdiction”.

(b) Sense of Congress.—Congress—

(1) expresses support and admiration for individuals and organizations working to encourage cooperation between Israeli Jews and Palestinians, including—

(A) Professor Mohammed Dajani Daoudi, who took students from al-Quds University in Jerusalem to visit Auschwitz in March 2014 only to return to death threats by fellow Palestinians and expulsion from his teacher’s union;

(B) the Israel Palestine Center for Research and Information, the only joint Israeli-Palestinian public policy think-tank,

(C) United Hatzalah, a nonprofit, fully volunteer Emergency Medical Services organization that, mobilizing volunteers who are religious or secular Jews, Arabs, Muslims, and Christians, provides EMS services to all people in Israel regardless of race, religion, or national origin; and

(D) Breaking the Impasse, an apolitical initiative of Palestinian and Israeli business and civil society leaders who advocate for a two-state solution and an urgent diplomatic solution to the conflict;

(2) reiterates strong condemnation of anti-Israel and anti-Semitic incitement in the Palestinian Authority as antithetical to the stated desire to achieve a just, lasting, and comprehensive peace settlement; and

(3) urges President Abbas and Palestinian Authority officials to discontinue all official incitement that runs contrary to the determination to put an end to decades of confrontation.

SEC. 123. Support for the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and inviolability of post-Soviet countries in light of Russian aggression and interference.

It is the sense of Congress that Congress—

(1) supports the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and inviolability of post-Soviet countries within their internationally recognized borders;

(2) expresses deep concern over increasingly aggressive actions by the Russian Federation;

(3) is committed to providing sufficient funding for the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs of the Department of State to address subversive and destabilizing activities by the Russian Federation within post-Soviet countries;

(4) supports robust engagement between the United States and post-Soviet countries through—

(A) the promotion of strengthened people-to-people ties, including through educational and cultural exchange programs;

(B) anticorruption assistance;

(C) public diplomacy;

(D) economic diplomacy; and

(E) other democratic reform efforts;

(5) encourages the President to further enhance nondefense cooperation and diplomatic engagement with post-Soviet countries;

(6) condemns the subversive and destabilizing activities undertaken by the Russian Federation within post-Soviet countries;

(7) encourages enhanced cooperation between the United States and the European Union to promote greater Euro-Atlantic integration, including through—

(A) the enlargement of the European Union; and

(B) the Open Door policy of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization;

(8) urges continued cooperation between the United States and the European Union to maintain sanctions against the Russian Federation until the Government of Russia has—

(A) fully implemented all provisions of the Minsk agreements, done at Minsk September 5, 2014 and February 12, 2015; and

(B) demonstrated respect for the territorial sovereignty of Ukraine;

(9) calls on the member states of the European Union to extend the current sanctions regime against the Russian Federation; and

(10) urges the consideration of additional sanctions if the Russian Federation continue to engage in subversive and destabilizing activities within post-Soviet countries.

SEC. 124. Russian propaganda report.

(a) Sense of Congress.—It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) the Russian Federation is waging a propaganda war against the United States and our allies; and

(2) a successful strategy must be implemented to counter the threat posed by Russian propaganda.

(b) Report.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually for the following 3 years, the Secretary, in consultation with appropriate Federal officials, shall submit an unclassified report, with a classified annex, to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives that contains a detailed analysis of—

(1) the recent use of propaganda by the Government of Russia, including—

(A) the forms of propaganda used, including types of media and programming;

(B) the principal countries and regions targeted by Russian propaganda; and

(C) the impact of Russian propaganda on such targets;

(2) the response by United States allies, particularly European allies, to counter the threat of Russian propaganda;

(3) the response by the United States to the threat of Russian propaganda;

(4) the extent of the effectiveness of programs currently in use to counter Russian propaganda;

(5) a strategy for improving the effectiveness of such programs;

(6) any additional authority needed to counter the threat of Russian propaganda; and

(7) the additional funding needed to successfully implement the strategy referred to in paragraph (5).

SEC. 125. Approval of export licences and letters of request to assist the Government of Ukraine.

(a) In general.—

(1) EXPORT LICENSE APPLICATIONS.—

(A) SUBMISSION TO CONGRESS.—The Secretary shall submit to the specified congressional committees a detailed list of all export license applications, including requests for marketing licenses, for the sale of defense articles and defense services to Ukraine.

(B) CONTENTS.—The list submitted under subparagraph (A) shall include—

(i) the date on which the application or request was first submitted;

(ii) the current status of each application or request; and

(iii) the estimated timeline for adjudication of such applications or requests.

(C) PRIORITY.—The Secretary should give priority to processing the applications and requests included on the list submitted under subparagraph (A).

(2) LETTERS OF REQUEST.—The Secretary shall submit to the specified congressional committees a detailed list of all pending Letters of Request for Foreign Military Sales to Ukraine, including—

(A) the date on which each such letter was first submitted;

(B) the current status of each such letter; and

(C) the estimated timeline for the adjudication of each such letter.

(b) Reports.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and every 90 days thereafter until the date set forth in paragraph (2), the Secretary shall submit a report to the specified congressional committees that describes the status of the applications, requests for marketing licenses, and Letters of Request described in subsection (a).

(2) TERMINATION DATE.—The date set forth in this paragraph is the earlier of—

(A) the date on which the President certifies to Congress that the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Government of Ukraine has been restored; or

(B) the date that is 5 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

(c) Specified congressional committees defined.—In this section, the term “specified congressional committees” means—

(1) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;

(2) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives;

(3) the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate; and

(4) the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 131. Atrocities prevention board.

(a) Establishment.—The President is authorized to establish, within the Executive Office of the President, an Interagency Atrocities Prevention Board (referred to in this section as the “Board”).

(b) Duties.—The Board is authorized—

(1) to coordinate an interagency approach to preventing mass atrocities;

(2) to propose policies to integrate the early warning systems of national security agencies, including intelligence agencies, with respect to incidents of mass atrocities and to coordinate the policy response to such incidents;

(3) to identify relevant Federal agencies, which shall track and report on Federal funding spent on atrocity prevention efforts;

(4) to oversee the development and implementation of comprehensive atrocities prevention and response strategies;

(5) to identify available resources and policy options necessary to prevent the emergence or escalation of mass atrocities;

(6) to identify and propose policies to close gaps in expertise, readiness, and planning for atrocities prevention and early action across Federal agencies, including training for employees at relevant Federal agencies;

(7) to engage relevant civil society and nongovernmental organization stakeholders in regular consultations to solicit current information on countries of concern; and

(8) to conduct an atrocity-specific expert review of policy and programming of all countries at risk for mass atrocities.

(c) Leadership.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Board shall be headed by a Senior Director, who—

(A) shall be appointed by the President; and

(B) shall report to the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs.

(2) RESPONSIBILITIES.—The Senior Director is authorized to have primary responsibility for—

(A) recommending and, if adopted, promoting United States Government policies on preventing mass atrocities; and

(B) carrying out the duties described in subsection (b).

(d) Composition.—The Board shall be composed of—

(1) representatives from—

(A) the Department of State;

(B) the United States Agency for International Development;

(C) the Department of Defense;

(D) the Department of Justice;

(E) the Department of the Treasury;

(F) the Department of Homeland Security;

(G) the Central Intelligence Agency;

(H) the Office of the Director of National Intelligence;

(I) the United States Mission to the United Nations; and

(J) the Federal Bureau of Investigation; and

(2) such other individuals as the President may appoint.

(e) Coordination.—The Board is authorized to coordinate with relevant officials and government agencies responsible for foreign policy with respect to particular regions and countries to help provide a cohesive, whole of government response and policy direction to emerging and ongoing atrocities.

(f) Report.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a classified report, with an unclassified annex, which shall include—

(1) an update on the interagency review mandated by Presidential Study Directive 10 that includes—

(A) an evaluation of current mechanisms and capacities for government-wide detection, early warning, information-sharing, contingency planning, and coordination of efforts to prevent and respond to situations of genocide, mass atrocities, and other mass violence, including such mass gender- and ethnicity-based violence;

(B) an assessment of the funding spent by relevant Federal agencies on atrocity prevention activities;

(C) current annual global assessments of sources of conflict and instability;

(D) recommendations to further strengthen United States capabilities to improve the mechanisms described in subparagraph (A); and

(E) evaluations of the various approaches to enhancing capabilities and improving the mechanisms described in subparagraph (A);

(2) recommendations to ensure burden sharing by—

(A) improving international cooperation and coordination to enhance multilateral mechanisms for preventing genocide and atrocities, including improving the role of regional and international organizations in conflict prevention, mitigation, and response; and

(B) strengthening regional organizations; and

(3) the implementation status of the recommendations contained in the interagency review described in paragraph (1).

(g) Materials and briefings.—The Senior Director and the members of the Board shall brief the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives at least annually.

(h) Sunset.—This section shall cease to be effective on June 30, 2017.

SEC. 132. United States engagement in the indo-pacific.

(a) In general.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a comprehensive assessment to the Chairmen and Ranking Members of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives of the United States engagement in the Indo-Pacific, including with partners across the Indo-Pacific region.

(b) Elements.—The assessment submitted under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) a review of current and emerging United States diplomatic, national security, and economic interests and trends in the Indo-Pacific region;

(2) a review of resources devoted to United States diplomatic, economic, trade, development, and cultural engagement and plans in the Indo-Pacific region during the 10-year period ending on the date of the enactment of this Act;

(3) options for the realignment of United States engagement in the Indo-Pacific region to respond to new opportunities and challenges, including linking United States strategy more broadly across the Indo-Pacific region; and

(4) the views of noted policy leaders and regional experts, including leaders and experts in the Indo-Pacific region, on the opportunities and challenges to United States engagement across the Indo-Pacific region.

(c) Consultation.—The Secretary, as appropriate, shall consult with—

(1) other United States Government agencies; and

(2) independent, nongovernmental organizations with recognized credentials and expertise in foreign policy, national security, and international economic affairs that have access to policy experts throughout the United States and from the Indo-Pacific region.

SEC. 133. Joint action plan to combat prejudice and discrimination and to foster inclusion.

(a) In general.—The Secretary is authorized to enter into a bilateral joint action plan with the European Union to combat prejudice and discrimination and to foster inclusion (referred to in this section as the “Joint Action Plan”).

(b) Contents of joint action plan.—The Joint Action Plan shall—

(1) address anti-Semitism;

(2) address prejudice against, and the discriminatory treatment of, racial, ethnic, and religious minorities;

(3) promote equality of opportunity for access to quality education and economic opportunities; and

(4) promote equal treatment by the justice system.

(c) Cooperation.—In developing the Joint Action Plan, the Secretary shall—

(1) leverage interagency policy expertise in the United States and Europe;

(2) develop partnerships among civil society and private sector stakeholders; and

(3) draw upon the extensive work done by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe to address anti-Semitism.

(d) Initiatives.—The Joint Action Plan may include initiatives for promoting equality of opportunity and methods of eliminating prejudice and discrimination based on religion, race, or ethnicity, including—

(1) training programs;

(2) regional initiatives to promote equality of opportunity through the strengthening of democratic institutions;

(3) public-private partnerships with enterprises and nongovernmental organizations;

(4) exchanges of technical experts;

(5) scholarships and fellowships; and

(6) political empowerment and leadership initiatives.

(e) Deputy Assistant Secretary.—The Secretary shall task an existing Deputy Assistant Secretary with the responsibility for coordinating the implementation of the Joint Action Plan with his or her European Union counterpart.

(f) Legal effects.—Any Joint Action Plan adopted under this section—

(1) shall not be legally binding; and

(2) shall create no rights or obligations under international or United States law.

(g) Rules of construction.—Nothing in this section may be construed to authorize—

(1) the Secretary to enter into a legally binding agreement or Joint Action Plan with the European Union; or

(2) any additional appropriations for the purposes and initiatives described in this section.

(h) Progress report.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a progress report on the development of the Joint Action Plan to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 134. Report on developing country debt sustainability.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of Treasury, shall submit a report containing an assessment of the current external debt environment for developing countries and identifying particular near-term risks to debt sustainability to—

(1) the appropriate congressional committees;

(2) the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the Senate; and

(3) the Committee on Financial Services of the House of Representatives.

(b) Contents.—The report submitted under subsection (a) shall assess—

(1) the impact of new lending relationships, including the role of new creditors;

(2) the adequacy of current multilateral surveillance mechanisms in guarding against debt distress in developing countries;

(3) the ability of developing countries to borrow on global capital markets; and

(4) the interaction between debt sustainability objectives of the developing world and the development-oriented investment agenda of the G–20, including the impact of—

(A) current debt sustainability objectives on investment in developing countries; and

(B) investment objectives proposed by the G–20 on the ability to meet the goals of—

(i) the Heavily Indebted Poor Country Initiative; and

(ii) the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative.

SEC. 135. United States strategy to prevent and respond to gender-based violence globally.

(a) Global strategy requirement.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and biennially thereafter for 6 years, the Secretary of State shall develop or update a United States global strategy to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls. The strategy shall be transmitted to the appropriate congressional committees and made publicly available on the Internet.

(b) Initial strategy.—For the purposes of this section, the “United States Strategy to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence Globally”, issued in August 2012, shall be deemed to fulfill the initial requirement of subsection (a).

(c) Collaboration and coordination.—In developing the strategy under subsection (a), the Secretary of State shall consult with—

(1) the heads of relevant Federal agencies;

(2) the Senior Policy Operating Group on Trafficking in Persons; and

(3) representatives of civil society and multilateral organizations with demonstrated experience in addressing violence against women and girls or promoting gender equality internationally.

(d) Priority country selection.—To further the objectives of the strategy described in subsection (a), the Secretary shall identify no less than 4 eligible low-income and lower-middle income countries with significant levels of violence against women and girls, including within displaced communities, that have the governmental or nongovernmental organizational capacity to manage and implement gender-based violence prevention and response program activities and should, when possible, be geographically, ethnically, and culturally diverse from one another.

(e) Country plans.—In each country identified under subsection (d) the Secretary shall develop comprehensive, multisectoral, and holistic individual country plans designed to address and respond to violence against women and girls that include—

(1) an assessment and description of the current or potential capacity of the government of each identified country and civil society organizations in each such identified country to address and respond to violence against women and girls;

(2) an identification of coordination mechanisms with Federal agencies that—

(A) have existing programs relevant to the strategy;

(B) will be involved in new program activities; and

(C) are engaged in broader United States strategies around development;

(3) a description of the monitoring and evaluation mechanisms established for each identified country, and their intended use in assessing overall progress in prevention and response;

(4) a projection of the general levels of resources needed to achieve the stated objectives in each identified country, including an accounting of—

(A) activities and funding already expended by the Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, other Federal agencies, donor country governments, and multilateral institutions; and

(B) leveraged private sector resources; and

(5) strategies, as appropriate, designed to accommodate the needs of stateless, disabled, internally displaced, refugee, or religious or ethnic minority women and girls.

(f) Report on priority country selection and country plans.—Not more than 90 days after selection of the priority countries required under subsection (d), and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report detailing the priority country selection process, the development of specific country plans, and include an overview of all programming and specific activities being undertaken, the budget resources requested, and the specific activities to be supported by each Executive agency under the strategy if such resources are provided.

(g) Rule of construction.—Nothing in this section may be construed to authorize any additional appropriations for the purposes and initiatives of this section.

SEC. 136. International corruption and accountability.

(a) Annual report.—Not later than June 1 of each year, the Secretary, in consultation with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (referred to in this section as the “USAID Administrator”), the Secretary of Defense, and the heads of appropriate intelligence agencies, shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a Country Report on Corruption Practices, with a classified annex, which shall include information about countries for which a corruption analysis was conducted under subsection (b).

(b) Corruption analysis elements.—The corruption analysis conducted under this subsection should include, among other elements—

(1) an analysis of individuals and associations that comprise corruption networks in the country, including, as applicable—

(A) government officials;

(B) private sector actors;

(C) criminals; and

(D) members of illegal armed groups;

(2) the identification of the state functions that have been captured by corrupt networks in the country, including, as applicable functions of—

(A) the judicial branch;

(B) the taxing authority;

(C) the central bank; and

(D) specific military or police units;

(3) the identification of—

(A) the key economic activities, whether licit or illicit, which are dominated by members of the corrupt network; and

(B) other revenue streams that enrich such members; and

(4) the identification of enablers of corrupt practices, within the country and outside the country.

(c) Publication and briefings.—The Secretary shall—

(1) publish the Country Report on Corruption and Accountability submitted under subsection (a) on the website of the Department; and

(2) brief the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives on the information contained in the report published under paragraph (1).

SEC. 137. Quadrennial diplomacy and development review.

(a) Requirement.—

(1) QUADRENNIAL REVIEWS REQUIRED.—Under the direction of the President, the Secretary of State shall every 4 years, during a year following a year evenly divisible by 4, conduct a review of United States diplomacy and development (to be known as a “quadrennial diplomacy and development review”).

(2) SCOPE OF REVIEWS.—Each quadrennial diplomacy and development review shall be a comprehensive examination of the national diplomacy and development policy and strategic framework of the United States for the next 4-year period until a subsequent review is due under paragraph (1). The review shall include—

(A) recommendations regarding the long-term diplomacy and development policy and strategic framework of the United States;

(B) priorities of the United States for diplomacy and development; and

(C) guidance on the related programs, assets, capabilities, budget, policies, and authorities of the Department of State and United States Agency for International Development.

(3) CONSULTATION.—In conducting each quadrennial diplomacy and development review, after consultation with Department of State and United States Agency for International Development officials, the Secretary of State should consult with—

(A) the heads of other relevant Federal agencies, including the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Commerce, the Chief Executive Officer of the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and the Director of National Intelligence;

(B) any other Federal agency that provides foreign assistance, including at a minimum the Export-Import Bank of the United States and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation;

(C) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and, as appropriate, other members of Congress; and

(D) other relevant governmental and nongovernmental entities, including private sector representatives, academics, and other policy experts.

(b) Contents of review.—Each quadrennial diplomacy and development review shall—

(1) delineate, as appropriate, the national diplomacy and development policy and strategic framework of the United States, consistent with appropriate national, Department of State, and United States Agency for International Development strategies, strategic plans, and relevant presidential directives, including the national security strategy prescribed pursuant to section 108 of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 404a);

(2) outline and prioritize the full range of critical national diplomacy and development areas, capabilities, and resources, including those implemented across agencies, and address the full range of challenges confronting the United States in this regard;

(3) describe the interagency cooperation, and preparedness of relevant Federal assets, and the infrastructure, budget plan, and other elements of the diplomacy and development policies and programs of the United States required to execute successfully the full range of mission priorities outlined under paragraph (2);

(4) describe the roles of international organizations and multilateral institutions in advancing United States diplomatic and development objectives, including the mechanisms for coordinating and harmonizing development policies and programs with partner countries and among donors;

(5) identify the budget plan required to provide sufficient resources to successfully execute the full range of mission priorities outlined under paragraph (2);

(6) include an assessment of the organizational alignment of the Department of State and the United States Agency for International Development with the national diplomacy and development policy and strategic framework referred to in paragraph (1) and the diplomacy and development mission priorities outlined under paragraph (2);

(7) review and assess the effectiveness of the management mechanisms of the Department of State and the United States Agency for International Development for executing the strategic priorities outlined in the quadrennial diplomacy and development review, including the extent to which such effectiveness has been enhanced since the previous report; and

(8) the relationship between the requirements of the quadrennial diplomacy and development review and the acquisition strategy and expenditure plan within the Department of State and the United States Agency for International Development.

(c) Foreign affairs policy board review.—The Secretary of State should apprise the Foreign Affairs Policy Board on an ongoing basis of the work undertaken in the conduct of the quadrennial diplomacy and development review.

(d) Rule of construction.—Nothing in this section may be construed to authorize any additional appropriations for the purposes and initiatives under this section.

SEC. 138. Disappeared persons in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.

(a) Findings.—Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The United States—

(A) values governance, security, and the rule of law in Mexico and Central America; and

(B) has reemphasized its commitment to this region following the humanitarian crisis of unaccompanied children from these countries across the international border between the United States and Mexico in 2014.

(2) Individuals migrating from Central America to the United States face great peril during their journey. Many go missing along the way and are often never heard from again.

(b) Report of disappeared persons.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary, in close consultation with the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Agency, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the heads of other relevant Federal agencies, shall submit a report to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives that includes—

(1) the number of cases of enforced disappearances in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador;

(2) an assessment of causes for the disappearances described in paragraph (1);

(3) the primary individuals and groups responsible for such disappearances; and

(4) the official government response in those countries to account for such disappeared persons.

SEC. 139. Report on implementation by the Government of Bahrain of recommendations from the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry.

(a) In general.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit an unclassified report to the appropriate congressional committees that describes the implementation by the Government of Bahrain of the recommendations contained in the 2011 Report of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (referred to in this section as the “Bahrain Report”).

(b) Content.—The report required under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) a description of the specific steps taken by the Government of Bahrain to implement each of the 26 recommendations contained in the Bahrain Report;

(2) an assessment of whether the Government of Bahrain has “fully complied with”, “partially implemented”, or “not meaningfully implemented” each recommendation referred to in paragraph (1); and

(3) an assessment of the impact of the findings in the Bahrain Report for the United States security posture in the Arab Gulf and the area of responsibility of the United States Central Command.

SEC. 140. Report on United States humanitarian assistance to Haiti and whether recent elections in Haiti meet international election standards.

(a) Reauthorization.—Section 5(a) of the Assessing Progress in Haiti Act of 2014 (22 U.S.C. 2151 note) is amended by striking “December 31, 2017” and inserting “December 31, 2022”.

(b) Report.—Section 5(b) of the Assessing Progress in Haiti Act of 2014 (22 U.S.C. 2151 note) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (12), by striking “and” at the end;

(2) in paragraph (13), by striking the period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

“(14) a determination of whether recent Haitian elections are free, fair and responsive to the people of Haiti; and

“(15) a description of any attempts to disqualify candidates for political officers in Haiti for political reasons.”.

SEC. 141. Sense of Congress with respect to the imposition of additional sanctions against the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

(a) Findings.—Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (in this section referred to as the “DPRK”) tested nuclear weapons on 3 separate occasions, in October 2006, in May 2009, and in February 2013.

(2) Nuclear experts have reported that the DPRK may currently have as many as 20 nuclear warheads and has the potential to possess as many as 100 warheads within the next 5 years.

(3) According to the 2014 Department of Defense report, “Military and Security Developments Involving the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” (in this subsection referred to as the “2014 DoD report”), the DPRK has proliferated nuclear technology to Libya via the proliferation network of Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan.

(4) According to the 2014 DoD report, “North Korea also provided Syria with nuclear reactor technology until 2007.”.

(5) On September 6, 2007, as part of “Operation Orchard”, the Israeli Air Force destroyed the suspected nuclear facility in Syria.

(6) According to the 2014 DoD report, “North Korea has exported conventional and ballistic missile-related equipment, components, materials, and technical assistance to countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.”.

(7) On November 29, 1987, DPRK agents planted explosive devices onboard Korean Air flight 858, which killed all 115 passengers and crew on board.

(8) On March 26, 2010, the DPRK fired upon and sank the South Korean warship Cheonan, killing 46 of her crew.

(9) On November 23, 2010, the DPRK shelled South Korea’s Yeonpyeong Island, killing 4 South Korean citizens.

(10) On February 7, 2014, the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on human rights in DPRK (in this subsection referred to as the “Commission of Inquiry”) released a report detailing the atrocious human rights record of the DPRK.

(11) Dr. Michael Kirby, Chair of the Commission of Inquiry, stated on March 17, 2014, “The Commission of Inquiry has found systematic, widespread, and grave human rights violations occurring in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. It has also found a disturbing array of crimes against humanity. These crimes are committed against inmates of political and other prison camps; against starving populations; against religious believers; against persons who try to flee the country—including those forcibly repatriated by China.”.

(12) Dr. Michael Kirby also stated, “These crimes arise from policies established at the highest level of the State. They have been committed, and continue to take place in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, because the policies, institutions, and patterns of impunity that lie at their heart remain in place. The gravity, scale, duration, and nature of the unspeakable atrocities committed in the country reveal a totalitarian State that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world.”.

(13) The Commission of Inquiry also notes, “Since 1950, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has engaged in the systematic abduction, denial of repatriation, and subsequent enforced disappearance of persons from other countries on a large scale and as a matter of State policy. Well over 200,000 persons, including children, who were brought from other countries to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea may have become victims of enforced disappearance,” and states that the DPRK has failed to account or address this injustice in any way.

(14) According to reports and analysis from organizations such as the International Network for the Human Rights of North Korean Overseas Labor, the Korea Policy Research Center, NK Watch, the Asian Institute for Policy Studies, the Center for International and Strategic Studies, and the George W. Bush Institute, there may currently be as many as 100,000 North Korean overseas laborers in various nations around the world.

(15) Such forced North Korean laborers are often subjected to harsh working conditions under the direct supervision of DPRK officials, and their salaries contribute to anywhere from $150,000,000 to $230,000,000 a year to the DPRK state coffers.

(16) According to the Director of National Intelligence’s 2015 Worldwide Threat Assessment, “North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile programs pose a serious threat to the United States and to the security environment in East Asia.”.

(17) The Worldwide Threat Assessment states, “North Korea has also expanded the size and sophistication of its ballistic missile forces, ranging from close-range ballistic missiles to ICBMs, while continuing to conduct test launches. In 2014, North Korea launched an unprecedented number of ballistic missiles.”.

(18) On December 19, 2015, the Federal Bureau of Investigation declared that the DPRK was responsible for a cyberattack on Sony Pictures conducted on November 24, 2014.

(19) From 1988 to 2008, the DPRK was designated by the United States Government as a state sponsor of terrorism.

(20) The DPRK is currently in violation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1695 (2006), 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), and 2094 (2013).

(21) The DPRK repeatedly violated agreements with the United States and the other so-called Six-Party Talks partners (the Republic of Korea, Japan, the Russian Federation, and the People’s Republic of China) designed to halt its nuclear weapons program, while receiving significant concessions, including fuel, oil, and food aid.

(22) The Six-Party Talks have not been held since December 2008.

(23) On May 9, 2015, the DPRK claimed that it has test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine.

(b) Sense of Congress.—It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) the DPRK represents a serious threat to the national security of the United States and United States allies in East Asia and to international peace and stability, and grossly violates the human rights of its own people;

(2) the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury should impose additional sanctions against the DPRK, including targeting its financial assets around the world, specific designations relating to human rights abuses, and a redesignation of the DPRK as a state sponsor of terror; and

(3) the President should not resume the negotiations with the DPRK, either bilaterally or as part of the Six-Party Talks, without strict preconditions, including that the DPRK—

(A) adhere to its denuclearization commitments outlined in the 2005 Joint Statement of the Six-Party Talks;

(B) commit to halting its ballistic missile programs and its proliferation activities;

(C) cease military provocations; and

(D) measurably and significantly improve its human rights record.

SEC. 201. Rightsizing accountability.

(a) In general.—Not later than 60 days after receiving rightsizing recommendations pursuant to a review conducted by the Office of Management, Policy, Rightsizing, and Innovation relating to overseas staffing levels at United States overseas posts, the relevant chief of mission, in coordination with the relevant regional bureau, shall submit a response to the Office of Management, Policy, Rightsizing, and Innovation that describes—

(1) any rightsizing recommendations that are accepted by such chief of mission and regional bureau;

(2) a detailed schedule for implementation of any such recommendations;

(3) any recommendations that are rejected; and

(4) a detailed justification providing the basis for the rejection of any such recommendations.

(b) Annual report.—On the date on which the President’s annual budget request is submitted to Congress, the Secretary shall submit an annual report to the appropriate congressional committees that describes the status of all rightsizing recommendations and responses described in subsection (a) from the preceding 5 years, including—

(1) a list of all such rightsizing recommendations made, including whether each such recommendation was accepted or rejected by the relevant chief of mission and regional bureau;

(2) for each accepted recommendation, a detailed description of the current status of its implementation according to the schedule provided pursuant to subsection (a)(2), including an explanation for any departure from, or changes to, such schedule; and

(3) for any rejected recommendations, the justification provided pursuant to subsection (a)(4).

(c) Report on regional bureau staffing.—In conjunction with each report required under subsection (b), the Secretary shall submit a supplemental report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes—

(1) an enumeration of the domestic staff positions in each regional bureau of the Department;

(2) a detailed explanation of the extent to which the staffing of each regional bureau reflects the overseas requirements of the United States within each such region;

(3) a detailed plan, including an implementation schedule, for how the Department will seek to rectify any significant imbalances in staffing among regional bureaus or between any regional bureau and the overseas requirements of the United States within such region if the Secretary determines that such staffing does not reflect—

(A) the foreign policy priorities of the United States; or

(B) the effective conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States; and

(4) a detailed description of the implementation status of any plan provided pursuant to paragraph (3), including an explanation for any departure from, or changes to, the implementation schedule provided with such plan.

SEC. 202. Integration of foreign economic policy.

(a) In general.—The Secretary, in conjunction with the Under Secretary of Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment, shall establish—

(1) foreign economic policy priorities for each regional bureau, including for individual countries, as appropriate; and

(2) policies and guidance for integrating such foreign economic policy priorities throughout the Department.

(b) Deputy Assistant Secretary.—Within each regional bureau of the Department, the Secretary shall task an existing Deputy Assistant Secretary with appropriate training and background in economic and commercial affairs with the responsibility for economic matters and interests within the responsibilities of such regional bureau, including the integration of the foreign economic policy priorities established pursuant to subsection (a).

(c) Coordination.—The Deputy Assistant Secretary given the responsibility for economic matters and interests pursuant to subsection (b) within each bureau shall—

(1) at the direction of the relevant Assistant Secretary, review and report to the Assistant Secretary of such bureau on all economic matters and interests; and

(2) serve as liaison with the Office of the Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment.

SEC. 203. Review of Bureau of African Affairs and Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs jurisdictions.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall—

(1) conduct a review of the jurisdictional responsibility of the Bureau of African Affairs and that of the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs relating to the North African countries of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya; and

(2) submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes—

(A) the findings of the review conducted under paragraph (1); and

(B) recommendations on whether jurisdictional responsibility among the bureaus referred to in paragraph (1) should be adjusted.

(b) Review.—The review conducted under subsection (a)(1) shall—

(1) identify regional strategic priorities;

(2) assess regional dynamics between the North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa regions, including the degree to which the priorities identified pursuant to paragraph (1)—

(A) are distinct between each such region; or

(B) have similar application across such regions;

(3) identify current priorities and effectiveness of United States Government regional engagement in North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa, including through security assistance, economic assistance, humanitarian assistance, and trade;

(4) assess the degree to which such engagement is—

(A) inefficient, duplicative, or uncoordinated between the North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa regions; or

(B) otherwise harmed or limited as a result of the current division of jurisdictional responsibilities;

(5) assess the overall coherence and effectiveness of the current division of jurisdictional responsibilities in Africa between the Bureau of African Affairs and the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, including with regard to coordination with other United States departments or agencies; and

(6) assess any opportunities and costs of transferring jurisdictional responsibility of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya from the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs to the Bureau of African Affairs.

SEC. 204. Special envoys, representatives, advisors, and coordinators.

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on special envoys, representatives, advisors, and coordinators of the Department, which shall include—

(1) a tabulation of the current names, ranks, positions, and responsibilities of all special envoy, representative, advisor, and coordinator positions at the Department, with a separate accounting of all such positions at the level of Assistant Secretary (or equivalent) or above; and

(2) for each position identified pursuant to paragraph (1)—

(A) the date on which the position was created;

(B) the mechanism by which the position was created, including the authority under which the position was created;

(C) the positions authorized under section 1(d) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(d));

(D) a description of whether, and the extent to which, the responsibilities assigned to the position duplicate the responsibilities of other current officials within the Department, including other special envoys, representatives, and advisors;

(E) which current official within the Department would be assigned the responsibilities of the position in the absence of the position;

(F) to which current official within the Department the position directly reports;

(G) the total number of staff assigned to support the position; and

(H) with the exception of those created by statute, a detailed explanation of the necessity of the position to the effective conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States.

SEC. 205. Conflict prevention, mitigation and resolution, and the inclusion and participation of women.

Section 704 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4024) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(e) The Secretary, in conjunction with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, shall ensure that all appropriate personnel, responsible for, or deploying to, countries or regions considered to be at risk of, undergoing, or emerging from violent conflict, including special envoys, members of mediation or negotiation teams, relevant members of the civil service or foreign service, and contractors, obtain training, as appropriate, in the following areas, each of which shall include a focus on women and ensuring women’s meaningful inclusion and participation:

“(1) Conflict prevention, mitigation, and resolution.

“(2) Protecting civilians from violence, exploitation, and trafficking in persons.

“(3) International human rights law and international humanitarian law.”.

SEC. 206. Information technology system security.

(a) In general.—The Secretary shall regularly consult with the Director of the National Security Agency and any other departments or agencies the Secretary determines to be appropriate regarding the security of United States Government and nongovernment information technology systems and networks owned, operated, managed, or utilized by the Department, including any such systems or networks facilitating the use of sensitive or classified information.

(b) Consultation.—In performing the consultations required under subsection (a), the Secretary shall make all such systems and networks available to the Director of the National Security Agency and any other such departments or agencies to carry out such tests and procedures as are necessary to ensure adequate policies and protections are in place to prevent penetrations or compromises of such systems and networks, including by malicious intrusions by any unauthorized individual or state actor or other entity.

(c) Security breach reporting.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and every 180 days thereafter, the Secretary, in consultation with the Director of the National Security Agency and any other departments or agencies the Secretary determines to be appropriate, shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees and to the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives that describes in detail—

(1) all known or suspected penetrations or compromises of the systems or networks described in subsection (a) facilitating the use of classified information; and

(2) all known or suspected significant penetrations or compromises of any other such systems and networks that occurred since the submission of the prior report.

(d) Content.—Each report submitted under subsection (c) shall include—

(1) a description of the relevant information technology system or network penetrated or compromised;

(2) an assessment of the date and time such penetration or compromise occurred;

(3) an assessment of the duration for which such system or network was penetrated or compromised, including whether such penetration or compromise is ongoing;

(4) an assessment of the amount and sensitivity of information accessed and available to have been accessed by such penetration or compromise, including any such information contained on systems and networks owned, operated, managed, or utilized by any other department or agency of the United States Government;

(5) an assessment of whether such system or network was penetrated by a malicious intrusion, including an assessment of—

(A) the known or suspected perpetrators, including state actors; and

(B) the methods used to conduct such penetration or compromise; and

(6) a description of the actions the Department has taken, or plans to take, to prevent future, similar penetrations or compromises of such systems and networks.

SEC. 207. Analysis of embassy cost sharing.

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees and to the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives that assesses the cost-effectiveness and performance of the International Cooperative Administrative Support Services system (referred to in this section as the “ICASS system”), including by assessing—

(1) the general performance of the ICASS system in providing cost-effective, timely, efficient, appropriate, and reliable services that meet the needs of all departments and agencies served;

(2) the extent to which additional cost savings and greater performance can be achieved under the current ICASS system and rules;

(3) the standards applied in the selection of the ICASS provider and the extent to which such standards are consistently applied; and

(4) potential reforms to the ICASS system, including—

(A) the selection of more than 1 service provider under certain circumstances;

(B) options for all departments or agencies to opt out of ICASS entirely or to opt out of individual services, including by debundling service packages;

(C) increasing the reliance on locally employed staff or outsourcing to local firms, as appropriate; and

(D) other modifications to the current ICASS system and rules that would incentivize greater effectiveness and cost efficiency.

SEC. 208. Parent advisory committee to the Interagency Working Group to Prevent International Parental Child Abduction.

Section 433(b) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 241(b)) is amended to read as follows:

“(b) Interagency coordination.—

“(1) INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP.—The Secretary of State shall convene and chair an interagency working group to prevent international parental child abduction, which shall be composed of presidentially appointed, Senate confirmed, officials from—

“(A) the Department of State;

“(B) the Department of Homeland Security, including U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement; and

“(C) the Department of Justice, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

“(2) ADVISORY COMMITTEE.—The Secretary of State shall convene an advisory committee to the interagency working group established pursuant to paragraph (1), for the duration of the working group’s existence, which shall be composed of not less than 3 left-behind parents, serving for 2-year terms, who—

“(A) shall be selected by the Secretary; and

“(B) shall periodically consult with the interagency working group on all activities of the interagency working group, as appropriate.”.

SEC. 209. Improving research and evaluation of public diplomacy.

(a) In general.—The Secretary shall—

(1) conduct regular research and evaluation of public diplomacy programs and activities of the Department, including through the routine use of audience research, digital analytics, and impact evaluations, to plan and execute such programs and activities; and

(2) make the findings of the research and evaluations conducted under paragraph (1) available to Congress.

(b) Director of Research and Evaluation.—

(1) APPOINTMENT.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall appoint a Director of Research and Evaluation in the Office of Policy, Planning, and Resources for the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs.

(2) LIMITATION ON APPOINTMENT.—The appointment of a Director of Research and Evaluation pursuant to paragraph (1) shall not result in an increase in the overall full-time equivalent positions within the Department.

(3) RESPONSIBILITIES.—The Director of Research and Evaluation shall—

(A) coordinate and oversee the research and evaluation of public diplomacy programs of the Department—

(i) to improve public diplomacy strategies and tactics; and

(ii) to ensure that programs are increasing the knowledge, understanding, and trust of the United States by relevant target audiences;

(B) report to the Director of Policy and Planning;

(C) routinely organize and oversee audience research, digital analytics and impact evaluations across all public diplomacy bureaus and offices of the Department;

(D) support embassy public affairs sections;

(E) share appropriate public diplomacy research and evaluation information within the Department and with other Federal departments and agencies;

(F) regularly design and coordinate standardized research questions, methodologies, and procedures to ensure that public diplomacy activities across all public diplomacy bureaus and offices are designed to meet appropriate foreign policy objectives; and

(G) report quarterly to the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, through the Commission’s Subcommittee on Research and Evaluation established pursuant to subsection (e), regarding the research and evaluation of all public diplomacy bureaus and offices of the Department.

(4) GUIDANCE AND TRAINING.—Not later than 180 days after his or her appointment pursuant to paragraph (1), the Director of Research and Evaluation shall create guidance and training for all public diplomacy officers regarding the reading and interpretation of public diplomacy program evaluation findings to ensure that such findings and lessons learned are implemented in the planning and evaluation of all public diplomacy programs and activities throughout the Department.

(c) Prioritizing research and evaluation.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Director of Policy, Planning, and Resources shall ensure that research and evaluation, as coordinated and overseen by the Director of Research and Evaluation, supports strategic planning and resource allocation across all public diplomacy bureaus and offices of the Department.

(2) ALLOCATION OF RESOURCES.—Amounts allocated for the purposes of research and evaluation of public diplomacy programs and activities pursuant to subsection (a) shall be made available to be disbursed at the direction of the Director of Research and Evaluation among the research and evaluation staff across all public diplomacy bureaus and offices of the Department.

(3) SENSE OF CONGRESS.—It is the sense of Congress that the Department should allocate, for the purposes of research and evaluation of public diplomacy activities and programs pursuant to subsection (a)—

(A) 3 to 5 percent of program funds made available under the heading “educational and cultural exchange programs”; and

(B) 3 to 5 percent of program funds allocated for public diplomacy programs under the heading “diplomatic and consular programs”.

(d) Limited exemption.—The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) shall not apply to collections of information directed at foreign individuals conducted by, or on behalf of, the Department for the purpose of audience research and impact evaluations, in accordance with the requirements under this section and in connection with the Department’s activities conducted pursuant to the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act (22 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.) or the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2451 et seq.).

(e) Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.—

(1) SUBCOMMITTEE FOR RESEARCH AND EVALUATION.—The Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy shall establish a Subcommittee for Research and Evaluation to monitor and advise on the research and evaluation activities of the Department and the Broadcasting Board of Governors.

(2) REPORT.—The Subcommittee for Research and Evaluation established pursuant to paragraph (1) shall submit an annual report to Congress in conjunction with the Commission on Public Diplomacy’s Comprehensive Annual Report on the performance of the Department and the Broadcasting Board of Governors in carrying out research and evaluations of their respective public diplomacy programming.

(3) REAUTHORIZATION.—Section 1334 of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6553) is amended by striking “October 1, 2015” and inserting “October 1, 2020”.

(f) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) AUDIENCE RESEARCH.—The term “audience research” means research conducted at the outset of public diplomacy program or campaign planning and design on specific audience segments to understand the attitudes, interests, knowledge and behaviors of such audience segments.

(2) DIGITAL ANALYTICS.—The term “digital analytics” means the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, accumulated in digital format, to indicate the outputs and outcomes of a public diplomacy program or campaign.

(3) IMPACT EVALUATION.—The term “impact evaluation” means an assessment of the changes in the audience targeted by a public diplomacy program or campaign that can be attributed to such program or campaign.

SEC. 210. Enhanced institutional capacity of the Bureau of African Affairs.

(a) In general.—The Secretary shall strengthen the institutional capacity of the Bureau of African Affairs to oversee programs and engage in strategic planning and crisis management by—

(1) establishing an office within the Bureau of African Affairs that is separate and distinct from the regional affairs office specifically charged with overseeing strategy development and program implementation related to security assistance;

(2) planning to facilitate the long-term planning process; and

(3) developing a concrete plan to rightsize the Bureau of African Affairs not later than 180 days after the date enactment of this Act.

(b) Report.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that describes the actions that have been taken to carry out subsection (a).

(c) Authorization of appropriations.—Nothing in this section may be construed to authorize the appropriation of additional amounts to carry out this section, and the Secretary shall use existing resources to carry out the provisions of this section.

SEC. 211. Review of Foreign Service Officer compensation.

(a) Independent assessment.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall commission an independent assessment of Foreign Service Officer compensation to ensure that such compensation is achieving its purposes and the goals of the Department, including to recruit, retain, and maintain the world’s premier diplomatic corps.

(2) REPORT.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes—

(A) the results of the independent assessment commissioned pursuant to paragraph (1); and

(B) the views of the Secretary regarding Foreign Service Officer compensation.

(b) Content.—The report required under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) a list of all compensation received by Foreign Service Officers assigned domestically or overseas, including base salary and any other benefits, allowances, differentials, or other financial incentives;

(2) for each form of compensation described in paragraph (1)—

(A) an explanation of its stated purpose;

(B) a description of all relevant authorities, including statutory authority; and

(C) an assessment of the degree to which its historical and current use matches its stated purpose; and

(3) an assessment of the effectiveness of each form of compensation described in paragraph (1) in—

(A) achieving its stated purpose;

(B) achieving the recruiting and retention goals of the Department; and

(C) achieving the assignment placement needs of the Department.

SEC. 212. Repeal of recertification requirement for senior Foreign Service.

Section 305 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3945) is amended by striking subsection (d).

SEC. 213. Compensatory time off for travel.

Section 5550b of title 5, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(c) The maximum amount of compensatory time off that may be earned under this section may not exceed 104 hours during any leave year (as defined in section 630.201(b) of title 5, Code of Federal Regulations).”.

SEC. 214. Certificates of demonstrated competence.

Not later than 7 days after submitting the report required under section 304(a)(4) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3944(a)(4)) to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the President shall make the report available to the public, including by posting the on the website of the Department in a conspicuous manner and location.

SEC. 215. Foreign Service assignment restrictions.

(a) Appeal of assignment restriction.—The Secretary shall establish a right and process for employees to appeal any assignment restriction or preclusion.

(b) Certification.—Upon full implementation of a right and process for employees to appeal an assignment restriction or preclusion, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that—

(1) certifies that such appeals process has been fully implemented; and

(2) includes a detailed description of such process.

(c) Notice.—The Secretary shall—

(1) publish the right and process established pursuant to subsection (a) in the Foreign Affairs Manual; and

(2) include a reference to such publication in the report required under subsection (b).

(d) Prohibiting discrimination.—Section 502(a)(2) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3982(a)(2)) is amended to read as follows:

“(2) In making assignments under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall ensure that a member of the Service is not assigned to, or restricted from, a position at a post in a particular geographic area, or domestically in a position working on issues relating to a particular geographic area, exclusively on the basis of the race, ethnicity, or religion of that member.”.

SEC. 216. Security clearance suspensions.

(a) Suspension.—Section 610 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4010) is amended—

(1) by striking the section heading and inserting the following:

“SEC. 610. Separation for cause; suspension”; and

(2) by adding at the end the following:

“(c) (1) In order to promote the efficiency of the Service, the Secretary may suspend a member of the Service without pay when—

“(A) the member’s security clearance is suspended; or

“(B) there is reasonable cause to believe that the member has committed a crime for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed.

“(2) Any member of the Foreign Service for whom a suspension is proposed under this subsection shall be entitled to—

“(A) written notice stating the specific reasons for the proposed suspension;

“(B) a reasonable time to respond orally and in writing to the proposed suspension;

“(C) representation by an attorney or other representative; and

“(D) a final written decision, including the specific reasons for such decision, as soon as practicable.

“(3) Any member suspended under this subsection may file a grievance in accordance with the procedures applicable to grievances under chapter 11.

“(4) If a grievance is filed under paragraph (3)—

“(A) the review by the Foreign Service Grievance Board shall be limited to a determination of whether the provisions of paragraphs (1) and (2) have been fulfilled; and

“(B) the Board may not exercise the authority provided under section 1106(8).

“(5) In this subsection:

“(A) The term ‘reasonable time’ means—

“(i) with respect to a member of the Foreign Service assigned to duty in the United States, 15 days after receiving notice of the proposed suspension; and

“(ii) with respect to a member of the Foreign Service assigned to duty outside the United States, 30 days after receiving notice of the proposed suspension.

“(B) The terms ‘suspend’ and ‘suspension’ mean placing a member of the Foreign Service in a temporary status without duties and pay.”.

(b) Clerical amendment.—The table of contents in section 2 of such Act is amended by striking the item relating to section 610 and inserting the following:


“Sec. 610. Separation for cause; suspension.”.

SEC. 217. Economic statecraft education and training.

The Secretary shall establish curriculum at the Foreign Services Institute to develop the practical foreign economic policy expertise and skill sets of Foreign Service officers, including by making available distance-learning courses in commercial, economic, and business affairs, including in—

(1) the global business environment;

(2) the economics of development;

(3) development and infrastructure finance;

(4) current trade and investment agreements negotiations;

(5) implementing existing multilateral and World Trade Organization agreements, and United States trade and investment agreements;

(6) best practices for customs and export procedures; and

(7) market analysis and global supply chain management.

SEC. 218. Report on diversity recruitment, employment, retention, and promotion.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and quadrennially thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit a comprehensive report to Congress that—

(1) describes the efforts, consistent with existing law, including procedures, effects, and results of the Department since the period covered by the prior such report, to promote equal opportunity and inclusion for all American employees in direct hire and personal service contractors status, particularly employees of the Foreign Service, to include equal opportunity for all races, ethnicities, ages, genders, and service-disabled veterans, with a focus on traditionally underrepresented minority groups;

(2) includes a section on—

(A) the diversity of selection boards;

(B) the employment of minority and service-disabled veterans during the most recent 10-year period, including—

(i) the number hired through direct hires, internships, and fellowship programs;

(ii) the number promoted to senior positions, including FS–01, GS–15, Senior Executive Service, and Senior Foreign Service; and

(iii) attrition rates by grade, civil and foreign services, and the senior level ranks listed in clause (ii);

(C) mentorship and retention programs; and

(3) is organized in terms of real numbers and percentages at all levels.

(b) Contents.—Each report submitted under subsection (a) shall describe the efforts of the Department—

(1) to propagate fairness, impartiality, and inclusion in the work environment domestically and abroad;

(2) to eradicate harassment, intolerance, and discrimination;

(3) to refrain from engaging in unlawful discrimination in any phase of the employment process, including recruitment, hiring, evaluation, assignments, promotion, retention, and training;

(4) to eliminate illegal retaliation against employees for participating in a protected equal employment opportunity activity;

(5) to provide reasonable accommodation for qualified employees and applicants with disabilities;

(6) to resolve workplace conflicts, confrontations, and complaints in a prompt, impartial, constructive, and timely manner;

(7) to improve demographic data availability and analysis regarding recruitment, hiring, promotion, training, length in service, assignment restrictions, and pass-through programs;

(8) to recruit a diverse staff by—

(A) recruiting women, minorities, veterans, and undergraduate and graduate students;

(B) recruiting at historically Black colleges and universities, Hispanic serving institutions, women’s colleges, and colleges that typically serve majority minority populations;

(C) sponsoring and recruiting at job fairs in urban communities;

(D) placing job advertisements in newspapers, magazines, and job sites oriented toward women and people of color;

(E) providing opportunities through the Foreign Service Internship Program and other hiring initiatives; and

(F) recruiting mid- and senior-level professionals through programs such as—

(i) the International Career Advancement Program;

(ii) the Public Policy and International Affairs Fellowship Program;

(iii) the Institute for International Public Policy Fellowship Program;

(iv) Seminar XXI at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for International Studies; and

(v) other similar, highly respected, international leadership programs; and

(9) to provide opportunities through—

(A) the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Fellowship Program;

(B) the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program; and

(C) the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program.

(c) Scope of initial report.—The first report submitted to Congress under this section shall include the information described in subsection (b) for the 3 fiscal years immediately preceding the fiscal year in which the report is submitted.

SEC. 219. Expansion of the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program, the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program, and the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program.

(a) Additional fellowships authorized.—Beginning in fiscal year 2016, the Secretary shall—

(1) increase by 10 the number of fellows selected for the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program;

(2) increase by 10 the number of fellows selected for the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program; and

(3) increase by 5 the number of fellows selected for the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program.

(b) Payne fellowship program.—Undergraduate and graduate components of the Donald M. Payne International Development Fellowship Program are authorized to conduct outreach to attract outstanding students who represent diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds with an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career.

SEC. 220. Retention of mid- and senior-level professionals from underrepresented groups.

(a) In general.—The Secretary should provide attention and oversight to the employment, retention, and promotion of underrepresented groups to promote a diverse ethnic representation among mid- and senior-level career professionals through programs such as—

(1) the International Career Advancement Program;

(2) Seminar XXI at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for International Studies; and

(3) other highly respected international leadership programs.

(b) Review of past programs.—The Secretary should review past programs designed to increase minority representation in international affairs positions, including—

(1) the USAID Undergraduate Cooperative and Graduate Economics Program;

(2) the Public Policy and International Affairs Fellowship Program; and

(3) the Institute for International Public Policy Fellowship Program.

SEC. 221. Review of jurisdictional responsibilities of the Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan and the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs.

(a) Review.—The Secretary of State shall conduct a review of the jurisdictional responsibilities of the Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan (SRAP) and the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs (SCA).

(b) Report.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the findings of the review conducted under subsection (a), including recommendations on whether jurisdictional responsibility between the 2 offices should be adjusted.

SEC. 222. Congressional notification of countries compliance with minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

Section 110 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7107) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(g) Congressional notification.—Not later than 30 days before the anticipated submission of each annual report under subsection (b)(1), the Secretary of State shall notify and brief the appropriate congressional committees concerning the countries that will be upgraded to a higher tier or downgraded to a lower tier in such report.”.

SEC. 223. International religious freedom training program.

Section 708 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4028) is amended—

(1) by redesignating subsections (b) and (c) as subsections (d) and (e), respectively;

(2) in subsection (d), as redesignated, by inserting “Refugees” before “The Secretary of State”;

(3) in subsection (e), as redesignated, by inserting “Child soldiers” before “The Secretary of State”; and

(4) by striking subsection (a) and inserting the following:

“(a) Development of curriculum.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom appointed under section 101(b) of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6411(b)) shall develop a curriculum for Foreign Service Officers that includes training on—

“(A) the scope and strategic value of international religious freedom;

“(B) how violations of international religious freedom harm fundamental United States interests;

“(C) how the advancement of international religious freedom can advance such interests;

“(D) how United States international religious freedom policy should be carried out in practice by United States diplomats and other Foreign Service Officers; and

“(E) the relevance and relationship of international religious freedom to United States defense, diplomacy, development, and public affairs efforts to combat violent extremism.

“(2) ROLE OF OTHER OFFICIALS.—The Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom shall carry out paragraph (1)—

“(A) in coordination with the Director of the George P. Shultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center and other Federal officials, as appropriate; and

“(B) in consultation with the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom established under section 201(a) of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6431(a)).

“(3) RESOURCES.—The Secretary of State shall ensure the availability of sufficient resources to develop and implement the curriculum required under this subsection.

“(b) Religious freedom training.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than the date that is 1 year after the date of the enactment of the Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016, the Director of the George P. Shultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center shall begin training on religious freedom, using the curriculum developed under subsection (a), for Foreign Service officers, including—

“(A) entry level officers;

“(B) officers prior to departure for posting outside the United States; and

“(C) incoming deputy chiefs of mission and ambassadors.

“(2) ELEMENTS.—The training required under paragraph (1) shall be substantively incorporated into—

“(A) the A–100 course attended by Foreign Service Officers;

“(B) the specific country courses required of Foreign Service Officers prior to a posting outside the United States, with training tailored to—

“(i) the particular religious demography of such country;

“(ii) religious freedom conditions in such country;

“(iii) religious engagement strategies; and

“(iv) United States strategies for advancing religious freedom.

“(C) the courses required of incoming deputy chiefs of mission and ambassadors.

“(c) Information sharing.—The curriculum and training materials developed pursuant to subsections (a) and (b) shall be shared with the United States Armed Forces and all other Federal departments and agencies whose personnel serve as attachés, advisors, detailees, or otherwise in United States embassies globally to provide training on—

“(1) United States religious freedom policies;

“(2) religious traditions;

“(3) religious engagement strategies;

“(4) religious and cultural issues; and

“(5) efforts to combat terrorism and violent religious extremism.”.

SEC. 301. Reports concerning the United Nations.

(a) Report on anti-Semitic activity at the United Nations and its agencies.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that describes—

(1) all activities at the United Nations and its subagencies that can be construed to exhibit an anti-Semitic bias, including official statements, proposed resolutions, and United Nations investigations;

(2) the use of United Nations resources to promote anti-Semitic or anti-Israel rhetoric or propaganda, including publications, internet websites, and textbooks or other educational materials used to propagate political rhetoric regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; and

(3) specific actions taken by the United States Government to address any of the activities described in paragraphs (1) and (2).

(b) Report on all United States Government contributions to the United Nations.—Section 4(c) of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (22 U.S.C. 287b(c)) is amended—

(1) by redesignating paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4), and (5) as paragraphs (2), (3), (5), (6), and (7), respectively; and

(2) by inserting before paragraph (2), as so redesignated, the following:

“(1) CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—A detailed description of all assessed and voluntary contributions, including in-kind contributions, of the United States to the United Nations and to each of its affiliated agencies and related bodies—

“(i) during the preceding fiscal year;

“(ii) estimated for the fiscal year in which the report is submitted; and

“(iii) requested in the budget of the President submitted to Congress under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code, for the following fiscal year.

“(B) CONTENT.—The description required under subparagraph (A) shall, for each fiscal year specified in clauses (i), (ii), and (iii) of that subparagraph, include—

“(i) the total amount or value of all contributions described in that subparagraph;

“(ii) the approximate percentage of all such contributions by the United States compared to all contributions to the United Nations and to each of its affiliated agencies and related bodies from any source; and

“(iii) for each such contribution described in subparagraph (A)—

“(I) the amount or value of the contribution;

“(II) whether the contribution was assessed by the United Nations or voluntary;

“(III) the purpose of the contribution;

“(IV) the department or agency of the United States Government responsible for the contribution; and

“(V) whether the United Nations or an affiliated agency or related body received the contribution and, if an affiliated agency or related body received the contribution, which such agency or body.

“(C) PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION.—Not later than 14 days after submitting a report required under this subsection to the designated congressional committees, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall post a text-based, searchable version of the description required by subparagraph (A) on a publicly available Internet website of that Office.”.

SEC. 302. Annual report on financial contributions to international organizations.

Section 4(b) of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (22 U.S.C. 287b(b)) is amended by striking “in which the United States participates as a member” and inserting “, including—

“(1) the amount of such contributions that were assessed by an international organization and the amount of such contributions that were voluntary; and

“(2) the ratio of United States contributions to total contributions received for—

“(A) the United Nations, specialized agencies of the United Nations, and other United Nations funds, programs, and organizations;

“(B) peacekeeping;

“(C) inter-American organizations;

“(D) regional organizations; and

“(E) other international organizations.”.

SEC. 303. Report on peacekeeping arrears, credits, and contributions.

Section 4(c) of the United Nations Participation Act (22 U.S.C. 287b(c)), as amended by section 301(b), is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(6) PEACEKEEPING CREDITS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—A complete and full accounting of United States peacekeeping assessments and contributions for United Nations peacekeeping operations, including the following:

“(i) A tabulation of annual United Nations peacekeeping assessment rates, the peacekeeping contribution rate authorized by the United States, and the United States public law that authorized the contribution rate for the United Nations peacekeeping budget for each fiscal year beginning in fiscal year 1995 through the fiscal year following the date of the report.

“(ii) A tabulation of current United States accrued shortfalls and arrears in each respective ongoing or closed United Nations peacekeeping mission.

“(iii) A tabulation of all peacekeeping credits, including—

“(I) the total amount of peacekeeping credits determined by the United Nations to be available to the United States;

“(II) the total amount of peacekeeping credits determined by the United Nations to be unavailable to the United States;

“(III) the total amount of peacekeeping credits determined by the United Nations to be available to the United States from each open and closed peacekeeping mission;

“(IV) the total amount of peacekeeping credits determined by the United Nations to be unavailable to the United States from each open and closed peacekeeping mission;

“(V) the total amount of peacekeeping credits applied by the United Nations toward shortfalls from previous years that are apportioned to the United States;

“(VI) the total amount of peacekeeping credits applied by the United Nations toward offsetting future contributions of the United States; and

“(VII) the total amount of peacekeeping credits determined by the United Nations to be available to the United States that could be applied toward offsetting United States contributions in the following fiscal year.

“(iv) An explanation of any claim of unavailability by the United Nations of any peacekeeping credits described in clause (iii)(IV).

“(v) A description of any efforts by the United States to obtain reimbursement in accordance with the requirements of this Act, including Department of Defense materiel and services, and an explanation of any failure to obtain any such reimbursement.

“(B) PEACEKEEPING CREDITS DEFINED.—In this paragraph, the term ‘peacekeeping credits’ means the amounts by which, during a United Nations peacekeeping fiscal year, the contributions of the United States to the United Nations for peacekeeping operations exceed the actual expenditures for peacekeeping operations by the United Nations that are apportioned to the United States.”.

SEC. 304. Assessment rate transparency.

(a) Report.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 30 days after each time the United Nations General Assembly modifies the assessment levels for peacekeeping operations, the Secretary shall submit a report, which may include a classified annex, to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

(2) CONTENTS.—Each report submitted under paragraph (1) shall describe—

(A) the change, by amount and percentage, of the peacekeeping assessment charged to each member state; and

(B) how the economic and strategic interests of each of the permanent members of the Security Council is being served by each peacekeeping mission currently in force.

(b) Availability of peacekeeping assessment data.—The Secretary shall direct the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the United Nations to urge the United Nations—

(1) to share the raw data used to calculate member state peacekeeping assessment rates; and

(2) to make available the formula for determining peacekeeping assessments.

SEC. 311. Preventing abuse in peacekeeping.

Not later than 15 days before the anticipated date of a vote (or, in the case of exigent circumstances, as far in advance of the vote as is practicable) on a resolution approving a new peacekeeping mission under the auspices of the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or any other multilateral organization in which the United States participates, or to reauthorize an existing such mission, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on that mission that includes the following:

(1) A description of the specific measures taken and planned to be taken by the organization related to the mission—

(A) to prevent individuals who are employees or contractor personnel of the organization, or members of the forces serving in the mission from engaging in acts of trafficking in persons, exploitation of victims of trafficking, or sexual exploitation or abuse; and

(B) to hold accountable any such individuals who engage in any such acts while participating in the mission.

(2) An assessment of the effectiveness of each of the measures described in paragraph (1).

(3) An accounting and assessment of all cases in which the organization has taken action to investigate allegations that individuals described in paragraph (1)(A) have engaged in acts described in that paragraph, including a description of the status of all such cases as of the date of the report.

SEC. 312. Inclusion of peacekeeping abuses in country report on human rights practices.

Section 116(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d)) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (11)(C), by striking “; and” and inserting a semicolon;

(2) in paragraph (12)(C)(ii), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; and”; and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

“(13) for each country that contributes personnel to United Nations peacekeeping missions, a description of—

“(A) any allegations of such personnel engaging in acts of trafficking in persons, exploitation of victims of trafficking, or sexual exploitation and abuse while participating in such a peacekeeping mission;

“(B) any repatriations of such personnel resulting from an allegation described in subparagraph (A);

“(C) any actions taken by such country with respect to personnel repatriated as a result of allegations described in subparagraph (A), including whether such personnel faced prosecution related to such allegations; and

“(D) the extent to which any actions taken as described in subparagraph (C) have been communicated by such country to the United Nations.”.

SEC. 313. Evaluation of United Nations peacekeeping missions.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes—

(1) a comprehensive evaluation of current United Nations peacekeeping missions;

(2) a prioritization of the peacekeeping missions;

(3) plans for phasing out and ending any mission that—

(A) has substantially met its objectives and goals; or

(B) will not be able to meet its objectives and goals; and

(4) a plan for reviewing the status of open-ended mandates for—

(A) the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK);

(B) the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO); and

(C) the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP).

(b) Approval of future peacekeeping missions.—The President shall direct the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the United Nations to ensure that no new United Nations peacekeeping mission is approved without a periodic mandate renewal.

(c) Funding limitation.—The United States shall not provide funding for any United Nations peacekeeping mission beginning after the date of the enactment of this Act unless the mission has a periodic mandate renewal.

SEC. 321. Encouraging employment of United States citizens at the United Nations.

Section 181 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 276c–4) is amended to read as follows:

“SEC. 181. Employment of United States citizens by certain international organizations.

“Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of the Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to Congress a report that provides—

“(1) for each international organization that had a geographic distribution formula in effect on January 1, 1991, an assessment of whether that organization—

“(A) is taking good faith steps to increase the staffing of United States citizens, including, as appropriate, as assessment of any additional steps the organization could be taking to increase such staffing; and

“(B) has met the requirements of its geographic distribution formula; and

“(2) an assessment of United States representation among professional and senior-level positions at the United Nations, including—

“(A) an assessment of the proportion of United States citizens employed at the United Nations Secretariat and at all United Nations specialized agencies, funds, and programs relative to the total employment at the United Nations Secretariat and at all such agencies, funds, and programs;

“(B) as assessment of compliance by the United Nations Secretariat and such agencies, funds, and programs with any applicable geographic distribution formula; and

“(C) a description of any steps taken or planned to be taken by the United States to increase the staffing of United States citizens at the United Nations Secretariat and such agencies, funds and programs.”.

SEC. 322. Ensuring appropriate United Nations personnel salaries.

(a) Compensation of United Nations personnel.—The President shall direct the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States at the United Nations—

(1) to establish appropriate policies, procedures, and assumptions for—

(A) determining comparable positions between officials in the professional and higher categories of employment at the United Nations headquarters in New York, New York, and in the United States Federal civil service;

(B) calculating the margin between the compensation of such officials at the United Nations headquarters and the civil service; and

(C) determining the appropriate margin for adoption by the United Nations to govern compensation for such officials;

(2) to make all policies, procedures, and assumptions described in paragraph (1) available to the public; and

(3) to limit increases in the compensation of United Nations officials to ensure that such officials remain within the margin range established by United Nations General Assembly Resolution A/RES/40/244, or any subsequent margin range adopted by the United Nations to govern compensation for United Nations officials.

(b) Report on salary margins.—The Secretary shall submit an annual report to the appropriate congressional committees, at the time of the submission of the budget of the President to Congress under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code, that

(1) describes the policies, procedures, and assumptions established or used by the United Nations—

(A) to determine comparable positions between officials in the professional and higher categories of employment at the United Nations headquarters in New York, New York, and in the United States Federal civil service;

(B) to calculate the percentage difference, or margin, between the compensation of such officials at the United Nations headquarters and the civil service; and

(C) to determine the margin range established in United Nations General Assembly Resolution A/RES/40/244, or any subsequent margin range adopted by the United Nations to govern compensation for United Nations officials;

(2) assesses, in accordance with the policies, procedures, and assumptions described in paragraph (1), the margin between net salaries of officials in the professional and higher categories of employment at the United Nations in New York and those of comparable positions in the United States Federal civil service;

(3) assesses any changes in the margin described in paragraph (2) from the previous year;

(4) assesses the extent to which any changes in that margin resulted from modifications to the policies, procedures, and assumptions described in paragraph (1); and

(5) provides the views of the Secretary on any changes in that margin and any such modifications.

SEC. 401. Visa ineligibility for international child abductors.

Section 212(a)(10)(C)(iii) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(10)(C)(iii)) is amended—

(1) in subclause (I), by adding “or” at the end;

(2) in subclause (II), by striking “; or” at the end and inserting a period; and

(3) by striking subclause (III).

SEC. 402. Presumption of immigrant intent for H and L visa classifications.

Section 214(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1184(b)) is amended—

(1) by striking “(other than a nonimmigrant described in subparagraph (L) or (V) of section 101(a)(15), and other than a nonimmigrant described in any provision of section 101(a)(15)(H)(i) except subclause (b1) of such section)”;

(2) by striking “under section 101(a)(15).” and inserting “under the immigration laws.”; and

(3) by striking “he” each place such term appears and inserting “the alien”.

SEC. 403. Visa information sharing.

Section 222(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1202(f)(2)) is amended—

(1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking “issuance or refusal” and inserting “issuance, refusal, or revocation”; and

(2) in paragraph (2)—

(A) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking “and on the basis of reciprocity”;

(B) in subparagraph (A), by striking “illicit weapons; or” and inserting “illicit weapons, or in determining the removability or eligibility for a visa, admission, or another immigration benefit of persons who would be inadmissible to, or removable from, the United States;”;

(C) in subparagraph (B)—

(i) by striking “for the purposes” and inserting “for 1 of the purposes”; and

(ii) by striking “or to deny visas to persons who would be inadmissible to the United States.” and inserting “; or”; and

(D) by adding at the end the following:

“(C) with regard to any or all aliens in the database, specified data elements from each record, if the Secretary of State determines that it is in the national interest to provide such information to a foreign government.”.

SEC. 501. Worldwide security protection.

(a) In general.—Funds made available in fiscal year 2016 for worldwide security protection shall to the extent practicable, before any such funds may be allocated to any other authorized purpose, be allocated for—

(1) immediate threat mitigation support in accordance with subsection (b) at facilities determined to be high threat, high risk pursuant to section 531;

(2) immediate threat mitigation support in accordance with subsection (b) at other facilities; and

(3) locations with high vulnerabilities.

(b) Immediate threat mitigation support prioritization.—In allocating funding for immediate threat mitigation support pursuant to this section, the Secretary shall prioritize funding for—

(1) the purchasing of additional security equipment, including additional defensive weaponry;

(2) the paying of expenses of additional security forces; and

(3) any other purposes necessary to mitigate immediate threats to United States personnel serving overseas.

SEC. 502. Embassy security, construction and maintenance.

(a) In general.—Funds made available in fiscal year 2016 for Worldwide Security Upgrades within “embassy security, construction and maintenance” shall to the extent practicable, before any funds may be allocated to any other authorized purpose, be allocated in the prioritized order of—

(1) immediate threat mitigation projects in accordance with subsection (b) at facilities determined to be high threat, high risk pursuant to section 531;

(2) other security upgrades to facilities determined to be high threat, high risk pursuant to section 531;

(3) all other immediate threat mitigation projects in accordance with subsection (b); and

(4) security upgrades to all other facilities or new construction for facilities determined to be high threat, high risk pursuant to section 531.

(b) Immediate threat mitigation projects prioritization.—In allocating funding for immediate threat mitigation projects pursuant to this section, the Secretary shall prioritize funding for the construction of safeguards that provide immediate security benefits and any other purposes necessary to mitigate immediate threats to United States personnel serving overseas.

(c) Additional limitation.—No funds authorized to be appropriated shall be obligated for new embassy construction, other than for high threat, high risk facilities, unless the Secretary certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that—

(1) the Department has fully complied with the requirements of subsection (a);

(2) high threat, high risk facilities are being secured to the best of the United States Government’s ability; and

(3) the Secretary will make funds available from the Embassy Security, Construction and Maintenance account or other sources to address any changed security threats or new or emergent security needs, including new immediate threat mitigation projects.

(d) Report.—The Secretary shall report to the appropriate congressional committees not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act on—

(1) funding for the priorities described in subsection (a);

(2) efforts to secure high threat, high risk facilities as well as high vulnerability locations facilities; and

(3) plans to make funds available from the Embassy Security, Construction and Maintenance account or other sources to address any changed security threats or new or emergent security needs, including new immediate threat mitigation projects.

SEC. 511. Local guard contracts abroad under diplomatic security program.

(a) In general.—Section 136(c)(3) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (22 U.S.C. 4864(c)(3)) is amended to read as follows:

“(3) in evaluating proposals for such contracts, award contracts to technically acceptable firms offering the lowest evaluated price, except that—

“(A) the Secretary may award contracts on the basis of best value (as determined by a cost-technical tradeoff analysis), especially for posts determined to be high threat, high risk pursuant to section 531 of the Department of State Operations Authorization and Embassy Security Act, Fiscal Year 2016; and

“(B) proposals received from United States persons and qualified United States joint venture persons shall be evaluated by reducing the bid price by 10 percent;”.

(b) Report.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives that includes—

(1) an explanation of the implementation of section 136(c)(3) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991, as amended by subsection (a); and

(2) for each instance in which a contract is awarded pursuant to subparagraph (A) of such section, a written justification and approval that describes the basis for such award and an explanation of the inability of the Secretary to satisfy the needs of the Department by awarding a contract to the technically acceptable firm offering the lowest evaluated price.

SEC. 512. Disciplinary action resulting from unsatisfactory leadership in relation to a security incident.

Section 304(c) of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4834 (c)) is amended—

(1) by redesignating paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) as subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), respectively, and moving such subparagraphs, as so redesignated, 2 ems to the right;

(2) by striking “Whenever” in the first sentence immediately following the subsection heading and inserting the following:

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Whenever”; and

(3) by inserting at the end the following:

“(2) CERTAIN SECURITY INCIDENTS.—

“(A) UNSATISFACTORY LEADERSHIP.—Unsatisfactory leadership by a senior official with respect to a security incident involving loss of life, serious injury, or significant destruction of property at or related to a United States Government mission abroad may be grounds for disciplinary action.

“(B) DISCIPLINARY ACTION.—If a Board finds reasonable cause to believe that a senior official provided such unsatisfactory leadership, the Board may recommend disciplinary action subject to the procedures in paragraph (1).”.

SEC. 513. Management and staff accountability.

(a) Authority of Secretary of State.—Nothing in this Act or in any other provision of law may be construed to prevent the Secretary from using all authorities invested in the office of Secretary to take personnel action against any employee or official of the Department that the Secretary determines has breached the duty of that individual or has engaged in misconduct or unsatisfactorily performed the duties of employment of that individual, and such misconduct or unsatisfactory performance has significantly contributed to the serious injury, loss of life, or significant destruction of property, or a serious breach of security, even if such action is the subject of an Accountability Review Board's examination under section 304(a) of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4834(a)).

(b) Accountability.—Section 304 of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4834) is amended—

(1) in subsection (c), by inserting “or has engaged in misconduct or unsatisfactorily performed the duties of employment of that individual, and such misconduct or unsatisfactory performance has significantly contributed to the serious injury, loss of life, or significant destruction of property, or the serious breach of security that is the subject of the Board's examination as described in subsection (a),” after “breached the duty of that individual”;

(2) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (e); and

(3) by inserting after subsection (c) the following:

“(d) Management accountability.—Whenever a Board determines that an individual has engaged in any conduct described in subsection (c), the Board shall evaluate the level and effectiveness of management and oversight conducted by employees or officials in the management chain of such individual.”.

SEC. 514. Security enhancements for soft targets.

Section 29 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2701) is amended, in the third sentence, by inserting “physical security enhancements and” after “Such assistance may include”.

SEC. 521. Additional reports on expansion and enhancement of Marine Corps Security Guard Program.

Section 1269(a)(2) of the Carl Levin and Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113–291; 10 U.S.C. 5983 note) is amended by inserting “and not less frequently than once each year thereafter until the date that is three years after such date” after “of this Act”.

SEC. 531. Designation and reporting for high threat, high risk posts.

(a) Report required.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the Secretary, in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence and the Secretary of Defense, shall submit, to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives, a classified report, with an unclassified summary, evaluating Department facilities that the Secretary determines to be high threat, high risk in accordance with subsection (c).

(b) Contents.—For each facility determined to be high threat, high risk pursuant to subsection (a), the report submitted under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) a narrative assessment describing the security threats and risks facing posts overseas and the overall threat level to United States personnel under chief of mission authority;

(2) the number of diplomatic security personnel, Marine Corps security guards, and other Department personnel dedicated to providing security for United States personnel, information, and facilities;

(3) an assessment of host nation willingness and capability to provide protection in the event of a security threat or incident, pursuant to the obligations of the United States under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, done at Vienna April 24, 1963, and the 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, done at Vienna April 18, 1961;

(4) an assessment of the quality and experience level of the team of United States senior security personnel assigned to the facility, considering collectively the assignment durations and lengths of government experience;

(5) the number of Foreign Service Officers who have received Foreign Affairs Counter Threat training;

(6) a summary of the requests made during the previous calendar year for additional resources, equipment, or personnel related to the security of the facility and the status of such requests;

(7) an assessment of the ability of United States personnel to respond to and survive a fire attack, including—

(A) whether the facility has adequate fire safety and security equipment for safe havens and safe areas; and

(B) whether the employees working at the facility have been adequately trained on the equipment available;

(8) if it is a new facility, a detailed description of the steps taken to provide security for the new facility, including whether a dedicated support cell was established in the Department to ensure proper and timely resourcing of security; and

(9) a listing of any high threat, high risk facilities where the facilities of the Department and other government agencies are not collocated, including—

(A) a rationale for the lack of collocation; and

(B) a description of what steps, if any, are being taken to mitigate potential security vulnerabilities associated with the lack of collocation.

(c) Determination of high threat, high risk facility.—In determining which facilities of the Department constitute high threat, high risk facilities under this section, the Secretary shall take into account with respect to each facility whether there are—

(1) high to critical levels of political violence or terrorism;

(2) national or local governments with inadequate capacity or political will to provide appropriate protection; and

(3) in locations where there are high to critical levels of political violence or terrorism or where national or local governments lack the capacity or political will to provide appropriate protection—

(A) mission physical security platforms that fall well below the Department's established standards; or

(B) security personnel levels that are insufficient for the circumstances.

(d) Inspector General review and report.—The Inspector General for the Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors shall annually—

(1) review the determinations of the Secretary with respect to high threat, high risk facilities, including the basis for making such determinations;

(2) review contingency planning for high threat, high risk facilities and evaluate the measures in place to respond to attacks on such facilities;

(3) review the risk mitigation measures in place at high threat, high risk facilities to determine how the Secretary evaluates risk and whether the measures put in place sufficiently address the relevant risks;

(4) review early warning systems in place at high threat, high risk facilities and evaluate the measures being taken to preempt and disrupt threats to such facilities; and

(5) provide to the appropriate congressional committees—

(A) an assessment of the determinations of the Secretary with respect to high threat, high risk facilities, including recommendations for additions or changes to the list of such facilities; and

(B) a report on the reviews and evaluations undertaken pursuant to paragraphs (1) through (4).

SEC. 532. Designation and reporting for high-risk counterintelligence threat posts.

(a) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) APPROPRIATE COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS.—The term “appropriate committees of Congress” means—

(A) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;

(B) the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate;

(C) the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate;

(D) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;

(E) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives;

(F) the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives;

(G) the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives; and

(H) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives

(2) PRIORITY 1 COUNTERINTELLIGENCE THREAT NATION.—The term “Priority 1 Counterintelligence Threat Nation” means a country designated as such by the October 2012 National Intelligence Priorities Framework (NIPF).

(b) Report required.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in conjunction with appropriate officials in the intelligence community and the Secretary of Defense, shall submit a report to the appropriate committees of Congress that assesses the counterintelligence threat to United States diplomatic facilities in Priority 1 Counterintelligence Threat Nations.

(2) CONTENTS.—The report required under paragraph (1) shall include—

(A) an assessment of the use of locally employed staff and guard forces and a listing of diplomatic facilities in Priority 1 Counterintelligence Threat Nations without controlled access areas; and

(B) recommendations for mitigating any counterintelligence threats and for any necessary facility upgrades, including costs assessment of any recommended mitigation or upgrades.

SEC. 533. Enhanced qualifications for Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for high threat, high risk posts.

The Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 is amended by inserting after section 206 (22 U.S.C. 4824) the following new section:

“SEC. 207. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for High Threat, High Risk Posts.

“The individual serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for High Threat, High Risk Posts shall have 1 or more of the following qualifications:

“(1) Service during the last 6 years at 1 or more posts designated as high threat, high risk by the Secretary of State at the time of service.

“(2) Previous service as the office director or deputy director of 1 or more of the following Department of State offices or successor entities carrying out substantively equivalent functions:

“(A) The Office of Mobile Security Deployments.

“(B) The Office of Special Programs and Coordination.

“(C) The Office of Overseas Protective Operations.

“(D) The Office of Physical Security Programs.

“(E) The Office of Intelligence and Threat Analysis.

“(3) Previous service as the Regional Security Officer at two or more overseas posts.

“(4) Other government or private sector experience substantially equivalent to service in the positions listed in paragraphs (1) through (3).”.

SEC. 534. Security environment threat list briefings.

(a) In general.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and upon each subsequent update of the Security Environment Threat List (SETL), the Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security shall provide classified briefings to the appropriate congressional committees on the Security Environment Threat List.

(b) Content.—The briefings required under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) an overview of the Security Environment Threat List; and

(2) a summary assessment of the security posture of those facilities where the Security Environment Threat List assesses the threat environment to be most acute, including factors that informed such assessment.

SEC. 535. Comptroller General of the United States report on implementation of Benghazi Accountability Review Board recommendations.

(a) In general.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit a report to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives that describes the progress of the Secretary in implementing the recommendations of the Benghazi Accountability Review Board.

(b) Content.—The report required under subsection (a) shall include—

(1) an assessment of the progress the Secretary has made in implementing each specific recommendation of the Accountability Review Board; and

(2) a description of any impediments to recommended reforms, such as budget constraints, bureaucratic obstacles within the Department or in the broader interagency community, or limitations under current law.

(c) Form.—The report required under subsection (a) shall be submitted in unclassified form but may contain a classified annex.

SEC. 536. Foreign Affairs Security Training Center.

(a) Office of Management and Budget.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall provide to the appropriate congressional committees all documents and materials related to its consideration and analysis concerning the Foreign Affairs Security Training Center at Fort Picket, Virginia, and any alternative facilities.

(b) Department of State.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall provide to the appropriate congressional committees all documents and materials related to the determination to construct a new Foreign Affairs Security Training Center at Fort Picket, Virginia, including any that are related to the development and adoption of all related training requirements, including any documents and materials related to the consideration and analysis of such facility performed by the Office of Management and Budget.

SEC. 537. Language training.

(a) In general.—Title IV of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4851 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“SEC. 416. Language requirements for diplomatic security personnel assigned to high threat, high risk posts.

“(a) In general.—Diplomatic security personnel assigned permanently to, or who are serving in, long-term temporary duty status as designated by the Secretary of State at a high threat, high risk post should receive language training described in subsection (b) in order to prepare such personnel for duty requirements at such post.

“(b) Language training described.—Language training referred to in subsection (a) should prepare personnel described in such subsection—

“(1) to speak the language at issue with sufficient structural accuracy and vocabulary to participate effectively in most formal and informal conversations on subjects germane to security; and

“(2) to read within an adequate range of speed and with almost complete comprehension on subjects germane to security.

“(c) Inspector general review.—Not later than September 30, 2016, the Inspector General of the Department of State and Broadcasting Board of Governors shall—

“(1) review the language training conducted pursuant to this section; and

“(2) make the results of such review available to the Secretary of State and the appropriate congressional committees.”.

(b) Clerical amendment.—The table of contents of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (Public Law 99–399) is amended by inserting after the item relating the section 415 the following:


“Sec. 416. Language requirements for diplomatic security personnel assigned to high threat, high risk posts.”.

SEC. 541. Provision of copies of accountability review board reports to Congress.

Not later than 2 days after an Accountability Review Board provides its report to the Secretary of State in accordance with title III of the Omnibus Diplomatic and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (22 U.S.C. 4831 et seq.), the Secretary shall provide copies of the report to the majority leader of the Senate, the minority leader of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the majority leader of the House of Representatives, and the minority leader of the House of Representatives, and to the appropriate congressional committees for retention and review by those committees.

SEC. 542. Staffing.

Section 302(b)(2) of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4832(b)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the following: “Such persons shall be drawn from bureaus or other agency subunits that are not impacted by the incident that is the subject of the Board’s review.”.

SEC. 601. Short title.

This title may be cited at the “Improving Department of State Oversight Act of 2015”.

SEC. 602. Competitive hiring status for former employees of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any employee of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction who completes at least 12 months of service at any time prior to the date of the termination of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (October 5, 2013), and was not terminated for cause shall acquire competitive status for appointment to any position in the competitive service for which the employee possesses the required qualifications.

SEC. 603. Assurance of independence of IT systems.

The Secretary, with the concurrence of the Inspector General of the Department of State and Broadcasting Board of Governors, shall certify to the appropriate congressional committees that the Department has made reasonable efforts to ensure the integrity and independence of the Office of the Inspector General Information Technology systems.

SEC. 604. Protecting the integrity of internal investigations.

Section 209(c)(5) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3929(c)(5)) is amended by inserting at the end the following new subparagraph:

“(C) REQUIRED REPORTING OF ALLEGATIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS AND INSPECTOR GENERAL AUTHORITY.—

“(i) IN GENERAL.—Each bureau, post or other office (in this subparagraph, an ‘entity’) of the Department of State shall, within five business days, report to the Inspector General any allegations of—

“(I) waste, fraud, or abuse in a Department program or operation;

“(II) criminal or serious misconduct on the part of a Department employee at the FS–1, GS–15, GM–15 level or higher;

“(III) criminal misconduct on the part of any Department employee; and

“(IV) serious, noncriminal misconduct on the part of any individual who is authorized to carry a weapon, make arrests, or conduct searches, such as conduct that, if proved, would constitute perjury or material dishonesty, warrant suspension as discipline for a first offense, or result in loss of law enforcement authority.

“(ii) INSPECTOR GENERAL AUTHORITY.—The Inspector General may, pursuant to existing authority, investigate matters covered by clause (i).

“(iii) LIMITATION ON INVESTIGATIONS OUTSIDE OF OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL.—No entity in the Department of State with concurrent jurisdiction over matters covered by clause (i), including the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, may initiate an investigation of such matter unless it has first reported the allegations to the Inspector General as required by clause (i), except as provided in clause (v) and (vi).

“(iv) COOPERATION.—If an entity in the Department of State initiates an investigation of a matter covered in clause (i) the entity must, except as provided in clause (v), fully cooperate with the Inspector General, including—

“(I) by providing to the Inspector General all data and records obtained in connection with its investigation upon request of the Inspector General;

“(II) by coordinating, at the request of the Inspector General, such entity’s investigation with the Inspector General; and

“(III) by providing to the Inspector General requested support in aid of the Inspector General’s oversight and investigative responsibilities.

“(v) EXCEPTIONS.—The Inspector General may prescribe general rules under which any requirement of clause (iii) or clause (iv) may be dispensed with.

“(vi) EXIGENT CIRCUMSTANCES.—Compliance with clauses (i), (iii), and (iv) of this subparagraph may be dispensed with by an entity of the Department of State if complying with them in an exigent circumstance would pose an imminent threat to human life, health or safety, or result in the irretrievable loss or destruction of critical evidence or witness testimony, in which case a report of the allegation shall be made not later than 48 hours after an entity begins an investigation under the authority of this clause and cooperation required under clause (iv) shall commence not later than 48 hours after the relevant exigent circumstance has ended.

“(vii) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.—Nothing in this subparagraph may be interpreted to affect any duty or authority of the Inspector General under any provision of law, including the Inspector General’s duties or authorities under the Inspector General Act.”.

SEC. 605. Report on Inspector General inspection and auditing of Foreign Service posts and bureaus and operating units Department of State.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to Congress on the requirement under section 209(a)(1) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3929(a)(1)) that the Inspector General of the Department of State and Broadcasting Board of Governors inspect and audit, at least every 5 years, the administration of activities and operations of each Foreign Service post and each bureau and other operating unit of the Department.

(b) Consideration of Multi-Tier system.—The report required under subsection (a) shall assess the advisability and feasibility of implementing a multi-tier system for inspecting Foreign Service posts featuring more (or less) frequent inspections and audits of posts based on risk, including security risk, as may be determined by the Inspector General.

(c) Composition.—The report required under subsection (a) shall include separate portions prepared by the Inspector General of the Department of State and Broadcasting Board of Governors, and the Comptroller General of the United States, respectively.

Passed the Senate April 28, 2016.

Attest:





Secretary  


114th CONGRESS
     2d Session
S. 1635

AN ACT
To authorize the Department of State for fiscal year 2016, and for other purposes.