Text: H.R.350 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (01/06/2017)


115th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 350


To exclude vehicles used solely for competition from certain provisions of the Clean Air Act, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 6, 2017

Mr. McHenry (for himself, Mr. Abraham, Mr. Bost, Mr. Bucshon, Mr. Burgess, Mr. Carter of Georgia, Mr. Cramer, Ms. Foxx, Mr. Gosar, Mr. Griffith, Mr. Grothman, Mr. Hudson, Mr. Huizenga, Mr. Jones, Mr. LaMalfa, Mr. Loudermilk, Mr. Moolenaar, Mr. Mullin, Mr. Pittenger, Mr. Posey, Mr. Roe of Tennessee, Mr. Rogers of Alabama, Mr. Rokita, Mr. Ryan of Ohio, Mr. Walberg, Mrs. Walorski, Mrs. Mimi Walters of California, Mr. Westerman, Mr. McClintock, Mr. Zeldin, Mr. Nolan, Mr. Holding, Mr. Brooks of Alabama, Mr. Cook, Mr. Emmer, Mr. Renacci, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Cuellar, Mr. Long, Mr. Sensenbrenner, Mr. Brat, Mrs. Wagner, Mr. Tiberi, Ms. Jenkins of Kansas, and Mr. Smith of Texas) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce


A BILL

To exclude vehicles used solely for competition from certain provisions of the Clean Air Act, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act of 2017” or the “RPM Act of 2017”.

SEC. 2. Findings.

The Congress finds that—

(1) at the time the Clean Air Act was written, and each time the Clean Air Act has been amended, the intent of Congress has been, and continues to be, that vehicles manufactured for, modified for, or utilized in organized motorized racing events would not be encompassed by the Clean Air Act’s definition of “motor vehicle”;

(2) when Congress sought to regulate nonroad vehicles in 1990, it explicitly excluded from the definition of “nonroad vehicle” any vehicle used solely for competition;

(3) despite the clear intent of Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency has cited the Clean Air Act as authority for regulating vehicles used solely for competition; and

(4) the Environmental Protection Agency has exceeded its statutory authority in its recent actions to regulate vehicles used solely for competition.

SEC. 3. Exclusion of vehicles used solely for competition from the anti-tampering provisions of the Clean Air Act.

Section 203 of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7522) is amended by adding at the end of subsection (a) the following: “No action with respect to any device or element of design referred to in paragraph (3) shall be treated as a prohibited act under that paragraph if the action is for the purpose of modifying a motor vehicle into a vehicle to be used solely for competition.”.

SEC. 4. Exclusion of vehicles used solely for competition from the definition of motor vehicle in the Clean Air Act.

Section 216 of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7550) is amended by striking “.” at the end of paragraph (2) and inserting “and that is not a vehicle used solely for competition, including any vehicle so used that was converted from a motor vehicle.”.

SEC. 5. Implementation.

Not later than 12 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall finalize any regulations necessary to implement the amendments made by this Act.