Text: S.1141 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)All Information (Except Text)

Text available as:

Shown Here:
Public Law No: 115-68 (10/06/2017)

 
[115th Congress Public Law 68]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]



[[Page 1201]]

                 WOMEN, PEACE, AND SECURITY ACT OF 2017

[[Page 131 STAT. 1202]]

Public Law 115-68
115th Congress

                                 An Act


 
 To ensure that the United States promotes the meaningful participation 
  of women in mediation and negotiation processes seeking to prevent, 
   mitigate, or resolve violent conflict. <<NOTE: Oct. 6, 2017 -  [S. 
                                1141]>> 

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, <<NOTE: Women, Peace, 
and Security Act of 2017.>> 
SECTION 1. <<NOTE: 22 USC 2151 note.>> SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Women, Peace, and Security Act of 
2017''.
SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

    Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) Around the world, women remain under-represented in 
        conflict prevention, conflict resolution, and post-conflict 
        peace building efforts.
            (2) Women in conflict-affected regions have achieved 
        significant success in--
                    (A) moderating violent extremism;
                    (B) countering terrorism;
                    (C) resolving disputes through nonviolent mediation 
                and negotiation; and
                    (D) stabilizing societies by enhancing the 
                effectiveness of security services, peacekeeping 
                efforts, institutions, and decisionmaking processes.
            (3) Research suggests that peace negotiations are more 
        likely to succeed and to result in durable peace agreements when 
        women participate in the peace process.
SEC. 3. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

    It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the meaningful participation of women in conflict 
        prevention and conflict resolution processes helps to promote 
        more inclusive and democratic societies and is critical to the 
        long-term stability of countries and regions;
            (2) the political participation, and leadership of women in 
        fragile environments, particularly during democratic 
        transitions, is critical to sustaining lasting democratic 
        institutions; and
            (3) the United States should be a global leader in promoting 
        the meaningful participation of women in conflict prevention, 
        management, and resolution, and post-conflict relief and 
        recovery efforts.

[[Page 131 STAT. 1203]]

SEC. 4. <<NOTE: 22 USC 2152j.>> STATEMENT OF POLICY.

    It shall be the policy of the United States to promote the 
meaningful participation of women in all aspects of overseas conflict 
prevention, management, and resolution, and post-conflict relief and 
recovery efforts, reinforced through diplomatic efforts and programs 
that--
            (1) integrate the perspectives and interests of affected 
        women into conflict-prevention activities and strategies;
            (2) encourage partner governments to adopt plans to improve 
        the meaningful participation of women in peace and security 
        processes and decision-making institutions;
            (3) promote the physical safety, economic security, and 
        dignity of women and girls;
            (4) support the equal access of women to aid distribution 
        mechanisms and services;
            (5) collect and analyze gender data for the purpose of 
        developing and enhancing early warning systems of conflict and 
        violence;
            (6) adjust policies and programs to improve outcomes in 
        gender equality and the empowerment of women; and
            (7) monitor, analyze, and evaluate the efforts related to 
        each strategy submitted under section 5 and the impact of such 
        efforts.
SEC. 5. <<NOTE: 22 USC 2152j-1.>> UNITED STATES STRATEGY TO 
                    PROMOTE THE PARTICIPATION OF WOMEN IN CONFLICT 
                    PREVENTION AND PEACE BUILDING.

    (a) <<NOTE: Deadlines. President. Consultation. Public 
information.>> Requirement.--Not later than one year after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, and again four years thereafter, the 
President, in consultation with the heads of the relevant Federal 
departments and agencies, shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees and make publicly available a single government-wide 
strategy, to be known as the Women, Peace, and Security Strategy, that 
provides a detailed description of how the United States intends to 
fulfill the policy objectives in section 4. The strategy shall--
            (1) support and be aligned with plans developed by other 
        countries to improve the meaningful participation of women in 
        peace and security processes, conflict prevention, peace 
        building, transitional processes, and decisionmaking 
        institutions; and
            (2) include specific and measurable goals, benchmarks, 
        performance metrics, timetables, and monitoring and evaluation 
        plans to ensure the accountability and effectiveness of all 
        policies and initiatives carried out under the strategy.

    (b) Specific Plans for Departments and Agencies.--Each strategy 
under subsection (a) shall include a specific implementation plan from 
each of the relevant Federal departments and agencies that describes--
            (1) the anticipated contributions of the department or 
        agency, including technical, financial, and in-kind 
        contributions, to implement the strategy; and
            (2) the efforts of the department or agency to ensure that 
        the policies and initiatives carried out pursuant to the 
        strategy are designed to achieve maximum impact and long-term 
        sustainability.

[[Page 131 STAT. 1204]]

    (c) Coordination.--The President should promote the meaningful 
participation of women in conflict prevention, in coordination and 
consultation with international partners, including, as appropriate, 
multilateral organizations, stakeholders, and other relevant 
international organizations, particularly in situations in which the 
direct engagement of the United States Government is not appropriate or 
advisable.
    (d) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
President, in implementing each strategy submitted under subsection (a), 
should--
            (1) provide technical assistance, training, and logistical 
        support to female negotiators, mediators, peace builders, and 
        stakeholders;
            (2) address security-related barriers to the meaningful 
        participation of women;
            (3) encourage increased participation of women in existing 
        programs funded by the United States Government that provide 
        training to foreign nationals regarding law enforcement, the 
        rule of law, or professional military education;
            (4) support appropriate local organizations, especially 
        women's peace building organizations;
            (5) support the training, education, and mobilization of men 
        and boys as partners in support of the meaningful participation 
        of women;
            (6) encourage the development of transitional justice and 
        accountability mechanisms that are inclusive of the experiences 
        and perspectives of women and girls;
            (7) expand and apply gender analysis, as appropriate, to 
        improve program design and targeting; and
            (8) conduct assessments that include the perspectives of 
        women regarding new initiatives in support of peace 
        negotiations, transitional justice and accountability, efforts 
        to counter violent extremism, or security sector reform.
SEC. 6. <<NOTE: 22 USC 2152j-2.>> TRAINING REQUIREMENTS REGARDING 
                    THE PARTICIPATION OF WOMEN IN CONFLICT 
                    PREVENTION AND PEACE BUILDING.

    (a) Foreign Service.--The Secretary of State, in conjunction with 
the Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development, shall ensure that all appropriate personnel (including 
special envoys, members of mediation or negotiation teams, relevant 
members of the civil service or Foreign Service, and contractors) 
responsible for or deploying to countries or regions considered to be at 
risk of, undergoing, or emerging from violent conflict obtain training, 
as appropriate, in the following areas, each of which shall include a 
focus on women and ensuring meaningful participation by women:
            (1) Conflict prevention, mitigation, and resolution.
            (2) Protecting civilians from violence, exploitation, and 
        trafficking in persons.
            (3) International human rights law and international 
        humanitarian law.

    (b) Department of Defense.--The Secretary of Defense shall ensure 
that relevant personnel receive training, as appropriate, in the 
following areas:
            (1) Training in conflict prevention, peace processes, 
        mitigation, resolution, and security initiatives that 
        specifically

[[Page 131 STAT. 1205]]

        addresses the importance of meaningful participation by women.
            (2) Gender considerations and meaningful participation by 
        women, including training regarding--
                    (A) international human rights law and international 
                humanitarian law, as relevant; and
                    (B) protecting civilians from violence, 
                exploitation, and trafficking in persons.
            (3) Effective strategies and best practices for ensuring 
        meaningful participation by women.
SEC. 7. <<NOTE: 22 USC 2152j-3.>> CONSULTATION AND COLLABORATION.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary of State and the Administrator of the 
United States Agency for International Development may establish 
guidelines or take other steps to ensure overseas United States 
personnel of the Department of State or the United States Agency for 
International Development, as the case may be, consult with appropriate 
stakeholders, including local women, youth, ethnic, and religious 
minorities, and other politically under-represented or marginalized 
populations, regarding United States efforts to--
            (1) prevent, mitigate, or resolve violent conflict; and
            (2) enhance the success of mediation and negotiation 
        processes by ensuring the meaningful participation of women.

    (b) Collaboration and Coordination.--The Secretary of State should 
work with international, regional, national, and local organizations to 
increase the meaningful participation of women in international 
peacekeeping operations, and should promote training that provides 
international peacekeeping personnel with the substantive knowledge and 
skills needed to ensure effective physical security and meaningful 
participation of women in conflict prevention and peace building.
SEC. 8. REPORTS TO CONGRESS.

    (a) Briefing.--Not later than 1 year after the date of the first 
submission of a strategy required under section 5, the Secretary of 
State, in conjunction with the Administrator of the United States Agency 
for International Development and the Secretary of Defense, shall brief 
the appropriate congressional committees on existing, enhanced, or newly 
established training carried out pursuant to section 6.
    (b) <<NOTE: President.>> Report on Women, Peace, and Security 
Strategy.--Not later than 2 years after the date of the submission of 
each strategy required under section 5, the President shall submit to 
the appropriate congressional committees a report that--
            (1) summarizes and evaluates the implementation of such 
        strategy and the impact of United States diplomatic efforts and 
        foreign assistance programs, projects, and activities to promote 
        the meaningful participation of women;
            (2) describes the nature and extent of the coordination 
        among the relevant Federal departments and agencies on the 
        implementation of such strategy;
            (3) outlines the monitoring and evaluation tools, 
        mechanisms, and common indicators to assess progress made on the 
        policy objectives set forth in section 4; and
            (4) describes the existing, enhanced, or newly established 
        training carried out pursuant to section 6.

[[Page 131 STAT. 1206]]

SEC. 9. <<NOTE: 22 USC 2152j-4.>> DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
                    (A) the Committee on Foreign Relations, the 
                Committee on Armed Services, and the Committee on 
                Appropriations of the Senate; and
                    (B) the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee 
                on Armed Services, and the Committee on Appropriations 
                of the of the House of Representatives.
            (2) Relevant federal departments and agencies.--The term 
        ``relevant Federal departments and agencies'' means--
                    (A) the United States Agency for International 
                Development;
                    (B) the Department of State;
                    (C) the Department of Defense;
                    (D) the Department of Homeland Security; and
                    (E) any other department or agency specified by the 
                President for purposes of this Act.
            (3) Stakeholders.--The term ``stakeholders'' means non-
        governmental and private sector entities engaged in or affected 
        by conflict prevention and stabilization, peace building, 
        protection, security, transition initiatives, humanitarian 
        response, or related efforts.

    Approved October 6, 2017.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY--S. 1141 (H.R. 2484):
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

SENATE REPORTS: No. 115-93 (Comm. on Foreign Relations).
CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 163 (2017):
            Aug. 3, considered and passed Senate.
            Sept. 25, considered and passed House.

                                  <all>