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Titles Actions Overview All Actions Cosponsors Committees Related Bills Subjects Latest Summary All Summaries

Titles (3)

Short Titles

Short Titles - Senate

Short Titles as Introduced

TICKETS Act
Transparency Improvements and Compensation to Keep Every Ticketholder Safe Act of 2017

Official Titles

Official Titles - Senate

Official Titles as Introduced

A bill to protect passengers on flights in air transportation from being denied boarding involuntarily, and for other purposes.


Actions Overview (1)

Date Actions Overview
04/26/2017Introduced in Senate

All Actions (1)

Date All Actions
04/26/2017Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
Action By: Senate

Cosponsors (10)


Committees (1)

Committees, subcommittees and links to reports associated with this bill are listed here, as well as the nature and date of committee activity and Congressional report number.

Committee / Subcommittee Date Activity Related Documents
Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation04/26/2017 Referred to

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Subjects (7)


Latest Summary (1)

There is one summary for S.947. View summaries

Shown Here:
Introduced in Senate (04/26/2017)

Transparency Improvements and Compensation to Keep Every Ticketholder Safe Act of 2017 or the TICKETS Act

This bill prohibits an air carrier from denying the boarding of a flight by a passenger who has been cleared to board, without the passenger's consent, unless such passenger presents a safety, security, or health risk.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) shall revise federal regulations relating to oversold flights:

  • to eliminate specified dollar amount limits on compensation provided to a passenger denied boarding involuntarily, and
  • to determine whether limits on the number of seats oversold for a flight are necessary and, if so, to consider whether to impose such limits based on a percentage of seats available on the aircraft.

The DOT shall prescribe regulations to require an air carrier to:

  • check in its employee or that of another air carrier seeking accommodation on a flight at least 60 minutes before its scheduled departure, and
  • specify on a passenger's itinerary and publicly post its policies with respect to oversold flights and requiring passengers to give up their seats to air carrier employees.