Text: H.R.4563 — 116th Congress (2019-2020)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (09/27/2019)


116th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 4563


To repeal Public Law 114–145 to ensure that the Drug Enforcement Administration has the authority to carry out needed enforcement actions for drug diversion control investigations and operations to combat the opioid epidemic, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

September 27, 2019

Mr. Fitzpatrick (for himself and Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To repeal Public Law 114–145 to ensure that the Drug Enforcement Administration has the authority to carry out needed enforcement actions for drug diversion control investigations and operations to combat the opioid epidemic, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Restoring Enforcement Standards to Track Opioids Responsively and Effectively Act of 2019” or the “RESTORE Act of 2019”.

SEC. 2. Restoring DEA’s authority to carry out needed enforcement actions to combat drug diversion and the opioid epidemic.

(a) Repeal.—Public Law 114–145 (the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2016) is hereby repealed.

(b) Restoration of provisions.—

(1) Effective as of the date of enactment of Public Law 114–145, the provisions of section 304 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 824) that were amended by Public Law 114–145 are hereby restored as if Public Law 114–145 had not been enacted into law.

(2) Subsection (k) of section 303 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 823(k)), as added by Public Law 114–145 and redesignated by Public Law 115–83, is hereby repealed.