Text: H.R.4623 — 116th Congress (2019-2020)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (10/08/2019)


116th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 4623


To provide lawful permanent resident status for certain advanced STEM degree holders, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

October 8, 2019

Mr. Foster (for himself and Ms. Johnson of Texas) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary


A BILL

To provide lawful permanent resident status for certain advanced STEM degree holders, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Keep STEM Talent Act of 2019”.

SEC. 2. Lawful permanent resident status for certain advanced STEM degree holders.

(a) Aliens not subject To direct numerical limitations.—Section 201(b)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(1)) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(F) (i) Aliens who—

“(I) have earned a degree in a STEM field at the master’s level or higher while physically present in the United States from a United States institution of higher education (as defined in section 101(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a))) accredited by an accrediting entity recognized by the Department of Education;

“(II) have an offer of employment from, or are employed by, a United States employer in a field related to such degree at a rate of pay that is higher than the median wage level for the occupational classification in the area of employment, as determined by the Secretary of Labor; and

“(III) are admissible pursuant to an approved labor certification under section 212(a)(5)(A)(i).

“(ii) In this subparagraph, the term ‘STEM field’ means a field of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics described in the most recent version of the Classification of Instructional Programs of the Department of Education taxonomy under the summary group of—

“(I) computer and information sciences and support services;

“(II) engineering;

“(III) mathematics and statistics;

“(IV) biological and biomedical sciences;

“(V) physical sciences;

“(VI) agriculture sciences; or

“(VII) natural resources and conservation sciences.”.

(b) Procedure for granting immigration status.—Section 204(a)(1)(F) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1154(a)(1)(F)) is amended by striking “203(b)(2)” and all that follows through “Attorney General” and inserting “203(b)(2), 203(b)(3), or 201(b)(1)(F) may file a petition with the Secretary of Homeland Security”.

(c) Dual intent for F nonimmigrants seeking advanced STEM degrees at United States institutions of higher education.—Notwithstanding sections 101(a)(15)(F)(i) and 214(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(F)(i), 1184(b)), an alien who is a bona fide student admitted to a program in a STEM field (as defined in section 201(b)(1)(F)(ii) of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(1)(F)(ii))) for a degree at the master’s level or higher at a United States institution of higher education (as defined in section 101(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a))) accredited by an accrediting entity recognized by the Department of Education may obtain a student visa or extend or change nonimmigrant status to pursue such degree even if such alien intends to seek lawful permanent resident status in the United States.


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