Text: H.R.4862 — 116th Congress (2019-2020)All Information (Except Text)

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Introduced in House (10/28/2019)


116th CONGRESS
1st Session
H. R. 4862


To reauthorize the United States-Jordan Defense Cooperation Act of 2015, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

October 28, 2019

Mr. Deutch (for himself and Mr. Wilson of South Carolina) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs


A BILL

To reauthorize the United States-Jordan Defense Cooperation Act of 2015, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “United States-Jordan Defense Cooperation Extension Act”.

SEC. 2. Findings.

Congress finds the following:

(1) Jordan is an instrumental partner in the fight against terrorism, including as a member of the Global Coalition To Counter ISIS and the Combined Joint Task Force—Operation Inherent Resolve.

(2) In 2014, His Majesty King Abdullah stated that “Jordanians and Americans have been standing shoulder to shoulder against extremism for many years, but to a new level with this coalition against ISIL”.

(3) On February 3, 2015, the United States signed a 3-year memorandum of understanding with Jordan, pledging to provide the kingdom with $1,000,000,000 annually in United States foreign assistance, subject to the approval of Congress.

(4) On February 14, 2018, the United States signed a new 5-year Memorandum of Understanding with Jordan in which the United States pledged to provide no less than $1,275,000,000 per year, subject to congressional appropriations, in United States bilateral foreign assistance to Jordan.

SEC. 3. Sense of Congress.

It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) Jordan plays a critical role in responding to the overwhelming humanitarian needs created by the conflict in Syria;

(2) Jordan, the United States, and other partners should continue working together to address this humanitarian crisis and promote regional stability, including through support for refugees in Jordan and internally displaced people along the Jordan-Syria border and the creation of conditions inside Syria that will allow for the secure, dignified, and voluntary return of people displaced by the crisis; and

(3) the United States should continue to assist Jordan in creating sustainable economic development.

SEC. 4. Reauthorization of United States-Jordan Defense Cooperation Act of 2015.

Section 5(a) of the United States-Jordan Defense Cooperation Act of 2015 (22 U.S.C. 2753 note) is amended—

(1) by striking “During the 3-year period” and inserting “During the period”; and

(2) by inserting “and ending on December 31, 2024” after “enactment of this Act”.

SEC. 5. Pursuing investment funds for Jordan.

(a) In general.—Not later than 180 days after the end of the transition period, the Chief Executive Officer of the United States International Development Finance Corporation shall issue a call for proposals pursuing investment funds with a focus on Jordan, whether as a specific country fund or as part of a regional fund with Jordan as a significant focus.

(b) Briefing.—Following the completion of the call process in subsection (a), the Chief Executive Officer of the United States International Development Finance Corporation shall brief the appropriate congressional committees describing the call process, any proposals submitted, and any funds approved pursuant to section 1421(c) of the BUILD Act (22 U.S.C. 9621).

(c) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.—The term “appropriate congressional committees” means—

(A) the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives; and

(B) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate.

(2) TRANSITION PERIOD.—The term “transition period” has the meaning given such term in section 1461 of the BUILD Act of 2018 (Public Law 115–254; 22 U.S.C. 9681).


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