Text: S.2920 — 116th Congress (2019-2020)All Information (Except Text)

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Placed on Calendar Senate (11/21/2019)

Calendar No. 308

116th CONGRESS
1st Session
S. 2920


To reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, and for other purposes.


IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

November 20, 2019

Ms. Ernst (for herself, Mr. Graham, Mr. Cornyn, Mrs. Capito, Mrs. Blackburn, Mr. Cramer, Mr. Rubio, Mrs. Fischer, Mr. Sullivan, Mr. Hoeven, and Mr. Perdue) introduced the following bill; which was read the first time

November 21, 2019

Read the second time and placed on the calendar


A BILL

To reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title; table of contents.

(a) Short title.—This Act may be cited as the “Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019”.

(b) Table of contents.—The table of contents for this Act is as follows:


Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2. Universal definitions and grant conditions.

Sec. 101. Stop grants.

Sec. 102. Grants to improve the criminal justice response.

Sec. 103. Grants to support families in the justice system.

Sec. 104. Outreach and services to underserved populations grants.

Sec. 105. Criminal provisions.

Sec. 106. Rape survivor child custody.

Sec. 107. Enhancing culturally specific services for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

Sec. 108. Grants for lethality assessment programs.

Sec. 201. Sexual assault services program.

Sec. 202. Rural domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and child abuse enforcement assistance program.

Sec. 203. Training and services to end violence against women with disabilities.

Sec. 204. Training and services to end abuse in later life.

Sec. 205. Abby Honold Act.

Sec. 301. Rape prevention and education grant.

Sec. 302. Creating hope through outreach, options, services, and education for children and youth (“Choose Children & Youth”).

Sec. 303. Grants to combat violent crimes on campuses.

Sec. 401. Study conducted by the centers for disease control and prevention.

Sec. 402. Saving money and reducing tragedies (SMART) through prevention grants.

Sec. 501. Strengthening the healthcare systems response.

Sec. 601. Short title.

Sec. 602. Definitions.

Sec. 603. Strengthening housing resources protections for survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Sec. 604. Increasing access to safe shelter for survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Sec. 605. Report to Congress.

Sec. 611. Housing rights.

Sec. 612. Monitoring; Director of Domestic Violence Prevention.

Sec. 613. VAWA Emergency Transfer Demonstration Program.

Sec. 614. Housing programs.

Sec. 701. National resource center on workplace responses to assist victims of domestic and sexual violence.

Sec. 702. Study on workplace best practices.

Sec. 703. GAO study.

Sec. 801. Grants to Indian Tribal governments.

Sec. 802. Grants to Indian Tribal coalitions.

Sec. 803. Consultation.

Sec. 804. Tribal jurisdiction over crimes committed in Indian country.

Sec. 805. Reporting requirements.

Sec. 811. Short title.

Sec. 812. Indian victims of crime.

Sec. 813. Regulations regarding Indian Tribes.

Sec. 821. Short title.

Sec. 822. Purposes.

Sec. 823. Definitions.

Sec. 824. Improving Tribal access to databases.

Sec. 825. Guidelines for responding to cases of missing or murdered Indians.

Sec. 826. Annual reporting requirements.

Sec. 827. Implementation and incentive.

Sec. 831. Short title.

Sec. 841. Office of Justice Services law enforcement.

Sec. 842. Authority to execute emergency orders.

Sec. 843. Detention services.

Sec. 844. Tribal law enforcement Officers.

Sec. 845. Oversight, coordination, and accountability.

Sec. 846. Integration and coordination of programs.

Sec. 847. Data sharing with Indian tribes.

Sec. 848. Judicial administration in Indian country.

Sec. 849. Federal notice.

Sec. 850. Detention facilities.

Sec. 851. Reauthorization for tribal courts training.

Sec. 852. Public defenders.

Sec. 853. Offenses in Indian country: trespass on Indian land.

Sec. 854. Resources for public safety in Indian communities; drug trafficking prevention.

Sec. 855. Substance abuse prevention tribal action plans.

Sec. 856. Office of Justice Services spending report.

Sec. 857. Trafficking Victims Protection.

Sec. 858. Reporting on Indian victims of trafficking.

Sec. 861. Federal jurisdiction over Indian juveniles.

Sec. 862. Reauthorization of tribal youth programs.

Sec. 863. Assistance for Indian tribes relating to juvenile crime.

Sec. 864. Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Sec. 865. Grants for delinquency prevention programs.

Sec. 871. Short title.

Sec. 872. Definitions.

Sec. 873. Federal law enforcement database reporting requirements.

Sec. 874. National Missing and Unidentified Persons System Tribal liaison.

Sec. 875. Missing and murdered response coordination grant program.

Sec. 876. GAO study on Federal law enforcement agency evidence collection, handling, and processing.

Sec. 877. Bureau of Indian Affairs and Tribal law enforcement officer counseling resources interdepartmental coordination.

Sec. 881. Short title.

Sec. 882. Definition of employer.

Sec. 901. Office on Violence Against Women technical clarifications.

Sec. 1001. Short title.

Sec. 1002. Prohibition on engaging in sexual acts while acting under color of law.

Sec. 1003. Incentive for states.

Sec. 1004. Reports to Congress.

Sec. 1101. Enhanced penalties.

Sec. 1102. Combat online predators.

Sec. 1103. Maximizing access to forensic exams.

Sec. 1104. Study on State coverage of forensic examinations and related medical costs following a sexual assault.

Sec. 1201. Short title.

Sec. 1202. Designation.

Sec. 1203. Media Campaign.

Sec. 1211. Legal assistance for victims.

Sec. 1212. Report on protection order service processes.

Sec. 1301. Short title.

Sec. 1302. Findings.

Sec. 1303. Amendments to current law prohibiting female genital mutilation.

Sec. 1304. Increased penalty for female genital mutilation.

Sec. 1305. Pilot program to prevent and respond to female genital mutilation or cutting.

Sec. 1306. Reporting on female genital mutilation or cutting.

Sec. 1401. Empowering victims of revenge pornography.

Sec. 1501. Short title.

Sec. 1502. Sexual assault by Federal employees and contractors.

Sec. 1601. National stalker and domestic violence reduction.

Sec. 1602. Federal victim assistants reauthorization.

Sec. 1603. Child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners reauthorization.

Sec. 1604. Sex offender management.

Sec. 1605. Court-appointed special advocate program.

SEC. 2. Universal definitions and grant conditions.

(a) In general.—Section 40002 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)—

(A) by striking “In this title” and inserting “In this title, for the purpose of grants authorized under this title ”;

(B) by redesignating paragraphs (12) through (45) as paragraphs (15) through (48), respectively;

(C) by redesignating paragraph (11) as paragraph (12);

(D) by redesignating paragraph (8) as paragraph (11) and moving it to appear before paragraph (12), as so redesignated;

(E) by redesignating paragraphs (6) and (7) as paragraphs (7) and (8), respectively;

(F) by redesignating paragraph (2) as paragraph (6) and moving it to appear before paragraph (7), as so redesignated;

(G) by redesignating paragraph (3) as paragraph (2);

(H) by redesignating paragraph (5) as paragraph (3) and moving it to appear after paragraph (2), as so redesignated;

(I) by inserting after paragraph (4) the following:

“(5) COURT-BASED PERSONNEL; COURT-RELATED PERSONNEL.—The terms ‘court-based personnel’ and ‘court-related personnel’ mean individuals working in the court, whether paid or volunteer, including—

“(A) clerks, special masters, domestic relations officers, administrators, mediators, custody evaluators, guardians ad litem, lawyers, negotiators, probation, parole, interpreters, victim assistants, victim advocates, and judicial, administrative, or any other professionals or personnel similarly involved in the legal process;

“(B) court security personnel;

“(C) personnel working in related, supplementary offices or programs (such as child support enforcement); and

“(D) any other court-based or community based personnel having responsibilities or authority to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking in the court system.”;

(J) in paragraph (11), as so redesignated, by striking “includes felony” and all that follows through “jurisdiction.” and inserting the following: “includes felony or misdemeanor crimes under the family or domestic violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant funding, and, in the case of victim services, includes the use or attempted use of physical abuse or sexual abuse, or a pattern of any other coercive behavior committed, enabled, or solicited to gain or maintain power and control over a victim, including verbal, psychological, economic, or technological abuse, by a person who—

“(A) is a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, or person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim;

“(B) is cohabitating, or has cohabitated, with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;

“(C) shares a child in common with the victim;

“(D) is an adult family member of, or paid or nonpaid caregiver, in an ongoing relationship of trust, with a victim 50 years of age or older or an adult victim with disabilities; or

“(E) commits acts against a youth or adult victim who is protected from those acts under the family or domestic violence laws of the jurisdiction.”;

(K) by inserting after paragraph (12), as so redesignated, the following:

“(13) FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION OR CUTTING.—The term ‘female genital mutilation or cutting’ means intentionally circumcising, excising, infibulating the whole or any part of the labia majora or labia minora or clitoris, or in any way causing bodily injury (as defined in section 1365 of title 18, United States Code) to the female genitalia for non-medical reasons.

“(14) FORCED MARRIAGE.—The term ‘forced marriage’ means a marriage to which 1 or both parties do not or cannot consent, and in which 1 or more elements of force, fraud, or coercion is present. Forced marriage can be both a cause and a consequence of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking.”; and

(L) by striking paragraph (32), as so redesignated, and inserting the following:

“(32) SEXUAL ASSAULT.—The term ‘sexual assault’—

“(A) means any non-consensual sexual act proscribed by Federal, Tribal or State law, including when the victim lacks capacity to consent; and

“(B) includes sex trafficking described in section 103(11)(A) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000.”;

(2) in subsection (b)—

(A) in paragraph (2), by adding at the end the following:

“(H) DEATH OF THE PARTY WHOSE PRIVACY HAD BEEN PROTECTED.—In the event of the death of any victim whose confidentiality and privacy is required to be protected under this subsection, grantees and subgrantees may share personally identifying information or individual information that is collected about deceased victims being sought for a fatality review to the extent permitted by their jurisdiction’s law and only if the following conditions are met:

“(i) The underlying objectives of the fatality review are to prevent future deaths, enhance victim safety, and increase offender accountability.

“(ii) The fatality review includes policies and protocols to protect identifying information, including identifying information about the victim’s children, from further release outside the fatality review team.

“(iii) The grantee or subgrantee makes a reasonable effort to get a release from the victim’s personal representative (if one has been appointed) and from any surviving minor children or the guardian of such children (but not if the guardian is the abuser of the deceased parent), if the children are not capable of knowingly consenting.

“(iv) The information released is limited to that which is necessary for the purposes of the fatality review.”;

(B) in paragraph (11), by adding at the end the following: “The Office on Violence Against Women shall make all technical assistance available as broadly as possible to any appropriate grantees, subgrantees, potential grantees, or other entities without regard to whether the entity has received funding from the Office on Violence Against Women for a particular program or project, with priority given to current and former grantees and subgrantees.”;

(C) in paragraph (13), by striking subparagraph (D) and inserting the following:

“(D) CONSTRUCTION.—Nothing contained in this paragraph shall be construed, interpreted, or applied—

“(i) to supplant, displace, preempt, or otherwise diminish the responsibilities and liabilities under other State or Federal civil rights law, whether statutory or common; or

“(ii) to affect the otherwise lawful employment practices of any organization under Federal law.”;

(D) in paragraph (14), by inserting before the period at the end the following: “ or other forms of gender-based violence, including female genital mutilation or cutting, forced marriage, and honor violence. For individuals who are 0 to 18 years of age and are victims of sexual assault, victim-centered services shall, to the extent practicable, be coordinated with services specified in section 212 of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. 20302). If such an organization is not available, services shall, to the extent practicable, be delivered in partnership with multidisciplinary teams.”; and

(E) by adding at the end the following:

“(17) INNOVATION FUND.—Of the amounts appropriated to carry out this title, not more than 1 percent shall be made available for pilot projects, demonstration projects, and special initiatives designed to improve Federal, State, local, Tribal, and other community responses to violence against women and girls.”.

(b) Grant accountability.—Section 40002(b)(16) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(b)(16)) shall apply to this Act and any grant program authorized under this Act.

SEC. 101. Stop grants.

(a) In general.—Part T of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10441 et seq.) is amended—

(1) in section 2001(b) (34 U.S.C. 10441(b))—

(A) by striking paragraph (6) and inserting the following:

“(6) developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs addressing the needs and circumstances of Indian tribes and urban Indian victims in dealing with violent crimes against women, including the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking;”;

(B) in paragraph (19), by striking “and” at the end;

(C) by striking paragraph (20) and inserting the following:

“(20) developing, enhancing, or strengthening prevention and educational programming to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or female genital mutilation or cutting, with not more than 5 percent of the amount allocated to a State to be used for this purpose;”; and

(D) by inserting after paragraph (20), the following:

“(21) developing, enlarging, or strengthening culturally specific victim services for and responses to female genital mutilation or cutting; and

“(22) developing, implementing, and training on best practices regarding victim-centered approaches in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, including policies addressing the use of bench warrants, body attachments, and material witness warrants for victims who fail to appear.”;

(2) in section 2007(d) (34 U.S.C. 10446(d))—

(A) by redesignating paragraphs(5) and (6) as paragraphs (6) and (7), respectively; and

(B) by inserting after paragraph (4) the following:

“(5) not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this paragraph, proof of compliance with the requirements regarding development, implementation, and training on best practices for victim-centered prosecution described in section 2017;”; and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

“SEC. 2017. Grant eligibility regarding compelling victim testimony.

“(a) In general.—To be eligible for a grant or subgrant under this part, a prosecution office shall certify, not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this section, that the office developed, implemented, and trained on best practices, based on national guidelines described in subsection (b), regarding victim-centered approaches in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, including policies addressing the use of bench warrants, body attachments, and material witness warrants for victims who fail to appear.

“(b) Establishment of national guidelines.—Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this section, the Director shall publish national guidelines regarding victim-centered approaches in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, including policies addressing the use of bench warrants, body attachments, and material witness warrants for victims who fail to appear, developed by experts in the fields of gender-based violence and national prosecution standards.”.

(b) Authorization of appropriations.—Section 1001(a)(18) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10261(a)(18)) is amended by striking “222,000,00 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “244,200,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(c) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsection (a) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 102. Grants to improve the criminal justice response.

(a) Heading.—Part U of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10461 et seq.) is amended in the heading, by striking “Grants to encourage arrest policies” and inserting “Grants to improve the criminal justice response”.

(b) Grants.—Section 2101 of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10461) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b)—

(A) in paragraph (1), by striking “proarrest” and inserting “offender accountability and homicide reduction”;

(B) in paragraph (8), by striking “section 3(2) of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102(2)))” and inserting “section 3 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102))”;

(C) in paragraph (19), by inserting before the period at the end the following: “, including victims among underserved populations”; and

(D) by adding at the end the following:

“(23) To develop, implement and train on best practices regarding victim-centered approaches in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, including policies addressing the use of bench warrants, body attachments, and material witness warrants for victims who fail to appear.

“(24) To train and maintain a designated VAWA Officer in State and local law enforcement agencies to coordinate and support the response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.”; and

(2) in subsection (c)(1)—

(A) by moving the margins of subparagraphs (A) through (E) two ems to the right;

(B) in subparagraph (A)—

(i) by moving the margins for clauses (i) and (ii) to ems to the right; and

(ii) in clause (i), by striking “encourage or mandate arrests of domestic violence offenders” and inserting “encourage arrests of domestic violence offenders”;

(C) in subparagraph (E), by moving the margins for clauses (i) and (ii) to ems to the right; and

(D) by adding at the end the following:

“(F) in the case of a prosecution office, certify that, not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this subparagraph, the office has developed, implemented and trained on best practices regarding victim-centered approaches in domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking cases, including policies addressing the use of bench warrants, body attachments, and material witness warrants for victims who fail to appear described in section 2017; and”.

(c) Authorization of appropriations.—Section 1001(a)(19) of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10261(a)(19)) is amended by striking “$73,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “80,300,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(d) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 103. Grants to support families in the justice system.

(a) In general.—Section 1301 of division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (34 U.S.C. 12464) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b), by striking “to improve” and inserting “improve”; and

(2) in subsection (e), by striking “$22,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$24,200,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsection (a)(1) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 104. Outreach and services to underserved populations grants.

(a) In general.—Section 120 of the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20123) is amended—

(1) in subsection (d)—

(A) in paragraph (4), by striking “or” at the end;

(B) in paragraph (5), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; or”; and

(C) by adding at the end the following:

“(6) developing, enlarging, or strengthening culturally specific victim services and responses related to, and prevention of female genital mutilation or cutting.”; and

(2) in subsection (g), by striking “$2,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$2,200,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsection (a)(1) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 105. Criminal provisions.

Section 2265(d)(3) of title 18, United States Code, is amended—

(1) by striking “restraining order or injunction,”; and

(2) by adding at the end the following: “This publication limitation applies to all protection orders issued by a State, territorial, or Tribal court, as well as protection orders issued by another State, territory, or Tribe.”.

SEC. 106. Rape survivor child custody.

Section 409 of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015 (34 U.S.C. 21308) is amended by striking “$5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2015 through 2019” and inserting “$5,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029.”.

SEC. 107. Enhancing culturally specific services for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

(a) Amendment.—Section 121 of the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20124) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a), by adding at the end the following:

“(3) ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—In addition to the amounts made available under paragraph (1), there are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $2,200,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029.”; and

(2) in subsection (b)(2)—

(A) in subparagraph (G), by striking “or” at the end;

(B) in subparagraph (H), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; or”; and

(C) by adding at the end the following:

“(I) developing, enlarging, or strengthening culturally specific victim services for and responses to female genital mutilation or cutting, honor violence, forced marriage, and child marriage.”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsection (a)(2) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 108. Grants for lethality assessment programs.

(a) In general.—The Attorney General may make grants to States, units of local government, Indian tribes, domestic violence victim service providers, and State or Tribal Domestic Violence Coalitions for technical assistance and training in the operation or establishment of a lethality assessment program.

(b) Lethality assessment program defined.—In this section, the term “lethality assessment program” means a program that—

(1) rapidly connects a victim of domestic violence to local community-based victim service providers;

(2) helps first responders and other entities in the criminal justice system, including courts, law enforcement agencies, and prosecutors of tribal government and units of local government, identify and respond to possibly lethal circumstances; and

(3) identifies victims of domestic violence who are at high risk of being seriously injured or killed by an intimate partner.

(c) Eligibility.—To be eligible for a grant under this section, an applicant shall demonstrate experience in developing, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating a lethality assessment program.

(d) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated $5,500,000 to carry out this section for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029.

SEC. 201. Sexual assault services program.

Section 41601(f)(1) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12511(f)(1)) is amended by striking “$40,000,00 to remain available until expended for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$120,000,000 to remain available until expended for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

SEC. 202. Rural domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and child abuse enforcement assistance program.

Section 40295(e)(1) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12341(e)(1)) is amended by striking “$50,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$150,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

SEC. 203. Training and services to end violence against women with disabilities.

Section 1402 of division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (34 U.S.C. 20122) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b)—

(A) by striking “disabled individuals” each place it appears and inserting “individuals with disabilities”;

(B) in paragraph (3), by inserting after “law enforcement” the following: “and other first responders”; and

(C) in paragraph (8), by striking “providing advocacy and intervention services within” and inserting “to enhance the capacity of”;

(2) in subsection (c)(1)(D), by striking “disabled individuals” and inserting “individuals with disabilities”; and

(3) in subsection (e), by striking “$9,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$9,900,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

SEC. 204. Training and services to end abuse in later life.

(a) Amendments.—Section 40801(b) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12421(b)) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (2)(A), by striking clause (iv) and inserting the following:

“(iv) conduct cross-training for law enforcement agencies and other first responders, prosecutors, agencies of States or units of local government, attorneys, health care providers, population specific organizations, faith-based leaders, victim advocates, victim service providers, and courts to better serve victims of abuse in later life, including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, exploitation or neglect.”;

(2) in paragraph (3)—

(A) in subparagraph (A)(iv), by striking “over 50 years of age” and inserting “50 years of age or over”; and

(B) in subparagraph (B)(iv), by striking “in later life” and inserting “50 years of age or over”; and

(3) in paragraph (5), by striking “$9,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$9,900,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (a) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 205. Abby Honold Act.

(a) Short title.—This section may be cited as the “Abby Honold Act”.

(b) Amendment.—Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“subtitle QTrauma-informed Training for Law Enforcement

“SEC. 41701. Demonstration program on trauma-informed training for law enforcement.

“(a) Definitions.—In this section—

“(1) the term ‘Attorney General’ means the Attorney General, acting through the Director of the Office on Violence Against Women;

“(2) the term ‘covered individual’ means an individual who interfaces with victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including—

“(A) an individual working for or on behalf of an eligible entity;

“(B) an administrator of an institution of higher education; and

“(C) an emergency services or medical employee;

“(3) the term ‘demonstration site’, with respect to an eligible entity that receives a grant under this section, means—

“(A) if the eligible entity is a law enforcement agency described in paragraph (4)(A), the area over which the eligible entity has jurisdiction; and

“(B) if the eligible entity is an organization or agency described in paragraph (4)(B), the area over which a law enforcement agency described in paragraph (4)(A) that is working in collaboration with the eligible entity has jurisdiction; and

“(4) the term ‘eligible entity’ means—

“(A) a State, local, territorial, or Tribal law enforcement agency; or

“(B) a national, regional, or local victim services organization or agency working in collaboration with a law enforcement agency described in subparagraph (A).

“(b) Grants authorized.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Attorney General shall award grants on a competitive basis to eligible entities to carry out the demonstration program under this section by implementing evidence-based or promising policies and practices to incorporate trauma-informed techniques designed to—

“(A) prevent re-traumatization of the victim;

“(B) ensure that covered individuals use evidence-based practices to respond to and investigate cases of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;

“(C) improve communication between victims and law enforcement officers in an effort to increase the likelihood of the successful investigation and prosecution of the reported crime in a manner that protects the victim to the greatest extent possible;

“(D) increase collaboration among stake holders who are part of the coordinated community response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and

“(E) evaluate the effectiveness of the training process and content by measuring—

“(i) investigative and prosecutorial practices and outcomes; and

“(ii) the well-being of victims and their satisfaction with the criminal justice process.

“(2) TERM.—The Attorney General shall make grants under this section for each of the first 2 fiscal years beginning after the date of enactment of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.

“(3) AWARD BASIS.—The Attorney General shall award grants under this section to multiple eligible entities for use in a variety of settings and communities, including—

“(A) urban, suburban, Tribal, remote, and rural areas;

“(B) college campuses; or

“(C) traditionally underserved communities.

“(c) Use of funds.—An eligible entity that receives a grant under this section shall use the grant to—

“(1) train covered individuals within the demonstration site of the eligible entity to use evidence-based, trauma-informed techniques and knowledge of crime victims’ rights throughout an investigation into domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including by—

“(A) conducting victim interviews in a manner that—

“(i) elicits valuable information about the domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and

“(ii) avoids re-traumatization of the victim;

“(B) conducting field investigations that mirror best and promising practices available at the time of the investigation;

“(C) customizing investigative approaches to ensure a culturally and linguistically appropriate approach to the community being served;

“(D) becoming proficient in understanding and responding to complex cases, including cases of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking—

“(i) facilitated by alcohol or drugs;

“(ii) involving strangulation;

“(iii) committed by a non-stranger;

“(iv) committed by an individual of the same sex as the victim;

“(v) involving a victim with a disability; or

“(vi) involving a male victim;

“(E) developing collaborative relationships between—

“(i) law enforcement officers and other members of the response team; and

“(ii) the community being served; and

“(F) developing an understanding of how to define, identify, and correctly classify a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and

“(2) promote the efforts of the eligible entity to improve the response of covered individuals to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking through various communication channels, such as the website of the eligible entity, social media, print materials, and community meetings, in order to ensure that all covered individuals within the demonstration site of the eligible entity are aware of those efforts and included in trainings, to the extent practicable.

“(d) Demonstration program trainings on trauma-informed approaches.—

“(1) IDENTIFICATION OF EXISTING TRAININGS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—The Attorney General shall identify trainings for law enforcement officers, in existence as of the date on which the Attorney General begins to solicit applications for grants under this section, that—

“(i) employ a trauma-informed approach to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and

“(ii) focus on the fundamentals of—

“(I) trauma responses; and

“(II) the impact of trauma on victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

“(B) SELECTION.—An eligible entity that receives a grant under this section shall select one or more of the approaches employed by a training identified under subparagraph (A) to test within the demonstration site of the eligible entity.

“(2) CONSULTATION.—In carrying out paragraph (1), the Attorney General shall consult with the Director of the Office for Victims of Crime in order to seek input from and cultivate consensus among outside practitioners and other stakeholders through facilitated discussions and focus groups on best practices in the field of trauma-informed care for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

“(e) Evaluation.—The Attorney General, in consultation with the Director of the National Institute of Justice, shall require each eligible entity that receives a grant under this section to identify a research partner, preferably a local research partner, to—

“(1) design a system for generating and collecting the appropriate data to facilitate an independent process or impact evaluation of the use of the grant funds;

“(2) periodically conduct an evaluation described in paragraph (1); and

“(3) periodically make publicly available, during the grant period—

“(A) preliminary results of the evaluations conducted under paragraph (2); and

“(B) recommendations for improving the use of the grant funds.

“(f) Authorization of appropriations.—The Attorney General shall carry out this section using amounts otherwise available to the Attorney General.

“(g) Rule of construction.—Nothing in this section shall be construed to interfere with the due process rights of any individual.”.

SEC. 301. Rape prevention and education grant.

(a) In general.—Section 393A of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 280b–1b) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)—

(A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by inserting “, including primary prevention activities,” after “programs”; and

(B) in paragraph (2), by inserting before the semicolon at the end the following: “or utilization of other communication technologies for the purposes related to such a hotline”;

(2) in subsection (b), by striking “Indian tribal” and inserting “Indian Tribal”;

(3) in subsection (c)—

(A) in paragraph (1), by striking “$50,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$165,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”; and

(B) in paragraph (3), by adding at the end the following: “Not less than 75 percent of the total amount made available under this subsection in each fiscal year shall be awarded in accordance with this paragraph.”; and

(4) by adding at the end the following:

“(e) Report.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall submit to Congress, the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate a report describing the activities carried out under this section.”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by paragraphs (1), (2), and (4) of subsection (a) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 302. Creating hope through outreach, options, services, and education for children and youth (“Choose Children & Youth”).

(a) In general.—Section 41201 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12451) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b)—

(A) in paragraph (1)—

(i) in subparagraph (B), by striking “or” at the end;

(ii) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; or”; and

(iii) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:

“(D) clarify State or local mandatory reporting policies and practices regarding peer-on-peer dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and sex trafficking.”; and

(B) in paragraph (2)—

(i) in subparagraph (A) by striking “or sex trafficking” and inserting “sex trafficking, or female genital mutilation or cutting”; and

(ii) in subparagraph (B) by striking “or sex trafficking” and inserting “sex trafficking, or female genital mutilation or cutting,”;

(2) in subsection (d)(3), by inserting “, and, where intervention or programming will include a focus on female genital mutilation or cutting, sufficient training on that topic” after “sex trafficking”; and

(3) in subsection (f), by striking “$15,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$27,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (a) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 303. Grants to combat violent crimes on campuses.

(a) In general.—Section 304 of the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20125) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b)—

(A) by amending paragraph (2) to read as follows:

“(2) To develop, strengthen, and implement campus policies, protocols, and services that more effectively identify and respond to the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking, including the use of technology to commit these crimes, and to train campus administrators, campus security personnel, and all participants in the resolution process, including personnel from the title IX coordinator’s office and student conduct office serving on campus disciplinary or judicial boards, on such policies, protocols, and services that promote a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution.”;

(B) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:

“(3) To provide prevention and education programming, including primary prevention activities, about domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including technological abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion, that is age-appropriate, culturally relevant, ongoing, delivered in multiple venues on campus, accessible, promotes respectful nonviolent behavior as a social norm, and engages men and boys. Such programming should be developed in partnership or collaboratively with experts in domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking prevention and intervention.”;

(C) in paragraph (9), by striking “and provide” and inserting “, provide, and disseminate”;

(D) in paragraph (10), by inserting “and disseminate” after “or adapt”; and

(E) by inserting after paragraph (10) the following:

“(11) To train campus health centers and appropriate campus faculty, such as academic advisors or professionals who deal with students on a daily basis, on how to recognize and respond to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including training campus health providers on how to educate all members of the campus community on the impacts of violence on health, unhealthy relationships, and how to support ongoing outreach efforts.”;

(2) in subsection (c)(3), by striking “fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “fiscal years 2020 through 2029”;

(3) in subsection (d)(3)—

(A) in subparagraph (B), by striking “for all incoming students” and inserting “for all students”;

(B) by amending subparagraph (D) to read as follows:

“(D) The grantee shall train all participants in the resolution process, including the title IX coordinator’s office and student conduct office, to respond effectively to situations involving domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.”; and

(4) in subsection (e), by striking “$12,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$17,600,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by paragraphs (1) and (3) of subsection (a) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 401. Study conducted by the centers for disease control and prevention.

Section 402(c) of the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 280b–4(c)) is amended by striking “$1,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$1,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

SEC. 402. Saving money and reducing tragedies (SMART) through prevention grants.

(a) In general.—Section 41303 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12463) is amended—

(1) in subsection (f), by striking “$15,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$49,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”; and

(2) in subsection (g), by adding at the end the following:

“(3) REMAINING AMOUNTS.—Any amounts not made available under paragraphs (1) and (2) may be used for any set of purposes described in paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) of subsection (b), or for a project that fulfills 2 or more of such sets of purposes.”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsection (a)(2) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 501. Strengthening the healthcare systems response.

(a) In general.—Section 399P of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 280g–4) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)(3), by striking “behavioral and mental health programs” and inserting “mental health and substance use disorder programs”; and

(2) in subsection (b)—

(A) in paragraph (1)—

(i) in subparagraph (A)—

(I) in clause (i), by striking “mental or behavioral care” and inserting “mental health and substance use disorders”; and

(II) in clause (ii), by inserting “, including human trafficking” after “other forms of violence and abuse”; and

(ii) in subparagraph (B)—

(I) in clause (ii)—

(aa) by striking “on-site access to”; and

(bb) by striking “patients by increasing” and all that follows through the semicolon and inserting the following: “patients by—

“(I) increasing the capacity of existing health care professionals, including specialists in trauma and in mental health and substance use disorders, and public health staff to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including for children exposed to such violence; or

“(II) improving the capacity of State domestic and sexual violence coalitions to coordinate with and support health care professionals and others in addressing domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;”; and

(II) in clause (iv) by striking the period at the end and inserting the following: “, with priority given to relevant programs administered through the Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health;”; and

(B) in paragraph (2)(C)—

(i) in clause (iii)—

(I) by striking “mental and behavioral health” and inserting “mental health and substance use disorder”; and

(II) by striking “or” at the end;

(ii) in clause (iv), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; or”; and

(iii) by adding at the end the following:

“(v) improving the capacity of substance use disorder treatment programs to respond to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including through the provision of technical assistance and training to such programs.”;

(3) in subsection (d)(2)—

(A) by striking “mental health” in each place such term appears and inserting “mental health and substance use disorders”; and

(B) in subparagraph (B), by inserting “, including related to mental health or substance use disorder services,” after “health system”;

(4) by redesignating subsections (g) and (h) as subsections (h) and (i), respectively;

(5) by inserting after subsection (f), the following:

“(g) Technical assistance and best practices for early childhood programs.—The Secretary shall, as appropriate, provider technical assistance and identify best practices to improve the capacity of early childhood programs funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Administration for Children and Families to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking among families served by such programs.”;

(6) in subsection (h), as so redesignated, by striking “$10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$11,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”; and

(7) in subsection (h), by striking “herein” and “provided for”.

(b) Report.—Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall prepare and submit to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives a report describing the activities carried out under section 399P of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 280g–4), as amended by subsection (a).

SEC. 601. Short title.

This subtitle may be cited as the “Help End Abusive Living Situations Act” or the “HEALS Act”.

SEC. 602. Definitions.

In this subtitle—

(1) the terms “dating violence”, “domestic violence”, “sexual assault”, and “stalking” have the meanings given those terms in section 40002(a) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(a));

(2) the term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development;

(3) the term “victim service provider” has the meaning given the term in section 401 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11360); and

(4) the term “victim service provider project” means a project administered by a victim service provider designed to meet the needs of survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families.

SEC. 603. Strengthening housing resources protections for survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

(a) Notice of funding availability.—Subtitle C of title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11360 et seq.) is amended—

(1) in section 422 (42 U.S.C. 11382)—

(A) in subsection (a)—

(i) by striking “The Secretary” and inserting the following:

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary”; and

(ii) by adding at the end the following:

“(2) SCORING.—For purposes of scoring applicants in the notice of funding availability, the Secretary shall neither prioritize nor deprioritize the following categories of projects solely on the basis of the category:

“(A) Rapid re-housing.

“(B) Permanent supportive housing.

“(C) Transitional housing.

“(D) Short-term emergency shelter.”; and

(2) in section 428(d)(2) (42 U.S.C. 11386b(d)(2))—

(A) in subparagraph (B), by striking “and” at the end;

(B) by redesignating subparagraph (C) as subparagraph (D); and

(C) by inserting after subparagraph (B) the following:

“(C) transitional housing for various populations, including, for survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families, projects providing transitional or permanent housing that provide trauma-informed services, maximize client choice, and address the special needs of those survivors; and”.

(b) Strategic plan.—In the next strategic plan required after the date of enactment of this Act under section 306 of title 5, United States Code, the Secretary shall include as a goal or objective—

(1) responding, including allocating appropriate resources, to the housing needs of survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families; and

(2) collaborating with the Office of Violence Against Women of the Department of Justice to ensure that there is no conflict between the rapid re-housing requirements of that Office and of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

(c) Evaluation.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall develop—

(1) in accordance with the selection criteria under section 427(b)(1) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11386a(b)(1)), as amended by section 604, measurable criteria upon which applicants for a grant under section subtitle C of title IV of that Act (42 U.S.C. 11381 et seq.) are evaluated to demonstrate their local policy priorities focused on survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families, including survivor-centered coordinated entry processes that appropriately assess and prioritize those survivors and take into account the safety and confidentiality needs of those survivors and their families; and

(2) mechanisms that promote the provision of technical assistance and support for programs to improve outcomes and maintain grant funding.

(d) Research agenda.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall develop a research agenda that—

(1) works and collaborates with the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of Violence Against Women of the Department of Justice; and

(2) focuses on survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families, concentrating on the housing modalities that best support them and the mechanisms that best facilitate their efforts to secure housing, while also paying attention to the critical safety concerns and the link between trauma and residential stability.

SEC. 604. Increasing access to safe shelter for survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Section 427 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11386a)) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b)(1)—

(A) in subparagraph (B)(iv)(I), by inserting “, including survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families” after “subpopulations”;

(B) in subparagraph (C)—

(i) in clause (iii), by striking “and” at the end;

(ii) in clause (iv), by adding “and” at the end; and

(iii) by adding at the end the following:

“(v) meets the safety and trauma needs of survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families, including access to safe shelter;”;

(C) in subparagraph (F)(ii), by striking “and” at the end;

(D) by redesignating subparagraph (G) as subparagraph (H); and

(E) by inserting after subparagraph (F) the following:

“(G) the extent to which the assistance to be provided within the geographic area will meet the safety and trauma needs of survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families, including access to safe shelter; and”; and

(2) by adding at the end the following:

“(d) Equal consideration of transitional housing projects.—In awarding funds to recipients under this subtitle, the Secretary shall consider transitional housing projects on an even basis with any other project of a qualified applicant.”.

SEC. 605. Report to Congress.

Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on—

(1) the trends in allocating resources beginning after the date of enactment of the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act of 2009 (Public Law 111–22; 123 Stat. 1663) to address the housing needs of survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and their families; and

(2) the increase in the effectiveness of those resources for promoting self-sufficiency and assisting survivors in finding employment beginning after the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 611. Housing rights.

Section 41411 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12491) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a)—

(A) in paragraph (1)(A), by striking “brother, sister,” and inserting “sibling,”;

(B) in paragraph (3)—

(i) in subparagraph (D), by striking “the program under subtitle A” and inserting ‘‘the programs under subtitles B through D’’;

(ii) by redesignating subparagraphs (I) and (J) as subparagraphs (J) and (K), respectively;

(iii) by inserting after subparagraph (H) the following:

“(I) the program under section 1338 of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4568);”;

(iv) in subparagraph (J), as so redesignated, by striking “and” at the end;

(v) in subparagraph (K), as so redesignated, by striking the period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and

(vi) by adding at the end the following:

“(L) housing assisted under the Comprehensive Service Programs for Homeless Veterans program under subchapter II of chapter 20 of title 38, United States Code (38 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.);

“(M) housing and facilities assisted under the grant program for homeless veterans with special needs under section 2061 of title 38, United States Code;

“(N) permanent housing for which assistance is provided under the program for financial assistance for supportive services for very low-income veteran families in permanent housing under section 2044 of title 38, United States Code;

“(O) to the extent practicable, such other Federal housing programs or Federally subsidized units providing affordable housing to low-income persons by means of restricted rents or rental assistance as identified by the appropriate agency; and”;

(2) by amending subsection (e) to read as follows:

“(e) Emergency transfers.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Each appropriate agency shall adopt a model emergency transfer plan for use by public housing agencies and owners or managers of housing assisted under covered housing programs that—

“(A) allows tenants who are victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to transfer to another available and safe dwelling unit assisted under a covered housing program if—

“(i) the tenant expressly requests the transfer; and

“(ii) (I) the tenant reasonably believes that the tenant is threatened with imminent harm from further violence if the tenant remains within the same dwelling unit assisted under a covered housing program; or

“(II) in the case of a tenant who is a victim of sexual assault, the sexual assault occurred on the premises during the 90 day period preceding the request for transfer; and

“(B) incorporates reasonable confidentiality measures, subject to other Federal and State law, to ensure that the public housing agency or owner or manager does not disclose the location of the dwelling unit of a tenant to a person that commits an act of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against the tenant.

“(2) ADDITIONAL TRANSFERS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—A public housing agency or owner or manager of housing assisted under a covered housing program may permit the tenant of any covered housing program to transfer to an available unit without regard to any waiting list or preference required or permitted under Federal law if the tenant meets the Federal eligibility requirements for the program and qualifies for an emergency transfer under this subsection.

“(B) REQUIREMENT.—The public housing agency or owner or manager choosing to implement this provision must do so pursuant to a written policy that is set forth in the public housing agency plan or under a written policy adopted by the owner or manager.

“(C) HOUSING ASSISTED UNDER A COVERED HOUSING PROGRAM DEFINITION.—For purposes of this paragraph, the term ‘housing assisted under a covered housing program’ includes housing for which the assistance under the covered housing program was provided before the effective date of this provision.”; and

(3) by amending subsection (g) to read as follows:

“(g) Implementation.—

“(1) TRAINING FOR STAFF OF COVERED HOUSING PROGRAMS.—The appropriate agency shall develop, in consultation with national service providers, training for public housing agencies or owners or managers of housing assisted under a covered housing program to provide a basic understanding of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, and to facilitate implementation of this section. Such training will be provided by the public housing agencies or owners or managers to the extent practicable.

“(2) INFORMATION.—Public housing agencies or owners or managers of housing assisted under a covered housing program shall supply all their appropriate staff with public contact information for all domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking service providers offering services in its local area, including interagency providers and private providers, including faith-based organizations.

“(3) AGENCY IMPLEMENTATION.—The appropriate agency with respect to each covered program shall implement this section, as this section applies to the covered housing program.

“(4) REGULATIONS.—The Secretary of each appropriate agency shall issue proposed regulations to carry out this section not later than 545 days after the date of enactment of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019”..”.

SEC. 612. Monitoring; Director of Domestic Violence Prevention.

Chapter 2 of subtitle N of Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12491 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“SEC. 41412. Monitoring.

“The appropriate agency shall, with respect to each covered housing program, establish a process, which may be complaint-based, to monitor, on a periodic basis, compliance with the requirements of section 41411.

“SEC. 41413. Director of Domestic Violence Prevention.

“(a) Establishment.—There is established within the Department of Housing and Urban Development a Director of Domestic Violence Prevention, who may hold other job titles in addition to the Director of Domestic Violence Prevention.

“(b) Duties.—The Director of Domestic Violence Prevention shall—

“(1) coordinate the development of regulations, policies, protocols, and guidelines relating to the implementation of this subtitle within the Department of Housing and Urban Development;

“(2) coordinate development of Federal regulations, policies, protocols, and guidelines on matters relating to the implementation of this subtitle at each appropriate agency administering a covered housing program; and

“(3) advise and coordinate with designated officials within the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, the Department of the Treasury, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Department of Justice concerning legislation, implementation, and other issues relating to or affecting the housing provisions under this subtitle.”.

SEC. 613. VAWA Emergency Transfer Demonstration Program.

(a) Authority.—The Secretary shall conduct a demonstration program to test locally or regionally based models of an emergency transfer program to determine how best to design a comprehensive approach to allow victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking to quickly, safely, and confidentially access other covered housing through emergency transfers, including how to collect and maintain information on units available for emergency transfers.

(b) Waivers and alternative requirements.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary may, as needed to test the effectiveness of local or regional plans for emergency transfers, waive or provide alternative requirements for any statute administered by the Secretary (except for requirements related to fair housing, nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the environment) for communities selected for participation in the demonstration program authorized under this section.

(2) NOTICE REQUIRED.—The Secretary shall publish any waivers or alternative requirements provided under paragraph (1) in the Federal Register not later than 10 calendar days before they become effective.

(3) EXPIRATION OF WAIVERS OR ALTERNATIVE REQUIREMENTS.—Any waivers or alternative requirements provided under this section shall expire on the date that is 5 years after the publication of the notice under subsection (c).

(c) Implementation.—The Secretary may implement the demonstration program under this section through a notice published in the Federal Register.

(d) Selection of participants.—The Secretary shall select participating communities through a single competitive process, as detailed in the notice published under subsection (c).

(e) Evaluation.—Not later than 8 years after the date of publication of the implementing notice under subsection (c), the Secretary shall assess and publish findings regarding the effectiveness, efficiency, and cost effectiveness of the emergency transfer programs under the demonstration program.

(f) Funding.—There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this section $22,000,000. Such funds shall remain available until the date that is 8 years after the date on which the notice is published under subsection (c).

SEC. 614. Housing programs.

(a) In general.—Section 41411(a)(3) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12491(a)(3)), as amended by section 606 of this Act, is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(P) rural development housing voucher assistance provided by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to section 542 of the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1490r), without regard to subsection (b) of such section, and applicable appropriation Acts.”.

(b) Transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.—Section 40299 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12351) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a), in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking “the Director of the Violence Against Women Office” and inserting “the Director of the Office on Violence Against Women”; and

(2) in subsection (g)(1), by striking “$35,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$38,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(c) Collaborative Grants To Increase the Long-Term Stability of Victims.—Section 41404(i) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12474(i)) is amended by striking “$4,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$4,400,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(d) Grants To Combat Violence Against Women in Public and Assisted Housing.—Section 41405 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12475) is amended—

(1) in subsection (b), by striking “the Director of the Violence Against Women Office” and inserting “the Director of the Office on Violence Against Women”; and

(2) in subsection (g), by striking “$4,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$4,400,000 for each fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

SEC. 701. National resource center on workplace responses to assist victims of domestic and sexual violence.

(a) In general.—Section 41501 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12501) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a), by striking “employers and labor organizations” and inserting “employers, labor organizations, and victim service providers”; and

(2) in subsection (e), by striking “$1,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018” and inserting “$2,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029”.

(b) Effective date.—The amendments made by subsection (a)(1) shall not take effect until October 1, 2020.

SEC. 702. Study on workplace best practices.

(a) Study on workplace best practices.—The Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Labor, and the Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, shall conduct a study on workplace best practices for providing support to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

(b) Public release and education program.—Not later than November 1, 2021, the Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Labor, and the Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission shall—

(1) submit to Congress the study conducted pursuant to subsection (a);

(2) publish the study conducted pursuant to subsection (a) on the Department of Justice’s website; and

(3) provide the public with educational resources to—

(A) promote communication skills in the workplace; and

(B) highlight Federal and State resources for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

SEC. 703. GAO study.

Not later than 24 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate a report that examines, with respect to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking who are, or were, enrolled at institutions of higher education and borrowed a loan made, insured, or guaranteed under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1070 et seq.) for which the victims have not repaid the total interest and principal due, each of the following:

(1) The implications of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking on a borrower's ability to repay their Federal student loans.

(2) The existence of policies and procedures regarding Federal student loan deferment, forbearance, and grace periods when a victim has to suspend or terminate the victim's enrollment at an institution of higher education due to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

(3) The existence of institutional policies and practices regarding retention or transfer of credits when a victim has to suspend or terminate the victim's enrollment at an institution of higher education due to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

(4) The availability or any options for a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking who attended an institution of higher education that committed unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts or practices, or otherwise substantially misrepresented information to students, to be able to seek a defense to repayment of the victim's Federal student loan.

(5) The limitations faced by a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to obtain any relief or restitution of the victim's Federal student loan debt.

SEC. 801. Grants to Indian Tribal governments.

Section 2015(a) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10452(a)) is amended, in paragraphs (2), (4), (5), (7), (8), and (9), by inserting “crimes, including” before “domestic” each place the term appears.

SEC. 802. Grants to Indian Tribal coalitions.

Section 2001(d)(3) of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10441) is amended, in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking “2014 through 2018” and inserting “2020 through 2029”.

SEC. 803. Consultation.

Section 903 of the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14045d) is amended—

(1) in subsection (a), by striking “and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013” and inserting “the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019”; and

(2) in subsection (b)(2), by inserting “crimes, including” before “domestic”.

SEC. 804. Tribal jurisdiction over crimes committed in Indian country.

Title II of Public Law 90–284 (25 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.) (commonly known as the “Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968”) is amended by striking section 204 (25 U.S.C. 1304) and inserting the following:

“SEC. 204. Tribal jurisdiction over crimes committed in Indian country.

“(a) Definitions.—In this section:

“(1) ASSAULT OF A LAW ENFORCEMENT OR CORRECTIONAL OFFICER.—The term ‘assault of a law enforcement or correctional officer’ means any violation of the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violation occurs where a person forcibly assaults, resists, opposes, impedes, intimidates, or interferes with any person designated as a tribal law enforcement or correctional officer engaged in or on account of the performance of their official duties.

“(2) COVERED CONDUCT.—The term ‘covered conduct’ means an offense—

“(A) described in paragraphs (1), (3), (4), (5), (6), (10), (13), and (14); and

“(B) committed in Indian country.

“(3) CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN.—The term ‘crimes against children’ means any violation of the criminal law of the Indian tribe that is a participating tribe if the violation occurs and is committed against an Indian child by a parent, legal custodian, or guardian of the Indian child, or a caregiver or person that would be subject to special tribal criminal jurisdiction.

“(4) DATING VIOLENCE.—The term ‘dating violence’ means any violation of the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violation occurs that was committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim, as determined by the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

“(5) DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.—The term ‘domestic violence’ means any violation of the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violation occurs that was committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, or by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic- or family- violence laws of an Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violence occurs.

“(6) HUMAN TRAFFICKING.—The term ‘human trafficking’ means any violation of the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violation occurs by a person that commits an act or practice described in paragraph (11) of section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

“(7) INDIAN COUNTRY.—The term ‘Indian country’ has the meaning given the term in section 1151 of title 18, United States Code.

“(8) PARTICIPATING TRIBE.—The term ‘participating tribe’ means an Indian tribe that—

“(A) meets the requirements to exercise special criminal jurisdiction described in subsection (b)(4);

“(B) elects to exercise special criminal jurisdiction over the Indian country of that Indian tribe; and

“(C) submits notice to the Attorney General of the intent of the Indian tribe to self-certify and begin exercising special criminal jurisdiction.

“(9) PROTECTION ORDER.—The term ‘protection order’—

“(A) means any injunction, restraining order, or other order issued by a civil or criminal court for the purpose of preventing violent or threatening acts or harassment against, sexual violence against, contact or communication with, or physical proximity to, another person; and

“(B) includes any temporary or final order issued by a civil or criminal court, whether obtained by filing an independent action or as a pendent lite order in another proceeding, if the civil or criminal order was issued in response to a complaint, petition, or motion filed by or on behalf of a person seeking protection.

“(10) SEXUAL ASSAULT.—The term ‘sexual assault’ means any nonconsensual sexual act or contact proscribed by the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violation occurs, including in any case in which the victim lacks capacity to consent.

“(11) SPECIAL CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.—The term ‘special criminal jurisdiction’ means the criminal jurisdiction that a participating tribe may exercise under this section but could not otherwise exercise.

“(12) SPOUSE OR INTIMATE PARTNER.—The term ‘spouse or intimate partner’ has the meaning given the term in section 2266 of title 18, United States Code.

“(13) STALKING.—The term ‘stalking’ means engaging in a course of conduct in violation of the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violation occurs that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the safety of the person or the safety of others.

“(14) VIOLATION OF A PROTECTION ORDER.—The term ‘violation of a protection order’ means any act that—

“(A) occurs in the Indian country of the participating tribe; and

“(B) violates a protection order that—

“(i) prohibits or provides protection against violent or threatening acts or harassment against, sexual violence against, contact or communication with, or physical proximity to, another person;

“(ii) is enforceable by the participating tribe; and

“(iii) is consistent with section 2265(b) of title 18, United States Code.

“(b) Nature of the criminal jurisdiction.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in addition to all powers of self-government recognized and affirmed by sections 201 and 203, the powers of self-government of a participating tribe, including any participating tribe in the State of Maine, include the inherent power of that tribe, which is hereby recognized and affirmed, to exercise special criminal jurisdiction over all persons.

“(2) CONCURRENT JURISDICTION.—The exercise of special criminal jurisdiction by a participating tribe shall be concurrent with the jurisdiction of the United States, of a State, or of both.

“(3) APPLICABILITY.—Nothing in this section—

“(A) creates or eliminates any Federal or State criminal jurisdiction over Indian country; or

“(B) affects the authority of the United States or any State government that has been delegated authority by the United States to investigate and prosecute a criminal violation in Indian country.

“(4) REQUIREMENTS TO EXERCISE SPECIAL CRIMINAL JURISDICTION OVER COVERED CONDUCT.—No participating tribe may exercise special criminal jurisdiction or otherwise exercise jurisdiction over covered conduct committed in the jurisdiction of a participating tribe by a defendant unless—

“(A) the proceeding is presided over by a judge of the participating tribe with a current, valid license, and in good standing, to practice law in any State, the District of Columbia, or territory of the United States; and

“(B) each attorney prosecuting or defending the defendant has a current, valid license, and in good standing, to practice law in any State, the District of Columbia, or territory of the United States.

“(5) EXCEPTIONS.—

“(A) VICTIM AND DEFENDANT ARE BOTH NON-INDIANS.—

“(i) DEFINITION OF VICTIM.—In this subparagraph and with respect to a criminal proceeding in which a participating tribe exercises special criminal jurisdiction based on a violation of a protection order, the term ‘victim’ means a person specifically protected by a protection order that the defendant allegedly violated.

“(ii) EXCEPTION.—A participating tribe may not exercise special criminal jurisdiction over an alleged offense if neither the defendant nor the alleged victim is an Indian.

“(B) DEFENDANT LACKS TIES TO THE PARTICIPATING TRIBE.—A participating tribe may exercise special criminal jurisdiction over a defendant only if the defendant—

“(i) resides in the Indian country of the participating tribe;

“(ii) is employed in the Indian country of the participating tribe; or

“(iii) is a spouse, intimate partner, or dating partner of—

“(I) a member of the participating tribe; or

“(II) an Indian who resides in the Indian country of the participating tribe.

“(6) SPECIAL CRIMINAL JURISDICTION SELF-CERTIFICATION.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—An Indian tribe shall submit to the Attorney General written notice of the intent of the Indian tribe to begin exercising special criminal jurisdiction.

“(B) AUDITING REQUIREMENTS.—

“(i) IN GENERAL.—The Attorney General may conduct an audit or review of a participating tribe to determine if the participating tribe is in compliance with all requirements necessary to exercise special criminal jurisdiction.

“(ii) ONSITE VISITS.—To the maximum extent practicable, the audits and reviews conducted under clause (i) shall include onsite visits by the appropriate official of the Department of Justice.

“(iii) REGULATIONS.—The Attorney General, in consultation with participating tribes, shall promulgate regulations to ensure that appropriate action is taken if a participating tribe is found under clause (i) not to be in compliance with all requirements necessary to exercise special criminal jurisdiction.

“(c) Rights of defendants.—In a criminal proceeding in which a participating tribe exercises criminal jurisdiction over covered conduct by a defendant, including special criminal jurisdiction, the participating tribe shall provide to the defendant all rights under the Constitution of the United States afforded criminal defendants by the courts of the United States, as interpreted by the courts of the United States, including the right to an impartial jury, the right to counsel, and the right to due process.

“(d) Selection of detention facility.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in paragraph (2), on conviction of a non-Indian defendant by a participating tribe, the participating tribe may select, with the consent of the Attorney General, a Federal or Tribal detention facility.

“(2) EXCEPTION.—Nothing in this subsection shall prohibit a participating tribe from housing a non-Indian inmate in a tribal facility that was prosecuted under the special criminal jurisdiction of the Indian tribe.

“(e) Post-sentencing notice requirements.—Immediately on the sentencing of a defendant to any form of custody following a trial or guilty plea, the tribal court of the participating tribe shall—

“(1) notify the defendant of his or her right to file a habeas corpus petition in the Federal district court for the district in which the defendant will be held in custody;

“(2) provide the defendant with a form habeas corpus petition for petitioners seeking relief and with adequate postage to enable the defendant to mail the form from the place of custody to the district court for filing;

“(3) advise a defendant who is unable to pay applicable filing fees of the right to ask for permission to file a habeas corpus petition in forma pauperis; and

“(4) advise the defendant of his or her appellate rights, which include—

“(A) the right to stay proceedings;

“(B) the right to an attorney; and

“(C) the right both—

“(i) to appeal to the appellate court of the participating tribe; and

“(ii) to file a petition for a writ of habeas corpus in a court of the United States.

“(f) Post-conviction relief.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 14 days after the date on which a sentence has been imposed, the defendant may request an appeal of the decision to the appellate court of jurisdiction of the participating tribe, which shall hear the appeal and render a decision not later than 90 days after the date on which the request is received.

“(2) LICENSED ATTORNEYS AND JUDGES OF TRIBAL APPELLATE COURTS.—Subsection (b)(4) shall apply to each attorney and each judge on an appellate court proceeding of the participating tribe reviewing a sentence under this subsection.

“(g) Petitions for special Tribal writs of habeas corpus.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Regardless of whether a defendant requests an appeal under subsection (f)(1), the defendant may file a petition for a writ of habeas corpus in a court of the United States under section 203 at any time after the conviction of the defendant becomes final.

“(2) EFFECT OF ORDER.—Tribal courts shall be bound by all orders issued by a court of the United States after review of a petition for a writ of habeas corpus under section 203.

“(3) SCOPE OF REVIEW.—A court of the United States reviewing a petition for a writ of habeas corpus under this subsection shall have jurisdiction to review the conviction of the defendant, including any deprivation of the rights of the defendant under subsection (c).

“(4) PROHIBITION ON INCORPORATING CERTAIN HABEAS PROVISIONS.—In reviewing a petition for a writ of habeas corpus under section 203 by a non-Indian petitioner, no court may apply any requirement described in section 2254 or 2255 of title 28, United States Code.

“(h) Petitions to stay detention.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—A person who has filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus in a court of the United States under section 203 may petition that court, the appellate court of jurisdiction of the participating tribe, or both, to stay further detention of that person by the participating tribe.

“(2) GRANT OF STAY.—A court shall grant a stay described in paragraph (1) if the court—

“(A) finds that there is a substantial likelihood that the habeas corpus petition will be granted; and

“(B) after giving each alleged victim in the matter an opportunity to be heard, finds by clear and convincing evidence that under conditions imposed by the court, the petitioner is not likely to flee or pose a danger to any person or the community if released.

“(3) NOTICE.—An Indian tribe that has ordered the detention of any person has a duty to immediately notify such person of his or her rights and privileges under this subsection and under section 203.

“(i) Civil action for deprivation of rights.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Every person who, under color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage of any participating tribe, subjects, or causes to be subjected, any defendant in a criminal prosecution of the covered conduct, including the special criminal jurisdiction of the participating tribe, to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution of the United States and Federal laws, shall be liable to the party injured in an action at law, suit in equity, or other proper proceeding for redress.

“(2) IMMUNITY FOR TRIBAL OFFICIALS.—In any action described in paragraph (1), tribal officials shall be entitled to claim the same immunity accorded public officials in actions brought under section 1979 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (42 U.S.C. 1983).

“(3) ADMINISTRATION.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—An action described in paragraph (1) may be brought in any appropriate district court of the United States.

“(B) TIMING.—An action described in paragraph (1) shall commence not later than 4 years after the date on which the conduct giving rise to the action occurred.

“(j) Grants to tribal governments.—The Attorney General may award grants to the governments of Indian tribes (or to authorized designees of those governments)—

“(1) to strengthen tribal criminal justice systems to assist Indian tribes in exercising special criminal jurisdiction, including—

“(A) law enforcement (including the capacity of law enforcement or court personnel to enter information into and obtain information from national crime information databases);

“(B) prosecution;

“(C) trial and appellate courts;

“(D) pretrial services;

“(E) probation systems;

“(F) detention and correctional facilities;

“(G) alternative rehabilitation centers;

“(H) culturally appropriate services and assistance for victims and their families;

“(I) criminal codes and rules of criminal procedure, appellate procedure, and evidence; and

“(J) contracting for services directly relating to the prosecution or defense of a defendant;

“(2) to provide indigent criminal defendants with the effective assistance of licensed defense counsel, at no cost to the defendant, in criminal proceedings in which a participating tribe prosecutes a violation of covered conduct committed in Indian country;

“(3) to ensure that, in criminal proceedings in which a participating tribe exercises special criminal jurisdiction, jurors are summoned, selected, and instructed in a manner consistent with all applicable requirements; and

“(4) to accord victims of covered conduct rights that are similar to the rights of a crime victim described in section 3771(a) of title 18, United States Code, consistent with tribal law and custom.

“(k) Supplement, not supplant.—Amounts made available under this section shall supplement and not supplant any other Federal, State, tribal, or local government amounts made available to carry out activities described in this section.

“(l) Authorization of appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated $15,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2029 to carry out subsection (j) and to provide training, technical assistance, data collection, and evaluation of the criminal justice systems of participating tribes.”.

SEC. 805. Reporting requirements.

(a) Definitions.—In this section, the terms “participating tribe” and “special criminal jurisdiction” have the meanings given the terms in section 204 of Public Law 90–284 (25 U.S.C. 1304) (commonly known as the “Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968”).

(b) Requirements.—The Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior, shall submit to the Committee on Indian Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives an annual report that includes—

(1) a comprehensive list of each participating tribe, including the date on which each participating tribe noticed the intent to begin exercising special criminal jurisdiction;

(2) details of prosecutions, for each participating tribe and in total, under the special criminal jurisdiction, including—

(A) the number and type of arrests;

(B) the number of convictions;

(C) the number of cases pending;

(D) the number of acquittals;

(E) the number of Federal referrals;

(F) the number of guilty pleas;

(G) the number of dismissals;

(H) the number of declinations;

(I) the number of jury trials, bench trials, and jury convictions;

(J) the number, results, current status of special tribal writs of habeas corpus; and

(K) demographic information on those arrested and prosecuted under the special criminal jurisdiction; and

(3) recommendations to Congress on how the special criminal jurisdiction can be improved.

SEC. 811. Short title.

This subtitle may be cited as the “Securing Urgent Resources Vital to Indian Victim Empowerment Act” or the “SURVIVE Act”.

SEC. 812. Indian victims of crime.

(a) Grant program for Indian crime victim services.—The Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (34 U.S.C. 20101 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 1404F the following:

    Grant program for Indian crime victim services

“Sec. 1404G. (a) Definitions.—In this section:

“(1) APPROPRIATE COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS.—The term ‘appropriate committees of Congress’ means—

“(A) the Committee on Indian Affairs of the Senate;

“(B) the Subcommittee on Indian, Insular and Alaska Native Affairs of the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of Representatives;

“(C) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate; and

“(D) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives.

“(2) COVERED GRANT.—The term ‘covered grant’ means a grant under subsection (c).

“(3) ELIGIBLE INDIAN TRIBE.—The term ‘eligible Indian Tribe’ means an Indian Tribe that submits a written proposal for a covered grant to the Director in accordance with subsection (c)(2).

“(4) IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBER.—The term ‘immediate family member’ has the meaning given the term in section 115(c) of title 18, United States Code.

“(5) INDIAN.—The term ‘Indian’ means a member of an Indian Tribe.

“(6) INDIAN LAND.—The term ‘Indian land’ has the meaning given the term ‘Indian lands’ in section 3 of the Native American Business Development, Trade Promotion, and Tourism Act of 2000 (25 U.S.C. 4302).

“(7) INDIAN TRIBE.—The term ‘Indian Tribe’ has the meaning given the term ‘Indian tribe’ in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 5304).

“(8) PERSONALLY IDENTIFYING INFORMATION.—The term ‘personally identifying information’ has the meaning given the term in section 40002(a) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(a)).

“(9) SERVICES TO VICTIMS OF CRIME.—The term ‘services to victims of crime’—

“(A) has the meaning given the term in section 1404; and

“(B) includes efforts that—

“(i) respond to the emotional, psychological, or physical needs of a victim of crime;

“(ii) assist a victim of crime in stabilizing his or her life after victimization;

“(iii) assist a victim of crime in understanding and participating in the criminal justice system; or

“(iv) restore a measure of security and safety for a victim of crime.

“(10) VICTIM OF CRIME.—The term ‘victim of crime’ means an individual who has suffered direct physical, sexual, financial, or emotional harm as a result of the commission of a crime.

“(b) Duties of the Director.—The Director shall—

“(1) administer the grant program described in subsection (c);

“(2) provide planning, research, training, and technical assistance to recipients of covered grants; and

“(3) coordinate with the Office of Tribal Justice, the Indian Health Service, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs in implementing the grant program described in subsection (c).

“(c) Grant program.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—On an annual basis, the Director shall make grants to eligible Indian Tribes for the purposes of funding—

“(A) a program, administered by one or more Indian Tribes, that provides services to victims of crime, which may be provided in traditional form or through electronic, digital, or other technological formats, including—

“(i) services to victims of crime provided through subgrants to agencies or departments of Tribal governments or nonprofit organizations;

“(ii) domestic violence shelters, rape crisis centers, child abuse programs, child advocacy centers, and elder abuse programs providing services to victims of crime;

“(iii) medical care, equipment, treatment, and related evaluations arising from the victimization, including—

“(I) emergency medical care and evaluation, nonemergency medical care and evaluation, psychological and psychiatric care and evaluation, and other forms of medical assistance, treatment, or therapy, regardless of the setting in which the services are delivered;

“(II) mental and behavioral health and crisis counseling, evaluation, and assistance, including outpatient therapy, counseling services, substance abuse treatment, and other forms of specialized treatment, including intervention and prevention services;

“(III) prophylactic treatment to prevent an individual from contracting HIV/AIDS or any other sexually transmitted disease or infection; and

“(IV) forensic medical evidence collection examinations and forensic interviews of victims of crime—

“(aa) to the extent that other funding sources are unavailable or insufficient; and

“(bb) on the condition that, to the extent practicable, the examiners and interviewers follow relevant guidelines or protocols issued by the State, unit of local government, or Indian Tribe with jurisdiction over the area in which the examination or interview is conducted;

“(iv) legal services, legal assistance services, and legal clinics (including services provided by pro bono legal clinics and practitioners), the need for which arises directly from the victimization;

“(v) the training and certification of service animals and therapy animals;

“(vi) equipment for Braille or TTY/TTD machines for the deaf necessary to provide services to victims of crime;

“(vii) restorative justice opportunities that allow victims of crime to meet with the perpetrators if the meetings are voluntarily agreed to by the victim of crime and are for therapeutic purposes; and

“(viii) training and related materials, including books, training manuals, and training videos, for staff and service providers to develop skills necessary to offer quality services to victims of crime;

“(B) the development or implementation of training, technical assistance, or professional development that improves or enhances the quality of services to victims of crime, including coordination between healthcare, education, and justice systems;

“(C) the transportation of victims of crime to—

“(i) receive services; or

“(ii) participate in criminal justice proceedings;

“(D) emergency legal assistance to victims of crime that is directly connected to the crime;

“(E) the supervision of direct service providers and contracts for professional or specialized services that are related directly to providing services to victims of crime;

“(F) the repair and replacement of essential items used during the provision of services to victims of crime to contribute to and maintain a healthy and safe environment for the victims;

“(G) transitional housing for victims of crime, particularly victims who have a particular need for such housing and cannot safely return to previous housing, including travel, rental assistance, security deposits, utilities, and other related costs that are incidental to the relocation to transitional housing;

“(H) the relocation of victims of crime, particularly where necessary for the safety and well-being of the victim, including reasonable moving expenses, security deposits for housing, rental expenses, and utility startup costs;

“(I) the coordination of activities that facilitate the provision of direct services to victims of crime;

“(J) a multi-system, inter-agency, multi-disciplinary response to the needs of victims of crime; and

“(K) the administration of the program and services described in this section.

“(2) ELIGIBILITY.—An Indian Tribe seeking a covered grant shall, in response to a request for proposal, submit to the Director a written proposal for a covered grant, which shall include—