Bill summaries are authored by CRS.

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Passed Senate amended (11/13/1985)

(Measure passed Senate, amended, roll call #305 (60-39))

Title I: Textile And Apparel Trade Enforcement - Textile and Apparel Trade Enforcement Act of 1985 - Limits the total quantity of 1985 imports of textiles (other than textile luggage, handbags, and flat goods) from a major producing country to the lesser of an amount equal to 101 percent: (1) of the total quantity of textile products imported from such country if the total had increased by six percent annually (one percent annually for wool products) during 1981 through 1984; or (2) if the United States has an agreement with such country providing for an annual growth rate of less than six percent, of the total quantity of such products from such country imported during 1984.

Provides that if such import limitation would result in 1985 imports of less than 70 percent of the total 1984 imports then the total quantity of textile imports from a major producing country during 1985 shall be not less than 40 percent of the total imports from such country during 1984.

Requires that 1985 imports of textile luggage, handbags, and flat goods covered by an import limitation agreement with a major producing country or with a producing country are limited in accordance with such agreement.

Limits the total 1985 imports of textiles of a producing country to an amount equal to the total quantity of 1984 imports.

Limits 1985 imports of textiles (other than certain cotton, wool, and man-made fiber sweaters) from a small producing country to an amount equal to the sum of: (1) the total quantity of such imports in 1984; plus (2) an amount equal to 15 percent of such quantity if the article is not categorized as import sensitive or one percent of such quantity if the article is categorized as import sensitive.

Limits 1985 imports of cotton, wool, and man-made fiber sweaters from Guam and from the Northern Mariana Islands.

Sets forth a formula for adjusting the growth of textile imports annually. Sets forth certain minimum quantities of textile imports that all countries shall be allowed to export to the United States. Provides a special rule for determining when a small producing country shall be designated a producing country. Requires the Secretary of Commerce to enforce this Act.

Directs the Secretary, within six months of enactment of this Act, to establish an import licensing system under which an importer of textiles will be required to present an import permit as a condition of entry of such textiles.

Directs the President to report to the Congress annually on the administration of this Act.

Directs the Secretary of Commerce to review the textile import control program ten years after enactment of this title.

Amends the Tariff Schedules of the United States to provide duty-free treatment for certain cotton, wool, and man-made fiber sweaters imported from Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Exempts from textile import limitations certain textile imports from insular possessions of the United States if they meet specified requirements.

Title II - American Footwear Industry Recovery Act of 1985 - Limits imports of nonrubber footwear during each of the eight years following enactment of this title to 60 percent of the estimated apparent domestic consumption of such footwear for such year. Allocates portions of such quota among different types of nonrubber footwear. Directs the Secretary of Commerce to make annual and quarterly determinations of the expected apparent domestic consumption of nonrubber footwear.

Directs the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of the Treasury to enforce this Act.

Provides that for purposes of the provision of the Trade Act of 1974 dealing with compensation authority for import restrictions the import limits imposed, under this title shall be treated as import relief actions.

Title III: Copper - Copper Free Market Restoration Act of 1985 - Declares that it is national policy that the United States must seek to negotiate agreements temporarily limiting copper production by foreign copper producers in order to: (1) ensure an adequate supply of domestic copper; (2) expand employment in the copper industry; and (3) stabilize foreign copper production.

Directs the President, acting through the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) and the Secretary of the Interior, to undertake negotiations, during the nine months following enactment of this Act, with: (1) all major copper producing countries in order to obtain voluntary restraint agreements limiting copper production in such countries during each year within the copper import restraint period (a five year period following enactment of this Act); and (2) with all significant copper producing countries in order to obtain voluntary restraint agreements limiting copper production in such countries during each year within the copper import restraint period. Directs the President to report to the Congress every three months during the nine months following enactment of this Act on the progress of such negotiations. Sets forth information to be included in such periodic reports and in the final report to the Congress.

Directs the USTR, if such voluntary restraint agreements take effect, to monitor and report to the Congress on copper production in such countries during each year within the copper import restraint period.

Title IV: Foreign Labor Practices - Directs the International Trade Commission (ITC) to study labor practices of each foreign country which had a surplus in the balance of trade between the United States and such foreign country for 1984 that exceeded $4,000,000,000. Sets forth analyses to be included in such study. Requires the ITC to report to the Congress, the Secretary of Labor, and the Secretary of Commerce on such report within nine months of enactment of this Act.

Directs the Secretary of Labor and the Secretary of Commerce each to conduct a separate investigation to: (1) identify each of the labor practices discussed in the ITC report that is illegal under Federal or State law or that should be prohibited under an international labor law code; (2) determine what labor principles and rules should be included in an international labor law code; and (3) determine the issues involved in, and the prospects for achieving, the elimination of such labor practices through negotiations. Directs the Secretaries to submit their reports to the Congress within three months of submission of the ITC report.