INTRODUCING HOUSE RESOLUTION COMMEMORATING AND ACKNOWLEDGING THE SERVICE OF DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER AS GENERAL OF THE ARMY AND PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
(House of Representatives - October 14, 1999)

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[Page H10113]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




   INTRODUCING HOUSE RESOLUTION COMMEMORATING AND ACKNOWLEDGING THE 
SERVICE OF DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER AS GENERAL OF THE ARMY AND PRESIDENT OF 
                           THE UNITED STATES

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a previous order of the House, the 
gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Moran) is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. MORAN of Kansas. Mr. Speaker, today I am pleased to join with the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hall) in introducing House Concurrent 
Resolution 198. It is my honor today to commend a fellow Kansan and the 
gentleman from Texas commending, I guess, a fellow Texan, Dwight David 
Eisenhower. Today is the 109th anniversary of the birth of our 34th 
President. The Kansas legislature recently passed a resolution 
recognizing today, October 14, that day of each year as Dwight D. 
Eisenhower Day, an official State observance and an opportunity for 
schools to teach students about our former President. The resolution 
encourages museums and schools to develop educational programs for our 
young people to learn about Eisenhower. The city of Abilene in my 
district is commencing holding 3 days of celebrations so that people 
across the State and country may recognize, celebrate and learn more 
about the life of our most accomplished son.
  Today, I am speaking in hopes that we can follow Kansas' lead by 
encouraging Americans all across the United States to take time to 
remember, honor and learn about Dwight David Eisenhower.
  President Eisenhower's life should be an inspiration to all Americans 
to work continuously to make this country and this world a better 
place. Born in Denison, Texas, in the district of the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Hall) and raised in Abilene, Kansas, in the First District 
of my State, Ike was one of seven sons and grew up in a home of modest 
means. He became interested in the military at an early age. Following 
his graduation from Abilene High School in 1909 and a job at the Bell 
Springs Creamery, young Ike was accepted to the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, New York, in 1911.
  On July 1, 1916, Ike married Miss Mamie Geneva Doud of Denver, 
Colorado. The Eisenhowers had two sons, Doud Dwight who died in infancy 
and John Sheldon Doud who followed his father into national service, is 
now a retired brigadier general in the Army Reserves, a former U.S. 
ambassador to Belgium and one of our Nation's leading military 
historians.
  In 1935, Ike assumed the rank of captain and accompanied General 
Douglas MacArthur to the Philippines, serving as a senior military 
assistant to the Philippine government. After an impressive series of 
promotions, Mr. Eisenhower was appointed the supreme commander of the 
Allied forces in December 1943. On June 6, 1944, the day now known 
simply as D-Day, Ike commanded Operation Overlord, leading the invasion 
of Normandy which led to the successful liberation of France and the 
ultimate defeat of Nazi Germany.
  On November 19, 1945, Eisenhower was designated as chief of staff for 
the U.S. Army, and in 1947 he became President of Colombia University 
in New York City. Upon hearing the call of his country, Ike returned to 
service and was named supreme allied commander of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization where he served until May of 1952.
  That year, Eisenhower returned to his hometown of Abilene, Kansas, to 
announce his candidacy for President of the United States. Ike served 
two terms as President, from January 20, 1953 to January 20, 1961. As 
President, Ike saw the end of the Korean War, and the entry of Alaska 
and Hawaii into the union. Upon signing the Civil Rights Act of 1957, 
Ike helped desegregate public schools as well as the U.S. military 
claiming, ``There must be no second class citizens in this country.'' 
As his civil rights policies changed the course of history, so did his 
establishment of the Federal interstate highway system. As the 
Eisenhower highway system connects the States, Eisenhower was 
instrumental in connecting us to space by signing the bill which 
created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
  Clearly, Eisenhower had a profound effect on the course of mankind. 
This past March marked the 30th anniversary since Eisenhower's death. 
He died on March 28, 1969, at the age of 78 and was buried in Abilene, 
Kansas. Eisenhower's life achievements illustrate to kids that it is 
possible to aspire to greatness from humble beginnings, to respect 
those around you, and to take pride in our country. His character 
teaches parents the importance of instilling values of hard work, 
determination and honesty in our children. October 14 is a day to 
reflect on the contributions Dwight D. Eisenhower made to this country 
over his lifetime. We can all learn from his actions which is why folks 
in Abilene and in Kansas and all across the country still say, ``I like 
Ike.''

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