SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING CONGRESSIONAL PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY; Congressional Record Vol. 146, No. 68
(House of Representatives - June 06, 2000)

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[Pages H3875-H3876]
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     SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING CONGRESSIONAL PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY

  Mr. GOODLING. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to 
the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 229) expressing the sense of 
Congress regarding the United States Congressional Philharmonic Society 
and its mission of promoting musical excellence throughout the 
educational system and encouraging people of all ages to commit to the 
love and expression of musical performance.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                            H. Con. Res. 229

       Whereas in February 1996, several Senators and members of 
     the House of Representatives participated in a performance of 
     the Broadway musical ``1776'', a story depicting the signing 
     of the Declaration of Independence;
       Whereas in April 1996 several Senators and members of the 
     House of Representatives met with Maestro Martin Piecuch, the 
     music director of the musical ``1776'', and formed the United 
     States Congressional Choral Society;
       Whereas on May 20, 1998, the United States Congressional 
     Choral Society debuted at St. Joseph's Church on Capitol 
     Hill, with standing ovations following its rendition of the 
     ``Song of Democracy'' and the ``Battle Hymn of the 
     Republic'';
       Whereas on March 13, 1999, the United States Congressional 
     Philharmonic Orchestra String Quartet played before the 
     Ambassador to the United States from Canada at the Embassy of 
     Canada in the District of Columbia;
       Whereas on March 19, 1999, the United States Congressional 
     Choral Society appeared in performance at the Washington 
     National Cathedral;
       Whereas on May 13, 1999, the United States Congressional 
     Philharmonic Orchestra String Quartet played before a 
     gathering of Ambassadors at the Benjamin Franklin Diplomatic 
     Reception Room of the United States Department of State;
       Whereas the United States Congressional Philharmonic 
     Society is approved as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization 
     under the Internal Revenue Code and is a corporation in good 
     standing under the laws of the State of Delaware;
       Whereas the United States Congressional Philharmonic 
     Society will offer free concerts to the public in the 
     Washington metropolitan area;
       Whereas the United States Congressional Philharmonic 
     Society will encourage the development of young musical 
     talent across the United States by providing educational 
     programs for schools across the nation and establishing 
     internships and scholarships; and
       Whereas the United States Congressional Philharmonic 
     Society envisions holding a series of concerts focusing on 
     themes such as Celebrations of America, Salutes to the 
     States, a Great Americans series, and an International 
     Congressional Concert series: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
     concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that the 
     United States Congressional Philharmonic Society should be 
     applauded--
       (1) for organizing two musical groups, the United States 
     Congressional Choral Society and the United States 
     Congressional Philharmonic Orchestra;
       (2) for having as its mission the promotion of patriotism, 
     freedom, democracy, and understanding of American culture 
     through sponsorship, management, and support of these groups 
     and their derivative ensembles as they communicate through 
     the international language of music in concerts and other 
     multimedia performances in the District of Columbia and 
     throughout the United States and the world; and
       (3) for promoting musical excellence throughout the 
     educational system, from pre-school through post-graduate, 
     and encouraging people of all ages to commit to the love and 
     expression of musical performance.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Goodling) and the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
Fattah) each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Goodling).
  Mr. GOODLING. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I rise in support of House Concurrent Resolution 229 expressing the 
sense of Congress regarding the United States Congressional 
Philharmonic Society and its dual mission, promoting musical excellence 
throughout the educational system and encouraging people of all ages to 
commit to the love and expression of musical performance.
  In February 1996, several Members of Congress participated in the 
performance of the Broadway musical 1776, a story depicting the signing 
of the Declaration of Independence. I practiced and rehearsed and then 
was unable to participate. The Members of Congress so enjoyed this 
experience that as an outgrowth, the United States Congressional Choral 
Society was founded in April 1996. The Congressional Choral Society is 
composed of Members, staff and friends of the United States Congress. 
In fact, I have also performed with the choral society.
  On May 20, 1998, the Congressional Choral Society debuted along with 
the Washington Symphony Orchestra at St. Joseph's Church on Capitol 
Hill with standing ovations following their rendition of the Song of 
Democracy and the Battle Hymn of the Republic. The marriage of the 
Congressional Choral Society and the Washington Symphony Orchestra gave 
birth to the idea and the eventual reality of a congressional 
Philharmonic orchestra. The United States Congressional Philharmonic 
Society is the institution principally responsible for the formation, 
development, and operation of the United States Congressional 
Philharmonic Orchestra and the United States Congressional Choral 
Society which, I might add, I have chaired in all 15 years of its 
existence.
  The vision of the Congressional Philharmonic Society is to become the 
artistic voice of America through the international language of music. 
The society will do that by encouraging congressional Members, staff, 
and friends of the United States Congress to use their musical 
resources and talents. Given those talents and resources, the society 
can accept invitations to present musical programs and intends to 
present musical performances that will enrich lives all across America 
with patriotic and classical presentations.
  The mission of the Congressional Philharmonic Society is to promote 
patriotism, freedom, democracy, understanding, and world peace through

[[Page H3876]]

music. That mission will be accomplished by sponsoring, managing, and 
supporting the Congressional Choral Society and the Congressional 
Symphony Orchestra as they communicate through the international 
language of music in concerts and other multimedia performances.
  House Concurrent Resolution 229 is simple and straightforward. It 
notes that the Congressional Philharmonic Society is approved as a 
501(c)3 nonprofit organization under the Internal Revenue Code, offers 
free concerts to the public in the Washington metropolitan area, and 
encourages the development of young musical talent across the United 
States by providing internships, scholarships, and educational programs 
for schools across the Nation.
  This resolution states that it is the sense of the Congress that the 
United States Congressional Philharmonic Society should be applauded 
for having as its mission the promotion of patriotism, freedom, 
democracy, and understanding of American culture through the 
international language of music; and for promoting musical excellence 
throughout the educational system, and encouraging people of all ages 
to commit to the love and expression of musical performance.
  I would like to thank the gentleman from Virginia--Mr. Davis--for 
introducing this resolution, and I would urge my colleagues to support 
House Concurrent Resolution 229 and the Congressional Philharmonic 
Society.

                              {time}  1230

  Mr. GOODLING. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FATTAH. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I rise in support of H. Con. Res. 229, and I am again amazed at the 
multi-talented nature of the chairman of the Committee on Education and 
the Workforce. I was not aware that he also performed in these 
organizations beyond his work on the committee of setting a national 
education policy, but he is truly a Renaissance man.
  Madam Speaker, I support the legislation and the prime sponsor of it, 
the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Davis). We came to the Congress 
together, and I hold him in high esteem.
  Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GOODLING. Madam Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to 
the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Davis).
  Mr. DAVIS of Virginia. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding me this time, and I appreciate his efforts in bringing this 
bill to the floor.
  I rise today as the proud sponsor of H. Con. Res. 229, which 
expresses the sense of Congress regarding the United States 
Philharmonic Society and its mission of promoting musical excellence 
throughout the educational system and encouraging people of all ages to 
commit to the joy and expression of musical performance.
  I believe that all Americans should have the opportunity to 
participate in music and art programs. Arts education programs and, 
specifically, music education programs have a positive impact on the 
lives of our children. Music education is a valuable lesson that serves 
to enrich our children and our society, and the United States 
Congressional Philharmonic Society plays a vital role in accomplishing 
these goals.
  The United States Congressional Philharmonic Society has created its 
own unique and appropriate mission which promotes patriotism, freedom, 
democracy, and understanding of American culture through sponsorship, 
management, and support of these groups and their derivative ensembles 
as they communicate through the international language of music in 
concerts and other multimedia performances in the United States and the 
world.
  Under the organization of Maestro Martin Piecuch, the Congressional 
Philharmonic Society has quickly established itself as a voice of 
freedom and democracy through the art of music. Maestro Piecuch can be 
credited with planting the seed for the Congressional Philharmonic 
Society when he directed the Broadway musical 1776 at DAR Constitution 
Hall in March of 1995 in which 12 Members of Congress played roles as 
the Founding Fathers of this great Nation.
  As the music director and conductor of the Washington Symphony 
Orchestra, the maestro has played a great role in the world of music 
for the citizens of Northern Virginia. He has served as resident 
conductor, orchestra manager, and chorus manager at Wolf Trap Farm Park 
for the Performing Arts and held the position of music director and 
conductor with the Alexandria Choral Society.
  The United States Congressional Philharmonic Society has developed a 
concert series to promote democracy and peace throughout the world. 
Most recently, on May 13, 2000, the String Quartet of the United States 
Congressional Philharmonic Orchestra performed in the United States 
Department of State Diplomatic Reception Room before the ambassadors to 
America representing the South African Development countries.
  I would also like to thank former United States Senator Charles Percy 
for his support of the Congressional Philharmonic Society. Senator 
Percy's leadership and guidance have played a great role in Society's 
formation.
  Madam Speaker, the United States Congressional Philharmonic Society 
is a living example of how our country's principles of freedom and 
liberty can be showcased to the entire world through music. I urge all 
Members to join us in supporting this resolution.
  Mr. GOODLING. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I do want to mention that the Capitol Hill Choral Society which I 
chair was the brainchild of Betty Buchanan who has been our director 
for 13 years, and she is the wife of our former colleague, Congressman 
John Buchanan. We have given many concerts with junior high choruses 
throughout Washington, D.C.
  Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mrs. Biggert). The question is on the motion 
offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Goodling) that the 
House suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. 
Res. 229.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution was 
agreed to.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

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