EXPRESSING SORROW OF THE HOUSE AT THE DEATH OF THE HONORABLE PATSY T. MINK, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF HAWAII
(Extensions of Remarks - October 03, 2002)

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[Extensions of Remarks]
[Pages E1743-E1744]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




 EXPRESSING SORROW OF THE HOUSE AT THE DEATH OF THE HONORABLE PATSY T. 
           MINK, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF HAWAII

                                 ______
                                 

                               speech of

                       HON. STEPHANIE TUBBS JONES

                                of ohio

                    in the house of representatives

                        Tuesday, October 1, 2002

  Mrs. JONES of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in remembrance of my 
colleague Congresswoman Patsy Mink who served in the House of 
Representatives for twelve terms. She was the first woman of Asian 
descent to serve in the U.S. Congress. Representative Patsy Mink's 
ancestry is the classic story of immigrants seeking a better life in 
America for themselves and their families. Her four grandparents 
emigrated from Japan in the late 1800's to work as contract laborers in 
Maui's sugar plantations.
  Representative Mink began college at the University of Hawaii, but 
transferred to the University of Nebraska where she faced a policy of 
segregated student housing. Working with other students, their parents, 
and even university trustees, this policy of discrimination was ended. 
She returned to the University of Hawaii to prepare for medical school 
and graduated with a degree in zoology and chemistry. However, in 1948, 
none of the twenty medical schools to which she applied would accept 
women. She decided to study law and was accepted by the University of 
Chicago because they considered her a ``foreign student.'' Choosing not 
to inform the University that Hawaii was an American territory, she 
obtained her Doctor of Jurisprudence in 1951. Newly married, she became 
the first Asian-American woman to practice law in Hawaii.
  In 1956, she was elected to the Territorial House of Representatives. 
It was the beginning of a long and effective political life. In 1959, 
Hawaii became the 50th state. In 1965, Patsy Mink was elected to the 
U.S. House of Representatives and began the first of six consecutive 
terms in the House of Representatives. She was the first woman of color 
to be elected to Congress.
  Representative Mink's ability to build coalitions for progressive 
legislation continued during her tenure in Congress. She introduced

[[Page E1744]]

the first comprehensive Early Childhood Education Act and authored the 
Women's Educational Equity Act.
  In the early 1970's, she played a key role in the enactment of Title 
IX of the Higher Education Act Amendments. Written in 1972 to be 
enacted by 1977, Title IX, which prohibited gender discrimination by 
federally funded institutions, has become the major tool for women's 
fuller participation not only in sports, but in all aspects of 
education. Title IX is the reason why girls and women have made such 
gains in education and particularly in sports. In 1971, only 294,015 
girls participated in high school athletics. Today, over 2.7 million 
girls participate in high school athletics, an 847 percent increase, 
according to the Department of Education.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to reiterate the importance the legacy of 
my dear friend Patsy Mink. Congresswoman Mink will be remembered for 
her deep concern and support of education, women rights, and Pacific 
Islander issues. Her struggles and accomplishments bear witness to the 
strength of the American Spirit.

                          ____________________