SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 75--EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF THE CONGRESS THAT A COMMEMORATIVE POSTAGE STAMP SHOULD BE ISSUED TO PROMOTE PUBLIC AWARENESS OF DOWN SYNDROME
(Senate - October 23, 2003)

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[Page S13149]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




 SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 75--EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF THE CONGRESS 
 THAT A COMMEMORATIVE POSTAGE STAMP SHOULD BE ISSUED TO PROMOTE PUBLIC 
                       AWARENESS OF DOWN SYNDROME

  Mr. DURBIN (for himself, Mr. Cornyn, Mr. Bingaman, Mr. Bayh, Mr. 
Feingold, and Mr. Inouye) submitted the following concurrent 
resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs:

                            S. Con. Res. 75

       Whereas Down syndrome affects people of all races and 
     economic levels;
       Whereas Down syndrome is the most frequently occurring 
     chromosomal abnormality;
       Whereas 1 in every 800 to 1,000 children is born with Down 
     syndrome;
       Whereas more than 350,000 people in the United States have 
     Down syndrome;
       Whereas 5,000 children with Down syndrome are born each 
     year;
       Whereas as the mortality rate associated with Down syndrome 
     in the United States decreases, the prevalence of individuals 
     with Down syndrome in the United States will increase;
       Whereas some experts project that the number of people with 
     Down syndrome will double by 2013;
       Whereas individuals with Down syndrome are becoming 
     increasingly integrated into society and community 
     organizations, such as school, health care systems, work 
     forces, and social and recreational activities;
       Whereas more and more people in the United States interact 
     with individuals with Down syndrome, increasing the need for 
     widespread public acceptance and education; and
       Whereas a greater understanding of Down syndrome and 
     advancements in treatment of Down syndrome-related health 
     problems have allowed people with Down syndrome to enjoy 
     fuller and more active lives: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
     concurring), That it is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the United States Postal Service should issue a 
     commemorative postage stamp to promote public awareness of 
     Down syndrome; and
       (2) the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee should recommend 
     to the Postmaster General that such a stamp be issued.

  Mr. DURBIN. Mr. President, today I am pleased to submit a resolution 
expressing the sense of the Congress that a commemorative United States 
postage stamp should be issued to promote public awareness of Down 
syndrome and the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee should recommend to 
the Postmaster General that such a stamp be issued. I am honored to be 
joined by Senator Cornyn, Senator Bayh, Senator Bingaman, Senator 
Feingold, and Senator Inouye in this effort.
  Down syndrome is a genetic condition usually caused by an error in 
cell division called non-disjunction. Regardless of the type of Down 
syndrome a person may have, all people with Down syndrome have an 
extra, critical portion of the number 21 chromosome present in all, or 
some, of their cells. This additional genetic material alters the 
course of development and causes the characteristics associated with 
the syndrome.
  Down syndrome affects people of all races and economic levels. It is 
the most frequently occurring chromosomal abnormality, occurring once 
out of every 800 to 1,000 births. In the United States, more than 
350,000 people have Down syndrome. Nearly 5,000 children with Down 
syndrome are born each year. Because the mortality rate connected with 
Down syndrome is decreasing, the number of individuals with Down 
syndrome in our society is increasing. Some experts predict that the 
prevalence of individuals with Down syndrome will double in the next 10 
years, further increasing the need for public acceptance and education 
about this genetic condition.
  October is designated as Down Syndrome Awareness Month, so this is an 
appropriate time to demonstrate support for people with Down syndrome 
and encourage greater inclusion and acceptance in our society. I 
encourage my colleagues to co-sponsor this meaningful resolution and 
assist our efforts to convince the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee 
to recommend the issuance of a postage stamp promoting public awareness 
of Down syndrome.

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