GRANT W. GREEN POST OFFICE BUILDING; Congressional Record Vol. 151, No. 147
(House of Representatives - November 08, 2005)

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[Pages H9979-H9980]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                  GRANT W. GREEN POST OFFICE BUILDING

  Mr. WESTMORELAND. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill (H.R. 3770) to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 205 West Washington Street in Knox, Indiana, 
as the ``Grant W. Green Post Office Building''.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                               H.R. 3770

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. GRANT W. GREEN POST OFFICE BUILDING.

       (a) Designation.--The facility of the United States Postal 
     Service located at 205 West Washington Street in Knox, 
     Indiana, shall be known and designated as the ``Grant W. 
     Green Post Office Building''.
       (b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, 
     document, paper, or other record of the United States to the 
     facility referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be 
     a reference to the ``Grant W. Green Post Office Building''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Westmoreland) and the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Davis) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Westmoreland).


                             General Leave

  Mr. WESTMORELAND. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend 
their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under 
consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Georgia?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. WESTMORELAND. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 3770 
authored by the distinguished gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Chocola).
  Mr. Speaker, this bill would designate this post office in Knox, 
Indiana, as the Grant W. Green Post Office Building.
  As the longest serving postman in Knox history, Grant Green served 
the people of Knox from 1920 to 1970. For more than half a century, he 
refused to let anything, ``neither rain nor sleet nor snow nor dark of 
night,'' keep him from his appointed routes. For 23 years, he delivered 
mail to all houses located north of the Nickel Plate Railroad tracks, 
which ran through the center of town. He spent the remaining 27 years 
of his career delivering mail

[[Page H9980]]

on rural routes at a time when most homes were located on dirt or 
gravel roads.
  Grant Green moved to Knox as a young man to raise a family, but he 
quickly became the quintessential public servant: hardworking, 
passionate about his job, and dedicated to the people in the country in 
which he served. He was also extremely active in the community as a 70-
year member of the local Masonic Lodge. Mr. Green passed away on 
December 29, 1990, but will be forever remembered as one of the most 
dedicated citizens of the community of Knox, Indiana.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to come together to recognize the 
vast dedication of Grant W. Green to public service in Knox, Indiana.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, as a member of the House Government Reform Committee, I 
am pleased to join my colleague in consideration of H.R. 3770, 
legislation designating a postal facility in Knox, Indiana, after the 
late Grant W. Green.
  This legislation, which was introduced by Representative Chris 
Chocola of Indiana on September 14, 2005, was unanimously reported by 
the Government Reform Committee on October 20, 2005. H.R. 3770 enjoys 
the support and co-sponsorship of the entire Indiana delegation.
  A rural letter carrier, Mr. Green had the distinction of being the 
longest serving postal carrier in Knox history. He worked for the Post 
Office Department from 1920 until 1970. His route ran through the 
center of Knox and in rural areas, working for 50 years.
  Mr. Green's neighbors and friends remember him as dedicated, 
hardworking, and passionate about his job. Nothing kept Mr. Green from 
delivering the mail. He was a dependable and friendly letter carrier.
  Mr. Speaker, it always gives me great pleasure when we recognize the 
contributions of postal workers by dedicating a facility in their 
honor. Designating the newly opened post office in Knox after Mr. Green 
is a wonderful way to honor the memory of Grant W. Green, and I urge 
swift passage of this bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BUYER. Mr. Speaker, I had the privilege of representing the city 
of Knox in Starke County for ten years in Congress, and though it is no 
longer in my congressional district, it is a town that remains special 
to me. It is a community filled with tight-knit families who support 
one another through good times and bad.
  What is so fitting about naming Knox's post office for Grant Green is 
that it is not only a tribute to the people of Knox, but to the men and 
women of the U.S. Postal Service.
  Grant Green lived nearly his entire life in Knox where he raised his 
family, was a model citizen, and dedicated himself to public service.
  It is that public service for which he is best known. For 50 years, 
he served the people of Knox as a postman.
  Now, in these days of instant communication and relatively 
inexpensive travel, it is sometimes easy to overlook the vital role 
that the men and women of the U.S. Postal Service have played for our 
communities, especially our rural communities.
  Communities such as Knox may have small populations, but they are 
typically surrounded by family farms. In decades past, postmen may have 
been the only outside contact that those families had for weeks. Their 
arrival and what they brought, not only in the mailbag but also in news 
from town to town, was vital and eagerly awaited.
  For 50 years, Grant Green was the link to the outside world for many 
families and we honor his service today with the naming of the new Knox 
Post Office.
  Mr. CHOCOLA. Mr. Speaker, today, the House will consider H.R. 3770, 
legislation to designate the newly opened post office in Knox, Indiana, 
as the ``Grant W. Green Post Office Building.''
  Grant Green worked as a postal carrier in Knox, Indiana from 1920 to 
1970, making him the longest-serving postal employee in the community's 
history. For 23 years, he delivered mail to all houses located North of 
the Nickel Plate Railroad tracks, which ran through the center of Knox. 
He spent the remaining 27 years of his career delivering mail on rural 
routes at a time most rural homes were located on dirt or gravel roads.
  A native of North Judson, Indiana, Grant moved to Knox as a young boy 
and attended Knox High School. Grant was hired by the local post office 
in 1920 and he quickly became the quintessential public servant: 
hardworking, passionate about his job, and dedicated to the people and 
country he served. Twenty years later, he married Margie Gaede. 
Together, they raised five children, all graduates of Knox High School. 
Grant was active throughout the community, including his nearly 70-year 
membership in the local Masonic Lodge. He died on December 29, 1990 and 
was buried on his 50th wedding anniversary, December 31, 1990.
  For more than half a century, Grant refused to let anything, 
``neither rain nor sleet nor snow nor dark of night,'' keep him from 
his appointed routes. Naming the new post office in Knox after a local 
courier and pillar of the community will honor not only Grant Green, 
but also the hard working postal employees with whom he served. It will 
recognize an era unique in the American experience, and it will make a 
statement to future generations about the importance Knox places on a 
strong work ethic and public service. I urge my colleagues to join me 
in supporting this legislation.
  Mr. WESTMORELAND. Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to support the 
passage of H.R. 3770, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Feeney). The question is on the motion 
offered by the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Westmoreland) that the House 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 3770.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds of 
those present have voted in the affirmative.
  Mr. WESTMORELAND. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the 
Chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this question will 
be postponed.

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