TRIBUTE TO COLONEL JOHN W. IVES; Congressional Record Vol. 151, No. 90
(Extensions of Remarks - June 30, 2005)

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[Extensions of Remarks]
[Pages E1404-E1405]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                    TRIBUTE TO COLONEL JOHN W. IVES

                                 ______
                                 

                     HON. C.A. DUTCH RUPPERSBERGER

                              of maryland

                    in the house of representatives

                        Wednesday, June 29, 2005

  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. Mr. Speaker, it is my distinct honor today to rise 
and pay tribute to a great American, Colonel John W. Ives, for his 
distinguished and exemplary service on behalf of my constituents and a 
grateful nation.
  When Colonel Ives first enlisted as a soldier in 1972, no one could 
have imagined the events of September 11, 2001 and the war on terrorism 
that would ensue. And yet in hindsight, Colonel Ives' entire career 
prepared him to be a leader in our post 9/11 world and to help the Army 
position itself to face the future.
  Colonel Ives was commissioned as a military intelligence officer in 
1981 after completing his undergraduate studies in the Business School 
at the University of Texas, El Paso. Colonel Ives led two platoons in 
the 125th Military Intelligence Battalion (CEWI), followed by 2 years 
as the S2 Intelligence Officer with the 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry 
Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He later directed a Joint Agency Task 
Team from the National Photographic Interpretation Center, specializing 
in North Korean affairs. During his combat tour in Operation Desert 
Storm, Colonel Ives served as the S3 Operations Officer.
  Following his time in Desert Storm, Colonel Ives continued his 
established career in intelligence by managing sensitive advanced 
technology programs for the Office of Secretary of Defense. From 1997-
1999, he commanded the 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion 
(Operations) in the Republic of Korea, afterwards being assigned as 
Director, Imagery Assessments Directorate (lAD) with the National 
Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC). In June 2002, he assumed command of 
the Army Garrison at Fort Meade.
  A highly decorated individual, Colonel Ives' commitment to American 
security is evident in the number of awards he has earned. The Bronze 
Star Medal, Defense Meritorious Service Medal (3rd Oak Leaf Cluster), 
Joint Staff Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal (3rd Oak Leaf 
Cluster), National Defense Service Medal (2nd Oak Leaf Cluster), Saudi 
Arabian-Kuwait Liberation Medal, and the Kuwait Liberation Medal are 
just a few of the many decorations Colonel Ives has achieved. Never one 
to rest in his accomplishments, Colonel Ives continues to fight for 
excellence for every soldier and for our nation's Army.
  I am proud to represent both Ft. Meade and NSA. As a member of the 
House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, I understand the 
threats our nation faces and fully appreciate the contributions of 
military intelligence experts like Colonel Ives. I have also had the 
pleasure of personally knowing Colonel Ives to be a man who cares 
deeply about his country. He has provided dutiful service as a leader 
on

[[Page E1405]]

the battlefield and an expert in the field of intelligence for over 30 
years. Our nation is indebted to leaders like Colonel Ives, who deserve 
our respect for their unending dedication in providing security for 
Americans both at home and abroad. Of course, no soldier can be 
successful without a supportive and understanding family at home. Their 
service and sacrifice in allowing Colonel Ives to do his work deserves 
our respect and appreciation as well.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in thanking Colonel Ives 
for his decades of tireless service towards the protection of our 
nation. We wish him and his family well in his retirement.

                          ____________________




[Extensions of Remarks]
[Pages E1404-E1405]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                    TRIBUTE TO COLONEL JOHN W. IVES

                                 ______
                                 

                     HON. C.A. DUTCH RUPPERSBERGER

                              of maryland

                    in the house of representatives

                        Wednesday, June 29, 2005

  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. Mr. Speaker, it is my distinct honor today to rise 
and pay tribute to a great American, Colonel John W. Ives, for his 
distinguished and exemplary service on behalf of my constituents and a 
grateful nation.
  When Colonel Ives first enlisted as a soldier in 1972, no one could 
have imagined the events of September 11, 2001 and the war on terrorism 
that would ensue. And yet in hindsight, Colonel Ives' entire career 
prepared him to be a leader in our post 9/11 world and to help the Army 
position itself to face the future.
  Colonel Ives was commissioned as a military intelligence officer in 
1981 after completing his undergraduate studies in the Business School 
at the University of Texas, El Paso. Colonel Ives led two platoons in 
the 125th Military Intelligence Battalion (CEWI), followed by 2 years 
as the S2 Intelligence Officer with the 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry 
Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He later directed a Joint Agency Task 
Team from the National Photographic Interpretation Center, specializing 
in North Korean affairs. During his combat tour in Operation Desert 
Storm, Colonel Ives served as the S3 Operations Officer.
  Following his time in Desert Storm, Colonel Ives continued his 
established career in intelligence by managing sensitive advanced 
technology programs for the Office of Secretary of Defense. From 1997-
1999, he commanded the 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion 
(Operations) in the Republic of Korea, afterwards being assigned as 
Director, Imagery Assessments Directorate (lAD) with the National 
Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC). In June 2002, he assumed command of 
the Army Garrison at Fort Meade.
  A highly decorated individual, Colonel Ives' commitment to American 
security is evident in the number of awards he has earned. The Bronze 
Star Medal, Defense Meritorious Service Medal (3rd Oak Leaf Cluster), 
Joint Staff Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal (3rd Oak Leaf 
Cluster), National Defense Service Medal (2nd Oak Leaf Cluster), Saudi 
Arabian-Kuwait Liberation Medal, and the Kuwait Liberation Medal are 
just a few of the many decorations Colonel Ives has achieved. Never one 
to rest in his accomplishments, Colonel Ives continues to fight for 
excellence for every soldier and for our nation's Army.
  I am proud to represent both Ft. Meade and NSA. As a member of the 
House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, I understand the 
threats our nation faces and fully appreciate the contributions of 
military intelligence experts like Colonel Ives. I have also had the 
pleasure of personally knowing Colonel Ives to be a man who cares 
deeply about his country. He has provided dutiful service as a leader 
on

[[Page E1405]]

the battlefield and an expert in the field of intelligence for over 30 
years. Our nation is indebted to leaders like Colonel Ives, who deserve 
our respect for their unending dedication in providing security for 
Americans both at home and abroad. Of course, no soldier can be 
successful without a supportive and understanding family at home. Their 
service and sacrifice in allowing Colonel Ives to do his work deserves 
our respect and appreciation as well.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in thanking Colonel Ives 
for his decades of tireless service towards the protection of our 
nation. We wish him and his family well in his retirement.

                          ____________________