CONGRATULATING LOVIE SMITH AND TONY DUNGY ON BECOMING THE FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN HEAD COACHES OF NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE TEAMS TO QUALIFY FOR THE SUPER BOWL
(House of Representatives - January 30, 2007)

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[Pages H1014-H1018]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




    CONGRATULATING LOVIE SMITH AND TONY DUNGY ON BECOMING THE FIRST 
  AFRICAN-AMERICAN HEAD COACHES OF NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE TEAMS TO 
                       QUALIFY FOR THE SUPER BOWL

  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and 
agree to the resolution (H. Res. 90) congratulating Lovie Smith of the 
Chicago Bears and Tony Dungy of the Indianapolis Colts on becoming the 
first African-American head coaches of National Football League teams 
to qualify for the Super Bowl.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                               H. Res. 90

       Whereas in the 40 Super Bowls prior to Super Bowl XLI, to 
     be held on February 4, 2007, no National Football League 
     (NFL) team that played in the Super Bowl had an African-
     American head coach;
       Whereas on January 21, 2007, in Chicago, Illinois, the 
     Chicago Bears, coached by Lovie Smith--an African-American--
     defeated the New Orleans Saints by a score of 39 to 14 in the 
     National Football Conference Championship game and advanced 
     to Super Bowl XLI;
       Whereas Lovie Smith was named the 13th head coach in 
     Chicago Bears history on January 15, 2004;
       Whereas Lovie Smith was named the Associated Press NFL 
     Coach of the Year for 2005;
       Whereas Lovie Smith's 11 victories in 2005 are the most by 
     a second-year coach in the history of the Chicago Bears and 
     he became the first second-year coach of the Bears to win a 
     division title, earning the second seed in the National 
     Football Conference playoffs;
       Whereas on January 21, 2007, in Indianapolis, Indiana, the 
     Indianapolis Colts, coached by Tony Dungy--an African-
     American--defeated the New England Patriots by a score of 38 
     to 34 in the American Football Conference's Championship game 
     and also advanced to Super Bowl XLI;
       Whereas Anthony Kevin ``Tony'' Dungy was named head coach 
     of the Indianapolis Colts on January 22, 2002;
       Whereas the 2006 season was Tony Dungy's 5th with the Colts 
     and 11th as an NFL head coach;
       Whereas Tony Dungy is the 35th coach in NFL history to earn 
     100 career victories (including playoff victories);
       Whereas Tony Dungy leads all NFL head coaches in wins from 
     1999 to 2005, with a record of 78 wins and 34 defeats;
       Whereas the NFL had a record 7 African-American head 
     coaches in 2006 and a record of 197 African-American coaches 
     total, including 7 assistant head coaches; and
       Whereas since Frederick Douglass ``Fritz'' Pollard became 
     the first African-American head coach in the NFL in 1922, 
     there have been nine other African-American head coaches in 
     the NFL--including five who are currently serving: Now, 
     therefore, be it
       Resolved,  That the House of Representatives congratulates 
     Lovie Smith of the Chicago Bears and Tony Dungy of the 
     Indianapolis Colts for their accomplishments and for being 
     the first African-American head coaches of National Football 
     League teams to qualify for the Super Bowl.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Davis) and the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Burton) each 
will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Illinois.


                             General Leave

  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
all Members may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend 
their remarks.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Illinois?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, this Sunday, history will be 
made in the National Football League when two African American head 
coaches battle for a Super Bowl championship.
  Not only is this the first time a black head coach has vied for the 
title, but two have done so in the same season. Lovie Smith, of the 
Chicago Bears, and Tony Dungy, of the Indianapolis Colts, are hailed as 
two of the most humble in the league.
  In an era where professional sports is crowded with big egos and loud 
mouths, these two quietly push their players to be better athletes and 
better individuals.
  Like myself, Coach Smith grew up in a small town in the South. Coach 
Smith talks about how growing up in the small town of Big Sandy, Texas, 
taught him the values of hard work, self-determination, self-discipline 
and teamwork. These are American values taught in a small town.
  One thing that I admire about Lovie Smith is that he approaches 
coaching as a professor, as a mentor. He does not yell or swear at his 
players. He teaches them and motivates them. He builds his players up, 
reflecting a strength of character to be commended and imitated.

                              {time}  1500

  Coach Smith started his coaching career studying under Tony Dungy in 
Tampa Bay, and the two developed a defense that relied on team speed 
and hard hitting. They also developed a close friendship that 
continues, even as opponents in the largest single sporting event in 
America.
  Through their relationship, both have become brilliant defensive 
football minds and refined player managers. Their class and work ethic 
make them part of an elite group of coaches, and their contributions 
continue to have a great effect on league diversity in the coaching 
ranks. Their achievements stretch far beyond the football field, and 
their impact is felt throughout the entire African American, as well as 
the entire American, community.
  I congratulate both of these coaches for their hard work and success. 
Of course I want them both to be successful on Sunday, but I must 
confess that I would rather that Lovie Smith be more successful than 
his mentor.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.

[[Page H1015]]

  You know, this is really a great Super Bowl we are facing for a 
number of reasons, not the least of which for the first time we have 
two African American coaches who are going to be coaching the football 
teams in the Super Bowl. There has never been an African American coach 
reach the Super Bowl, and now we have two, both teams. They are two of 
the finest men you are ever going to want to see coaching football 
teams, let alone teams in the Super Bowl. Tony Dungy, in his fifth 
season with the Colts, has compiled a record of 68-20. He has had five 
playoff appearances, he has had four AFC South titles, two AFC 
championship games, and finally an AFC championship. He has just done 
an outstanding job.
  And Lovie Smith has done an outstanding job with the Chicago Bears. 
With a team racked by injuries, his first season he went 5-11. Then 
they went 11-5 and made the playoffs before falling to the Carolina 
Panthers. And then this year they made the Super Bowl for the first 
time since Mike Ditka led the Bears back in 1986.
  They are both very fine men. They are not just a credit to the 
African American race, but they are a credit to humanity. I have 
watched both of them on television. They are both very strong Christian 
men, they are both very patriotic men, and they are loved by their 
teams.
  I have not been conversant with how the people in Chicago feel about 
Lovie Smith, but everybody in Indianapolis thinks that Tony Dungy walks 
on water; they think he is the greatest coach we have ever had. And he 
is the kind of guy that, even when he is behind, doesn't know the 
meaning of giving up. I mean, this last playoff game when they came 
from behind from a greater deficit than any playoff championship team 
in history was really something. I admitted, when we were talking about 
the game the other night on the floor, that in the first half I was so 
upset I almost changed to American Movie Classics. We were behind 21-3. 
And I changed over the channel for a minute and I thought, no, I can't 
give up on the Colts; they won't give up. I changed the channel back, 
and dag-gone they came from that deficit to win the game. It was an 
outstanding championship effort. And it was led by an African American, 
Tony Dungy, who was the coach.
  Lovie Smith did an outstanding job with the Bears. He led them 
through a very difficult last few seasons and led them to the 
championship. They were both talking about being the first African 
American in the Super Bowl, and now they are both at the same time. So 
I think that really shows what kind of men they are.
  The only difference I would have with my colleague on the other side 
of the aisle who has a great resonant voice, Mr. Davis, is that I am 
one of the few guys here on the floor today who is going to be rooting 
for the Indianapolis Colts.
  Now, we may be outnumbered here tonight. My colleagues are going to 
be speaking, and most of them are going to be talking about Lovie Smith 
and the Bears, you will outnumber us, but on Sunday you won't because 
the Colts are going all the way. As I said the other night, I am blue 
through and through and I am rooting for the Colts and they are going 
to win, but I still love the Bears and Lovie Smith, and I am very sorry 
that they won't win, but he is still a great coach.
  With that, Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I want to thank the gentleman 
from Indiana. He is a distinguished Member of this body, and sometimes 
he is very prophetic, he can predict things. Of course I think today he 
is making an error. I certainly look forward to Tony Dungy and the 
Colts not giving up, but I've got a feeling that they might give out.
  It is my pleasure right now to yield such time as she might consume 
to the chairperson of the Congressional Black Caucus, the originator of 
this resolution and one who comes from a great sports town where 
basketball is the name of their game, Representative Carolyn Kilpatrick 
from the State of Michigan.
  Ms. KILPATRICK. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for allowing me the time.
  Madam Speaker, I am an avid football fan, an avid basketball fan, as 
well as hockey. Michigan and Detroit proper are always part of that 
game.
  Championships. Unfortunately, two other great teams are in the Super 
Bowl, one of the most exciting sports activities happening this weekend 
in Miami, Florida as we have seen since the last Super Bowl was held in 
Detroit, Super Bowl XL. And I am honored to stand here, as some of my 
previous colleagues have said, to just pay respect to the National 
Football League. This is not my first association with them. We have 
run a coaches' clinic with the National Football League now for some 
time. They work with high school coaches to develop their skill so that 
their athletes and graduates will matriculate into the NFL as they go 
through their college years.
  So I am honored to, first of all, thank the NFL for working with us 
and with the men across this country, that the young men become strong 
in their character, in their competitiveness and in their nature as 
they win Super Bowls.
  As was said a little bit earlier, Chicago Bears, one of my favorite 
teams, and thank you, Coach Lovie Smith and the front office and all of 
you who have brought the Bears this far, to the players, to the wives, 
to the families for the sacrifices that you have made. We honor you, 
Chicago Bears; and we wish you the best, Coach Smith.
  And also Coach Tony Dungy. I have followed his career for many years. 
The tragedy that he had last year, we all prayed for him in this 
Nation, and our prayers are with you as well.
  Indianapolis, Chicago, Super Bowl XLI in Miami, just a few hours from 
now; and for the first time in the history of the sport, which started 
in 1869, we have not one, but two African American men, Lovie Smith 
being a protege of Tony Dungy, leading two fantastic teams in one of 
the greatest sports of mankind.
  So I stand here to thank the NFL and to thank the coaches, the 
players, their families and the institution. It was the NFL who 
started, in 1987, the Minority Coaches Fellowship that allowed many 
offensive coaches and defensive coaches to become head coaches. Today, 
we have three head coaches who graduated from that program and actively 
working with their sports to bring them this far.
  Over the years, and in 2002, the late Johnny Cochran and Cyrus Mehri 
put forth a program known today as the ``Rooney Program'' after Dan 
Rooney, who I had an opportunity to meet, the owner of the Pittsburgh 
Steelers just last year in Detroit during the Super Bowl, which allows 
and asks that NFL teams consider achievement and expertise, that they 
might move forward and present championship coaches as has been had 
right now as we begin to celebrate Super Bowl XLI.
  It is a great day that is coming in the next few days. Thank you to 
the league, as well as to our heroes, Coach Tony Dungy, Coach Lovie 
Smith. And I don't want to stand here and pick a winner; I like the 
game too much. Unfortunately, the Detroit Lions won't be there, but we 
like you, too, Detroit Lions. Just do better next year, okay? But for 
the rest of the world, and as this sport will be watched across the 
world, congratulations to the first two African American coaches to 
reach the Super Bowl.
  May the best team win, and we will be hollering and screaming for you 
all Sunday evening. God bless
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. Before I yield 3 minutes to my good friend 
from Texas, a former judge, before I recognize him, I just want to say 
that I have wagered some Indiana popcorn for a deep dish pizza and some 
kind of cake, and anybody that wants to bet on the Bears, call me up, 
I've got plenty of popcorn.
  With that, I yield 3 minutes to my good friend from Texas (Mr. 
Gohmert).
  Mr. GOHMERT. Well, I certainly appreciate my good friend, Mr. Burton, 
yielding, even though I rise to say how much I agree with the gentleman 
from Illinois about the greatness of Lovie Smith.
  Chicago Bears' head coach Lovie Smith is a Super Bowl-bound 
gentleman. He was born May 8, 1958 in the wonderful town of Gladewater, 
Texas in my home district in the middle of east Texas. He grew up in 
Big Sandy, Texas, was voted the boy most likely to succeed in the class 
of 1976 in Big Sandy High School. He was also part of

[[Page H1016]]

three State football championships there in Big Sandy, Texas, where 
they do know good football.
  After playing college ball at Tulsa, where he earned two-time All-
America and three-time All-Missouri Valley Conference honors, he began 
his coaching career at his hometown high school in Big Sandy, Texas.
  Now, 2 years later, Lovie Smith began coaching collegiately at Tulsa, 
Wisconsin, Arizona State, Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio State. After 
coaching the linebackers for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and then helping 
the St. Louis Rams return to the Super Bowl, Lovie Smith eventually 
found himself in Chicago as the defensive coordinator for the Bears. 
The team allowed the fewest points in the NFL in 2005 and ranked second 
in overall defense. He was named the 13th head coach in Chicago Bears 
history on January 15, 2004. Coach Smith was named the Associated Press 
NFL Coach of the Year for 2005.
  Lovie Smith and his wife, Maryann, have three sons, Matthew, Michael 
and Miles, as well as twin grandsons, Malachi and Noah.
  Now, Big Sandy City Hall tells us today that they have 1,275 
residents; and within that delightfully proud town, there is a street 
in which Lovie Smith's childhood home was, where he grew up. It burned 
down a couple of years after they moved, but that street is now marked 
with a sign that bears the name of Lovie Smith. Coach Smith responded 
to that naming: ``Where else would I want it to be? Those are my roots; 
that is where I grew up. Most of who I am today came from that street. 
There is no other place I would want a sign with my name on it. I am 
proud of where I came from.''
  Let me tell you, Madam Speaker, we are certainly proud of Coach Lovie 
Smith in east Texas.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, if I ever get an opportunity, I 
want to go and visit Big Sandy, Texas. So, Representative Gohmert, you 
can look forward to visitors coming time and time again.
  It is now my pleasure to yield such time as he might consume to my 
colleague from Chicago, unfortunately, the Bears are in my 
congressional district, right outside of his district, but we all share 
the Bears, Representative Bobby Rush.
  Mr. RUSH. Madam Speaker, the NFL did not have a single black head 
coach in the modern era until the Oakland Raiders, your district, hired 
Art Shell way back in 1989. The reason for this was not simply because 
the NFL was considered a racist league, but it was that teams tended to 
hire people they knew, team owners hired the individuals who they were 
familiar with. And they looked for candidates that offered a comfort 
level and an image of what sports success had always looked like in the 
National Football League.

                              {time}  1515

  Unfortunately, that image was always white, that is, until now, Madam 
Speaker.
  Madam Speaker, regardless of who wins this Sunday, although I 
proclaim victory, the owners and fans will hopefully realize that 
success is not always white and male. Hopefully, after Super Bowl XLI 
is concluded, NFL teams will truly seek to find the best and most 
qualified candidate to lead their teams, whether they look like Bill 
Parcells or Dennis Green. Hopefully, other African American assistant 
coaches and candidates for coaching positions who have never been given 
an opportunity to coach a team will finally have a chance to make a 
name for themselves rather than NFL teams continually recycling the 
same old faces regardless if they have ever been successful or not.
  Who knows if it is mere coincidence or not that the Steelers, the 
Pittsburgh Steelers, hired young Mike Tomlin, the team's first black 
head coach in its 74-year history and, I might add, an assistant under 
Tony Dungy in Tampa Bay, on the same day that Lovie Smith and Tony 
Dungy made the Super Bowl.
  Madam Speaker, it is always appropriate at this time to share 
gratitude and high regards for those individuals who make courageous 
decisions, and I share my gratitude and my high regards for Steelers 
owner Dan Rooney, the namesake of the so-called Rooney rule, the man 
who successfully lobbied in 2002 for a history-making rule that 
requires all NFL teams to interview minority candidates for coaching 
jobs before they hire their choices.
  It is because of visionaries like Mr. Rooney that people like Lovie 
Smith and Tony Dungy were even given a chance to become a head coach in 
the NFL in the first place. And the whole NFL league, indeed the 
Nation, is better off because of it.
  Madam Speaker, I would like to send my congratulations to both 
coaches, Tony Dungy and Lovie Smith, and to their teams, the Chicago 
Bears and the other team, and say, Go Bears this Sunday in Miami.
  Madam Speaker, I name it and I claim it. On Sunday, the Chicago Bears 
will be the new NFL Super Bowl champions. And I know my friend and 
colleague from Indiana realizes that deep down in the pit of his heart.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. Before I yield time to my good friend from 
Illinois, another Bears fan who played football without a helmet, I 
just would like to say to Congressman Rush, I want lots of pepperoni on 
the pizza you are going to buy me Sunday.
  I recognize the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Kirk) for 3 minutes.
  Mr. KIRK. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this resolution. Last 
week, I placed a wager with one of our colleagues, Dr. Jindal, and Mr. 
Boustany, on the Bears and whether they would win a place at the Super 
Bowl. Who won? The Bears. And now we look forward to welcoming these 
two sons of Louisiana to pay their football wager, which is to spend a 
work session at the Lake County, Illinois, Habitat For Humanity, 
ironically preparing a home for a new family displaced by Hurricane 
Katrina and now living in northern Illinois.
  Regarding the coming contest, my district is home to both Lovie Smith 
and the Bears' training facility, Halas Hall in Lake Forest. I am 
honored to represent Lovie, whose life story is an inspiration. Raised 
in rural Big Sandy, Texas, Lovie's modesty and work led him to become 
the premier head coach of the NFL. Since his 5-11 start in 2004, his 
first season in Chicago, Lovie coached the Bears to a spectacular 26-9 
record over the past two seasons, including two impressive playoff 
victories.
  Lovie embodies the Bears tradition of tough, hard-nosed football that 
has defined the organization since its founding in 1919. As the Bears' 
19th head coach, Lovie has joined the coaching giants like Mike Ditka 
and George Halas as leaders of the Monsters of the Midway. Chicago has 
embraced Lovie as a football icon, and I am proud to honor him on the 
floor today.
  And today we also have a message for the Bears organization. Lovie 
deserves a raise and a ring because he has earned the respect of 
everyone from Chicagoland. Best of luck to you, Coach, in Miami. And I 
won't say anything cheap like, Bears love horse meat for breakfast
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I am going to continue to 
reserve for a minute. I am hoping that my good friend Julia Carson 
manages to make it over. I know that she is on her way. And so I would 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. Madam Speaker, I am very happy at this time to 
recognize another great American and a great Indianapolis Colts friend 
from Indianapolis, Mr. Mike Pence, for 3 minutes.
  Mr. PENCE. I thank the gentleman for yielding and ask unanimous 
consent to revise and extend in case I say anything especially 
offensive to the Bears.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Indiana?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. PENCE. Madam Speaker, let me say from my heart that I am honored 
to cosponsor this important resolution. It represents an important 
cultural step in American life. That we would shatter the color barrier 
and ceiling that for reasons unknown to this Hoosier seem to have 
prevented the matriculation of an African American head coach to the 
Super Bowl, that we would shatter it in a way that both teams arrive 
with distinguished head coaches of African descent is enormously 
important. I think it sends an extremely important message particularly 
to African American youth, and I rejoice in that.
  Now, as to whether or not the coach of the Bears deserves a raise and 
a ring, let me say with great respect to Lovie Smith, I rise in 
particular admiration

[[Page H1017]]

of head coach Tony Dungy in his fifth season with the Indianapolis 
Colts. Under his leadership, the Colts have had a record of 60-20, five 
playoff appearances, four AFC South titles, two AFC championship games, 
and as the world watched in wonder a week ago Sunday, an AFC 
championship.
  But as Mr. Burton attested, it is his career in Indiana off the field 
that I find more impressive than his career on the field. Since his 
time in Tampa Bay, he has brought his commitment to Christian values to 
young people through the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. He launched 
Mentors for Life, a program that provided tickets to Buccaneers home 
games to area youth and their mentors. And I was there about a year ago 
when Coach Dungy welcomed thousands of young people to the arena known 
as the Wigwam in Anderson, Indiana, and there he shared about his faith 
and the importance of faith and character and values to the young men 
and women who gathered there.
  Whoever it is that walks away with the ring, and I remain adamantly 
confident that the horseshoe will leave Miami with the ring, let me say 
that Tony Dungy has earned a ring and earned our praise as Lovie Smith 
has. Our admiration to two great men, two great leaders.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I have no speakers, but I will 
reserve for the purpose of closing.
  Mr. BURTON of Indiana. Madam Speaker, we have no further speakers.


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  I would like to just say that Congresswoman Carson is not yet here, 
but I know I speak for her when I say that she admires very much both 
Lovie Smith and Coach Tony Dungy, and I am sure that she would say if 
she were here that she is going to be rooting very strongly for the 
Indianapolis Colts even though she does admire Lovie Smith as a great 
American and a great leader. And if she were here, I am sure she would 
also want me to say that she would like a piece of the pizza I am going 
to get from some of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle after 
the game on Sunday.
  Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, to close, we have heard all of 
the richly and rightly deserved accolades, and I really can't think of 
any person in the profession of athletics that I admire more than I do 
Tony Dungy. He is indeed just a gentleman's gentleman, a man of 
impeccable character, a man who inspires you. Even if you are rooting 
for the other team, you still can feel his depth coming through. And so 
I wish him well. I certainly hope that he will have some reserves to 
share with my good friend Representative Burton so he can help him pay 
off the debt.
  But I also want to say that I represent lots of different things in 
the district that I have. I represent the Bulls, I represent the Bears, 
Oprah Winfrey, the mayor of the city of Chicago, and we take great 
pride in all that our community is. Lovie Smith has brought the level 
of character to the Illinois area, the Chicago community, unmatched. We 
wish him and the Bears well. And I am going to leave all of the room 
that I can have for everything that my friends Dan Burton and Julia 
Carson will bring. Go Bears.
  Mr. EMANUEL. Madam Speaker, I rise today in strong support of House 
Resolution 90, recognizing the accomplishments of two outstanding head 
coaches in the NFL, Lovie Smith of the Chicago Bears and Tony Dungy of 
the Indianapolis Colts. On February 4th, 2007 these two men will not 
only lead their teams to the field to play in the largest sporting 
event in America, Super Bowl XLI, they will also become the first 
African-American head coaches to ever bring a team to the NFL title 
game.
  This past season, both Coach Smith and Coach Dungy experienced 
tremendous successes, leading their teams to 13-3 and 12-4 seasons 
respectively, and winning divisional and conference crowns for the 
cities of Chicago and Indianapolis. But throughout their tenure as 
coaches in the NFL, these two men have consistently represented the 
pinnacle of class and humility, providing exemplary role models for 
their players, families, and any child in America.
  Lovie Smith and Tony Dungy are not just competitors, they are also 
friends and colleagues. Smith served as Linebackers Coach for Dungy 
during their time together in the Tampa Bay Buccaneers franchise.
  During this time, Mr. Dungy served as a mentor and friend for Mr. 
Smith, engendering the calm and professional manner for which both 
coaches are highly regarded.
  As a lifelong Chicagoan and a Bears fan, I am especially proud of 
Lovie Smith and the Chicago Bears, and I wish them the best of luck in 
Super Bowl XLI. This Sunday marks the first Chicago appearance in the 
Super Bowl in over 20 years, and we are all looking forward to a great 
game. Regardless of the outcome, the milestone that Coach Smith and 
Coach Dungy have reached makes Super Bowl XLI even more special. For 
the first time, an African-American head coach will hoist the Lombardi 
Trophy over his head as NFL Champion, and we can all be proud of both 
of the two men poised to earn that honor.
  Madam Speaker, I again extend my congratulations to Lovie Smith and 
Tony Dungy on their outstanding seasons and for their breakthrough at 
the highest level of coaching. I wish them both the best of luck in all 
of their endeavors, though I certainly wish Coach Smith a bit more luck 
this particular Sunday. Go Bears.
  Mr. WALBERG. Madam Speaker, this Sunday, when Tony Dungy takes the 
field as head coach of the Indianapolis Colts, he, along with Chicago 
Bears head coach Lovie Smith, will become the first African-Americans 
to coach a football team in the Super Bowl, the National Football 
League's championship game.
  This is just one accomplishment in the extraordinary life of this 
native son of Michigan's 7th Congressional District.
  Born October 6, 1955, in Jackson, Michigan, Anthony Kevin ``Tony'' 
Dungy lives his life in a way that truly embodies all the best about 
south central Michigan.
  Dungy attended Parkside High School in Jackson, excelling on the 
football field, basketball court and in the classroom.
  Tony next starred as the quarterback of the University of Minnesota 
football team from 1973-76. By the time his collegiate career ended, 
Dungy finished as the school's all-time leader in attempts, 
completions, touchdown passes and passing yardage.
  Dungy played an integral role in the Pittsburgh Steelers' Super Bowl 
winning season of 1978, when he led the team in interceptions.
  Following his successful playing career, Dungy spent time as a 
collegiate and professional assistant coach, before being named head 
coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1995.
  In 2002, the Indianapolis Colts franchise named Tony Dungy its head 
coach, and this season is Dungy's fifth in Indianapolis and his 11th as 
an NFL head coach.
  Dungy is the first NFL head coach to defeat all 32 NFL teams and 
became the 35th coach in NFL history to earn 100 career victories in 
2005. Dungy also is one of six coaches to win 100 or more regular-
season games in his 10 years as a head coach.
  During the past four seasons, Dungy's Colts have won four AFC South 
Division championships and compiled the best winning percentage in the 
NFL.
  As remarkable as Dungy's career on the field has been, he is perhaps 
best known for his unique contributions off of it.
  Dungy and his wife Lauren, proud parents of five, have been involved 
with multiple organizations in the communities he has coached in, 
including Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Athletes in Action, Big 
Brothers/Big Sisters, Boys and Girls Club, Basket of Hope and the 
Prison Crusade Ministry.
  Through his example of faith and family, Dungy has impacted thousands 
of men and women of all ages across our great country.
  On behalf of Michigan's 7th District, I would like to extend 
congratulations to Coach Dungy, a native son, for his outstanding 
accomplishments this season and wish both he and his family happiness 
in the years to come.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Madam Speaker, I proudly rise in strong 
support of H. Res. 90 to commend both Lovie Smith, head coach of the 
Chicago Bears, and Tony Dungy, head coach of the Indianapolis Colts, 
for leading their respective teams to berths in Super Bowl XLI, to be 
played this Sunday, February 4, 2007, in Miami, Florida. Never before 
in history has a team playing in the Super Bowl been led by an African 
American head coach. Super Bowl XLI will make history as the first 
Super Bowl to feature not one, but two, African American head coaches. 
Although it has taken 41 years, this is an achievement of which all 
Americans can and should be justly proud.
  Madam Speaker, on January 21, 2007, in Chicago, Illinois, the Chicago 
Bears, coached by Lovie Smith defeated the New Orleans Saints by a 
score of 39 to 14 in the National Football Conference Championship game 
and advanced to Super Bowl XLI. For his phenomenal performance in 
restoring the Chicago Bears to their former glory as the ``Monsters of 
the Midway,'' Lovie Smith, the 13th head coach in the storied history 
of one of the NFL's greatest franchises, was named the Associated Press 
NFL Coach of the Year for 2005.

[[Page H1018]]

  In the 2005 season, Lovie Smith's Chicago Bear's won 11 games, the 
most ever by a second-year coach in the history of the Chicago Bears 
and he became the first second-year coach of the Bears to win a 
division title, earning the second seed in the National Football 
Conference playoffs. The 2006 Chicago Bears won 14 of their 16 games 
and earned the top seed in the National Football Conference playoffs.

  Madam Speaker, on January 21, 2007, in Indianapolis, Indiana, the 
Indianapolis Colts, coached by Tony Dungy defeated the 3-time Super 
Bowl Champion New England Patriots by a score of 38 to 34 in the 
American Football Conference's Championship game to win the right to 
play the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI for the NFL Championship. Tony 
Dungy, who is in his 5th season as head coach of the Indianapolis Colts 
and 11th as an NFL head coach, having previously coached the Tampa Bay 
Buccaneers to the NFC Championship game in the 2000 season, is one of 
the NFL's most outstanding head coaches.
  For example, Madam Speaker, Tony Dungy is only the 35th coach in the 
history of the NFL to win 100 games in his career. And Tony Dungy leads 
all NFL head coaches in wins from 1999 to 2005, with a record of 78 
wins and 34 losses. Should his Indianapolis Colts prevail in the Super 
Bowl, Tony Dungy will join Mike Ditka and Tom Flores and become the 
newest member of one of the most exclusive clubs in all of sports: a 
Super Bowl champion as both a player and head coach.
  Madam Speaker, the NFL had a record 7 African American head coaches 
in 2006 and the 197 African-American coaches, including 7 assistant 
head coaches, is also a record. While no one would dispute that there 
is still much progress to be made on the sidelines and front offices of 
the NFL and other professional sports, it is also indisputable that 
much progress has been made since Frederick Douglass ``Fritz'' Pollard 
became the first African American head coach in the NFL in 1922.
  For this reason, Madam Speaker, I take great pride in congratulating 
both Lovie Smith and Tony Dungy and their outstanding football teams 
for their excellence on the field and the dignity with which they have 
conducted themselves off the field. I join with the more than 100 
million Americans and billions of viewers globally who will be watching 
the Super Bowl in congratulating these two men and their teams for 
putting themselves within one victory of the sport's ultimate prize. 
And I join with viewers and fans everywhere in wishing to see one of 
the great games in Super Bowl history and hoping that the best team 
wins.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Davis) that the House suspend the rules 
and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 90.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds of 
those voting have responded in the affirmative.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and 
nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, this 15-
minute vote on suspending the rules on H. Res. 90 will be followed by a 
5-minute vote on suspending the rules on H. Res. 24 and H. Con. Res. 
20. Remaining postponed votes will be taken tomorrow.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 425, 
nays 0, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 61]

                               YEAS--425

     Abercrombie
     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Allen
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baker
     Baldwin
     Barrett (SC)
     Barrow
     Bartlett (MD)
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono
     Boozman
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boustany
     Boyd (FL)
     Boyda (KS)
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown, Corrine
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp (MI)
     Campbell (CA)
     Cannon
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson
     Carter
     Castle
     Castor
     Chabot
     Chandler
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole (OK)
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cubin
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis, David
     Davis, Lincoln
     Davis, Tom
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly
     Doolittle
     Doyle
     Drake
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Edwards
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Emanuel
     Emerson
     Engel
     English (PA)
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Everett
     Fallin
     Farr
     Fattah
     Feeney
     Ferguson
     Filner
     Flake
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Fossella
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gilchrest
     Gillibrand
     Gillmor
     Gingrey
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goode
     Goodlatte
     Gordon
     Granger
     Graves
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayes
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth
     Higgins
     Hill
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hobson
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hooley
     Hoyer
     Hulshof
     Hunter
     Inglis (SC)
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jefferson
     Jindal
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones (NC)
     Jones (OH)
     Jordan
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Keller
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Knollenberg
     Kucinich
     Kuhl (NY)
     Lamborn
     Lampson
     Langevin
     Lantos
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lewis (KY)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Mahoney (FL)
     Maloney (NY)
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey
     Marshall
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul (TX)
     McCollum (MN)
     McCotter
     McCrery
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McHugh
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     McNulty
     Meehan
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Millender-McDonald
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (KS)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Musgrave
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Neugebauer
     Nunes
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peterson (MN)
     Peterson (PA)
     Petri
     Pickering
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe
     Pomeroy
     Porter
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Pryce (OH)
     Putnam
     Radanovich
     Rahall
     Ramstad
     Rangel
     Regula
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Renzi
     Reyes
     Reynolds
     Rodriguez
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salazar
     Sali
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Saxton
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg
     Shays
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Solis
     Souder
     Space
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Tancredo
     Tanner
     Tauscher
     Taylor
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Towns
     Turner
     Udall (CO)
     Udall (NM)
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden (OR)
     Walsh (NY)
     Walz (MN)
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch (VT)
     Weldon (FL)
     Weller
     Westmoreland
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wicker
     Wilson (NM)
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Wynn
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Alexander
     Davis, Jo Ann
     Hastert
     LaHood
     McDermott
     Norwood
     Paul
     Sullivan
     Waters
     Wolf

                              {time}  1557

  So (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the rules were suspended and 
the resolution was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________