RECOGNIZING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PEARL HARBOR NAVAL SHIPYARD
(House of Representatives - July 22, 2008)

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[Pages H6773-H6775]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




  RECOGNIZING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PEARL HARBOR NAVAL SHIPYARD

  Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree 
to the resolution (H. Res. 1139) recognizing the 100th anniversary of 
the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and congratulating the men and women 
who provide exceptional service to our military and keep our Pacific 
Fleet ``fit to fight''.
  The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
  The text of the resolution is as follows:

                              H. Res. 1139

       Whereas Congress established the Pearl Harbor Naval 
     Shipyard on May 13, 1908, and it has grown from a ``coaling 
     and repair station'' to being known as the ``No Ka Oi 
     Shipyard'' and a national treasure that is strategically 
     important to our Nation and equally vital to Hawaii;
       Whereas during World War II, shipyard workers earned the 
     motto, ``We keep them fit to fight'', by resurrecting the 
     United States Pacific Fleet from the bottom of Pearl Harbor, 
     helping turn the tide of the war at Midway, and maintaining 
     the ships that would ultimately win victory at sea and sail 
     triumphantly into Tokyo Bay;
       Whereas the shipyard has demonstrated its diverse 
     capabilities by supporting America's space exploration, 
     Antarctic expeditions, and national missile defense;

[[Page H6774]]

       Whereas it continues to support the United States Pacific 
     Fleet as the largest ship repair facility between the western 
     coast of the United States and the Far East, providing full-
     service maintenance for Pacific Fleet ships and submarines 
     throughout the Asia-Pacific theater;
       Whereas the shipyard has become the largest single 
     industrial employer in Hawaii and is the largest fully 
     integrated military-civilian workforce involved in full-
     service shipyard work in the United States;
       Whereas the shipyard has earned multiple national awards 
     for its dedicated environmental stewardship and excellent 
     safety programs, such as the prestigious Occupational Safety 
     and Health Administration's Star award in May 2007; and
       Whereas the shipyard has a direct annual economic impact of 
     more that $600,000,000 in Hawaii, and through its apprentice, 
     engineer co-op, and other student hire programs, provides 
     extraordinary training, employment, and career opportunities 
     for residents: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved, That the House of Representatives recognizes the 
     100th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and 
     congratulates the men and women who provide exceptional 
     service to our military and keep our Pacific Fleet ``fit to 
     fight''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) and the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Hawaii.


                             General Leave

  Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their 
remarks on the resolution under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Hawaii?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I rise today to recognize Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard on its 100th 
anniversary. On this important centennial, I would like to commemorate 
the men and women who have served and continue to serve in the 
shipyard. In their honor, we have introduced H. Res. 1139.
  The Congress established the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard on May 13, 
1908, and it has grown from a coaling and repair station to being known 
in Hawaiian as the ``No Ka Oi Shipyard''--``No Ka Oi'' meaning the 
best--and is a national treasure that is strategically important to our 
Nation and equally vital to Hawaii.
  During World War II, shipyard workers earned the motto, ``We keep 
them fit to fight,'' by resurrecting the United States Pacific Fleet 
from the bottom of Pearl Harbor, helping to turn the tide of war at 
Midway, and maintaining the ships that would ultimately win victory at 
sea and sail triumphantly into Tokyo Bay.
  Throughout the decades, the shipyard has demonstrated its diverse 
capabilities by supporting America's space exploration, Antarctic 
expeditions, and national missile defense. It continues to support the 
United States Pacific Fleet as the largest ship repair facility between 
the West Coast of the United States and the Far East, providing full-
service maintenance for Pacific Fleet ships and submarines throughout 
the Asia Pacific theater.
  The shipyard has become the largest single industrial employer in 
Hawaii and is the largest fully integrated military-civilian workforce 
involved in full service shipyard work in the United States. The 
shipyard has a direct annual economic impact of more than $600 million 
in Hawaii, and through its apprentice, engineer co-op, and other 
student hire programs, provides extraordinary training, employment, and 
career opportunities for residents.
  Moreover, the shipyard has earned multiple national awards for its 
dedicated environmental stewardship and excellent safety programs, such 
as the prestigious Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Star 
Award in May of 2007.
  I want to recognize the 100th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor Naval 
Shipyard and congratulate the men and women who provide exceptional 
service to our military and indeed keep the Pacific Fleet ``fit to 
fight.''
  Madam Speaker, I'm going to reserve the balance of my time at this 
point.
  Mr. WITTMAN of Virginia. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
might consume.
  Madam Speaker, today I rise in strong support of House Resolution 
1139, recognizing the 100th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor Naval 
Shipyard in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
  The mission of this outstanding shipyard, ``We keep them fit to 
fight,'' demonstrates the pride and professionalism of the men and 
women who serve our Nation in Pearl Harbor. The unified shipyard team 
is committed to the on-time delivery of the high quality submarine and 
surface ship maintenance at or below expected costs. The Pearl Harbor 
shipyard's culture of continuous improvement and extremely high 
standards for safety, security, and environmental protection are 
paramount in maintaining the readiness of our fleet and our military's 
mission. Properly maintaining nuclear-powered submarines and 
conventionally powered warships is instrumental in enabling our 
fighting forces to conduct operations in the global war on terror.
  Our national defense demands that we have a strong and capable Naval 
Fleet, and the officers and crews of these fine warships, as well as 
the men and women of the shipyards, make this possible. Our Nation 
would not have the world's most technologically advanced combat ships 
without the talent and dedication of the military-industrial team and 
the public and private shipyards.
  In honoring the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, I note that now, just as 
100 years ago, both quality and quantity matter with respect to our 
Naval Fleet. That is why I voted to increase the funding for the 
Virginia Class Submarine program to enable the construction of two 
nuclear-powered submarines per year by fiscal year 2010. It is, again, 
time for our Nation to have a strategic outlook on the future role of 
our naval forces, and our Navy should establish a 313-ship fleet, at a 
minimum, to maintain our maritime dominance and forward presence around 
the globe.

                              {time}  1630

  Moreover, such a fleet is only sustainable if we continue to invest 
in the people, skills and infrastructure of our public shipyards.
  The 100th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor Shipyard is historically 
significant as the United States Navy continues to set the 
international standard of excellence. I urge your support in continuing 
to promote the role of shipbuilding and ship repair and defending our 
Nation in the 21st century. Maintaining the skills and strength of the 
industrial base and providing the necessary resources for future 
construction and repair will enable our country to benefit from the 
tremendous scientific and military achievements as the ships that have 
been repaired in Pearl Harbor have for over a century.
  So, Madam Speaker, I would like to recognize the 100th anniversary of 
the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and congratulate the men and women who 
provide exceptional service to our military, keeping our fleet ``fit to 
fight'' as they demonstrate honor, courage and commitment on a daily 
basis.
  I call upon all Americans to pause and honor the service and 
sacrifice of not only those brave Americans who have served in our 
shipyards, but also those who have served and continue to serve in the 
defense of our Nation and its values.
  I urge my colleagues to support this most worthy resolution.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Madam Speaker, I want to compliment Mr. Wittman and 
I want to thank him. It is perhaps by coincidence, but a happy 
coincidence, that the gentleman, of course, is from Virginia. And with 
Virginia and Hawaii, we represent the east coast and the far west 
coast, I guess--really west--in Hawaii.
  And I want to thank him as well for his excellent statement. Part of 
the reason being that he has outlined very, very well, I think, one of 
the most important issues that we face and one that does not always 
receive the kind of attention that I think it warrants, namely, our 
shipyards as a resource, and meeting the strategic interests of the 
United States.
  Our shipyards, both public and private, are crucial, vital and 
necessary not only to the defense of the United States, but to seeing 
to it that, should

[[Page H6775]]

we be called upon to exert military activity anywhere in the world, the 
backbone, the foundation of any naval presence in any such contingency 
is dependent on the professionalism, dedication and perseverance of 
shipyards in this Nation.
  He also mentioned, of course, the Virginia Class submarines, the 
nuclear submarines. And having observed the maintenance facilities in 
Hawaii at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, I can assure you and Mr. Wittman 
that those Virginia Class submarines will be welcomed there, and that 
the repair and maintenance will be handled by people at the height of 
their professional capacity.
  The military's counsel there, the Pearl Harbor supervisors--some of 
whom I believe are in the gallery today observing what we're carrying 
out today in terms of the resolution--understand that we're going 
through more than just simply a ritual undertaking. I think that 
perhaps sometimes these resolutions get put into that category in the 
sense that it appears sometimes that we're going through the motions. 
But I'm sure you know, Madam Speaker, that one of the advantages of 
ritual in our society and among our species is that ritual is the great 
conservator of value. It is a measurement of our sense of ourselves, 
where we've been, where we're going, and what we have as the basis for 
the future.
  And so, yes, we're commemorating the 100th anniversary today of Pearl 
Harbor Naval Shipyard, but in doing so, we remind ourselves of its 
historic legacy and we remind ourselves as well as to what the future 
may require of us here in the United States. The Pearl Harbor Naval 
Shipyard stands ready to do its duty. Yes, Madam Speaker, I can tell 
you Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard will see that our naval forces are 
``fit to fight.''
  Madam Speaker, at this time, I have no further requests for time. I 
am prepared to close after my colleague has yielded back his time. And 
I will continue to reserve my time pending that happy occasion.
  Mr. WITTMAN of Virginia. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  I just wanted to thank the gentleman from Hawaii for his kind words. 
And I know that this Nation looks forward to having our Virginia Class 
submarines being maintained ``fit to fight'' there at Pearl Harbor 
Naval Shipyard. So I truly appreciate that.
  Ms. HIRONO. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of H. Res. 1139, a 
resolution that recognizes the men and women of Pearl Harbor Naval 
Shipyard for their service to our military on the 100th anniversary of 
its opening.
  Established by the United States Navy in 1908, Pearl Harbor Naval 
Shipyard has a distinguished history of serving our country. Attacked 
on December 7, 1941, the workers of Pearl Harbor quickly recovered, 
returning fifteen of eighteen damaged ships to combat within half a 
year. On June 1, 1942, an extensively damaged USS Yorktown arrived in 
Pearl Harbor needing repairs that would normally take an estimated four 
months to complete. Shipyard workers performed these repairs in only 72 
hours and returned the Yorktown to sea, where it played a decisive role 
in the Battle of Midway, the pivotal naval battle in the Pacific during 
World War II.
  The Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard currently serves as the home port for 
seventeen Los Angeles-class submarines and twelve other naval ships. 
Workers at this shipyard have repaired ships successfully in every war 
from World War II to the present and are now preparing for the Navy's 
Virginia-class submarines that are scheduled to begin arriving in 2009. 
It is time for us to recognize this longstanding commitment to our 
country and celebrate the tireless contributions of the men and women 
of Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard.
  I urge my colleagues to support this measure.
  Mr. WITTMAN of Virginia. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) that the House suspend the 
rules and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 1139.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the resolution was agreed to.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

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