RECOGNIZING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CINCO DE MAYO
(House of Representatives - May 04, 2009)

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[Pages H5069-H5073]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




             RECOGNIZING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CINCO DE MAYO

  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to the 
resolution (H. Res. 230) recognizing the historical significance of the 
Mexican holiday of Cinco de Mayo, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
  The text of the resolution is as follows:

                              H. Res. 230

       Whereas May 5, or Cinco de Mayo in Spanish, is celebrated 
     each year as a date of great importance by the Mexican and 
     Mexican-American communities;
       Whereas the Cinco de Mayo holiday commemorates May 5, 1862, 
     the date on which the Battle of Puebla was fought by Mexicans 
     who were struggling for their independence and freedom;

[[Page H5070]]

       Whereas Cinco de Mayo has become one of Mexico's most 
     famous national holidays and is celebrated annually by nearly 
     all Mexicans and Mexican-Americans, north and south of the 
     United States-Mexico border;
       Whereas the Battle of Puebla was but one of the many 
     battles that the courageous Mexican people won in their long 
     and brave struggle for independence and freedom;
       Whereas the French, confident that their battle-seasoned 
     troops were far superior to the almost amateurish Mexican 
     forces, expected little or no opposition from the Mexican 
     army;
       Whereas the French army, which had not experienced defeat 
     against any of Europe's finest troops in over half a century, 
     sustained a disastrous loss at the hands of an outnumbered, 
     ill-equipped, and ragged, but highly spirited and courageous, 
     Mexican force;
       Whereas after three bloody assaults upon Puebla in which 
     over a thousand gallant Frenchmen lost their lives, the 
     French troops were finally defeated and driven back by the 
     outnumbered Mexican troops;
       Whereas the courageous and heroic spirit that Mexican 
     General Zaragoza and his men displayed during this historic 
     battle can never be forgotten;
       Whereas many brave Mexicans willingly gave their lives for 
     the causes of justice and freedom in the Battle of Puebla on 
     Cinco de Mayo;
       Whereas the sacrifice of the Mexican fighters was 
     instrumental in keeping Mexico from falling under European 
     domination;
       Whereas the Cinco de Mayo holiday is not only the 
     commemoration of the rout of the French troops at the town of 
     Puebla in Mexico, but is also a celebration of the virtues of 
     individual courage and patriotism of all Mexicans and 
     Mexican-Americans who have fought for freedom and 
     independence against foreign aggressors;
       Whereas Cinco de Mayo serves as a reminder that the 
     foundation of the United States is built by people from many 
     nations and diverse cultures who are willing to fight and die 
     for freedom;
       Whereas Cinco de Mayo also serves as a reminder of the 
     close spiritual and economic ties between the people of 
     Mexico and the people of the United States, and is especially 
     important for the people of the southwestern States where 
     millions of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans make their homes;
       Whereas in a larger sense Cinco de Mayo symbolizes the 
     right of a free people to self-determination, just as Benito 
     Juarez once said, ``El respeto al derecho ajeno es la paz'' 
     (``The respect of other people's rights is peace''); and
       Whereas many people celebrate during the entire week in 
     which Cinco de Mayo falls: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved, That the House of Representatives recognizes the 
     historical struggle for independence and freedom of the 
     Mexican people and requests the President to issue a 
     proclamation recognizing that struggle and the importance of 
     Cinco de Mayo.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Payne) and the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Boozman) each 
will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey.


                             General Leave

  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include 
extraneous material on the resolution under consideration
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from New Jersey?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this resolution 
and yield myself as much time as I may consume.
  Let me begin by thanking our colleague from the great State of 
California, Joe Baca, for introducing this resolution.
  H. Res. 230 recognizes the historical struggle for independence and 
freedom of the Mexican people and requests that the President issue a 
proclamation recognizing that struggle and the importance of Cinco de 
Mayo. This is a celebration we should all join in.
  Cinco de Mayo commemorates May 5, 1862, on which the Battle of Puebla 
was fought by Mexicans who were struggling for their independence and 
freedom, along with their comrades and against the French soldiers.
  This is a celebration of the virtues, courage and patriotism of all 
Mexicans and a point of pride for Mexican Americans, who have fought 
for freedom against foreign forces. Cinco de Mayo has become one of 
Mexico's most famous national holidays. It is a unique reminder that 
both Mexicans and Mexican Americans, north and south of the United 
States-Mexico border, observe in honor.
  Grand celebrations take place in cities and towns all across the 
United States of America, the biggest being in western and southwestern 
cities such as Los Angeles. Festivities often include sporting events, 
parades, mariachi music, Mexican food and dancing. Sometimes the 
celebration goes on for weeks.

                              {time}  1415

  In a larger sense, Cinco de Mayo serves as a reminder to all 
Americans that the foundation of our great country was built by people 
from many nations with diverse cultural backgrounds who were willing to 
fight and to die for their freedom.
  Cinco de Mayo can be understood both as a moment to celebrate the 
significant Mexican roots that have grown in the United States, as well 
as to symbolize more generally the right of all people to self-
determination. It was a valiant struggle. They fought brilliantly. We 
urge our colleagues to support this resolution.
  Mr. Speaker, I certainly at this time reserve the balance of my time.
  MR. BOOZMAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  This Tuesday marks Cinco de Mayo, a regional holiday in Mexico that 
commemorates Mexico's unlikely defeat of French forces at the Battle of 
Puebla on May 5, 1862. For generations, however, Cinco de Mayo has also 
been recognized throughout the United States.
  The strong ties between our two nations are demonstrated around the 
country as family and friends join together to celebrate Mexico's 
culture and experiences. Through efforts like the Merida Initiative and 
NAFTA, these ties continue to grow--only stronger.
  Our mutual commitment to democracy and security in the region will 
prove increasingly important as some in the hemisphere work to advance 
their illicit agendas. Already, we have seen the transnational impact 
of the drug cartels and organized crime groups operating in Mexico. 
Joint efforts by our countries to thwart criminal activities within 
Mexico have sent these criminals north into the United States and south 
into Central America.
  We must continue to work with our democratic partners and allies to 
present a united front against those who pose a threat to U.S. 
interests, security, and values.
  So, as many throughout the United States and Mexico celebrate Cinco 
de Mayo this week, I hope that they are reminded not only of Mexico's 
proud past, but also of her ongoing shared commitment to independence, 
democracy, and security.
  I thank Congressman Baca for introducing this timely resolution.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAYNE. I yield 5 minutes to the sponsor of the resolution, the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Baca).
  Mr. BACA. First of all, I would like to thank the Congressman from 
New Jersey for his leadership on bringing this resolution, and also as 
the chair of the Subcommittee on Africa. I would like to thank the 
gentleman from Arkansas for bringing up the resolution that is 
important to a lot of us. Also, I would like to thank the ranking 
members; the ranking member of the Foreign Affairs Committee, Howard 
Berman, and then, of course, Ms. Ros-Lehtinen, as well, for their 
leadership and support in bringing this bipartisan effort to the floor.
  I rise today in support of H. Res. 230, a resolution recognizing the 
historical significance of the Mexican holiday of Cinco de Mayo. This 
resolution recognizes the Cinco de Mayo holiday, which honors the 
spirit and the courage of the Mexican people involved in the Battle of 
Puebla on May 5, 1862.
  In that battle, General Ignacio Zaragoza led the Mexican forces 
against the well-trained French Army, which vastly outnumbered the 
Mexicans. After only 4 hours, General Ignacio Zaragoza was able to 
claim victory. As a result of General Zaragoza's tremendous victory, 
the French foreign forces sustained heavy losses and were forced to 
withdraw from the area.
  Along with Mexican Independence Day on September 16, Cinco de Mayo 
has become a time to celebrate Mexican heritage and culture with pride 
and dignity. While Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican Army's 
victory over the French in this battle, it was one of many battles that 
the Mexican people won in the long and brave struggle for independence 
and freedom. And this is what they fight for today in comprehensive 
immigration.

[[Page H5071]]

  Today, Cinco de Mayo is celebrated not only in recognition of the 
defeat of the French Army, but it also celebrates the virtues of 
individual courage and patriotism of all Mexican Americans--all 
Mexicans who have fought for their freedom and independence. Today, we 
will also celebrate Cinco de Mayo in the White House with President 
Obama.
  However, it also serves as a reminder to all of the wonderful culture 
and characteristics that Latinos have brought to this country. I am an 
example in terms of what I am wearing right now.
  Latinos are the fastest-growing minority population in this country, 
accounting for over 45 million people--49 million, if you include 
Puerto Rico. It represents about 17 percent of the total population.
  The contributions made by Latinos to our American culture are 
countless--ranging from business, to art, to sports, to science, you 
name it. You see all kinds of figures everywhere around the United 
States.
  Latinos have fought hard and are willing to make the ultimate 
sacrifice for this country. They have fought in every major war since 
the Revolutionary War. You have seen them fight for this country.
  We have served with honor to defend this great country, and we will 
do that because we believe in it. That is why people come to the United 
States--for the freedom that we have.
  Today, there are 30 Latino Members in the United States Congress--
bipartisan. Also, we have Secretary Ken Salazar at the Department of 
the Interior, and Secretary Hilda Solis at the Department of Labor, who 
are both of Latino origin. This number points to what a driving force 
Latino communities have become in our country economically, socially, 
and politically.
  Cinco de Mayo also serves as a reminder of our wonderful and 
longstanding relationship with our great neighbors to the south. Last 
year, over $367.5 billion of goods were traded between the United 
States and Mexico. That makes Mexico our Nation's third leading trading 
partner.
  Cinco de Mayo provides us with a great opportunity to look back at 
our own heritage as Americans--and I say as Americans. Our ancestors 
all came from diverse cultures and different homelands. Yet, they 
banded together to fight against oppression and tyranny, helping to 
form this great country that we have today.
  While Latino culture has come a long way, we all must come together 
to make sure we recognize the inequities that exist right now in our 
communities, and that we deal with social and economic disadvantage 
that affect a lot of us.
  My colleagues and I in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus share a 
common purpose--working to break down those walls and increase 
opportunities in areas such as education and health care so that we all 
have equity, regardless of who we are, where we come from, for that 
same kind of justice and equality.
  This past February, I was proud to give my support to the Recovery 
Act. As a great number of Hispanic families, as well as many other 
families, are struggling mightily during this recession, this act helps 
to create jobs for millions of Americans, invest in health care, 
education, and energy.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. PAYNE. I yield the gentleman 1 additional minute
  Mr. BACA. With that, I say let's support H. Res. 230, and ask for 
your support.
  Mr. BOOZMAN. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAYNE. I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from California (Ms. 
Watson).
  Ms. WATSON. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of House Resolution 230, 
introduced by my good friend and colleague, Representative Joe Baca, to 
recognize the historical significance of the widely celebrated Mexican 
holiday, Cinco de Mayo.
  On May 5, 1862, while outnumbered almost two to one at the Battle of 
Puebla, Mexican General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguin led the Mexican Army 
and defeated a much larger and well-equipped French Army that had not 
been defeated in nearly five decades.
  The battle would also prove to be significant because this would mark 
the last time an army from a foreign country invaded the Americas.
  As many of you know, this holiday is not only commemorated in the 
United States and Mexico, but brings together cultures from all over 
the world to join in the celebration--even people in faraway lands such 
as the Island of Malta in the Mediterranean join in this festival.
  The holiday is a chance for us to set aside our differences and 
support the Mexican people for the bravery shown by those men who 
fought at the Battle of Puebla 147 years ago.
  I ask my colleagues to join me in recognizing the historical 
significance of Cinco de Mayo and the bravery shown that day in 1862.
  Mr. BOOZMAN. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAYNE. It is my pleasure to yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Puerto Rico (Mr. Pierluisi).
  Mr. PIERLUISI. I rise today in strong support of House Resolution 
230, which has been introduced by my friend and colleague, Mr. Baca, 
and recognizes the historical significance of Cinco de Mayo.
  For the people of Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is an important symbol of 
freedom, liberty, and self-determination. In our country, Cinco de Mayo 
is a celebration of the rich history and culture that Mexican Americans 
have brought to the United States.
  Hispanics are the fastest-growing minority group in the United 
States. There are 30 Hispanic Members of Congress, including many 
Mexican Americans, representing constituencies from all around the 
country.
  Tomorrow, millions of Americans will join our neighbors to the south 
in celebrating Cinco de Mayo. This day serves as an important reminder 
of Mexico's proud history and of the many contributions that Mexican 
Americans have made to this country.
  I urge my colleagues to help recognize Cinco de Mayo, and to support 
House Resolution 230.
  Mr. BOOZMAN. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAYNE. At this time I yield 10 minutes to the gentleman from 
American Samoa (Mr. Faleomavaega).
  Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. I do want to thank my good friend and colleague, 
the gentleman from New Jersey, as our distinguished chairman also of 
our House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of House Resolution 230, to 
recognize the historical significance of the Mexican history of Cinco 
de Mayo. I commend my colleague, the gentleman from California, for 
introducing this legislation, as it truly does serve as a reminder that 
all the people of our great Nation, regardless of their race, color, or 
even gender, have enriched our diversity in our cultures and are worthy 
of respect as a Nation.
  Mr. Speaker, Cinco de Mayo commemorates the battle of Puebla. On May 
5, 1862, outnumbered and outgunned Mexican forces, determined to 
protect their land, successfully defended the town of Puebla against 
French soldiers and its transferred ruler by the name of Ferdinand 
Maximilian, who was an archduke from Austria and a puppet of Emperor 
Napoleon III of France.
  For Mexico, this day has come to represent a symbol of Mexican unity 
and patriotism in the history of Mexico. It is a celebration of the 
virtues of individual courage and patriotism of all Mexicans and 
Mexican Americans whose ancestors are from Mexico and are part of the 
rich diversity of our Nation.
  It also serves as a reminder of the cultural, spiritual, and economic 
ties between the people of Mexico and our great country.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to share with my colleagues the life and history 
of a particular leader who, in my humble opinion, is the greatest hero 
in Mexico's history--a true statesman whose name is inextricably linked 
with the name Cinco de Mayo. His name is Don Benito Juarez, President 
of Mexico from 1862 to 1863, and 1867 to 1872.

                              {time}  1430

  President Juarez led the Mexican people in their fight for 
independence during this crucial period of their history. President 
Juarez was the first Mexican President of indigenous Indian descent--
indigenous Indian descent.

[[Page H5072]]

His parents were members of the Zapotec tribe, prevalent in the 
provinces of the State of Oaxaca in Mexico. An orphan at age 3, young 
Benito Juarez worked in the cornfields and as a shepherd until the age 
of 12. When he went to Oaxaca City at the age of 13 to attend school, 
he could not read, could not write or couldn't even speak Spanish. He 
was adopted by lay members of the Franciscan Order who taught the young 
Juarez reading, writing, arithmetic and Spanish grammar. He later 
entered the Franciscan seminary in Oaxaca and studied Aquinas and other 
great Catholic philosophers, eventually turning his attention instead 
to the study of law. President Juarez was educated in the law in 
preparation for a political career.
  Mr. Speaker, in his first political position as a city councilman, he 
was noted as a strong defender of indigenous Indian rights. He 
participated in the revolutionary overthrow of Santa Anna in 1855, 
becoming the minister of justice and instituting reforms that were 
embodied in the constitution of 1857. During the Reform War of 1858 to 
1861, President Juarez led the liberals against the conservative 
faction of Mexico's Government. The liberals succeeded only through 
popular support and the unwavering determination of President Juarez, 
and he was elected President in 1861.
  Mr. Speaker, to fully understand the quality of the leadership of 
Mexico at the time in the person of President Don Benito Juarez, one 
can compare him to, arguably perhaps, the greatest President in our own 
country's history, President Abraham Lincoln. Both leaders, in fact, 
presided over their countries in times of crisis, demonstrating great 
courage and perseverance in the fight for freedom. Both grew up in 
poverty and studied law. Both fought against bigotry and racism. In 
fact, President Lincoln and President Juarez were contemporaries who 
held each other in high regard. In fact, in 1858, upon hearing of 
Juarez's struggles in Mexico, President Lincoln sent him an encouraging 
message expressing hope ``for the liberty of your government and its 
people.'' Even in the midst of our own Civil War, President Lincoln 
provided arms and munitions to President Juarez to support the Mexican 
people in their fight against France. When the U.S. Confederacy sent an 
emissary to Mexico to enlist support for their cause, President Juarez 
jailed the man for 30 days before sending him away, a clear sign of 
support for President Lincoln's cause at the time.
  Mr. Speaker, today, the United States and Mexico share close ties. We 
also share the ideals of freedom and democracy. Because of our shared 
values and the tremendous contributions made by Mexican Americans, I 
think it is fitting and most proper for us in Congress to recognize the 
historical struggle of the Mexican people for independence against 
French colonial rule.
  It is ironic, Mr. Speaker, that we have the gentleman by the name of 
Lafayette whose portrait is right over here who came here as a French 
patriot to help us fight against British colonialism, and the only 
foreigner here with the patriot right next to our Founding Father, 
George Washington. It is ironic that in the history of Mexico, 
Napoleon, being the ruler that he was, sent Maximilian to continue 
French colonial rule in Mexico, and so now we had to kick the French 
out in order to give the Mexican people their freedom.
  Again I thank the gentleman from California, former chairman of the 
Congressional Hispanic Caucus, my good friend, for his leadership and 
initiative for introducing this bill.
  I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong 
support of H. Res. 230, resolution honoring the significance and impact 
of Cinco de Mayo. I would like to begin by applauding the efforts and 
leadership of the author of the resolution, Congressman Joe Baca, as 
well as the rest of my colleagues in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus 
for bringing this bill before us today.
  Mr. Speaker, since 1862 the holiday has traditionally commemorated 
the victory of a poorly armed Mexican militia over a larger, better 
equipped French army at the Battle of Puebla. Today, however, Cinco de 
Mayo in the United States has become a celebration of Hispanic heritage 
not unlike Saint Patrick's Day for Irish-Americans.
  To be sure, Mr. Speaker, Irish-Americans and Hispanic-Americans have 
much in common. We are bound together by Catholic, working-class 
experiences. Our relatives came and continue to come to this country 
from largely rural, uneducated backgrounds. Our struggles were, are and 
continue to be twin struggles for equality, as well as political and 
cultural recognition.
  From Bernardo de Galvez to Admiral David Farragut to Cesar Chavez, 
Hispanic-Americans have made significant contributions to the 
development of our nation. In just the last election, Latinos 
represented 9 percent of the electorate and provided the margin of 
victory in large swaths of the country, voting for President Obama by a 
margin larger than 2-to-1.
  And because Hispanics constitute the majority of our nation's newest 
Americans, Madam Speaker, I cannot speak here without at least 
mentioning the subject of immigration. As Mr. Fareed Zakaria affirms in 
his acclaimed book, The Post-American World:

       Foreign students and immigrants account for almost 50 
     percent of all science researchers in [our] country. In 2006 
     they received 40 percent of all PhDs. By 2010, 75 percent of 
     all science PhDs in [our] country will be awarded to foreign 
     students. When these graduates settle in the country, they 
     create economic opportunity. Half of all Silicon Valley 
     start-ups have one founder who is an immigrant or first 
     generation American. The potential for a new burst of 
     American productivity depends not on our education system or 
     R spending, but on our immigration policies.

  Immigrants are America's great strength. If we remain true to our 
history; if we remain the most open and flexible society the world; if 
we continue to absorb cultures, devour ideas and feed off the energy of 
poor immigrants we will thrive. This is America's genius.
  Hispanics are another great chapter in the larger history of our 
immigrant country. They make America more American.
  I urge my colleagues to support this important resolution.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker; I rise today in support of H. 
Res. 230 ``Recognizing the historical significance of the Mexican 
holiday of Cinco de Mayo'' and I would like to thank my colleague 
Representative Baca for introducing this resolution in the House.
  May 5, or Cinco de Mayo in Spanish, is celebrated each year as a date 
of great importance by the Mexican and Mexican-American communities. 
This holiday commemorates May 5, 1862, the date on which the Battle of 
Puebla was fought. However, Cinco de Mayo is not ``an obligatory 
federal holiday'' in Mexico, but rather a holiday that can be observed 
voluntarily.
  Cinco de Mayo has become one of Mexico's most famous national 
holidays and is celebrated annually by many Mexicans and Mexican-
Americans, north and south of the United States-Mexico border. In the 
United States, Cinco de Mayo has taken on significance beyond that in 
Mexico. The date is perhaps best recognized in the United States as a 
date to celebrate the culture and experiences of Americans of Mexican 
ancestry, much as St. Patrick's Day, Oktoberfest, and the Chinese New 
Year are used to celebrate those of Irish, German, and Chinese ancestry 
respectively. Similar to those holidays, Cinco de Mayo is observed by 
many Americans regardless of ethnic origin.
  Cinco de Mayo is a regional holiday in Mexico, primarily celebrated 
in the state of Puebla, with some limited recognition in other parts of 
Mexico. The holiday commemorates the Mexican army's unlikely defeat of 
French forces at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, under the 
leadership of Mexican General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguin.
  Cinco de Mayo's history has its roots in the French Occupation of 
Mexico. The French occupation took shape in the aftermath of the 
Mexican-American War of 1846-48. With this war, Mexico entered a period 
of national crisis during the 1850's. Years of not only fighting the 
Americans but also a civil war, had left Mexico devastated and 
bankrupt. On July 17, 1861, President Benito Juarez issued a moratorium 
in which all foreign debt payments would be suspended for a brief 
period of two years, with the promise that after this period, payments 
would resume.
  The English, Spanish and French refused to allow President Juarez to 
do this, and instead decided to invade Mexico and get payments by 
whatever means necessary. The Spanish and English eventually withdrew, 
but the French refused to leave. Their intention was to create an 
Empire in Mexico under Napoleon III.
  The French, confident that their battle-seasoned troops were far 
superior to the almost amateurish Mexican forces, expected little or no 
opposition from the Mexican army. The French army, which had not 
experienced defeat against any of Europe's finest troops in over half a 
century, sustained a disastrous loss at the hands of an outnumbered, 
ill-equipped, and ragged, but highly spirited and courageous, Mexican 
force.

[[Page H5073]]

  After three bloody assaults upon Puebla in which over a thousand 
gallant Frenchmen lost their lives, the French troops were finally 
defeated and driven back by the outnumbered Mexican troops. Although 
the Mexican army was victorious over the French at Puebla, the victory 
only delayed the French invasion on Mexico City; a year later, the 
French occupied Mexico. The courageous and heroic spirit that Mexican 
General Zaragoza and his men displayed during this historic battle can 
never be forgotten.
  While Cinco de Mayo has limited significance nationwide in Mexico, 
the date is observed in the United States and other locations around 
the world as a celebration of Mexican heritage and pride. However, a 
common misconception in the United States is that Cinco de Mayo is 
Mexico's Independence Day, which actually is September 16, the most 
important national patriotic holiday in Mexico. The Cinco de Mayo 
holiday is not only the commemoration of the rout of the French troops 
at the town of Puebla in Mexico, but is also a celebration of the 
virtues of individual courage and patriotism, which all Americans can 
appreciate. Cinco de Mayo also serves as a reminder of the close 
spiritual and economic ties between the people of Mexico and the people 
of the United States, and is especially important for the people of the 
southwestern States where millions of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans 
make their homes. In a larger sense Cinco de Mayo symbolizes the right 
of a free people to self-determination and should be recognized and 
honored by this Congress.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, as a native of southern California, Cinco 
de Mayo celebrations have been a part of my life as long as I can 
remember. It is a day to celebrate our southern neighbors and the cause 
of Mexican independence. The historic battle at Puebla, Mexico on the 
fifth of May, 1862, is a David versus Goliath story that demonstrates 
that man can overcome any obstacle in the pursuit of freedom. On Cinco 
de Mayo we remember the brave stand at Puebla and we celebrate the 
cause of freedom around the world.
  Mr. BOOZMAN. I want to thank Mr. Baca for bringing this forward, and 
I urge my colleagues to support it, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. PAYNE. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Payne) that the House suspend the rules 
and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 230, as amended.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds 
being in the affirmative, the ayes have it.
  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the 
Chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will be 
postponed.

                          ____________________