STANLEY J. ROSZKOWSKI UNITED STATES COURTHOUSE; Congressional Record Vol. 155, No. 51
(House of Representatives - March 25, 2009)

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[Pages H3995-H3996]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




             STANLEY J. ROSZKOWSKI UNITED STATES COURTHOUSE

  Mr. COSTELLO. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the 
Senate bill (S. 520) to designate the United States courthouse under 
construction at 327 South Church Street, Rockford, Illinois, as the 
``Stanley J. Roszkowski United States Courthouse''.
  The Clerk read the title of the Senate bill.
  The text of the Senate bill is as follows:

                                 S. 520

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. STANLEY J. ROSZKOWSKI UNITED STATES COURTHOUSE.

       (a) Designation.--The United States courthouse under 
     construction, as of the date of enactment of this Act, at 327 
     South Church Street, Rockford, Illinois, shall be known and 
     designated as the ``Stanley J. Roszkowski United States 
     Courthouse''.
       (b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, 
     document, paper, or other record of the United States to the 
     United States courthouse referred to in subsection (a) shall 
     be deemed to be a reference to the ``Stanley J. Roszkowski 
     United States Courthouse''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Costello) and the gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Guthrie) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Illinois.


                             General Leave

  Mr. COSTELLO. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their 
remarks and include therein extraneous materials on S. 520.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Illinois?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COSTELLO. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of S. 520, legislation 
introduced by the senior Senator from Illinois, Senator Dick Durbin, to 
name the United States district courthouse in Rockford, Illinois, after 
Stanley J. Roszkowski. Judge Roszkowski has ably served our country in 
times of war and peace, and I am pleased to be here today to speak on 
behalf of this bill.
  Stanley J. Roszkowski was raised in the village of Royalton, 
Illinois, which is located in Franklin County in southern Illinois. One 
of 15 children, he volunteered for the Army Air Corps during World War 
II, and served as a nose gunner on a B-26 bomber, flying over 35 
missions in Italy and Germany.
  After the war, he went on to earn his bachelor's degree from the 
University of Illinois and then his law degree, working as an appliance 
salesman to pay for his college tuition. He moved to Rockford, 
Illinois, opened a successful law practice, and became involved in his 
community.
  He gave up his practice of law when President Carter appointed him to 
the bench in 1977, where he served for the next 20 years as a Federal 
judge in the Northern District of Illinois. Judge Roszkowski took 
senior status in 1991,

[[Page H3996]]

and was known for running a business-like but relaxed courtroom. He was 
praised by his peers for being extremely knowledgeable, competent, 
fair, and objective, and a gentleman at all times.
  Through his long service to our country, in the military and on the 
Federal bench, Judge Roszkowski has given a great deal to all of us, 
and naming this courthouse in his honor is a fitting tribute to his 
career.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support S. 520.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  This bill names the United States courthouse currently under 
construction in Rockford, Illinois as the Stanley J. Roszkowski United 
States Courthouse.
  Judge Roszkowski was raised in Royalton, Illinois, and during World 
War II he volunteered for the Army Air Corps and served as a nose 
gunner on a B-26 bomber, flying more than 35 missions in Italy and 
Germany.
  After the war, he earned his bachelor's degree from the University of 
Illinois in 1949, and a law degree from the University of Illinois 
College of Law in 1954. In 1955, he moved to Rockford, Illinois, and 
began his practice of law, until his appointment in 1977 by President 
Carter to the U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois. In 
1991, Judge Roszkowski assumed senior status on the Federal bench, and 
served in that capacity until his retirement in 1998.
  Among his many accomplishments, Judge Roszkowski was a member of the 
Illinois, Florida, and American Bar Associations, and served on the 
board of directors of the Federal Judges Association. He also lectured 
extensively at seminars for various bar associations in U.S. courts, 
and participated in countless workshops and mediation courses sponsored 
by the Federal Judicial Center.
  Early in his career, he was elected a fellow with the American 
College of Trial Lawyers, and served as the chairman and member of the 
Rockford Fire and Police Commission.
  Naming this new courthouse in Rockford, Illinois seems appropriate in 
recognition of Judge Roszkowski's dedication to public service and the 
legal profession. I have no objections to the passage of this bill, and 
support its adoption.
  Mr. OBERSTAR. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of S. 520, a bill 
to designate the United States Courthouse under construction at 327 
South Church Street in Rockford, Illinois, as the Stanley J. Roszkowski 
United States Courthouse.
  Stanley Roszkowski was born on January 22, 1923, and was raised in 
Royalton, Illinois. He was one of 15 children. He served a decorated 
tour in World War II as a nose gunner on a B26 bomber. After his 
discharge from the United States Air Force, he enrolled at the 
University of Illinois where he received his B.S. in 1949, and his J.D. 
in 1954. He then opened up a successful law practice in Rockford.
  Stanley Roszkowski was appointed judge for the United States District 
Court for the Northern District of Illinois on October 11, 1977. He 
took senior status on January 9, 1991, and retired in January of 1998 
after serving for more than 20 years.
  Judge Roszkowski was instrumental in having the courthouse 
constructed in Rockford, Illinois, and this designation is a tribute to 
his years of service to the court and community.
  I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting S. 520.
  Mr. MANZULLO. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise in support of S. 520, 
which would name the new federal courthouse currently under 
construction in Rockford, Illinois after Stanley J. Roszkowski, former 
Federal Judge in the Northern District of Illinois. Judge Roszkowski 
played an integral role in bringing a new federal courthouse to 
Rockford.
  Stanley Roszkowski was raised in Royalton, Illinois, one of 15 
children. As a testimony to his courage and love of country, he 
volunteered during World War II to serve in the U.S. Army Air Corps and 
was assigned the role of a nose gunner on a B-26 bomber, flying over 35 
missions in Italy and Germany between 1943 and 1945. Service in the 
Army Air Corps was an extremely hazardous occupation, with one of the 
highest casualty rates out of all the branches of the service.
  Many Allied bombers were blown out of the sky by German fighters or 
by flak. For those who survived being shot down, a dismal stay at a 
German Prisoner of War (POW) camp awaited them where many did not live 
to see the end of the war. The fact that Staff Sergeant Stanley 
Roszkowski survived the daunting odds of completing 35 separate 
missions is a reflection of his skill and courage and those of his 
fellow crewmembers.
  After the war, Stanley Roszkowski earned his Bachelor's degree from 
the University of Illinois in 1949 and subsequently earned his law 
degree from the College of Law at the University of Illinois in 1954. 
He paid for school by working as an appliance salesman and is where he 
met his lovely wife, Catherine.
  Stanley Roszkowski decided to locate his new law practice in 
Rockford, Illinois and become active in the local community. He was the 
founder and eventually became Chairman of the Board of the First State 
Bank and Trust of Rockford.
  He also was a member and Chairman of the Rockford Fire and Police 
Commission. Judge Roszkowski was also honored with the General Pulaski 
Heritage Award for Outstanding Service to the Polish-American Community 
in 1982.
  In 1977, President Jimmy Carter appointed and the U.S. Senate 
confirmed Stanley Roszkowski to the federal bench where he served for 
the next 20 years as a Federal Judge in the Northern District of 
Illinois. After his retirement from the bench in 1997, Judge Roszkowski 
now serves as a mediator/arbitrator for the Judicial Arbitration and 
Mediation Services (JAMS). The aim of JAMS is to resolve some of the 
nations largest and most complex and contentious disputes. Given the 
depth of experience, knowledge, and professionalism of Judge 
Roszkowski, JAMS is well served to have him as a resource to help with 
alternative dispute resolutions.
  Mr. Speaker, it is appropriate to name the new federal courthouse in 
Rockford after Judge Roszkowski because of his role in the community 
and his driving force in making this project a reality today. I urge my 
colleagues to support S. 520.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COSTELLO. Mr. Speaker, I urge passage of this legislation. I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Costello) that the House suspend the rules 
and pass the Senate bill, S. 520.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the Senate bill was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

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