STUDENT AID AND FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 2009; Congressional Record Vol. 155, No. 132
(House of Representatives - September 17, 2009)

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           STUDENT AID AND FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 2009

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 746 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the State of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 3221.

                              {time}  1021


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the State of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 3221) to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965, and for 
other purposes, with Ms. DeGette (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole House rose on 
Wednesday, September 16, 2009, a request for a recorded vote on 
amendment No. 7, printed in House Report 111-256, offered by the 
gentlewoman from North Carolina (Ms. Foxx), had been postponed.


                  Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Reyes

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. REYES. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 8 offered by Mr. Reyes:
       Page 191, line 15, after ``students'' insert ``, including 
     students who are veterans or members of the National Guard or 
     Reserves,''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Reyes) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. REYES. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  (Mr. REYES asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. REYES. Madam Chair, the men and women who have made enormous 
sacrifices to serve our country deserve every opportunity to get a good 
education, and my amendment will help them do just that.
  My amendment will encourage community colleges to use the funding 
provided through the new grant program to increase the level of 
training for our veterans and for our members of the National Guard and 
Reserves. This amendment will help community colleges do outreach to 
our veterans and to our National Guardsmen and Reservists who may be 
looking to obtain new skills and training in these difficult economic 
times.
  This funding is also now intended to help our veterans realize the 
benefits of the post-9/11 GI Bill that Congress passed last year. The 
post-9/11 GI Bill was created by landmark legislation that makes good 
on America's promise to take care of those who have proudly served our 
Nation. It offers unprecedented benefits that will make college 
affordable to our Nation's veterans.
  However, the legislation will not meet its full potential if eligible 
veterans are not aware or if they do not take advantage of the 
opportunities available in their communities. This amendment will help 
to promote a more veteran-friendly environment at our Nation's 
community colleges by encouraging this generation of American heroes to 
use the benefits that they have so rightly earned.
  Community colleges provide the first postsecondary experience for 
many students, and are critical in providing them with the education 
and training that is required for the high-demand jobs that are needed 
to keep the United States competitive.
  I am pleased that my colleague, Representative Adler, has a similar 
amendment that will assist veterans who are seeking to attend 4-year 
colleges or universities. Making sure that veterans want to pursue an 
advanced degree and that they are able to do so is the right thing to 
do for our local economies and for our competitive future. I urge my 
colleagues to support this amendment.
  I yield to my colleague, the gentleman from California (Mr. George 
Miller).
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I thank the gentleman for yielding. 
I thank him for offering this amendment.

[[Page H9676]]

  Madam Chair, we would strongly support this amendment. As he is well 
aware of--and as, I think, most of the Nation is--the young men and 
women who have joined the Armed Forces over the last 8 or 9 years left 
this country to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan and elsewhere in the 
trouble spots of the world. Many of them left as high school graduates, 
some of them not high school graduates. They even left an economy that 
is very different today than it was when they left their homes to serve 
this Nation. Clearly, we want to make sure that they have the 
opportunities to integrate back into the economy after leaving the 
service on terms that are helpful to them, to their families and to 
their local communities.
  So thank you very much for offering this amendment.
  Mr. REYES. I thank the chairman.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time, although I 
do not oppose this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Minnesota is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. In fact, I rise to say that we are going to 
support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. REYES. Thank you, Madam Chair, and I thank my colleague.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Reyes).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Etheridge

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 9 offered by Mr. Etheridge:
       Page 24, after line 24, insert the following:
       ``(iii) providing loan counseling, loan delinquency, and 
     default aversion assistance to student loan borrowers and 
     institutions of higher education;
       Page 25, line 1, redesignate clause (iii) as clause (iv).
       Page 25, line 4, redesignate clause (iv) as clause (v).
       Page 76, line 15, strike ``and''.
       Page 76, after line 15, insert the following:
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in the subsection header, by striking ``Origination, 
     Servicing, and Data Systems'' and inserting ``Origination, 
     Servicing, Delinquency Prevention and Default Aversion 
     Services, Default Collections, Outreach, and Data Systems'';
       (B) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
     ``The Secretary may'' and inserting ``(1) in general.--The 
     Secretary may'';
       (C) by redesignating paragraphs (1) through (4) as 
     subparagraphs (A) through (D), and moving such subparagraphs 
     two ems to the right;
       (D) in subparagraph (C) (as redesignated by subparagraph 
     (C) of this paragraph), by striking ``and'' after the 
     semicolon;
       (E) by redesignating subparagraph (D) (as redesignated by 
     subparagraph (C) of this paragraph) as subparagraph (E);
       (F) by inserting after subparagraph (C) (as so 
     redesignated) the following new subparagraph:
       ``(D) delinquency prevention and default aversion services, 
     default collections, financial aid counseling, career and 
     education counseling, financial literacy, guidance counselor 
     and financial aid officer training services, and other 
     outreach services; and''; and
       (G) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(2) Limitation.--The Secretary may enter into contracts 
     for the services described in paragraph (1)(D) with--
       ``(A) agencies with agreements with the Secretary under 
     subsections (b) and (c) of section 428 on the date of 
     enactment of the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 
     2009, that are providing such services on such date and that 
     meet the qualifications determined by the Secretary; or
       ``(B) nonprofit subsidiaries of agencies described in 
     subparagraph (A), if such subsidiaries were established, 
     pursuant to State law, on or before January 1, 1998, and meet 
     the qualifications determined by the Secretary.''; and
       Page 76, line 16, redesignate paragraph (2) as paragraph 
     (3).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from North Carolina (Mr. Etheridge) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from North Carolina.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. I yield myself 2 minutes.
  I want to thank Chairman Miller for his support on this amendment and 
for his work to expand educational opportunities for all of America's 
students.
  Madam Chair, as we work to make our student loan system work better 
for taxpayers, we must also make sure that the system still works for 
students and for families who seek to improve their futures through 
education.
  My amendment makes sure that the benefits that help students and that 
expands access to college, including loan counseling, outreach and 
education default prevention services, continue to be available. It 
clarifies that these services, targeted to local needs by State 
educational authorities and nonprofit agencies, are eligible for 
funding under H.R. 3221.
  Guarantee agencies, such as the North Carolina Education Assistance 
Authority in my State, have developed customized services to help 
students learn to manage their debt and to avoid default. As an 
example, in 2007, they helped students with more than $52 billion in 
debt recovery from delinquent loans, saving both students and taxpayers 
their money.
  Guarantors and affiliated nonprofits, like the College Foundation of 
North Carolina, help families plan for college and help them navigate 
these financial aid and loan options. Every day, nearly 10,000 students 
and families turn to the CFNC to get help and information.
  We need to make sure that these services continue to be available, 
and my amendment ensures that they are. Higher education is still a key 
to the American Dream, and this will help make it even more so.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. I would be happy to yield.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I thank the gentleman for offering 
this amendment. It's a good amendment and it's important.
  These agencies have a track record in helping students and in helping 
the taxpayers with default diversion activities; but also, we look 
forward to their having an expanded role in financial literacy and in 
helping students as they contemplate going to college and, while 
they're in college, helping them manage their debt and helping them 
make decisions about whether they need all of that debt or not and also 
as they leave, because this Congress, on a bipartisan basis, has passed 
a number of loan forgiveness programs and the income determinant 
repayment program.

                              {time}  1030

  So the students really can start to see how they can manage the debt 
and make career choices at the same time. Unfortunately, many students 
don't realize it until they graduate; they really would have liked to 
have done something else, but they didn't think they could have that 
career and manage their debt. So these agencies are going to take on an 
even more important role for young people as they start and progress 
through college.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in 
opposition to the amendment, although at this time I do not expect to 
oppose it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Minnesota is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, this amendment kind of attempts 
to cobble together a new system that will provide students, families 
and colleges the types of delinquency prevention, default aversion and 
financial literacy services available today under the FFEL Program.
  I do not oppose these types of activities; I support them. But the 
existence of this amendment, it seems to me, is proof that we are 
eliminating these important benefits by eliminating the FFEL Program.
  Rather than figuring out a better way to keep the FFEL Program, to 
keep the private sector involved, the majority is attempting to wedge 
some of its components into the direct loan program. I am concerned 
that the net result will mean fewer students served with more red tape 
for those who do wish to obtain these services.
  As I said, Madam Chair, I am not going to oppose this amendment, but

[[Page H9677]]

Members should know there is a much easier way to preserve the value-
added elements of FFEL. Rather than destroying the program and working 
to recreate it, we can work to preserve and improve the FFEL Program.
  Madam Chair, I yield back.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to my colleague from 
Vermont, a cosponsor of this amendment, Mr. Welch.
  Mr. WELCH. Mr. Etheridge, I thank you for your work. Mr. Miller, I 
thank you for your work.
  I am in strong support of this amendment. The bill is terrific 
because what it does is take taxpayer assistance and give it to kids 
and parents rather than to big bailed-out banks.
  Secondly, what this amendment does is allow those institutions like 
the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, a nonprofit dedicated to 
getting kids to go to college, to help them navigate the process of 
financing college and then to contend with the challenges of repaying 
the loan. It has had an incredible success rate. So this benefit gives 
the benefit to those local institutions that are nonprofit, student-
centered, parent-centered, family-centered, to be able to continue to 
do that work at the local level.
  Thank you for your leadership on this, Mr. Etheridge. It will make a 
big difference for folks in Vermont.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to my colleague and 
cosponsor, and someone who has been working on this issue for a long 
time, the gentleman from North Carolina, Congressman Price.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chair, I thank my colleague, and I 
want to thank the chairman of the committee and the entire committee 
for their work on this bill, making historic investments in America's 
education and economic prosperity.
  In particular, I want to thank the committee for including provisions 
in the bill that would allow guaranty agencies, such as the North 
Carolina State Education Assistance Authority, to provide value-added 
outreach services via contracts with the Department of Education. These 
services play a vital role at both ends of the student loan process by 
informing borrowers about their education financing options before 
college and helping them successfully repay their loans after 
graduation.
  Our proposed amendment simply clarifies that several of the key 
borrower services guaranty agencies currently provide, such as 
delinquency prevention, default aversion, and delinquency collections, 
also would be eligible for contract arrangements with the Department.
  The work of these agencies pays real dividends for students and 
taxpayers alike. In North Carolina, default rates have been 
consistently among the Nation's lowest and about half the national 
average for the last few years. In 2007, these services helped prevent 
an estimated $52 billion in loans from going into default, according to 
the National Council of Higher Education Loan Programs.
  So I thank my colleague from North Carolina and our other cosponsors 
for their collaborative work in putting forth this amendment, and urge 
Members to give it their support.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to my friend and 
colleague from North Dakota (Mr. Pomeroy) who is a cosponsor also.
  Mr. POMEROY. I thank the gentleman for yielding and his work on this 
amendment. I rise in strong support of this amendment.
  It will impact entities like the Bank of North Dakota, the only 
State-owned bank in the country. This bank provides for the students of 
our State the lending and servicing functions for the Federal student 
loan program, and it is uniquely positioned in this regard in the 
country.
  It has provided students and families the tools and techniques to 
deal with their student loan debt. It has worked to maintain low 
default rates through one-on-one repayment default counseling, on-
campus presentations and other outreach efforts.
  As a result, we have had very low default rates in North Dakota. I am 
pleased with the service they have provided to their students.
  I am delighted that this amendment, unlike the underlying bill, would 
allow that to continue. I know the chairman has given his approval to 
this amendment and urge its adoption.
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. Madam Chair, I thank the chairman and ranking member 
for their work on this bill to help members of the committee, and I 
encourage my colleagues to vote for the amendment and the underlying 
bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Etheridge).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mr. Driehaus

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. DRIEHAUS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 10 offered by Mr. Driehaus:
       Page 21, after line 9, insert the following:
       (iii) encourages State policies that are designed to 
     improve rates of enrollment and re-enrollment of dislocated 
     workers in postsecondary education;
       Page 21, line 10, redesignate clause (iii) as clause (iv).
       Page 21, line 14, redesignate clause (iv) as clause (v).
       Page 26, after line 19, insert the following:
       (1) Dislocated worker.--The term ``dislocated worker'' has 
     the meaning given such term in section 101(9) of the 
     Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2801(9)).
       Page 26, line 20, redesignate paragraph (1) as paragraph 
     (2).
       Page 27, line 18, redesignate paragraph (2) as paragraph 
     (3).
       Page 27, line 22, redesignate paragraph (3) as paragraph 
     (4).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Ohio (Mr. Driehaus) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio.
  Mr. DRIEHAUS. Madam Chair, I yield myself as much time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Chair, as we discuss H.R. 3221, I would like to draw attention 
to a critical component of the bill, and that is the College Completion 
and Innovation Fund.
  This amendment, Madam Chair, impacts one portion of the College 
Completion and Innovation Fund, and that specifically is the State 
Innovation and Completion Grants. About 50 percent of the College 
Completion and Innovation Fund goes to State Innovation and Completion 
Grants. These are targeted at low-income and disadvantaged populations 
in each of our States, and they are meant to incentivize States to 
engage in creative efforts with low-income communities, working with 
nonprofits, working with universities, to provide grants for these 
populations.
  With that, the State has to provide to the Department of Education a 
plan describing how they will utilize the funds. This amendment is 
quite simple in that it states that in that plan we must target and we 
must include dislocated workers.
  And I think you will agree, Madam Chair, and I think most of the 
Members will agree, that in this economy, with the number of employees 
that are currently unemployed, we need to be targeting and looking at 
the skill sets of dislocated workers. Because when we talk about 
innovation and education, when we talk about reeducating our workforce, 
there is no more important population than those that are recently 
unemployed. And as we move toward a new technology economy, it's 
critical that although we have tremendous workers across the United 
States, we appreciate the fact that they need more education, that they 
need retooling in order to make them competitive for the jobs of the 
21st century in order for us to compete in a global marketplace.
  So this is a simple amendment, Madam Chair, and it simply says to the 
States that we need to be focusing on those dislocated workers.
  I yield to the distinguished chair of the committee, Mr. Miller.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I want to thank the gentleman for 
yielding and thank the gentleman from Ohio. This is obviously a very 
important component of this legislation.
  His amendment substantially improves it, because the whole Nation is 
aware of the needs of dislocated workers, and certainly in the Midwest,

[[Page H9678]]

where workers are leaving one generation of technology and seeking jobs 
in communities or seeking the next generation of manufacturing and 
technology. This is very important that they be included in these State 
plans.
  Mr. DRIEHAUS. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in 
opposition, although I do not plan to oppose it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Minnesota is 
recognized.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. The purpose of this amendment is indeed 
laudable. It's to ensure that dislocated workers are considered in each 
State's postsecondary education planning. It's a reasonable goal. I 
support the goal. We should all support that goal.
  But there is a rich irony here in that the underlying bill itself is 
going to create thousands of these dislocated workers. We have seen 
estimates of 30,000 or 35,000.
  So if we are serious about helping dislocated workers, and I believe 
we are, we should scrap this underlying job-killing bill and find a 
better way to stabilize student lending for the long term.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DRIEHAUS. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Driehaus).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Cuellar

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. CUELLAR. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 11 offered by Mr. Cuellar:
       Page 80, after line 22, insert the following new section 
     (and conform the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 216. OUTREACH EFFORTS.

       (a) Outreach Activities Required.--The Secretary of 
     Education shall conduct outreach activities in accordance 
     with this section to inform and educate students and their 
     families about the transition to Federal Direct lending under 
     the amendments made by this title to title IV of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965.
       (b) Required Components of Outreach.--The Secretary shall 
     provide for the broad dissemination of information on such 
     amendments and shall--
       (1) operate and maintain an Internet website through which 
     individuals may obtain information on changes made to the 
     Federal Family Education Loan programs and the Federal Direct 
     Loan programs;
       (2) develop and disseminate information to high school 
     seniors and their parents concerning student loans and 
     student aid;
       (3) provide assistance to institutions of higher education 
     to educate students on the repayment of Federal Direct loans; 
     and
       (4) ensure that all outreach efforts are developed using 
     plain language and are culturally- and language-appropriate.
       (c) Use of Other Entities.--In carrying out this 
     subsection, the Secretary may work with other appropriate 
     entities to facilitate the dissemination of information under 
     this section and to provide assistance as described in this 
     section.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Cuellar) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. CUELLAR. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I might 
consume.
  Madam Chair, I rise today in support of my amendment to the Student 
Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009, which I believe is 
acceptable to the chairman, Chairman Miller.
  I surely want to thank Chairman Miller for the leadership that he has 
provided, and the ranking member, Mr. Kline, for the work that he has 
been doing in the committee.
  Madam Chair, at a time when our Nation's students need it the most, 
this legislation makes significant changes to student lending, one of 
the biggest changes that we have seen in years and years. While this 
bill makes tremendous investments in education, too many potential 
college students may be unaware of it.
  Unfortunately, today, there are many students, especially those who 
may be first in their families to apply to college or who may come from 
disadvantaged communities, who are ill-informed about Federal student 
loans. Many students aren't aware of the opportunities available to 
them or of the responsibilities that follow from taking out a loan. 
This lack of information will range from students deciding that college 
is too expensive to those who default on their loans after graduation.
  When you look at some of the States that have been impacted, this 
particular amendment will call on the Secretary to work with colleges 
and universities to educate students about the repayment of Federal 
direct loans, and this amendment will help cut excessive default rates 
that threaten the eligibility of some of the schools from participating 
in this student aid program.
  My home State of Texas has one of the highest student loan default 
rates in the country, and financial aid directors in my district have 
cited a lack of information and outreach as a primary cause. As we make 
college more accessible to all Americans, we need to make sure that 
students and their families have the information so they can make 
reasoned and informed decisions.
  This simple but important amendment will lead to increased student 
awareness, financial aid opportunities, help prevent student loan 
defaults and increase our country's production of talented graduates. I 
urge all my colleagues to support it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in 
opposition, although I don't plan to vote against it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Minnesota is 
recognized.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, this amendment, it seems to me, 
is a little bit like putting a bandaid on what has proven to be a 
gaping wound. I don't think it's going to make many things worse, and 
it might even stop a little bit of the bleeding, but it certainly won't 
heal the damage.
  H.R. 3221 eliminates a program that over 70 percent of colleges and 
universities have consistently chosen. This amendment is an 
acknowledgment that the breakneck pace of this transition by next 
summer will be a problem for students, families and schools.
  While I share the concern about this radical change to our financial 
aid system, I fear this amendment may not do as much good as the 
gentleman from Texas hopes. The Department of Education already 
maintains a Web site on Federal aid programs and regularly disseminates 
information to high schools about the availability of Federal student 
aid.
  In spite of information about the direct loan program, most schools 
still choose the FFEL Program. That tells me it's not a lack of 
information but a genuine preference for the choice, innovation and 
competition of the FFEL Program.
  Informing students and families is important, but it's no substitute 
for simply maintaining the program they already know and they already 
like.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CUELLAR. I yield as much time as he may consume to Mr. Andrews of 
New Jersey.

                              {time}  1045

  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I rise to 
express the committee's strong support for his amendment. It is 
important to reflect on what Mr. Cuellar's amendment does, and what the 
bill does not do.
  Mr. Cuellar's amendment answers questions for students and families 
and financial aid officers and universities and colleges about how best 
to access student loans. Mr. Cuellar's amendment, I think, very wisely 
recognizes there is a whole different kind of person who is achieving a 
higher education in our country today.
  It is not simply the person fresh out of high school. It is people 
who are in the middle of a career change, either voluntarily or 
involuntarily because of a layoff or a plant closing. It is a person 
who is a bit further along in life who wants to build his or her career 
by going to college. It is a nonconventional student. It might be a 
person very new to America, or it might be a person who has been here 
for a very long time. It is people facing language, cultural, or other 
kinds of issues.
  What Mr. Cuellar's amendment is doing is making sure that the 
Department of Education is a constructive

[[Page H9679]]

and active partner in answering the questions that our constituents 
have. We enthusiastically embrace and support his amendment.
  His amendment improves on a bill that doesn't really do any of the 
things that with all due respect the minority said. The minority 
discusses this as some sort of radical shift. It is not radical at all. 
Right now a student goes to a financial aid office and applies for a 
Pell Grant. It is a common process done throughout college and 
university campuses around the country. The only change between 
applying for a Pell Grant and applying for a student loan is you sign a 
document that is a note to pay the loan back. That is the only 
additional step that takes place. As a matter of fact, it is far less 
bureaucratic and far less complicated for a student accessing such a 
loan.
  This bill saves the taxpayers $10 billion over time off the deficit. 
It stops the practice of rewarding people for taking risks with 
taxpayers' money. It understands, as the Congressional Budget Office 
has said, that the savings generated from this are $87 billion over 
time. The bill promotes efficiency. It will generate economic 
development.
  With respect to the gentleman's point about lost jobs, Mr. 
Etheridge's amendment very much speaks to that. It makes sure that loan 
originators are now eligible to become loan processors and collectors, 
and much of the work done by those who originate in the private sector 
will now be done in the private sector by those who process and service 
these loans.
  So the underlying bill saves the taxpayers money, significantly 
expands educational opportunity, and reduces the deficit by $20 billion 
over time. Mr. Cuellar's amendment significantly adds to the value of 
this bill. The committee strongly supports his amendment.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, clearly there is continuing 
disagreement over money that this bill saves or costs. The 
Congressional Budget Office provided an original score of a so-called 
savings of $87 billion. That same Congressional Budget Office has 
provided additional information which would indicate that this bill is 
going to put us further into deficit, further into debt by perhaps as 
much as $50 billion.
  This is not a money-saving bill. This is, indeed, a government 
takeover of an industry. This will cost jobs despite the Etheridge 
amendment. This is a bad piece of legislation. I am going to support 
this amendment because it is at least a Band-Aid.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CUELLAR. I yield back.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Cuellar).
  The amendment was agreed to.


         Amendment No. 12 Offered by Mr. Murphy of Connecticut

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. MURPHY of Connecticut. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk made in order under the rule.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 12 offered by Mr. Murphy of Connecticut:
       Page 163, line 22, insert ``(which may include establishing 
     or supporting partnerships with institutions of higher 
     education (as such term is defined in section 101 of the 
     Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001) to support such 
     education and training)'' after ``providers''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Connecticut (Mr. Murphy) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Connecticut.
  Mr. MURPHY of Connecticut. Madam Chair, I yield myself for such time 
as I may consume.
  I would like to first thank Chairman Miller, Representative Andrews, 
Representative Hinojosa, the ranking member for their work on the 
underlying legislation. We are debating right now landmark legislation 
that is going to bring more access, affordable access, to hundreds of 
thousands, if not millions, of college students across this country.
  Therefore, it is only fitting that as a component to this 
legislation, the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act also heavily 
invests in birth-to-5 education. We know investing in early childhood 
education creates a pathway to later success in our educational 
spectrum.
  Madam Chair, I have spent the last several months touring around my 
district talking with the people who make our early childhood education 
system work. I have hosted round table discussions in cities like 
Torrington and Danbury and listened to parents and providers and 
administrators; and there is one message I have heard loud and clear, 
and that is the lack of early education degree programs in Connecticut 
and across the country often makes it difficult to find highly 
qualified early learning teachers in Connecticut and across the Nation.
  My amendment simply seeks to clarify that the very important Early 
Learning Challenge Fund included in this bill would allow for States to 
use some of that grant money to partner with local colleges and 
universities to create or to expand effective education and training 
programs for early learning providers.
  I was a very strong supporter of our Head Start and School Readiness 
Act in 2007. That bill requires that Head Start teachers by 2011 have 
associate's degrees; and by 2013, 50 percent of Head Start teachers be 
required to have a bachelor's or master's degree. I think it is 
important to make sure that our Nation's kids have teachers and 
educators who have that academic background and education. But we need 
to make sure that our educational system feeds our early learning 
centers with those trained professionals.
  I appreciate the chairman's help on this bill and appreciate 
Representative Andrews' support, and I urge the Chamber's support.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, once again I rise to claim time 
in opposition, although once again I am not going to oppose the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Minnesota is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. The purpose of this amendment is to allow 
States to provide education and training for early learning providers 
by entering into partnerships with higher education institutions. I 
don't oppose these partnerships at all, but I am concerned with the 
underlying language here.
  What we are doing in the bill, we are diverting $8 billion to fund 
and impose requirements on State early childhood systems. In 2005 the 
GAO reported there were already 69 Federal early childhood programs 
spread out over 10 Federal agencies with no coordinated or 
comprehensive strategy.
  It is not the partnerships to improve early learning provider 
training that cause my concern. It is the entire notion that the 
Federal Government is inserting itself yet again into pre-K education 
and other areas, especially when we have not yet met our obligation to 
very important programs like IDEA, creating new programs that once 
again will be underfunded, once again will compete with special ed. We 
ought not be adding new programs when we haven't met our basic 
obligations.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MURPHY of Connecticut. I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding, and the committee 
congratulates and thanks him for this very excellent work he has done 
on this amendment.
  Mr. Murphy's amendment recognizes that some of the most important 
teaching in America is going on right now by people who have had some 
of the least access to high-quality education for themselves. And it is 
not because they are not competent; it is not because they don't want 
it. It is because the resources have not been there.
  The research is very clear that children in the early years of their 
lives develop much of their learning patterns and their skills. The 
country needs a significant investment in high-quality teacher 
education for the men and women who are teaching preschools across the 
country.
  Mr. Murphy's amendment, I think, embraces that concept in a very wise

[[Page H9680]]

way by encouraging the States that will receive early learning funding 
under this bill to consider using some of that funding in partnerships 
with higher education institutions so that the quality of teaching may 
improve.
  This, I think, is an amendment that will pay dividends for years to 
come because better education for our pre-K students will lead to 
better achievement in the classroom which will yield better results 
throughout the lives of these students when they become taxpayers and 
workers and productive citizens of this country.
  I think this is an effort that will bear fruit for many years to 
come. The committee would urge a ``yes'' vote.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. MURPHY of Connecticut. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman for his 
support.
  There are thousands of early childhood educators in my district, and 
I am sure similar numbers across the country who want to go back to 
school and get that advanced degree. Right now the problem is there 
aren't slots for them to do this. This early learning challenge grant 
provides the opportunity to expand on programs that exist today and 
helps to create new ones. I would urge support for this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Murphy).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Childers

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 13 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. CHILDERS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 13 offered by Mr. Childers:
       Page 43, beginning on line 17, amend section 106 (and 
     conform the Table of Contents accordingly) to read as 
     follows:

     SEC. 106. VETERANS RESOURCE OFFICER GRANTS.

       Section 873 (20 U.S.C. 1161t) is amended--
       (1) by amending the header to read as follows: ``MODEL 
     PROGRAMS FOR CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE FOR VETERAN STUDENT 
     SUCCESS; VETERANS RESOURCE OFFICERS'';
       (2) in subsection (a), by inserting ``, or Veterans 
     Resource Officers,'' after ``model programs'';
       (3) by amending subsection (b) to read as follows:
       ``(b) Grant Authorized.--
       ``(1) In general.--Subject to the availability of 
     appropriations under subsection (f), the Secretary shall 
     award grants to institutions of higher education to--
       ``(A) develop model programs to support veteran student 
     success in postsecondary education; or
       ``(B) hire a Veterans Resource Officer to increase the 
     college completion rates for veteran students enrolled at 
     such institutions of higher education.
       ``(2) Grant period.--A grant awarded under this section 
     shall be awarded for a period of 3 years.''; and
       (4) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by amending the header to read as follows: ``Model 
     program required activities''; and
       (ii) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking 
     ``under this section'' and inserting ``for the purpose 
     described in subsection (b)(1)(A)'';
       (B) by redesignating paragraph (2) as paragraph (3); and
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following:
       ``(2) Veterans resource officer required activities.--An 
     institution of higher education receiving a grant for the 
     purpose described in subsection (b)(1)(B) shall use such 
     grant to hire a Veterans Resource Officer whose duties shall 
     include--
       ``(A) serving as a liaison between--
       ``(i) veteran students;
       ``(ii) the faculty and staff of the institution;
       ``(iii) local facilities of the Department of Veterans 
     Affairs; and
       ``(iv) mental healthcare providers at the Department of 
     Veterans Affairs to ensure that veteran students are referred 
     to such providers if needed; and
       ``(B) organizing and advising veteran student organizations 
     and hosting veterans-oriented group functions on campus;
       ``(C) distributing news and information to all veteran 
     students, including through maintaining newsletters and 
     listserves; and
       ``(D) assisting in the training of Department of Veterans 
     Affairs certifying officials, when applicable.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Mississippi (Mr. Childers) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Mississippi.
  Mr. CHILDERS. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, I rise today in support of H.R. 3221, and I ask my 
colleagues for their support of my amendment to H.R. 3221 and our 
Nation's veterans. I want to thank the chairman and the committee for 
making my amendment in order today.
  This amendment would require campus veterans resource officers to act 
as a link between student veterans and mental health care providers at 
the Department of Veterans Affairs. With the support of veterans 
resource officers on university and college campuses, student veterans 
will be better connected to vital services provided by the Department 
of Veterans Affairs and will be better prepared to complete their 
studies.
  With the recent implementation of the post-9/11 GI Bill, veterans 
have greater affordability and access to higher education and training. 
My amendment would help ensure that student veterans are able to 
complete their degree and graduate.
  When the recently deployed National Guard Members from my district in 
Mississippi return, I want to see these education benefits accessed by 
veterans, and help those veterans to succeed in their college careers. 
I would like to especially commend the unprecedented investments in 
community colleges included in H.R. 3221. Community colleges in 
Mississippi are some of the best in the Nation. They play an important 
role in preparing students for tomorrow's workforce. A community 
college education is one of the best investments a student can make.
  I thank our veterans for their service to our Nation, and I encourage 
them to access the training and education benefits they have earned. I 
urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this important amendment.
  I reserve my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in 
opposition to the amendment, although again I do not intend to oppose 
the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Minnesota is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  This is a very worthy goal, and I applaud the gentleman's efforts in 
putting this amendment together. We should be doing things in all of 
our legislation that will strengthen the support that we provide for 
our men and women in uniform while they are in uniform, while they are 
overseas, when they come back, and when they take the uniform off. I 
applaud the gentleman and support the amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CHILDERS. Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding, and I join my friend 
from Minnesota in supporting this amendment. I know that my friend from 
Minnesota speaks as a father and as a veteran when he speaks in favor 
of this amendment. We salute his service.
  This amendment is part of a series of amendments that carry forth a 
bipartisan tradition of this House that says that we don't want to 
simply welcome our troops home with welcoming ceremonies; we want to 
really welcome them home with services and respect and resources that 
they so richly deserve.

                              {time}  1100

  This amendment carries forth that tradition by emphasizing that our 
veterans who choose to pursue a higher education and who would benefit 
from the full range of health services that are available to veterans 
need to have those services.
  The amendment requires an active liaison process between the veteran 
service officer on a campus and the health care people at the Veterans 
Administration so that veterans can have the full range of services 
and, frankly, try to make as much one-stop shopping as we can. So a 
veteran who is trying to balance his or her family obligations and work 
obligations and school obligations, who has some health care

[[Page H9681]]

issues, is able to get services in one place, maybe, instead of two or 
three.
  It makes a lot of sense for people. I think the author has reflected 
the views of his constituents not only in his district, but veterans 
around our country.
  The majority on the committee is strongly in favor of this proposal 
because it recognizes not only the service that our veterans have given 
us, but the needs they have. And we would urge a ``yes'' vote.
  Mr. CHILDERS. I thank the gentleman for his remarks. I would also 
like to thank the gentleman from across the aisle for his kind remarks 
and support of our veterans as well.
  Madam Chair, this is simple: This is good for veterans; it's good for 
universities and community colleges, and this is one way that this body 
can honor our commitment to our men and women who have worn the uniform 
so proudly.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Mississippi has the right to 
close.


                         Parliamentary Inquiry

  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. It was the gentleman's amendment. 
Parliamentary inquiry, Madam Chair. Doesn't the opposite side have the 
right to close on these amendments as offered?
  The Acting CHAIR. Only a manager in true opposition has the right to 
close. When the gentleman claims the time in opposition by unanimous 
consent, not actually opposing the amendment, then the proponent of the 
amendment has the right to close.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Thank you, Madam Chair.
  I support this amendment. I support the comments of my colleagues 
from New Jersey and Mississippi, the author of the bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CHILDERS. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Childers).
  The amendment was agreed to.


          Amendment No. 14 Offered by Mr. Adler of New Jersey

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 14 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. ADLER of New Jersey. Madam Chairwoman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 14 offered by Mr. Adler of New Jersey:
       Page 31, line 10, redesignate subparagraph (D) as 
     subparagraph (E).
       Page 31, line 17, redesignate subparagraph (E) as 
     subparagraph (F).
       Page 31, after line 9, insert the following:
       (D) include activities to increase degree or certificate 
     completion for students who are veterans;

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House resolution 746, the gentleman 
from New Jersey (Mr. Adler) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. ADLER of New Jersey. Thank you, Madam Chairwoman. I yield myself 
such time as I may consume.
  I'd like to start by thanking Chairman Miller, Chairman Andrews, and 
Ranking Member Kline for their leadership on this important matter.
  The legislation we're discussing today provides funding to schools, 
nonprofits, and other educational-related organizations that assist 
students in the completion of college and associate degrees.
  My amendment, along with that earlier amendment offered by Mr. Reyes, 
will take this bill to the next level and prioritize grants to schools 
and organizations that have shown a dedication to ensure student 
veterans have the support and resources they need to complete their 
degrees.
  Our veterans have served our country to keep our country safe and 
free, and they deserve every opportunity to succeed as they return 
home. We should make every effort to ensure that their transition from 
service to civilian life is smooth and successful.
  To that end, my amendment will prioritize schools and organizations 
that support our student veterans and help them apply the skills 
learned in military service to the classroom.
  I thank the schools and organizations who already take steps to 
increase education opportunities for our veterans and hope that my 
amendment will support their efforts and provide an incentive for 
others to join them.
  Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey, has been on 
the forefront in my home State, providing much needed education 
opportunities to our servicemembers. Most recently, Rutgers created 
veterans' services offices, mentoring programs, special orientations, 
and advisory boards to better assist our State's veterans obtain the 
college degrees and certifications they deserve.
  I hope that this bill pushes more colleges and universities across 
the country to support our veterans in the future.
  Judge Washington said it best: ``The willingness with which our young 
people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall 
be directly proportional as to how they perceive the veterans of 
earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their country.''
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CASTLE. I rise not in opposition, but to claim the time in 
opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Delaware is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. CASTLE. Let me first address Mr. Adler's amendment. I think this 
is actually a very good purpose, and I'm supportive of it. We actually 
have done something similar to this in the Higher Education Act, in 
putting people in colleges to help with veterans. I think its purpose 
is well intended.
  I also have examined this legislation carefully. It's gone through 
our committee, on which I served several times. I think there are some 
very good aspects to the bill, if you just isolate that and you believe 
all the numbers that are in there--increasing the Pell Grant limit, 
simplifying the financial aid process, supporting minority-serving 
institutions, supporting early childhood education programs, expanding 
services for veterans, and supporting community colleges and putting 
money towards deficit reduction. All that is well and good, but I have 
a couple problems with this legislation.
  One is I'm not a hundred percent sure that I believe all the numbers 
which are being thrown around in terms of the savings. Secondly, I have 
examined the way student loans are done now, and I have examined the 
Federal Family Education Loan program, the FFEL program, which is the 
federally backed student loan program, and I have found that that 
program serves 4,421 colleges and universities nationally, and close to 
$68 billion in student loans during the past year, according to the 
Congressional Research Service; whereas, the Direct Loan Program, which 
we're shifting to, only serves 1,500 colleges versus the 4,421, and $19 
billion versus the $68 billion.
  In other words, there's been a decision made by most colleges and 
universities in this country to go with the existing program, the FFEL 
program, over the Direct Loan Program, and I worry about what that 
shift might encounter.
  One of the things that's going to happen at a time in which 
unemployment in this country is 10 percent is there's going to be a 
loss of jobs in the private sector. The Consumer Bankers Association 
indicates that this bill threatens approximately 30,000 people's jobs 
nationwide, and that's all over the country, because various banks make 
this kind of servicing dollars available and, therefore, have 
employment in that area. So you're talking about potentially a huge job 
loss in that area.
  I had introduced an amendment before the Rules Committee with Tom 
Price from Georgia which would have indicated that we should hold this 
up until we can get a study of the job loss, but that, unfortunately, 
is not before us today.
  But the problem still remains. We're just not certain, Madam 
Chairwoman, exactly what this will entail. If everything we hear about 
the bill is absolutely correct and all that money can be saved and the 
Federal Government is not going to hire a lot more people or mess it up 
in some other way in terms of the cost savings, there may be a very 
valid argument for the bill. I think it makes some very good points. 
But if those things do not prove out--and many things that we talk 
about here on the floor don't prove out in

[[Page H9682]]

practice--I think that would be problematic.
  Part of the problem is that you're looking at 30,000 jobs, all of 
which are at risk. And you can argue about whether its origination or 
servicing and that kind of thing, but the bottom line is some 
percentage of those jobs would be at risk.
  So I'm supportive of the amendment, to get back to the heart of why 
we're speaking right now, but I have some serious reservations about 
where we're going with this legislation at this time for the reasons 
which I stated.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ADLER of New Jersey. I thank the gentleman for his supporting the 
amendment.
  May I inquire as to how much time I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 3 minutes remaining.
  Mr. ADLER of New Jersey. I yield 2 minutes to my colleague, the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding, and the committee 
expresses its strong support and appreciation for your good work. We 
support it and would urge a ``yes'' vote. Again, this follows in the 
tradition of doing things for our veterans, not just talking about 
them.
  With respect to the underlying bill and addressing the two points 
made by my friend from Delaware, first, with respect to job loss. The 
concern that we all share about job loss is one of the reasons why. 
This bill makes provisions for loan providers, private loan providers 
who presently originate and service loans to continue to have a robust 
role in the servicing and processing and collection of loans. We 
believe that the record will show as the years go through on this that 
the opportunities will, in fact, expand for those in that field.
  Second, with respect to the issue of the cost of this bill, as the 
Members know, under our rules, we have an agreement that the 
Congressional Budget Office is the authoritative source, and the 
Congressional Budget Office has given an authoritative analysis of this 
bill. That authoritative analysis says that the change that's made, 
which is the cessation of the process of rewarding private institutions 
to take risk with taxpayers' money, a very logical change, that that 
change generates gross savings of $87 billion over the years that are 
subject to the analysis, and that in this bill $10 billion of that is 
dedicated to deficit reduction.
  So I think the issue is clear. The bill provides for a continuing 
robust role for private sector firms and workers, and the Congressional 
Budget Office has authoritatively stated the savings generated by this 
bill are $87 billion.
  The underlying bill is strong. The gentleman from New Jersey's 
amendment strengthens the bill. We would urge a ``yes'' vote on his 
amendment.
  Mr. CASTLE. Madam Chairwoman, how much time do we have left on this 
side?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 1\1/2\ minutes left.
  Mr. CASTLE. I yield myself the remaining time.
  I understand well the second speaker, the gentleman from New Jersey, 
Mr. Andrews, and I think he's right. As I said at the beginning, there 
are many good aspects to this bill if we can believe all those things 
are going to come together. As a matter of fact, it's been a little 
difficult for me to oppose it for that reason, because if these things 
do happen, that's advantageous.
  With all due respect to the authoritative analysis from CBO, I don't 
always believe everything I hear from CBO. Not that they don't do a 
good job, but they are anticipating behavior as far as the future is 
concerned. So I'm not sure if we're going to have $87 billion of 
savings to spread over all these other things. My hunch is there's 
going to be a lot of hiring that's going to have to go on to do the 
origination and servicing which is there.
  I'm also very concerned if we take away the origination, which is 
really what the bill does, as far as the private lenders are concerned, 
you're going to get left with the servicing, and that's going to mean a 
substantial reduction in jobs. I'm not suggesting 30,000 jobs. We're 
going to lose a substantial number, I think, of private sector jobs. 
I'm just reticent about that for that reason. I would have hoped that 
we could have had some delay before we go full thrust in this and find 
out 5 years from now it isn't quite as has been promised.
  Again, I do support the amendment, but I have some underlying 
concerns about the legislation. I respect all that's being stated and, 
frankly, I hope it's correct, because it could be in the best interest 
of the future of our government.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ADLER of New Jersey. They fought for our freedom. They fought for 
our safety. They fought for an ever greater America as a beacon of hope 
for freedom for the world. We can do something for them today by 
supporting this amendment. I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Adler).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 15 Offered by Mr. Himes

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 15 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. HIMES. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 15 offered by Mr. Himes:
       Page 21, after line 9, insert the following:
       (iii) encourages the full use of State resources in support 
     of financial literacy programs;
       Page 21, line 10, redesignate clause (iii) as clause (iv).
       Page 21, line 14, redesignate clause (iv) as clause (v).
       Page 21, line 20, redesignate clause (v) as clause (vi).
       Page 25, line 3, strike ``and''.
       Page 25, after line 5, insert the following:
       ``(v) programs to provide financial literacy education and 
     counseling to elementary, secondary, and postsecondary 
     students that include an examination of how financial 
     planning may impact a student's ability to pursue 
     postsecondary education; and''.
       Page 31, after line 9, insert the following:
       ``(D) include activities that enhance the financial 
     literacy and awareness of students who are potentially 
     eligible for assistance under this Act, especially those 
     students from groups that are traditionally underrepresented 
     in postsecondary education;''.
       Page 31, line 10, redesignate subparagraph (D) as 
     subparagraph (E).
       Page 31, line 17, redesignate subparagraph (E) as 
     subparagraph (F).
       Page 77, line 7, insert ``, including financial literacy 
     programs,'' before ``(if any)''.
       Page 80, beginning on line 1, amend subparagraph (B) to 
     read as follows:
       ``(B) deliver a wide range of financial literacy and 
     counseling tools to equip students with the information 
     necessary to make prudent decisions concerning their 
     educational success and financial well-being.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Connecticut (Mr. Himes) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Connecticut.
  Mr. HIMES. Thank you, Madam Chair. I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I'd like to begin by thanking Chairman Miller and Ranking Member 
Kline for their leadership on this very important bill.
  Madam Chair, the next century belongs to the Nation which best 
educates its citizens today. If America wants to compete in the world 
economy, we need an educated workforce; yet, the single greatest 
barrier to higher education can be summed up in one word: cost.
  College tuition has gone up more than any other good or service in 
the last 20 years. The Department of Education tells us that students 
hold a staggering $714 billion in outstanding student loan debt. If we 
want students to succeed in the classroom, we need to help them manage 
the financial commitments that got them there.
  And so as Congress acts today to bring higher education within reach 
for millions more Americans, we must promote access to the financial 
education that students need to make what is usually the most important 
financial decision of their young lives.
  The need to enhance our outreach here is enormous. Recent reports 
estimate that between 30 and 40 percent of first- and second-year 
students will be put into default at some point during the life of 
their loans.

                              {time}  1115

  At the same time, a financial literacy survey taken by Harris 
International in 2009 said that 47 percent of

[[Page H9683]]

Americans between the ages of 18 and 34 give themselves C's, D's or F's 
on their knowledge of personal finance.
  The amendment I offer today with my colleagues, Congresswomen 
McCarthy and Schwartz, makes several technical changes to the 
underlying bill which, at no additional cost, will help to ensure that 
States, nonprofits and private loan servicers who benefit from the new 
investments in college attainment and completion made by this bill do 
their utmost to include high-quality financial literacy training in 
their efforts to help keep more of our kids in school and in the 
postsecondary degree of their choice.
  The Himes-McCarthy-Schwartz amendment enjoys the support of the 
National Association of College Admissions Counseling, the National 
Foundation for Credit Counseling, the Corporation for Enterprise and 
Development, and the Institute for Financial Literacy. I encourage my 
colleagues to vote in support of this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim the time in 
opposition to this amendment, although, in fact, I'm going to support 
the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Thank you, Madam Chair.
  This is a good, laudable goal. I certainly hope it works. Financial 
literacy is in dire straits at every stage of our development. I don't 
know that this will do the job, but I certainly like the direction it's 
going.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HIMES. Madam Chair, I first yield 1 minute to my colleague and 
fellow sponsor, the distinguished gentlelady from New York (Mrs. 
McCarthy).
  Mrs. McCARTHY of New York. Thank you, Mr. Himes. I appreciate working 
with you and Congresswoman Schwartz in working to bring this important 
amendment to the floor. I want to also thank Chairman Miller, Ranking 
Member Kline and the committee staff for their hard work on H.R. 3221 
which will make landmark investments in education and will provide $10 
billion in deficit reduction. I also want to thank the chairman for 
working with me to include several positions in the bill related to 
school safety, classroom noise, child care facilities and increasing 
college access for low-income and minority students.
  The amendment before us would make five technical changes to the bill 
to strengthen the financial literacy components. It has become apparent 
that the lack of education among students and consumers about financial 
systems and products is one of the key elements of our Nation's current 
economic crisis. In many cases, consumers were preyed on by financial 
institutions and sold into debts that they were not capable of 
fulfilling. This has been a defining factor of the current economic 
crisis.
  This amendment seeks to better educate students and arm them with the 
knowledge that will help them navigate the rough waters of our economy. 
It's more important than ever that Americans become informed consumers 
in order to prevent our economy from weakening further. I believe it is 
never too early or too late to learn about consumer, economic and 
personal finance concepts. This amendment is a good step that will 
hopefully put Americans on a track toward fiscal responsibility and 
make a new generation of informed consumers.
  I urge all of my colleagues to support the amendment and the 
underlying bill.
  Mr. HIMES. I next yield 1 minute to my colleague and fellow sponsor, 
the distinguished gentlelady from Pennsylvania (Ms. Schwartz).
  Ms. SCHWARTZ. Thank you.
  I rise today in support of the Himes-McCarthy-Schwartz amendment 
which strengthens the financial literacy provisions in the Student Aid 
and Fiscal Responsibility Act.
  As our country emerges from a recession that has starkly exposed the 
need for good financial planning and fiscal responsibility for 
individuals, for corporations and for the Nation, supporting financial 
literacy education is more important than ever. That is why I'm proud 
to work with my colleagues, Mr. Himes and Mrs. McCarthy, on this 
amendment before us.
  The amendment makes several commonsense additions that will encourage 
financial literacy education for students; and importantly, it will 
reach students early, well before they enter college so that early 
financial planning and counseling can positively impact students' views 
that college is possible, that it is financially accessible. And it 
will enable students to develop sound financial habits that they will 
carry with them through college and beyond.
  The Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act addresses important 
issues of college affordability, including how students and their 
families plan, save and borrow for college. This amendment will 
strengthen the financial literacy provisions, and I am very pleased to 
see its inclusion in this bill.
  Mr. HIMES. Finally I yield 1 minute to my colleague and a great 
leader in the area of financial literacy, the distinguished gentlelady 
from Texas (Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson).
  Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Thank you very much.
  I rise in support of the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act 
and the Himes-McCarthy-Schwartz amendment on financial literacy.
  Statistics from my State show that there is a staggering 50 percent 
drop between the number of persons that are high school graduates and 
persons that have a bachelor's degree or higher. This is below the 
national trend.
  I represent a district with a large percent of underrepresented 
groups in postsecondary education. Preparation for a postsecondary 
education starts far in advance of a student's enrollment in college. 
In fact, it is this preparation that got them accepted into college. 
The same should be said for student financial literacy in preparation 
for higher education.
  Our people as well as our country are benefactors of broad-based 
financial literacy initiatives. We are only as rich as our poorest 
citizens. Enactment of this bill will go a long way toward ensuring 
that our young people do not fall into the current adult financial 
trends, including delinquency in paying bills, maintaining high credit 
card debt, as well as not establishing budgeting priorities for the 
most needs basic, including housing and food.
  I encourage my colleagues to vote for this legislation and this 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. All time having expired, the question is on the 
amendment offered by the gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Himes).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HIMES. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Connecticut 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 16 Offered by Ms. Kilroy

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 16 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Ms. KILROY. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 16 offered by Ms. Kilroy:
       Page 185, beginning on line 21, strike paragraph (2) and 
     insert the following:
       (2) are institutions of higher education eligible for 
     assistance under title III or V of the Higher Education Act 
     of 1965, or consortia that include such an institution; or
       (3) are focused on serving low-income, non-traditional 
     students (as defined in section 803(j) of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1161c(j))), or students who 
     are dislocated workers, who do not have a bachelor's degree.
       Page 196, beginning on line 21, strike subsection (c) and 
     all that follows through page 197, line 5, and insert the 
     following:
       (c) Grant Duration; Renewal.--A grant awarded under this 
     section shall be awarded to an eligible State for a 6-year 
     period, except that if the Secretary determines that the 
     eligible State has not made demonstrable progress in 
     achieving the benchmarks developed pursuant to subsection (h) 
     by the end of the third year of the grant period, non further 
     grant funds shall be made available to the entity after the 
     date of such determination.
       (d) Priority.--In awarding grants under this section, the 
     Secretary shall give priority to applications focused on 
     serving low-income, nontraditional students (as defined in 
     section 803(j) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     1161c(j))), or students who are dislocated workers, who do 
     not have a bachelor's degree.

[[Page H9684]]

       (e) Federal and Non-Federal Share; Supplement, Not 
     Supplant.--

  Ms. KILROY. Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to bring up the 
amendment as modified by the form placed at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the modification.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Modification to amendment No. 16 offered by Ms. Kilroy:
       Page 185, beginning on line 21, strike paragraph (2) and 
     insert the following:
       (2) are institutions of higher education eligible for 
     assistance under title III or V of the Higher Education Act 
     of 1965, or consortia that include such an institution; or
       (3) are focused on serving low-income, non-traditional 
     students (as defined in section 803(j) of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1161c(j))), students who are 
     dislocated workers, or students who are veterans, who do not 
     have a bachelor's degree.
       Page 196, beginning on line 21, strike subsection (c) and 
     all that follows through page 197, line 5, and insert the 
     following:
       (c) Grant Duration; Renewal.--A grant awarded under this 
     section shall be awarded to an eligible State for a 6-year 
     period, except that if the Secretary determines that the 
     eligible State has not made demonstrable progress in 
     achieving the benchmarks developed pursuant to subsection (h) 
     by the end of the third year of the grant period, non further 
     grant funds shall be made available to the entity after the 
     date of such determination.
       (d) Priority.--In awarding grants under this section, the 
     Secretary shall give priority to applications focused on 
     serving low-income, nontraditional students (as defined in 
     section 803(j) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     1161c(j))), students who are dislocated workers, or students 
     who are veterans, who do not have a bachelor's degree.
       (e) Federal and Non-Federal Share; Supplement, Not 
     Supplant.--

  Ms. KILROY (during the reading). Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent 
to dispense with the reading.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the reading is dispensed with.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the amendment is modified.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentlewoman 
from Ohio (Ms. Kilroy) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Ohio.
  Ms. KILROY. Thank you, Madam Chair. I yield myself as much time as I 
may consume.
  My amendment will help Americans looking for jobs. My amendment will 
focus on getting the 55,000 unemployed central Ohioans in my district 
back working and also help veterans get the training that they and 
millions of unemployed Americans need to get that job, a job that will 
support a family and increase their wages. My amendment is possible 
because of the strong work of Chairman Miller and his committee, and I 
thank him for that.
  For many, finding a new job will mean enrolling in school at a time 
when the costs of higher education have been steadily increasing. 
Community colleges often represent the best and most affordable 
opportunity for individuals who need to obtain new skills but do not 
have the means to pay the tuition. Columbus State Community College in 
my district has been a source of pride because of the outstanding job 
they have done in these tough economic times to improve workforce 
training. On their own, they have created a special scholarship program 
that gives workers over the age of 25 without degrees up to $3,500 for 
retraining.
  My amendment would ensure that Columbus State can continue their 
program and will encourage community colleges across the country to 
focus on dislocated workers and veterans. My amendment would help all 
of our out-of-work constituents, like the program at Columbus State has 
already helped my constituent Ryan. Raising a family of five, he was 
laid off from his job at a GM auto parts plant. But the scholarship 
program allowed him to retrain and pursue a passion to become a chef, 
get a full-time job and support his family. Not only did he receive a 
full-time job at a local restaurant, but he was also encouraged to open 
a catering business. His first job was a graduation party this summer 
that led to 14 new catering opportunities.
  Madam Chair, this bill will be historic because of the opportunities 
it creates for education for our children. My amendment will ensure 
that this historic bill will also assist out-of-work Americans and 
veterans by getting them out of dead ends and into successful career 
paths.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in 
opposition to the amendment, although, once again, I do not plan to 
oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Thank you, Madam Chair.
  Our higher education system should be focused on serving low-income 
and nontraditional students along with dislocated workers and veterans. 
In fact, some parts of the system are already working and working well. 
Community colleges and proprietary institutions, for example, are 
addressing this need. I do not oppose prioritizing these populations if 
we're providing grants for education and job training. But again, this 
amendment proves that H.R. 3221 was crafted hastily, failing to 
adequately address the needs of students and job seekers. It creates a 
new program that duplicates many of the purposes of the existing job 
training system under the Workforce Investment Act which is long 
overdue for reauthorization, I might add. Those populations are 
receiving assistance today under WIA.
  I would also point out the perverse consequences of this bill coupled 
with this amendment. Under H.R. 3221, we will likely see significant 
job losses, creating those dislocated workers. Rather than adding to 
the number of dislocated workers, we should simply abandon this job-
killing bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. KILROY. May I inquire, Madam Chair, how much time I have?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Ohio has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Ms. KILROY. I yield such time as he may consume to Representative 
Andrews from New Jersey.
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank the gentlelady for yielding.
  The committee expresses its strong support for the gentlelady's 
amendment. The amendment is very much about a person who's not simply 
seeking a new job, like the story the gentlelady told about Ryan, but 
who is seeking a new career. And frankly, this is the difference 
between the issues raised in the Workforce Investment Act, which we 
should reauthorize, and this bill. The Workforce Investment Act really 
focuses on switching from job to job and helping someone do that.
  The gentlelady's amendment and this bill focus on building a whole 
new life and a whole new career, which is necessary for many of our 
people. They have to do it involuntarily, but it also makes that 
available for the person who perhaps is doing it voluntarily.
  The gentlelady's amendment properly focuses on the 55,000 people in 
her district and the millions of people across this country who find 
themselves involuntarily in a position where they must build a new 
career and a new life. Her amendment rewards institutions that are most 
innovative and creative in achieving that goal. For these reasons, we 
enthusiastically support the gentlelady's amendment and would urge a 
``yes'' vote.
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. Madam Chair, we're going to support this 
amendment. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. KILROY. Madam Chair, I appreciate the support from my colleagues 
and my colleagues from across the aisle. It is time that we come 
together to address this issue of the unemployed in our country. This 
amendment is about them. It's about getting them the education, the 
jobs and the training that will help them contribute to our economy and 
support their families.
  I thank you very much and ask for support from my colleagues for the 
amendment and for this bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kilroy), as modified.
  The amendment, as modified, was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 17 Offered by Mr. Minnick

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 17 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. MINNICK. I have an amendment at the desk.

[[Page H9685]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 17 offered by Mr. Minnick:
       Page 193, line 8, amend clause (iv) to read as follows:
       (iv) transfer of general education credits, including 
     education credits earned while serving in the Armed Forces, 
     between institutions of higher education, as applicable;

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Idaho (Mr. Minnick) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Idaho.
  Mr. MINNICK. Madam Chair, no group better exemplifies the power of 
what a college education can accomplish in building on practical life 
experiences than that of our Nation's servicemen and -women. So many of 
my State's and our Nation's leaders grew into adulthood through the 
military and then, with the benefit of a quality college education, 
went on to serve their communities and countries in positions of 
significant leadership in all walks of life.

                              {time}  1130

  It is critical that members of the Armed Forces who thirst for 
further formal education and show the extra initiative to earn college 
credit while in the service have the opportunity later to count those 
credits toward an advanced degree.
  I'm proud to say that my amendment to the Student Aid and Fiscal 
Responsibility Act will enhance that opportunity by allowing servicemen 
and women to transfer academic credits earned while serving in the 
Armed Forces between institutions of higher education so as to benefit 
not only themselves but their families and their country.
  My amendment has been endorsed by the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans 
of America, the Idaho Division of Veteran Services, and the Idaho 
American legion.
  I would like to thank Chairman Miller and members of the Education 
and Labor Committee for their hard work on this legislation.
  I urge my colleagues to support the Minnick amendment.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in opposition though I 
do not oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chair, this amendment is important, I think, 
because I have some military experience and I have a lot friends with 
military experience, and as we send our young men and women across the 
world to defend us, they do take advantage of college opportunities 
that so many people and so many institutions do offer our military. And 
when they come home, we should expect that their efforts should count 
towards their degrees.
  I think this is a very good thing to do, and I appreciate the 
gentleman from Idaho for bringing this forward.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MINNICK. I thank the gentleman, and I yield to the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank the author of the amendment for yielding.
  The committee strongly supports his amendment and commends him for 
his excellent work.
  No student should pay twice for the same course. If someone takes an 
English course and excels in it and learns a certain set of skills, he 
or she should then not have to pay again and consume his or her time 
again a second time around at a different institution. This is even 
more true for the men and women who volunteer to serve this country in 
the Armed Forces. I think it's very important that the House 
understands the benefits of Mr. Minnick's very wise amendment.
  If a young American today who's serving in Afghanistan is able to 
access college credits whether online or in person and then he or she 
returns to his or her hometown and wants to transfer those credits so 
he or she can then build on their education, what Mr. Minnick says is 
that's one of the standards that we're going to hold these institutions 
to to see how well they cooperate with that veteran who has returned 
home. What it really does is make sure that the veteran has extra 
leverage, that if the course meets reasonable academic requirements and 
if the student really learns what he or she should, they're going to 
get the credit; so the veteran is not going to pay twice, nor is he or 
she going to have to spend as much time on their course. This is a very 
important to a lot of our returning veterans.
  The committee enthusiastically embraces and supports this amendment 
by Mr. Minnick.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Again I just want to say I agree. When our military men 
and women travel, they're temporary. When they travel, they're away 
from their homes and they move around quite often. And the military has 
done an outstanding job of encouraging people to advance their degrees, 
advance in the ranks; noncommissioned officers as well as commissioned 
officers now require education and degrees. And I think it's very 
important that we do this, as they may be in Afghanistan for a year and 
then back in Fort Campbell, Kentucky, for a year or two, and they're 
picking up different courses. Then when they get home and want to get 
on with their life and get back into the civilian sector, they ought to 
put all that together into a clear path towards a degree.
  Again I appreciate the gentleman bringing this forward.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. MINNICK. I thank the gentleman from Kentucky, and I appreciate 
the bipartisan support for this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Idaho (Mr. Minnick).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. MINNICK. Madam Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Idaho will 
be postponed.


               Amendment No. 18 Offered by Mr. Perriello

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 18 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. PERRIELLO. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 18 offered by Mr. Perriello:
       Page 161, line 21, redesignate paragraph (14) as paragraph 
     (15).
       Page 161, after line 20, insert the following:
       (14) A description of any disparity by geographic area 
     (urban and rural) of available high quality early learning 
     programs for low-income children and the steps the State will 
     take to decrease such disparity, if applicable.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Perriello) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. PERRIELLO. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Today I rise in support of my amendment to H.R. 3221, the Student 
Financial Assistance and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009.
  Simply stated, a well-educated citizenry is the bedrock of democracy. 
H.R. 3221 will help to renew America's global leadership in education. 
The bill will accomplish this important goal by making college more 
accessible, reforming quality early education opportunities, and by 
strengthening community colleges and training programs to help build a 
highly skilled and innovative 21st century workforce that is ready for 
the rigors of a global economy.
  Study after study has validated the important role that early 
childhood education plays in a student's future educational success. 
U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius, 
recently testified before Congress, noting that ``too many children are 
entering school without the basic skills they need to succeed in 
kindergarten and beyond.'' The Secretary went on to say what many of us 
already know: ``Children who start off

[[Page H9686]]

school behind their peers are more likely to stay behind throughout 
their school lives and into adulthood, meaning they never reach their 
full potential.''
  As a representative of a rural district, I know all too well the 
myriad of challenges faced by our rural public schools, many of which 
are faced with the evolving responsibility of providing our children 
with a first-class education while operating on less than adequate 
resources. In light of these disparities and the critical nexus between 
quality early childhood education and future educational success, I 
believe that affirmative steps must be taken to ensure that all public 
schools, regardless of geographic location, receive equal treatment in 
Federal education reform initiatives.
  To that end the amendment I offer today would require that those 
States participating in the U.S. Department of Education's Quality 
Pathways Grant Program will evaluate and report to the Secretary of 
Education a description of any disparity by geographic area, rural and 
urban, that exists in ongoing high-quality, early learning programs for 
low-income children. The amendment would also require that 
participating States outline the steps the State will take to address 
any such disparities. The Congressional Budget Office has determined 
this amendment would have no direct effect on Federal direct spending 
or revenues and thus would have no PAYGO impact.
  The key here is to do two things: First, to focus on the vital issue 
of early childhood development and education; and, second, not to 
punish those rural areas where disparity exists but rather to reward 
those areas that have identified that problem and laid out a plan for 
moving forward. This is not about punishing but about rewarding 
success, rewarding innovation, and moving forward, particularly in 
those crucial rural areas where it's so important that our children, 
our young people, get these same opportunities. As a Nation, we have a 
responsibility to ensure that all of our children have access to a 
high-quality education and the American Dream.
  I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support this 
amendment and the underlying legislation so that we may move forward 
with our commitment to America's future.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in opposition though 
I'm not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chair, as I understand it, the purpose of this 
amendment is to ensure States applying for this new pre-K funding 
understand any geographic disparity between early learning programs for 
low-income children and consider steps to reduce the disparity. This 
amendment's a positive step. It may even move us closer to ensuring 
more low-income children are served by this program, something that's 
really not clearly spelled out in the bill.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PERRIELLO. I thank the gentleman for his remarks, and I yield to 
the gentleman from New Jersey.
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank my friend for yielding and express the 
committee's strong support for his well-thought-out amendment.
  The amendment reflects embracing three principles. The first is 
deficit reduction, because the underlying bill reduces the deficit by 
$10 billion. The second is the value of high-quality pre-kindergarten 
education for the children of this country. And the third is the 
principle of fairness. The quality of a child's education should not 
depend on his or her zip code. What Mr. Perriello's amendment does is 
to say that States who receive these early learning grants will have to 
pay attention to that fact, to discern any patterns of inequality that 
exist and talk about what they're going to do to fix them. We think 
that's a very important point, and we commend Mr. Perriello for 
listening to people in his district. I know he represents a lot of very 
small counties and local subdivisions, but I know that he doesn't treat 
anyone's concerns as small. And by raising this amendment, he is 
raising the concerns of those constituents.
  The committee enthusiastically supports this amendment.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PERRIELLO. Madam Chair, I ask that my colleagues support this 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Perriello).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 19 Offered by Mr. Schauer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 19 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. SCHAUER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 19 offered by Mr. Schauer:
       Page 31, line 10, redesignate subparagraph (D) as 
     subparagraph (E).
       Page 31, line 17, redesignate subparagraph (E) as 
     subparagraph (F).
       Page 31, after line 9, insert the following:
       (D) include activities to encourage dislocated workers (as 
     such term is defined in section 101(9) of the Workforce 
     Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2801(9)) to complete 
     postsecondary education opportunities;

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Schauer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan.
  Mr. SCHAUER. Madam Chair, my amendment gives priority in awarding 
Federal grants to schools, States, and nonprofits to encourage 
dislocated workers to complete their degrees.
  In the last 2 years, 6.5 million Americans have lost their jobs, and 
many of them remain dislocated workers. These individuals are in need 
of retraining in a new field that will help them transition in the new 
economy. And nowhere is this more true than in my home State of 
Michigan.
  I want to tell you about Ray Roddy in Hillsdale, Michigan. His home 
county, by the way, has an unemployment rate of 20 percent. Mr. Roddy 
was laid off from his job making engine components and realized he 
would need further education to find another job. He enrolled at 
Jackson Community College and is working hard to become a nurse. Many 
like Ray need retraining to regain employment in a new field but are 
unable to find it.
  Now, within the Access and Completion Innovation Fund, my amendment 
will give priority to degree completion, something that matters to 
people like Ray Roddy. H.R. 3221 will make key investments in providing 
Americans with affordable and accessible education. My amendment will 
ensure that those who have been hurt the most in this tough economy, 
like Ray, aren't lost and are provided with opportunities for 
retraining to get back on their feet.
  Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from North Carolina 
(Mr. Etheridge).
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Madam Chair, I rise to engage in a colloquy with the gentleman from 
California, the distinguished chairman of the Education and Labor 
Committee.
  Yesterday we voted to accept an amendment to ensure that local 
educational agencies that contain a military installation selected for 
closure under the BRAC process would qualify for access to reserved 
funds for distressed areas.
  Mr. Chairman, not only do base closures under the BRAC process 
significantly affect local communities but also do rapid expansions due 
to realignment. The significant influx of military families, while 
welcomed in our communities, results in immediate and significant 
enrollment increases in our local schools and community colleges. These 
rapid population shifts put a strain on local budgets already 
distressed by the economic downturn.
  Mr. Chairman, I am hopeful that as we move to conference, we can 
contemplate how we might assist these communities as well.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. SCHAUER. I yield an additional 1 minute to the gentleman from 
North Carolina.


 =========================== NOTE =========================== 

  
  September 17, 2009 on Page H9686 the following appeared: Mr. 
PERRIELLO. I yield an additional . . .
  
  The online version should be corrected to read: Mr. SCHAUER. I 
yield an additional . . .


 ========================= END NOTE ========================= 

  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. ETHERIDGE. I yield to the chairman.

[[Page H9687]]

  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I realize that the BRAC process has 
a multitude of consequences for local communities, both those facing 
base closures and those dealing with base expansions. As we move 
forward, we can take a look at how we might assist these communities 
under existing avenues as well as in conference on this legislation.

                              {time}  1145

  Mr. ETHERIDGE. I thank the gentleman from California for his work on 
this issue and for this legislation.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition, 
although I do not oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Kentucky is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. The purpose of this amendment is to ensure dislocated 
workers are encouraged to compete through the grant process, and we 
think that's a worthwhile goal.
  Also, since I have time, I want to complement what Chairman Miller 
just said on BRAC. I actually represent Fort Knox, which is a big 
winner in the BRAC. I know a lot of communities were distressed before, 
but Fort Knox is going to be expanding and putting a lot of strain on 
our local schools.
  I look forward to seeing what comes out of conference and being an 
opportunity to be supportive of that. I really appreciate that very 
much.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCHAUER. Madam Chairman, I yield to the gentleman from New Jersey 
(Mr. Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank the author for yielding, and the committee 
strongly supports his amendment.
  This is another example of making sure that the educational 
opportunities in this bill are focused on American workers who most 
need the help, those who find themselves with their lives disrupted, 
their finances in tatters, and in a lot of trouble. The author just 
told a very moving story about one of his constituents who fit that 
description. What we want the House to do is move his legislation to 
success today and move forward so we can help the kind of individuals 
that the author of the amendment talked about. We thank him for 
offering it and express our support.
  Mr. SCHAUER. Madam Chair, I ask my colleagues to support this 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Schauer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it,
  Mr. SCHAUER. Madam Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 20 Offered by Mr. Teague

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 20 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 20 offered by Mr. Teague:
       Page 182, after line 20, insert the following:
       (7) Are students who are veterans.
       Page 192, after line 2, insert the following:
       (8) Expanding, enhancing, or creating academic programs or 
     training programs that focus on preparing students for 
     skilled occupations in energy-related fields, which may be 
     carried out in partnership with employers and may include 
     other relevant partners, that provide relevant job-skill 
     training (including apprenticeships and worksite learning and 
     training opportunities) for skilled occupations in high-
     demand industries.
       (9) Expanding, enhancing, or creating academic programs or 
     training programs that prepare students for occupations 
     critical to serving veterans, including occupations within 
     the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from New Mexico (Mr. Teague) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Mexico.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Madam Chairwoman, I rise today to offer the first of two 
amendments I have to H.R. 3221, the Student Aid and Fiscal 
Responsibility Act of 2009. I would like to thank Chairwoman Slaughter 
and Chairman Miller for allowing the House to debate my proposals.
  Madam Chairman, this amendment makes three commonsense changes to the 
American Graduation Initiative and the Student Aid and Fiscal 
Responsibility Act. The American Graduation Initiative makes a historic 
investment in our community colleges.
  In my home State of New Mexico, community colleges enroll over 51,000 
students. These institutions of higher education provide critical 
pathways for many nontraditional students to receive an education, and 
they provide training for workers looking to get hired on in a local 
industry.
  My amendments will help the community colleges in my district access 
resources to serve the many veterans across New Mexico and help my 
constituents get training for energy jobs, which represent most of the 
good-paying jobs available in southern New Mexico.
  My first amendment makes sure that the programs geared toward helping 
our veterans be successful in school are given priority in receiving 
grants. I consider one of my most important responsibilities in 
Congress to be looking out for the interests of our veterans. That's 
why I work for and earned a seat on the Veterans' Affairs Committee, 
and that's why I introduced this amendment and other legislation on 
their behalf.
  By adopting this amendment, we will make sure that our veterans are 
at the front of the line in receiving the benefits of the bill. And 
after the service they have so selflessly given to our country, they 
deserve to be at the front of the line.
  I encourage my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this amendment and show 
our veterans that they are a priority by giving them priority under the 
American Graduation Initiative.
  The next change makes sure that schools can use grant funds to 
establish, enhance, or expand programs that are geared towards training 
personnel who can serve our veterans. This change will allow schools to 
use money from this bill to train workers to serve our veterans in VA 
hospitals, clinics, and centers across America. And it could mean that 
we will be training the mental health professionals we need to address 
the growing problem of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  The return of the soldiers from Afghanistan and Iraq is putting a 
tremendous strain on our already understaffed Veterans' Administration. 
We must start training workers to fill in these positions. This cannot 
happen overnight, and we must start making investments in solving this 
problem today.
  The last part of my amendment will help schools in my district train 
students for energy jobs. In the northeast part of my district, they 
are looking for wind turbine technicians, and in the southeast we need 
skilled hands in the oilfield. No matter which part of the energy 
industry somebody wants to work in, they should be able to get the 
training they need at the community college in their town.
  So my amendment aims to make it easier for schools to use grant funds 
to establish, enhance, or expand programs that train workers for 
careers in energy-related fields. A trained energy workforce will help 
us produce more energy in America, and producing more energy in America 
is the only way we can end our dependence on foreign oil and make our 
Nation secure.
  I urge my colleagues to support this commonsense amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chair, I rise to claim time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Kentucky is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chairwoman, the purpose of this amendment is 
twofold: it gives priority for applicants for the Community College 
Grant Program serving students who are veterans, and it also will allow 
to expand in energy-related fields.
  We do not oppose the amendment, and I yield back my time.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Madam Chairwoman, I am happy to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Andrews).

[[Page H9688]]

  Mr. ANDREWS. I thank the gentleman from New Mexico, the author of the 
amendment, for yielding.
  The committee strongly supports his very well-thought-out amendment.
  Madam Chair, one of the things that I think we need to highlight 
about this amendment is its wisdom in understanding that perhaps the 
people who are best suited to work in our VA system are those who 
served the country themselves in the Armed Forces.
  The gentleman talked about the fact that perhaps some of our 
returning veterans will be trained to work in mental health services 
for work in VA clinics and VA hospitals. And who would better 
understand the challenges and issues that one of our returning vets is 
facing than someone who has walked in his or her shoes?
  So we think that among the many good ideas in this amendment, that 
focus on training people for the VA system makes an awful lot of sense. 
Obviously, as well, the energy component of the gentleman's amendment 
makes a great deal of sense.
  So the committee thanks the gentleman for offering this amendment and 
would urge people in both parties to vote ``yes'' and support it.
  Mr. TEAGUE. I thank the gentleman from New Jersey for his comments, 
and I urge all of my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this bill.
  Madam Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New Mexico (Mr. Teague).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 21 offered by Mr. Teague

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 21 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Madam Chairwoman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 21 offered by Mr. Teague:
       Page 5, after line 7, insert the following new section (and 
     conform the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 4. USE OF SAVINGS FOR DEBT REDUCTION.

       All savings in Federal expenditures not otherwise expended 
     as a result of the enactment of this Act shall be made 
     available for the reduction of the Federal deficit.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from New Mexico (Mr. Teague) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Mexico.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Madam Chairwoman, I rise today to offer and speak in 
support of my deficit reduction amendment to H.R. 3221, the Student Aid 
and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009.
  First of all, I would like to thank Chairwoman Slaughter and Chairman 
Miller for allowing the amendment to come to the floor today.
  My amendment is simple; and like a lot of simple, commonsense 
legislation, it's not long either. Here's what it says:
  All savings and Federal expenditures not otherwise expended as a 
result of enactment of this act shall be made available for the 
reduction of the Federal deficit. In other words, where we don't spend 
a dollar, we save a dollar.
  Madam Chairwoman, America is drowning in debt. On the day that I was 
sworn in, the national debt was about $10.6 billion. And this year 
alone, the Congressional Budget Office expects that we will add another 
$1.4 trillion in deficit. This is clearly an unsustainable course. Our 
government must start practicing some fiscal responsibility. 
Businessmen like me have to balance their books; government needs to 
try and do the same.
  This bill will put $10 billion toward reducing the deficit. But if 
we're going to completely close our annual deficits, we need a 
sustained solution. That is why I am also a strong supporter of 
statutory pay-as-you-go legislation, which says that Congress can't 
spend a dollar without saving a dollar.
  Today, with the passage of this legislation, we save $10 billion of 
taxpayer money. With the passage of my amendment, we take that $10 
billion and we lock it away for the purpose of deficit reduction. We 
lock it away to make sure our children and grandchildren don't have to 
pay a dollar.
  So let's save this $10 billion, but let's also find a sustainable 
solution to reducing our deficit. That means tightening our belts when 
we need to, and of course passing statutory PAYGO into law.
  Madam Chairwoman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Chairman, I rise to claim time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from Kentucky is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. I yield myself as much time as I may consume.
  When we're talking about the $10 billion savings to the deficit and 
using CBO numbers, the number that we like to talk about, if you look 
at the overall cost of the budget, CBO numbers in the discretionary 
side, what this bill would do to the discretionary side, they're 
transferring money out of the mandatory into the discretionary side for 
administration.
  And, also, as we expand Pell Grants, with this bill we will expand 
Pell Grants, on the mandatory side, which this bill scores, it doesn't 
score what will happen in the discretionary side. Part of Pell Grants 
are discretionary, so if you expand Pell Grant applicants in the 
mandatory side, it is also going to require additional appropriations. 
And we believe that the admin in the discretionary side plus the 
expansion of Pell Grants from CBO numbers is $13.5 billion cost to the 
system, which is more than the $10 billion that we're putting in the 
deficit reduction now. So we will have to increase more than we're 
putting in the deficit reduction.
  The other thing is, these numbers were scored by CBO in March, and 
the most up-to-date numbers of people participating in the Pell Grants 
as of August--now that we're here in September--the August numbers 
believe that it will be $11.4 billion in added Pell Grant costs when 
using the most up-to-date numbers. And so I think those are real 
numbers that we can talk about. We are already up to--I guess it's $25 
billion of costs that this will have when we're talking about $10 
billion in savings.
  The one thing that wasn't taken into account either--and these are 
numbers that could come to pass or not, but those first two numbers I 
think are real. The other is the $33 billion that CBO says hasn't been 
identified that are market risk to the program. Now, that's market 
risk: so you could have them, you could not have them, I'll cede that. 
But I do believe that the discretionary side of Pell and the most up-
to-date numbers of Pell do show that it's about a $25 billion cost of 
the bill.
  Madam Chairwoman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Madam Chairwoman, I am happy to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Andrews).
  Mr. ANDREWS. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding. We are 
in strong support of his amendment.
  Since his very first day in the House, the gentleman has worked 
diligently on the issue of addressing our deficit and reducing our 
debt. By supporting this amendment and by supporting this bill, he is 
following that course in a couple of ways. First, he is understanding 
that reducing entitlements is a key to reducing the deficit. And this 
bill has a net reduction of $10 billion in mandatory spending, as 
validated by the Congressional Budget Office. It is one of the single 
most significant entitlement reductions in several years, and the 
gentleman is to be commended for supporting it.
  Second, the amendment shows understanding that economic growth is a 
powerful way to reduce our deficit and, therefore, our debt. And by 
supporting the investment in the education of the American people, we 
are supporting more jobs and more economic growth.
  Finally, I would commend the gentleman for making sure that every 
dollar of that $10 billion in entitlement reduction will in fact be 
dedicated to deficit reduction.
  The gentleman has offered a very good amendment. The committee 
strongly supports it and urges a ``yes'' vote.

                              {time}  1200

  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Chairman, if we disagree with the CBO numbers from 
the March score, instead of using the

[[Page H9689]]

most up-to-date ones, if you take $10 billion and save it from a 
mandatory program, I applaud that, and I applaud the amendment because 
we should save toward deficit reduction. Yet, if the bill allows you to 
take $10 billion and to save it for deficit reduction but on the 
discretionary side of the counter a tax dollar is a tax dollar and it 
requires you to spend $13.5 billion on transferring administrative 
costs from the program to discretionary, then the additional Pell 
Grants are going to have to be spent by the discretionary side through 
the appropriations process. So when you save $10 billion here but you 
spend $13.5 billion there, then you're raising the deficit $3.5 
billion. I don't know any other way to look at it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Mr. Chairman, the CBO says that this bill will generate 
savings, and my amendment says that these savings will go to paying off 
the deficit.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Holden). The question is on the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from New Mexico (Mr. Teague).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. TEAGUE. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Mexico 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 22 Offered by Mr. Souder

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 22 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous 
consent to speak out of turn for 2 minutes.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from California?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Chairman, it is now time, as the 
Chair has noted, to move to amendment No. 22 by Mr. Souder. My 
understanding is that Mr. Souder will not be offering that amendment 
and that he and the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Perlmutter) have had 
discussions around this amendment, and they have agreed that we should 
work this out in the conference committee. I have agreed to their 
discussions, and they are pursuing those at this time.
  Mr. PERLMUTTER. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I would be happy to yield to the 
gentleman from Colorado.
  Mr. PERLMUTTER. Thank you, Mr. Miller.
  Mr. Chairman, Mr. Souder and I have had a conversation. I think we're 
going to reach a good compromise that will be good for the bill. I have 
committed, as have you, to work with Mr. Souder in a conference 
committee to get that done.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I thank the gentleman.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.


                 Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Flake

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 23 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. FLAKE. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 23 offered by Mr. Flake:
       Page 5, after line 7, insert the following new section (and 
     conform the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 4. PROHIBITION ON EARMARKS.

       None of the funds appropriated pursuant to this Act may be 
     used for a Congressional earmark as defined in clause 9(d) of 
     rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Flake) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. FLAKE. Mr. Chair, this amendment, I believe, is noncontroversial. 
It simply ensures that the funds within the new grant programs created 
in this bill are not earmarked but, rather, that they are awarded on a 
competitive or on a formula basis.
  It is important that we add prohibitive language here. There is 
prohibitive language in one of the sections of the bill, but it does 
not apply to the entire bill, so we need to ensure that the entire bill 
with these new grant programs isn't earmarked.
  As we have seen in the past, unfortunately, even when Congress says 
we have no intention of earmarking these accounts or this bill, we do. 
The best example, perhaps, is the Homeland Security bill. When the 
Homeland Security legislation came through first and we created the 
department, we were told that we wouldn't be earmarking these funds. 
Well, it just took us a few years, and now there are literally hundreds 
of earmarks in the Homeland Security bill.
  Many of the accounts that should be awarded on a competitive basis--
disaster mitigation and other things--are now earmarked, so when 
communities and organizations apply for this funding, it's already 
earmarked, and they can't even compete. We don't want this to happen in 
other areas as well, so it's important that this amendment is accepted. 
I believe that it will be.
  It is consistent with legislation that I've offered before to the 
BEACH Act a couple of years ago. That was voted on with a roll call 
vote and was approved. Later, when the Paycheck Fairness Act passed 
last year, this amendment was accepted by a voice vote. Most recently, 
it was accepted by voice vote on H.R. 1262, the Water Quality 
Investment Act, and on H.R. 2200, the TSA authorization bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ANDREWS. I rise to claim time in opposition, although I will not 
oppose the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from New Jersey is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Chairman, the committee supports the amendment. The 
clear intention of the underlying spending bill is that the funds be 
awarded on the formula and competitive basis stated in the bill. There 
is no intention that any be earmarked.
  For the record, I would just say that our support of the amendment 
should not be read to imply that we do not support congressionally 
sponsored projects in other contexts, but on this one, I agree with the 
gentleman's amendment and would urge its acceptance.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. FLAKE. I thank the gentleman.
  I wish the gentleman would make that statement, but I don't expect 
that here, certainly, and I am pleased that this amendment will be 
accepted.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ANDREWS. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Flake).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 24 Offered by Mr. Guthrie

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 24 
printed in House Report 111-256.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 24 offered by Mr. Guthrie:
       Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Ensuring Student Choice and 
     Competition Act of 2009''.

     SEC. 2. EXTENSION OF ENSURING CONTINUED ACCESS AND STUDENT 
                   LOANS ACT.

       Section 459A of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     1087i-1) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)(1), by striking ``July 1, 2010'' and 
     inserting ``July 1, 2014'';
       (2) in subsection (e)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)(A), by striking ``September 30, 2010'' 
     and inserting ``September 30, 2014'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) by striking ``February 15, 2011'' and inserting 
     ``February 15, 2015''; and
       (ii) by striking ``September 30, 2010'' and inserting 
     ``September 30, 2014''; and
       (C) in paragraph (3), by striking ``2010, and 2011'' and 
     inserting ``2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015'';
       (3) in subsection (f), by striking ``July 1, 2010'' and 
     inserting ``July 1, 2014''; and
       (4) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(g) Special Rule.--
       ``(1) In general.--Subject to paragraph (2), in carrying 
     out the program under this section, the Secretary shall 
     continue, until

[[Page H9690]]

     June 30, 2014, to carry out the 3 programs described in the 
     Federal Register notices published pursuant to subsection 
     (a)(2) of this section, as such programs were in effect on 
     the day before the date of enactment of the Ensuring Student 
     Choice and Competition Act of 2009.
       ``(2) Loan participation purchase program.--Notwithstanding 
     any provision of law to the contrary or the terms and 
     conditions of the programs described in the Federal Register 
     notices published pursuant to subsection (a)(2), an eligible 
     lender participating in the loan participation purchase 
     program shall not, prior to July 1, 2014, be required to--
       ``(A) make a redemption payment with respect to each 
     eligible loan purchased by the Secretary; or
       ``(B) exercise the put option with respect to each such 
     loan.
       ``(3) Definitions.--The terms `redemption payment' and `put 
     option' refer to the redemption payment and put option 
     described in the summary of the terms and conditions of the 
     loan participation purchase program (73 Federal Register 127, 
     July 1, 2008).''.

     SEC. 3. STUDY OF FFEL PROGRAM ALTERNATIVES.

       (a) Study Required.--
       (1) In general.--The Comptroller General of the United 
     States, the Secretary of Education, and the Secretary of the 
     Treasury, in consultation with the study group described in 
     paragraph (2), shall conduct a study to identify and make 
     recommendations for the development of a Federal student loan 
     program that incorporates a strong public-private partnership 
     between the Federal Government and the private sector.
       (2) Study group.--The Comptroller General of the United 
     States, the Secretary of Education, and the Secretary of the 
     Treasury shall convene a study group which shall include--
       (A) the Director of the Office of Management and Budget;
       (B) the Director of the Congressional Budget Office;
       (C) representatives of entities making loans under part B 
     of title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     1071 et seq.);
       (D) representatives of other entities in the financial 
     services community;
       (E) representatives of other participants in the student 
     loan programs; and
       (F) such other individuals as the Comptroller General of 
     the United States, the Secretary of Education, and the 
     Secretary of the Treasury may designate.
       (b) Design of the Study.--The study conducted under this 
     section shall identify recommendations for a new model for 
     maintaining a strong public-private partnership for student 
     lending. Such model shall be designed to achieve the 
     following objectives:
       (1) Use private capital in loan origination.
       (2) Produce sufficient market competition among loan 
     providers to ensure that students and families have choices 
     in Federal student loans.
       (3) Avoid waste, fraud, and abuse.
       (c) Factors.--The study group shall consider the following 
     factors in developing recommendations for a model that meets 
     the objectives described in subsection (b):
       (1) The ability of lenders, guaranty agencies, and loan 
     servicers to provide top-quality customer service, default 
     aversion activities, and financial literacy activities.
       (2) The use of in-school subsidies or flexible repayment 
     options to ensure that borrowers are able to successfully 
     repay their loans.
       (3) The ability of the program to be streamlined for ease 
     of administration and understanding by institutions of higher 
     education, students, and families.
       (4) The stability of the program during times of economic 
     disruption by uncontrollable market forces.
       (5) The use of market mechanisms in determining lender 
     return on student loans, while continuing to meet the other 
     objectives of the programs under parts B and D of title IV of 
     the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1071 et seq; 
     1087a et seq.), including the provision of loans to all 
     eligible students.
       (6) The feasibility of requiring borrowers to repay loans 
     through income tax withholding.
       (d) Preliminary Report and Publication of Study.--
       (1) Preliminary report.--Not later than July 1, 2012, the 
     study group shall prepare a preliminary report on the 
     recommendations of the study conducted under this section, 
     including any additional or dissenting views with respect to 
     the findings, available to the public with a 60-day request 
     for public comment. The study group shall review the public 
     comments.
       (2) Final report.--Not later than January 1, 2013, the 
     Comptroller General of the United States, the Secretary of 
     Education, and Secretary of the Treasury shall submit a final 
     report on the recommendations of the study, including any 
     additional or dissenting views, to the Committee on Education 
     and Labor of the House of Representatives and the Committee 
     on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.

     SEC. 4. REVISED SPECIAL ALLOWANCE CALCULATION.

       (a) Revised Calculation Rule.--Section 438(b)(2)(I) of the 
     Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1087-1(b)(2)(I)) is 
     amended by adding at the end the following new clause:
       ``(vii) Revised calculation rule to reflect financial 
     market conditions.--

       ``(I) Calculation based on libor.--For the calendar quarter 
     beginning on October 1, 2009, and each subsequent calendar 
     quarter, in computing the special allowance paid pursuant to 
     this subsection with respect to loans described in subclause 
     (II), clause (i)(I) of this subparagraph shall be applied by 
     substituting `of the 1-month London Inter Bank Offered Rate 
     (LIBOR) for United States dollars in effect for each of the 
     days in such quarter as compiled and released by the British 
     Bankers Association' for `of the quotes of the 3-month 
     commercial paper (financial) rates in effect for each of the 
     days in such quarter as reported by the Federal Reserve in 
     Publication H-15 (or its successor) for such 3-month period'.
       ``(II) Loans eligible for libor-based calculation.--The 
     special allowance paid pursuant to this subsection shall be 
     calculated as described in subclause (I) with respect to 
     special allowance payments for the 3-month period ending 
     December 31, 2009, and each succeeding 3-month period, on 
     loans for which the first disbursement is made--

       ``(aa) on or after the date of enactment of the Student Aid 
     and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009, and before July 1, 
     2010; and
       ``(bb) on or after January 1, 2000, and before the date of 
     enactment of the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 
     2009, if, not later than the last day of the second full 
     fiscal quarter after the date of enactment of such Act, the 
     holder of the loan affirmatively and permanently waives all 
     contractual, statutory or other legal rights to a special 
     allowance paid pursuant to this subsection that is calculated 
     using the formula in effect at the time the loans were first 
     disbursed.

       ``(III) Terms of waiver.--A waiver pursuant to subclause 
     (II)(bb) shall--

       ``(aa) be applicable to all loans described in such 
     subclause that are held under any lender identification 
     number associated with the holder (pursuant to section 487B); 
     and
       ``(bb) apply with respect to all future calculations of the 
     special allowance on loans described in such subclause that 
     are held on the date of such waiver or that are acquired by 
     the holder after such date.

       ``(IV) Participant's yield.--For the calendar quarter 
     beginning on October 1, 2009, and each subsequent calendar 
     quarter, the Secretary's participant yield in any loan for 
     which the first disbursement is made on or after January 1, 
     2000, and before October 1, 2009, and that is held by a 
     lender that has sold any participation interest in such loan 
     to the Secretary shall be determined by using the LIBOR-based 
     rate described in subclause (I) as the substitute rate (for 
     the commercial paper rate) referred to in the participation 
     agreement between the Secretary and such lender.'';

       (b) Conforming Amendment.--Section 438(b)(2)(I) of the 
     Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1087-1(b)(2)(I)) is 
     further amended--
       (1) in clause (i)(II), by striking ``such average bond 
     equivalent rate'' and inserting ``the rate determined under 
     subclause (I)''; and
       (2) in clause (v)(III) by striking ``(iv), and (vi)'' and 
     inserting ``(iv), (vi), and (vii)''.

     SEC. 5. AUTHORIZATION AND APPROPRIATION OF FUNDS.

       Section 401A(e)(1)(E) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
     (U.S.C. 1070a-1(e)(1)(E)) is amended by striking 
     ``$1,010,000,000'' and inserting ``$250,000,000''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 746, the gentleman 
from Kentucky (Mr. Guthrie) and a Member opposed each will control 10 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kentucky.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself as much time as I may 
consume.
  I am pleased to join Ranking Member Kline in offering this amendment. 
Our amendment accomplishes key goals for student loan stabilization and 
reform without gutting a successful public-private partnership.
  First, this amendment preserves the FFEL program--the Federal Family 
Education Loan Program. It ensures stability and continuity for both 
students and schools by extending the Ensuring Continued Access for 
Student Loans Act, or ECASLA, through 2014, which aligns it with the 
rest of the Higher Education Act, which Congress reauthorized last 
year.
  As long as we're facing a global credit shortage, ECASLA provides a 
Federal backstop to ensure there is no interruption in funding for 
students and families. As the market recovers, ECASLA offers the 
flexibility for private capital to return. In fact, even in today's 
weakened economy, a substantial portion of loans originated in the FFEL 
program are made with private capital.
  We know the ECASLA programs are working on campuses all around the 
country. We have heard from a group of financial aid administrators who 
have made it clear that ECASLA is working. You just don't have to talk 
to financial administrators. I would submit that 4,400 colleges and 
universities still participate in the FFEL program, and they voted with 
their feet. If they felt

[[Page H9691]]

that ECASLA had not been working, they would have joined the Direct 
Loan Program by now, but they haven't.
  I've heard from colleges and universities across my district--from 
large public, State universities to small, independent, private 
colleges, and they've all shared with me how the FFEL program benefits 
their students by offering the services of flexibility and choice with 
additional services. Let's not forget about how this helps students.
  Second, our amendment will drive down the deficit. ECASLA proves that 
you can save taxpayer money while preserving an effective program. In 
fact, we expect to generate $13 billion in savings over the next 5 
years. Poll after poll shows that the American people are deeply 
concerned about the deficit. We should invest in future generations by 
putting the savings toward deficit reduction.
  Third, we chart a path for the future by pursuing a comprehensive 
renewal of student lending. By extending ECASLA through 2014, 
consistent with other financial aid programs, we create a vital window 
of opportunity to pursue real student loan reform. Our amendment would 
create a commission to study the student lending system and would 
propose a new framework for stable, cost-effective financing.
  We will remove politics from the discussion and focus on what 
matters: preserving choice and competition for borrowers; preventing 
waste, fraud and abuse; maintaining value-added benefits like financial 
literacy and counseling; ensuring stability even in a weak economy; and 
retaining private capital, avoiding a massive infliction of debt on 
future generations.
  Finally, I would like to point out that our amendment does not create 
the same long-term entitlement expansions that have been called for in 
this bill. The issues addressed in the majority's bill are all 
important. Republicans care about the condition of our schools, about 
pre-K education, about community colleges, and about their role in 
developing our workforce, but this is the wrong place and the wrong way 
to address these challenges. We can invest in students without 
crippling them with runaway entitlement spending. This is a 
straightforward amendment based on extending a bipartisan solution. I 
urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment. I 
will oppose the amendment
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New Jersey is recognized for 10 
minutes.
  Mr. ANDREWS. Mr. Chairman, this amendment recognizes the need for 
substantial reform in the Federal student loan program. It recognizes 
that the practice of using taxpayer money to reward private 
institutions that take risks, not with their own money but with 
taxpayer money, doesn't make any sense. So there is recognition of this 
problem, and that recognition is shared by the underlying bill, but 
here is where the underlying bill parts company from the amendment, and 
it's why we oppose it.
  There is a huge difference between these two approaches on what to 
do. The approach that the minority favors saves about $17 billion less 
than the approach that the underlying bill favors. It's a reform that 
continues, unwisely in my judgment, the practice of using taxpayer 
money to subsidize private institutions that take a risk with taxpayer 
money. So, rather than continue those subsidies, the underlying bill 
makes some very different choices, and here is the difference on what 
the choices are in the $17 billion difference.
  The underlying bill says let's spend that money so returning veterans 
could get Pell Grants in addition to their GI benefits and continue 
their educations. They would spend the $17 billion on bank subsidies.
  Our bill recognizes the fact that community colleges are burgeoning 
with new enrollees who need an education because of the tumultuous 
circumstances in our economy. Our bill says let's spend the $17 billion 
to strengthen those community colleges. The amendment says let's spend 
it on bank subsidies.
  There are students, as we speak, who are attending schools. They're 
taking classes in broom closets, in former boiler rooms because their 
schools don't have adequate places to teach children. There are schools 
that are more than 100 years old where children are learning about the 
Civil War in buildings that were built at the time of the Civil War. 
Our bill says let's invest some of that $17 billion in upgrading the 
quality of those schools and in putting Americans back to work. The 
amendment says, no, let's spend it on bank subsidies.
  Finally, there is a choice about early childhood. Our bill says that 
we value and want to invest in the reading and math skills of a 4-year-
old or a 5-year-old so he or she can excel as a student, can climb the 
ladder as a student and can succeed as a worker and as a taxpayer. So 
it makes an historic investment in quality early childhood education 
around this country. Their bill favors bank subsidies. We think our 
approach is right.
  At this time, I yield to the chairman of the full committee to 
continue the argument, the gentleman from California (Mr. George 
Miller).
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I thank the gentleman.
  Mr. Chairman, my colleague on the other side of the aisle said that 
this legislation is the wrong way and the wrong place to make this 
investment. He has got it exactly backwards. This is the exact way to 
make this investment--to take the savings by cutting the subsidies to 
the lenders and recycling those on behalf of families, students and our 
community institutions so that we can expand the educational 
opportunities in this country.
  We cannot continue just to wring our hands about our competitive 
place in the world, about the need for new engineers, new scientists, 
new mathematicians, a skilled and technologically fit workforce in this 
country. We must do something about it.
  What the Obama administration has said under the leadership of the 
President and the Secretary of Education is that we're going to do 
something about it now, and we're going to provide additional money for 
Pell Grants, that we're going to provide additional money for community 
colleges, that we're going to provide additional money for early 
childhood education, and that we're going to provide additional 
opportunities for access and completion of that educational 
opportunity. It's not enough that young people start college. It's 
important that they finish college.
  We've got to do better at that, and we're going to do it in a 
fiscally sound manner. We're going to pay for it, because there is 
enough money in those exorbitant subsidies that we pay decade after 
decade that were first raised to the consciousness of this Congress by 
President Bush's Office of Management and Budget. They kept showing us 
the comparison. If you ran the Direct Loan Program, you would save a 
huge amount of money for the taxpayers.
  Finally, this Congress, under this administration, is taking the 
leadership to take that money and to recycle it on behalf of our 
families and students.

                              {time}  1215

  I just want to say, this is the right time, the right place, and the 
right way to do this. I thank him for his support in opposition to this 
amendment.
  Mr. ANDREWS. We reserve the balance of our time.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. 
Kline).
  Mr. KLINE of Minnesota. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  We clearly have some differences of opinion on this legislation, as 
often happens in this body. I want to underscore a couple of things 
that the underlying bill, by mandating the public option, mandating a 
government takeover of an industry, does to expand the government's 
role. It creates new programs, it creates new expenses. It will cost 
jobs in the private sector.
  And when you remove the budget gimmicks, and you look at the latest 
numbers from the Congressional Budget Office, it is clear that it will 
add to the deficit. It will add to our debt.
  And so we are looking at an underlying bill here that says it's 
better if we turn over to the Department of Education and the Treasury 
the responsibilities of lending $100 billion a year to students and 
getting the interest back from those loans.
  Of course, we don't have the $100 billion. We are running a deficit 
this year

[[Page H9692]]

of $1.6 trillion, and we are looking at a debt in 10 years of $21 
trillion. So in order for the government, now this huge bank, to have 
the money to lend, the government is going to have to go somewhere, 
China perhaps, and borrow that money so that it can lend the money. 
This seems to be a strange time to be doing this.
  I think the underlying bill is flawed. I think it is a rush to a 
government takeover. It is going to add to our deficit.
  So I rise in strong support of this amendment, which says let's take 
advantage of the private sector. Let's see if there is a way that we 
can strengthen it, encourage it. Let's take some time and continue with 
the bipartisan agreement ECASLA and look at the program before we push 
precipitously the entire industry into the hands of the government.
  Mr. ANDREWS. I would inquire of the Chair how much time we have 
remaining on our side?
  The Acting CHAIR. Both sides have 5 minutes remaining.
  Mr. ANDREWS. Before I yield to the gentleman from New York, it is 
very important for the Members to understand the alternative proposal 
substitute guts the early childhood investment, guts the increase in 
Pell Grant, guts the aid to community college and guts the other 
investments in education, the historically black colleges, the 
Hispanic-serving institutions, it takes away that investment. We think 
that is very unwise.
  At this time I would yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Bishop).
  Mr. BISHOP of New York. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I rise in opposition to the amendment, and I urge my colleagues to 
vote ``no'' on this amendment.
  Frankly, I am surprised. Over the last 2 days we have heard a great 
deal from our friends on the other side of the aisle about the deficit, 
about which we should all quite correctly be concerned. And, frankly, I 
thought that their substitute amendment would address that issue in a 
very forceful way.
  This amendment does not. This amendment leaves in place a program 
that is wasteful and expensive. It leaves in place a program that costs 
approximately $8 billion to $9 billion more per year than that which we 
are proposing to take its place, the Direct Loan Program.
  What this amendment essentially says is that over the next 5 years, 
the Federal Government gets to do the heavy lifting of this loan 
program. The Federal Government gets to do the heavy lifting of 
providing the capital, it gets to do the heavy lifting of guaranteeing 
the amounts that are loaned, and the private lenders get to walk away 
with the profits. I don't see how any reasonable person can think that 
that is a situation that we can allow to stand.
  What the amendment also says is, it says to needy students, Hope you 
can get by, hope you can make it as you try to pay your bills. We would 
love to help, but we have got these lenders that are counting on huge 
profits, and we have got to make sure that we provide for them.
  Our proposal, the underlying bill, says quite the opposite. Our 
proposal says that we are going to pay, take Federal tax dollars and 
put them to their highest possible use in this circumstance, and that 
is helping needy students go to college.
  Every one of us, virtually every one of us that has the privilege of 
serving in this Chamber, is here because we had the opportunity to seek 
a higher education. What our bill does, the underlying bill does, is it 
says to everyone else that's out there, that has aspirations of their 
own, that we are going to help you get your slice of the American 
dream.
  In doing so, we build a stronger Nation, because we build a Nation 
that can compete on equal footing with the rest of the world.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Chairman, the 2014 numbers, when the Higher 
Education Act is reauthorized--and we feel it would be appropriate to 
do it--when we have ECASLA in place, when the markets are turning 
around, when the markets do turn around, the heavy lifting--we were at 
a unique time last year. I wasn't in the Congress last year when the 
bipartisan group came together to do ECASLA to preserve, and worked, 
both Republicans and Democrats together, and should be commended for 
that.
  All we are asking is that we continue that until the higher education 
is authorized, during that time have the commission study and see 
exactly with what program we should go. We did talk a lot about deficit 
reduction because, quite frankly, I think that's the most important 
thing in the country.
  If we look at CBO numbers, when you say $10 billion in a mandatory 
spending program, but spend $13.5 billion in a discretionary spending 
program using CBO numbers, then you are not putting $10 billion to the 
deficit if you are spending $13.5 billion in discretionary spending, 
because as the Pell Grants expand on the mandatory side of the aisle, 
they also expand on the discretionary side. So when a taxpayer sends 
their dollar to Washington D.C., they don't mark it for discretionary 
or mandatory, it comes here and it's spent.
  So the underlying bill, using CBO numbers, I am not going to bring in 
the market risk, because we can argue that. Some people have asked for 
$33 billion, we could argue that. But just in real hard numbers, 
spending, transferring administration in the Pell Grant, discretionary 
side, says that the underlying bill is a $3.5 billion addition to the 
deficit.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ANDREWS. We would respectfully ask that the House disapprove this 
amendment, vote against it.
  I did want to return to one of the fiscal arguments we heard from my 
friend from Minnesota, that he is right, that the idea of borrowing 
money from central banks around the world is not desirable to anyone 
here. And he is right that we should embark on an effort to reduce our 
deficit and eventually reduce that debt.
  But I would respectfully say he is wrong with his further 
characterization of this issue.
  What the status quo does is to borrow that very same money, which 
none of us wants to borrow, and then turn around and use it to reward 
private lending institutions who are taking risks with taxpayer money. 
The issue is not whether the taxpayers are at risk, the issue is how 
they will be at risk.
  The existing status quo, which I believe the minority, through this 
amendment, shows that it understands needs change, puts the taxpayers' 
money at risk and then rewards private institutions for putting the 
taxpayers' money at risk. That simply makes no sense.
  With respect to the fiscal argument about the $87 billion and the 
cost in discretionary spending, there is one that is something that is 
clearly known, and something that is subject to dispute. What's clearly 
known is that the Congressional Budget Office has said there will be 
$87 billion in gross savings under this bill. What happens each year 
under the discretionary side is for this House to work its will and 
decide.
  So we would urge defeat of this amendment. If you believe in 
investment in early childhood education, in Pell Grants, in community 
colleges, in our Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and in 
our Hispanic-serving institutions and other minority-serving 
institutions, and if you believe in $10 billion of deficit reduction, 
the right course is to vote against this substitute, vote for the 
underlying bill.
  We yield back the balance of our time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Guthrie).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kentucky 
will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in House Report 111-256 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. Hoekstra of Michigan.
  Amendment No. 4 by Mrs. McMorris Rodgers of Washington.
  Amendment No. 7 by Ms. Foxx of North Carolina.

[[Page H9693]]

  Amendment No. 15 by Mr. Himes of Connecticut.
  Amendment No. 17 by Mr. Minnick of Idaho.
  Amendment No. 19 by Mr. Schauer of Michigan.
  Amendment No. 21 by Mr. Teague of New Mexico.
  Amendment No. 24 by Mr. Guthrie of Kentucky.
  The Chair will reduce to 5 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


                Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. Hoekstra

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Hoekstra) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 2 offered by Mr. Hoekstra:
       Strike title III of the Bill, and redesignate titles IV and 
     V as titles III and IV, respectively.
       Redesignate sections 401 through 409 as sections 301 
     through 309, respectively.
       Redesignate sections 501 through 505 as sections 401 
     through 405, respectively.
       Page 144, line 23, strike ``section 403'' and insert 
     ``section 303''.
       Page 145, line 1, strike ``section 404'' and insert 
     ``section 304''.
       Page 145, line 4, and page 174, lines 3 and 14, strike 
     ``section 403(c)(3)'' and insert ``section 303(c)(3)''.
       Page 145, line 17, and page 174, line 5, strike ``section 
     405'' and insert ``section 305''.
       Page 147, line 4, strike ``404'' and insert ``304''.
       Page 148, line 10, strike ``section 403(f)'' and insert 
     ``section 303(f)''.
       Page 150, line 15, strike ``section 405(2)'' and insert 
     ``section 305(f)''.
       Page 151, lines 4 and 25, page 153, lines 8 and 12, page 
     162, lines 2 and 17, page 163, line 1, page 166, lines 18 and 
     23, page 168, line 4 and 19, and page 175, line 25, strike 
     ``section 402(a)'' and insert ``section 302(a)''.
       Page 151, line 21, strike ``section 405(1)'' and insert 
     ``section 305(1)''.
       Page 153, line 13, and page 162, line 6, strike ``section 
     402(d)'' and insert ``section 302(d)''.
       Page 168, line 10, 15, and 21, page 169, line 2, and page 
     170, line 7, strike ``section 402(b)'' and insert ``section 
     302(b)''.
       Page 168, line 17, strike ``section 402(c)(3)'' and insert 
     ``section 302(c)(3)''.
       Page 170, line 11, strike ``section 402(c)(1)'' and insert 
     ``section 302(c)(1)''.
       Page 178, line 9, strike ``503'' and insert ``403''.
       Page 178, line 12, strike ``504'' and insert ``404''.
       Page 178, lines 15 and 18, strike ``section 505'' and 
     insert ``section 405''.
       Page 178, beginning on line 20, strike ``sections 503 and 
     504'' and insert ``sections 403 and 404''.
       Page 179, line 3, strike ``sections 503 and 504'' and 
     insert ``sections 403 and 404''.
       Page 183, line 8, strike ``section 502(a)(3)'' and insert 
     ``section 402(a)(3)''.
       Page 184, line 6, and page 194, line 10, strike ``section 
     501(b)(1)'' and insert ``section 401(b)(1)''.
       Page 188, line 15, strike ``section 505(b)'' and insert 
     ``section 405(b)''.
       Page 189, line 6, and page 191, lines 5, 13, and 20, strike 
     ``section 502(a)(3)'' and insert ``section 402(a)(3)''.
       Page 196, line 2, and page 200, line 1, strike ``503(i)'' 
     and insert ``403(i)''.
       Page 200, line 8, strike ``section 503(f)(1)'' and insert 
     ``section 403(f)(1)''.
       Conform the table of contents accordingly.

                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 161, 
noes, 262, not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 710]

                               AYES--161

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Deal (GA)
     Delahunt
     Dent
     Doggett
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Ehlers
     Emerson
     Fallin
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Guthrie
     Hall (TX)
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hoekstra
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline (MN)
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (NY)
     Lewis (CA)
     Linder
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     McCarthy (CA)
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Tim
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Price (GA)
     Putnam
     Rehberg
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Turner
     Upton
     Walden
     Wamp
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--262

     Ackerman
     Adler (NJ)
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boccieri
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Brown, Corrine
     Butterfield
     Cao
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (TN)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Driehaus
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foster
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gonzalez
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHugh
     McIntyre
     McMahon
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murtha
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sestak
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Taylor
     Teague
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Wexler
     Wilson (OH)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--16

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Bishop (UT)
     Costa
     Dingell
     Faleomavaega
     Johnson (GA)
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Moore (KS)
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Rahall
     Sutton
     Tanner

                              {time}  1250

  Mrs. CAPPS, Messrs. ENGEL, POSEY, HOYER, ADLER of New Jersey, 
HASTINGS of Florida, LARSON of Connecticut, WEINER, CAO, RUSH, CAPUANO, 
and WEXLER changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mrs. MILLER of Michigan and Mrs. McMORRIS RODGERS changed their vote 
from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


            Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mrs. McMorris Rodgers

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Washington (Mrs. McMorris Rodgers) on which further

[[Page H9694]]

proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice 
vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 4 offered by Mrs. McMorris Rodgers:
       Page 118, beginning on line 8, strike section 331 and 
     insert the following:

     SEC. 331. IMPERMISSIBLE USES OF FUNDS AND CONCURRENT FUNDING.

       (a) In General.--No funds received under this subtitle may 
     be used for--
       (1) payment of maintenance costs, including routine repairs 
     classified as current expenditures under State or local law;
       (2) stadiums or other facilities primarily used for 
     athletic contests or exhibitions or other events for which 
     admission is charged to the general public;
       (3) improvement or construction of facilities the purpose 
     of which is not the education of children, including central 
     office administration or operations or logistical support 
     facilities; or
       (4) purchasing carbon offsets.
       (b) Funding Under Other Acts.--Funds made available under 
     this title shall not be used to assist any local educational 
     agency that receives funding for the construction, 
     modernization, renovation, and repair of facilities under the 
     American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
       Conform the table of contents accordingly.

                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 167, 
noes 251, not voting 21, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 711]

                               AYES--167

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bright
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cao
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Davis (KY)
     Deal (GA)
     Dent
     Doggett
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Ehlers
     Emerson
     Fallin
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Guthrie
     Hall (TX)
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Himes
     Hoekstra
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kline (MN)
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (NY)
     Lewis (CA)
     Linder
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy, Tim
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Turner
     Upton
     Walden
     Wamp
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--251

     Ackerman
     Adler (NJ)
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boccieri
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brown, Corrine
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (TN)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Driehaus
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foster
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Giffords
     Gonzalez
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McMahon
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murtha
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Price (NC)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sestak
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Wilson (OH)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--21

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Braley (IA)
     Cantor
     Costa
     Culberson
     Dingell
     Franks (AZ)
     Inslee
     Israel
     Kennedy
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Perlmutter
     Radanovich
     Rangel
     Ryan (OH)
     Tanner
     Watt
     Wexler


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1257

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. FRANKS of Arizona. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 711 I inadvertently 
missed the vote. Had I been present, I would have voted ``aye.''
  Mr. CULBERSON. Mr. Chair, on rollcall 711 I was unable to record my 
vote. I intended to vote ``aye'' on that question.
  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 711 I was detained. Had I 
been present, I would have voted ``no.''


                  Amendment No. 7 Offered by Ms. Foxx

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from North 
Carolina (Ms. Foxx) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Amendment No. 7 offered by Ms. Foxx:
       Page 27, beginning on line 20, strike ``has the meaning 
     given'' and all that follows through ``2009'' and insert 
     ``refers to a State public employment service established 
     under the Wagner-Peyser Act (29 U.S.C. 49 et seq.)''.
       Page 27, line 25, strike ``have the meanings given'' and 
     all that follows through page 28, line 2, and insert ``refer 
     to a State workforce investment board established under 
     section 111 of the Workforce Investment Act (29 U.S.C. 2821) 
     and a local workforce investment board established under 
     section 117 of such Act (29 U.S.C. 2832), respectively.''
       Amend title V of the Bill to read as follows:

                  TITLE V--PRIVACY AND ACCESS TO DATA

     SEC. 501. PRIVACY AND ACCESS TO DATA.

       (a) In General.--Each State or consortia that receives a 
     grant under any provision of this Act shall implement 
     measures to--
       (1) ensure that the statewide longitudinal data system 
     under this subsection and any other data system the State or 
     consortia is operating for the purposes of this Act meet the 
     requirements of section 444 of the General Education 
     Provisions Act (20 U.S.C. 1232g) (commonly known as the 
     ``Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974'');
       (2) limit the use of information in any such data system by 
     governmental agencies in the State, including State agencies, 
     State educational authorities, local educational agencies, 
     community colleges, and institutions of higher education, to 
     education and workforce related activities under this Act or 
     education and workforce related activities otherwise 
     permitted by Federal or State law;

[[Page H9695]]

       (3) prohibit the disclosure of personally identifiable 
     information except as permitted under section 444 of the 
     General Education Provisions Act and any additional 
     limitations set forth in State law;
       (4) keep an accurate accounting of the date, nature, and 
     purpose of each disclosure of personally identifiable 
     information in any such data system, a description of the 
     information disclosed, and the name and address of the 
     person, agency, institution, or entity to whom the disclosure 
     is made, which accounting shall be made available on request 
     to parents of any student whose information has been 
     disclosed;
       (5) notwithstanding section 444 of the General Education 
     Provisions Act, require any non-governmental party obtaining 
     personally identifiable information to sign a data use 
     agreement prior to disclosure that--
       (A) prohibits the party from further disclosing the 
     information;
       (B) prohibits the party from using the information for any 
     purpose other than the purpose specified in the agreement; 
     and
       (C) requires the party to destroy the information when the 
     purpose for which the disclosure was made is accomplished;
       (6) maintain adequate security measures to ensure the 
     confidentiality and integrity of any such data system, such 
     as protecting a student record from identification by a 
     unique identifier;
       (7) where rights are provided to parents under this clause, 
     provide those rights to the student instead of the parent if 
     the student has reached the age of 18 or is enrolled in a 
     postsecondary educational institution; and
       (8) ensure adequate enforcement of the requirements of this 
     paragraph.
       (b) Use of Unique Identifiers.--It shall be unlawful for 
     any Federal, State, or local governmental agency to--
       (1) use the unique identifiers employed in such data 
     systems for any purpose other than as authorized by Federal 
     or State law; or
       (2) deny any individual any right, benefit, or privilege 
     provided by law because of such individual's refusal to 
     disclose the individual's unique identifier.
       Conform the table of contents accordingly.

                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 126, 
noes 301, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 712]

                               AYES--126

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Deal (GA)
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Duncan
     Emerson
     Flake
     Fleming
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline (MN)
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Linder
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran (KS)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Olson
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Putnam
     Rehberg
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rohrabacher
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Walden
     Wamp
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (SC)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--301

     Ackerman
     Adler (NJ)
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Brown, Corrine
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Cao
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castle
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gonzalez
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McMahon
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sestak
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Bilbray
     Costa
     Dingell
     Fallin
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Perlmutter
     Radanovich
     Tanner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1304

  Mr. ADLER of New Jersey changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 15 Offered by Mr. Himes

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Connecticut (Mr. Himes) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 428, 
noes 2, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 713]

                               AYES--428

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boustany
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown, Corrine
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cao
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Castor (FL)

[[Page H9696]]


     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Duncan
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Fallin
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gordon (TN)
     Granger
     Graves
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (KS)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Neugebauer
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olson
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Snyder
     Souder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                                NOES--2

     Johnson, Sam
     Smith (WA)
       

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Costa
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Tanner
     Tiberi


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1311

  Mr. SHADEGG changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 17 Offered by Mr. Minnick

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Idaho (Mr. 
Minnick) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 428, 
noes 0, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 714]

                               AYES--428

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boustany
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown, Corrine
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cao
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Duncan
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Fallin
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gordon (TN)
     Granger
     Graves
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (KS)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Neugebauer
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olson
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg

[[Page H9697]]


     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Souder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Bilbray
     Carnahan
     Costa
     Kingston
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Tanner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1317

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 19 Offered by Mr. Schauer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. Schauer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 425, 
noes 5, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 715]

                               AYES--425

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boustany
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Brown (SC)
     Brown, Corrine
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cao
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Duncan
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Fallin
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gordon (TN)
     Granger
     Graves
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (KS)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Neugebauer
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olson
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Souder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                                NOES--5

     Bishop (UT)
     Broun (GA)
     Flake
     Johnson, Sam
     McClintock

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Carnahan
     Costa
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Tanner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1323

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 21 Offered by Mr. Teague

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New Mexico 
(Mr. Teague) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 425, 
noes 0, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 716]

                               AYES--425

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boustany
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown, Corrine
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cao
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley

[[Page H9698]]


     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Duncan
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Fallin
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gordon (TN)
     Granger
     Graves
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (KS)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Neugebauer
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olson
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Souder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Abercrombie
     Bachmann
     Barrett (SC)
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Costa
     Emerson
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Scott (VA)
     Tanner
     Velazquez


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1329

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 24 Offered by Mr. Guthrie

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kentucky 
(Mr. Guthrie) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 165, 
noes 265, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 717]

                               AYES--165

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Deal (GA)
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Ehlers
     Emerson
     Fallin
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Guthrie
     Hall (TX)
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Hoekstra
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kline (MN)
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (NY)
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy, Tim
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Putnam
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Turner
     Upton
     Walden
     Wamp
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                               NOES--265

     Ackerman
     Adler (NJ)
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boccieri
     Bordallo
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Brown, Corrine
     Butterfield
     Cao
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Childers
     Christensen
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (TN)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Driehaus
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Faleomavaega
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Giffords
     Gonzalez
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McMahon
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Melancon
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murtha
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Norton
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pierluisi
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sablan
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)

[[Page H9699]]


     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sestak
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Wexler
     Wilson (OH)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Costa
     McHugh
     Meeks (NY)
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Tanner


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining in 
this vote.

                              {time}  1337

  Mr. SCHRADER changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute, as amended.
  The committee amendment in the nature of a substitute, as amended, 
was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Accordingly, under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Serrano) having assumed the chair, Mr. Holden, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 3221) to 
amend the Higher Education Act of 1965, and for other purposes, 
pursuant to House Resolution 746, he reported the bill back to the 
House with an amendment adopted by the Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  The question is on the amendment.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mr. ISSA. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?
  Mr. ISSA. I am, in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Issa moves to recommit the bill H.R. 3221 to the 
     Committee on Education and Labor with instructions to report 
     the same back to the House forthwith, with the following 
     amendment:
       Add at the end the following new title (and conform the 
     table of contents accordingly):

                       TITLE VI--DEFUND ACORN ACT

     SECTION 601. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Defund ACORN Act''.

     SEC. 602. PROHIBITIONS ON FEDERAL FUNDS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES 
                   WITH RESPECT TO CERTAIN INDICTED ORGANIZATIONS.

       (a) Prohibitions.--With respect to any covered 
     organization, the following prohibitions apply:
       (1) No Federal contract, grant, cooperative agreement, or 
     any other form of agreement (including a memorandum of 
     understanding) may be awarded to or entered into with the 
     organization.
       (2) No Federal funds in any other form may be provided to 
     the organization.
       (3) No Federal employee or contractor may promote in any 
     way (including recommending to a person or referring to a 
     person for any purpose) the organization.
       (b) Covered Organization.--In this section, the term 
     ``covered organization'' means any of the following:
       (1) Any organization that has been indicted for a violation 
     under any Federal or State law governing the financing of a 
     campaign for election for public office or any law governing 
     the administration of an election for public office, 
     including a law relating to voter registration.
       (2) Any organization that had its State corporate charter 
     terminated due to its failure to comply with Federal or State 
     lobbying disclosure requirements.
       (3) Any organization that has filed a fraudulent form with 
     any Federal or State regulatory agency.
       (4) Any organization that--
       (A) employs any applicable individual, in a permanent or 
     temporary capacity;
       (B) has under contract or retains any applicable 
     individual; or
       (C) has any applicable individual acting on the 
     organization's behalf or with the express or apparent 
     authority of the organization.
       (c) Additional Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``organization'' includes the Association of 
     Community Organizations for Reform Now (in this subsection 
     referred to as ``ACORN'') and any ACORN-related affiliate.
       (2) The term ``ACORN-related affiliate'' means any of the 
     following:
       (A) Any State chapter of ACORN registered with the 
     Secretary of State's office in that State.
       (B) Any organization that shares directors, employees, or 
     independent contractors with ACORN.
       (C) Any organization that has a financial stake in ACORN.
       (D) Any organization whose finances, whether federally 
     funded, donor-funded, or raised through organizational goods 
     and services, are shared or controlled by ACORN.
       (3) The term ``applicable individual'' means an individual 
     who has been indicted for a violation under Federal or State 
     law relating to an election for Federal or State office.
       (d) Revision of Federal Acquisition Regulation.--The 
     Federal Acquisition Regulation shall be revised to carry out 
     the provisions of this title relating to contracts.

  Mr. ISSA (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
for waiving the reading of the remainder of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from California?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from California is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mr. ISSA. Mr. Speaker, this motion to recommit is critical at this 
time. As many people in this body realize, the scandals surrounding the 
criminal activities of ACORN have called into question their role in 
all aspects of government, including aspects covered in this bill. The 
funding they've received under Health and Human Services, title IV, 
which is covered in this bill, and other areas make it extremely 
important that we consider it at this time.
  ACORN, as our committee had previously reported, is an organization 
with a long history of criminal indictments and activities, so much so 
that in fact the Census Bureau has, on its own, removed its funding. 
The Senate has voted 83-7 to remove funding; we must do the same thing.
  This motion to recommit deliberately is here because in fact this is 
a funding-related activity. This is one in which we understand that the 
very fundamental of taxpayer dollars being properly used and supported 
is at stake.
  There is no question as to where ACORN stands, where the 
administration and multiple Governors, including my own Governor, 
Arnold Schwarzenegger, have called for this investigation; 130 Members 
of this body have called on the President in fact to defund.
  So the motion to recommit, narrow in scope, simply makes the 
defunding of ACORN a portion of this bill, makes it clear that the 
Members of this House do not support ACORN's activities, including 
child trafficking, prostitution, and in fact a great many other 
criminal activities, including voter fraud. This is timely, it is 
targeted, and it is time that this House act.
  I move the motion, and ask for it to be voted positively.
  Mr. Speaker, this motion to recommit is simple. It's about protecting 
students and taxpayers.
  Earlier this week, more than 130 House Republicans wrote to President 
Obama requesting that he take immediate action to cut off all federal 
funding of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, 
or ACORN.
  ACORN has been linked to multiple instances of voter registration 
fraud and other illicit activity. In recent days, media accounts have 
detailed ACORN employees' alleged complicity in illegal schemes too 
unseemly to discuss in this chamber. To continue funding this 
organization would not just be indefensible--it would be an outrage.
  An analysis of federal data shows that ACORN has received more than 
$53 million in direct funding from the Federal Government since 1994, 
and has likely received substantially more indirectly through States 
and localities that receive Federal block grants.
  The Census Bureau recently decided to sever all ties with ACORN to 
ensure the integrity of their operations. This was the right decision. 
Unfortunately, ACORN's links to the Federal Government do not stop with 
the Census Bureau. This organization has infiltrated a host of federal 
programs, consuming taxpayer dollars even as it has repeatedly been 
found to engage in criminal activity.
  To fully protect taxpayers, we must enact a comprehensive ban on 
Federal funding for this

[[Page H9700]]

corrupt and criminal organization. This motion to recommit will do 
exactly that.
  Republicans have introduced legislation--the Defund ACORN Act--to put 
an immediate stop to Federal funding for this crooked bunch.
  U.S. International Agreements: The iron and steel section states: 
``This section shall be applied in a manner consistent with United 
States obligations under international agreements.'' This applies 
government-wide.
  Any and all Federal agencies: Section 505(a) is open to other 
entities the Secretary deems appropriate--an open-ended inclusion that 
could apply to any Federal agency.
  The tentacles of this legislation reach into the economy, our 
education system, our workforce system, and a host of other areas. It 
is truly a comprehensive bill--and a comprehensive ban on funding for 
ACORN, such as that included in this motion, is what is needed.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to 
the motion, although I will not oppose the motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Speaker, Members of the House, I 
want to begin by thanking so many Members of the House that have 
supported this bill today on this floor. The bipartisan support we had 
for so many of the amendments, the debate and the dialogue that we had, 
thank you so very much.
  When the President talked about the future of the American economy, 
he made it very clear that if we were going to be competitive in the 
rest of the world, if we were going to emerge in that top competitive 
position in the next generation of the globalized economy, where so 
many more countries are now able to educate young people, provide 
world-class organizations, universities, research facilities, that we 
had to change our education system, that we had to make a major 
investment, that we no longer could just think about how much money we 
put into education. We had to start thinking about the outcomes and 
whether we were getting the results for young people all across this 
country, were we getting the results for businesses across this 
country, were we getting the results for families.
  He made that very clear with the Race to the Top fund that is getting 
such wide reception and acceptance from Governors all over the country, 
from school districts, from unions, from families and organizations to 
see that change. He has extended that to the colleges and universities.
  It is not enough that a student enters a college, that he or she is 
eligible to go to college. The question is, Will they graduate from 
that college? And what he has put in this legislation is a discussion 
and a requirement that we understand how many people who enter college 
obtain that certificate for a career, that AA degree in a 2-year 
college, their ability to go on to a 4-year college. That's the first 
time we've ever asked that question.
  But it's terribly important, when two-thirds of the people going to 
college today are borrowing money, when they're borrowing money, we 
need to know that the colleges are providing the right kind of 
educational experience and the opportunity to succeed. That's what 
you've been voting for all day long, and I want to thank you because it 
will change the direction, it will change the direction in which we are 
going in this Nation. And I think it will dramatically enhance our 
possibilities of remaining the top competitive country in the world.
  That's why the Business Roundtable spoke to the issue of the 
community college provisions in this bill, how important they were so 
that the community colleges could become a catalyst for economic 
revitalization, for retooling, for dislocation, so that communities 
that are welcoming a new industry or communities that are losing an old 
one and thinking about where to go in the future, to make the community 
colleges the center of that training and education that so many 
American workers and families are seeking out today. That's what you 
voted to do in this bill.

                              {time}  1345

  I want to thank you very much.
  Mr. NADLER of New York. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. I will not yield. I want to thank 
you very much.
  As to this amendment, ACORN gets, I believe, no money under this 
bill, but that's not the issue. The issue is that I will support the 
gentleman's motion to instruct. We have a world-class bill here. We 
have a bill of opportunity for families, for students, for employers, 
for our country, and for our economy. I hope you will support it. Vote 
for the motion to instruct. Vote for this bill on final passage.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. ISSA. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, the Chair will reduce to 5 minutes 
the minimum time for any electronic vote on the question of passage.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 345, 
noes 75, answered ``present'' 2, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 718]

                               AYES--345

     Ackerman
     Aderholt
     Adler (NJ)
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Baird
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bean
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boccieri
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Boustany
     Boyd
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Buchanan
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Cao
     Capito
     Capps
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Childers
     Chu
     Clay
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     Davis (TN)
     Deal (GA)
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Driehaus
     Duncan
     Edwards (TX)
     Ehlers
     Ellsworth
     Emerson
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Fallin
     Farr
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Giffords
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gordon (TN)
     Granger
     Graves
     Grayson
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Hall (TX)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Heinrich
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Hodes
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Hoyer
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kagen
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilroy
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kline (MN)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (NY)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Markey (CO)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Melancon
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Moore (KS)
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murphy, Tim
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Napolitano
     Neugebauer
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olson
     Ortiz
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pomeroy
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Putnam
     Quigley
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise

[[Page H9701]]


     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sestak
     Shadegg
     Shea-Porter
     Shimkus
     Shuler
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Skelton
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Souder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stearns
     Stupak
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wamp
     Wasserman Schultz
     Weiner
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (OH)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Wu
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                                NOES--75

     Baldwin
     Becerra
     Brady (PA)
     Brown, Corrine
     Butterfield
     Capuano
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (IL)
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     Doyle
     Edwards (MD)
     Ellison
     Engel
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fudge
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Holt
     Honda
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson, E.B.
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kucinich
     Larsen (WA)
     Lee (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lynch
     Markey (MA)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     Meeks (NY)
     Mollohan
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Nadler (NY)
     Neal (MA)
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Polis (CO)
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Schakowsky
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Stark
     Thompson (MS)
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watson
     Waxman
     Wexler
     Woolsey

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--2

     Hastings (FL)
     Watt
       

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Clarke
     Connolly (VA)
     Costa
     Frank (MA)
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Tanner


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining on this vote.

                              {time}  1406

  Messrs. RAHALL, MOLLOHAN and ENGEL changed their vote from ``aye'' to 
``no.''
  Ms. ESHOO, Messrs. WELCH, INSLEE, FARR, DOGGETT, MINNICK, Ms. 
WASSERMAN SCHULTZ, Messrs. AKIN, EHLERS and JOHNSON of Georgia changed 
their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the motion to recommit was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the 
instructions of the House in the motion to recommit, I report the bill, 
H.R. 3221, back to the House with an amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Add at the end the following new title (and conform the 
     table of contents accordingly):

                       TITLE VI--DEFUND ACORN ACT

     SECTION 601. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Defund ACORN Act''.

     SEC. 602. PROHIBITIONS ON FEDERAL FUNDS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES 
                   WITH RESPECT TO CERTAIN INDICTED ORGANIZATIONS.

       (a) Prohibitions.--With respect to any covered 
     organization, the following prohibitions apply:
       (1) No Federal contract, grant, cooperative agreement, or 
     any other form of agreement (including a memorandum of 
     understanding) may be awarded to or entered into with the 
     organization.
       (2) No Federal funds in any other form may be provided to 
     the organization.
       (3) No Federal employee or contractor may promote in any 
     way (including recommending to a person or referring to a 
     person for any purpose) the organization.
       (b) Covered Organization.--In this section, the term 
     ``covered organization'' means any of the following:
       (1) Any organization that has been indicted for a violation 
     under any Federal or State law governing the financing of a 
     campaign for election for public office or any law governing 
     the administration of an election for public office, 
     including a law relating to voter registration.
       (2) Any organization that had its State corporate charter 
     terminated due to its failure to comply with Federal or State 
     lobbying disclosure requirements.
       (3) Any organization that has filed a fraudulent form with 
     any Federal or State regulatory agency.
       (4) Any organization that--
       (A) employs any applicable individual, in a permanent or 
     temporary capacity;
       (B) has under contract or retains any applicable 
     individual; or
       (C) has any applicable individual acting on the 
     organization's behalf or with the express or apparent 
     authority of the organization.
       (c) Additional Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``organization'' includes the Association of 
     Community Organizations for Reform Now (in this subsection 
     referred to as ``ACORN'') and any ACORN-related affiliate.
       (2) The term ``ACORN-related affiliate'' means any of the 
     following:
       (A) Any State chapter of ACORN registered with the 
     Secretary of State's office in that State.
       (B) Any organization that shares directors, employees, or 
     independent contractors with ACORN.
       (C) Any organization that has a financial stake in ACORN.
       (D) Any organization whose finances, whether federally 
     funded, donor-funded, or raised through organizational goods 
     and services, are shared or controlled by ACORN.
       (3) The term ``applicable individual'' means an individual 
     who has been indicted for a violation under Federal or State 
     law relating to an election for Federal or State office.
       (d) Revision of Federal Acquisition Regulation.--The 
     Federal Acquisition Regulation shall be revised to carry out 
     the provisions of this title relating to contracts.

          Amendment offered by Mr. George Miller of California

  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California (during the reading). I ask unanimous 
consent to suspend with the reading of the amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from California?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the amendment.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded 
vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 253, 
noes 171, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 719]

                               AYES--253

     Ackerman
     Adler (NJ)
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Arcuri
     Baca
     Baird
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bean
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Berry
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boccieri
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boucher
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bright
     Brown, Corrine
     Buchanan
     Butterfield
     Cao
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Childers
     Chu
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Dahlkemper
     Davis (AL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (TN)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delahunt
     DeLauro
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Driehaus
     Edwards (MD)
     Edwards (TX)
     Ellison
     Ellsworth
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Foster
     Fudge
     Giffords
     Gonzalez
     Gordon (TN)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hall (NY)
     Halvorson
     Hare
     Harman
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hodes
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kagen
     Kaptur
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick (MI)
     Kilroy
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick (AZ)
     Kissell
     Klein (FL)
     Kosmas
     Kratovil
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney
     Markey (CO)
     Markey (MA)
     Marshall
     Massa
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meek (FL)
     Meeks (NY)
     Melancon
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Minnick
     Mitchell
     Mollohan
     Moore (KS)
     Moore (WI)
     Moran (VA)
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (NY)
     Murphy, Patrick
     Murtha
     Nadler (NY)
     Napolitano
     Neal (MA)
     Nye
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perriello
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis (CO)
     Pomeroy
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Rodriguez
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Rothman (NJ)

[[Page H9702]]


     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Salazar
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schauer
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (GA)
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sestak
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Sires
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Snyder
     Space
     Speier
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stupak
     Sutton
     Taylor
     Teague
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson
     Watt
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Welch
     Wexler
     Wilson (OH)
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--171

     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Austria
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boehner
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boozman
     Boustany
     Boyd
     Brady (TX)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (SC)
     Brown-Waite, Ginny
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Buyer
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castle
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Deal (GA)
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart, L.
     Diaz-Balart, M.
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Ehlers
     Emerson
     Fallin
     Flake
     Fleming
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Garrett (NJ)
     Gerlach
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves
     Guthrie
     Hall (TX)
     Harper
     Hastings (WA)
     Heller
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herseth Sandlin
     Hoekstra
     Hunter
     Inglis
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan (OH)
     Kanjorski
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kirk
     Kline (MN)
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (NY)
     Lewis (CA)
     Linder
     LoBiondo
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMahon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Moran (KS)
     Murphy, Tim
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Olson
     Paulsen
     Pence
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Putnam
     Rehberg
     Reichert
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Scalise
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Souder
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiahrt
     Tiberi
     Turner
     Upton
     Walden
     Wamp
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Abercrombie
     Barrett (SC)
     Conyers
     Costa
     Frank (MA)
     McHugh
     Nunes
     Paul
     Radanovich
     Tanner


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining on this vote.

                              {time}  1416

  Mr. KAGEN changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________