HONORING THE SEATTLE TIMES AND THE PUGET SOUND BUSINESS JOURNAL
(Extensions of Remarks - April 21, 2010)

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[Extensions of Remarks]
[Pages E600-E601]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




    HONORING THE SEATTLE TIMES AND THE PUGET SOUND BUSINESS JOURNAL

                                 ______
                                 

                         HON. DAVID G. REICHERT

                             of washington

                    in the house of representatives

                       Wednesday, April 21, 2010

  Mr. REICHERT. Madam Speaker, I rise today in recognition of the 
wonderful accomplishments and tireless efforts of two of my local 
newspapers--the Seattle Times and the Puget Sound Business Journal. 
Both papers captured the attention of their readership by searching for 
all the details, double checking all the facts and meticulously 
painting the full pictures of the two most noteworthy stories of 2009. 
For its efforts in reporting on the financial troubles of Washington 
Mutual, the PSBJ was recognized by the Pulitzer Committee for 
explanatory reporting. The Seattle Times took the lead in reporting 
every aspect of the heinous murders of four police officers in 
Lakewood, Washington and for their outstanding efforts have been 
awarded a Pulitzer Prize for breaking news.
  When the fall of Washington Mutual first emerged, thousands of people 
throughout the Puget Sound area searched for the facts; the Puget Sound 
Business Journal supplied them. The incisive and thorough nature of 
their reporting allowed interested readers to understand the full scope 
of the issues at hand and the challenges facing their families, their 
pocketbooks and their neighborhoods. Although the coverage brought 
devastating news, it was fair, accurate and held a redeeming value. The 
Newspaper's journalists provided an invaluable public service and never 
looked for accolades--they simply did their jobs to the best of their 
abilities.
  Washington residents were greeted with extremely grim news the 
morning of November 29: four police officers had been shot and

[[Page E601]]

killed and the gunman was on the loose. The story--heartbreaking, 
complex, and infuriating--dragged on for more than 40 hours, with Times 
reporters, photographers, editors and producers working tirelessly to 
provide their readers with a comprehensive picture of the story as it 
unfolded. When the shooter was shot and killed early in the morning on 
a Seattle street, The Times was there to sift through the information 
and report the facts. The Times did a wonderful job reporting on an 
absolutely horrible and tragic string of events. I applaud them for 
their service to the community and congratulate them for the well 
deserved honor from the Pulitzer Committee.
  The stories told by the Puget Sound Business Journal and the Seattle 
Times, although depressing and brutal in nature, prove that even in the 
midst of a sluggish economy and a fractured marketplace for quality 
journalism, our nation's newspapers play an absolutely vital role in 
society. It is especially gratifying, as a native of the Puget Sound 
region, to recognize the remarkable accomplishments of some 
``hometown'' journalists. To name just a few individuals at the Times, 
I'd like to recognize Publisher Frank Blethen, Executive Editor David 
Boardman, Managing Editor Suki Dardarian and Assistant Managing Editor 
Jim Simon. In addition, Madam Speaker, it is nearly impossible to 
record the names of every person at The Times who contributed to the 
voluminous and detailed coverage of those difficult incidents, so I 
want to recognize the work of the entire newsroom staff and their 
giving and patient families. Additionally, I'd like to recognize Puget 
Sound Business Journal publisher Emory Thomas, Jr., Editor George Erb, 
reporter Kirsten Grind, and the rest of the wonderfully talented people 
at the PSBJ. At this time, it is almost impossible to determine how all 
of us will receive our news in the future. Whatever the answer, we all 
hope it comes from the dedicated and talented professionals highlighted 
here. professionals highlighted here.

                          ____________________