CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012; Congressional Record Vol. 157, No. 56
(House of Representatives - April 15, 2011)

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[Pages H2862-H2870]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




        CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012

  The Committee resumed its sitting.


                Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Grijalva

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Kingston). It is now in order to consider 
amendment No. 3 printed in part B of House Report 112-62.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the 
     following:

     SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL 
                   YEAR 2012.

       The Congress determines and declares that this concurrent 
     resolution establishes the budget for fiscal year 2012 and 
     sets forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2013 
     through 2021.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

     SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

       The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
     fiscal years 2012 through 2021:
       (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
     this resolution:
       (A) The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as 
     follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $2,931,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $3,394,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $3,705,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $3,922,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $4,124,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $4,388,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $4,607,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $4,828,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $5,056,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $5,309,000,000.
       (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal 
     revenues should be increased are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $373,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $307,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $265,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $280,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $299,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $317,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $335,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $345,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $353,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $358,000,000.
       (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the enforcement 
     of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total new 
     budget authority are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $3,986,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $3,900,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $4,036,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $4,147,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $4,368,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $4,537,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $4,707,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $4,905,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $5,115,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $5,305,000,000.
       (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
     this resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget 
     outlays are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $3,804,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $3,938,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $4,033,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $4,160,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $4,361,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $4,503,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $4,645,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $4,874,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $5,068,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $5,263,000,000.
       (4) Deficits (on-budget).--For purposes of the enforcement 
     of this resolution, the amounts of the deficits (on-budget) 
     are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $873,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $544,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $328,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $238,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $237,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $115,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $39,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $46,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $12,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: -$46,000,000.
       (5) Debt subject to limit.--Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) 
     of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the appropriate 
     levels of the public debt are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $16,092,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $16,909,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $17,522,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $18,078,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $18,652,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $19,120,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $19,531,000,000.

[[Page H2863]]

       Fiscal year 2019: $19,933,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $20,302,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021: $20,632,000,000.
       (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels of 
     debt held by the public are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2012: $11,309,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013: $11,955,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014: $12,379,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015: $12,714,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016: $13,043,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017: $13,250,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018: $13,380,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019: $13,514,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020: $13,616,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021; $13,658,000,000.

     SEC. 102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

       The Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
     levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
     2012 through 2021 for each major functional category are:
       (1) National Defense (050):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $672,883,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $683,936,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $539,678,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $614,983,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $531,171,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $560,652,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $535,020,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $542,554,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $547,842,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $547,770,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $556,868,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $550,059,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $566,902,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $553,733,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $579,207,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $569,566,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $588,753,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $579,729,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $599,264,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $590,067,000,000.
       (2) International Affairs (150):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $110,322,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $73,947,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $102,807,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $89,258,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $92,324,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $93,324,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $76,932,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $86,525,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $73,326,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $80,487,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $72,391,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $77,889,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $74,735,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $75,842,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $68,575,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $70,893,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $66,214,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $66,540,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $63,879,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $63,660,000,000.
       (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,317,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $31,981,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,863_,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $31,852,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,441,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $32,271,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,778,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $32,535,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $33,685,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $33,354,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $34,441,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $34,045,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $35,230,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $34,799,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $36,006,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $35,522,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $36,798,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $36,299,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $37,595,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $36,995,000,000.
       (4) Energy (270):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $45,893,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $30,456,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $38,741,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $35,415,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,206,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $31,636,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $20,200,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,880,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $17,737,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $21,507,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $15,230,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $17,852,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $15,347,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $15,356,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $10,576,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $12,860,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $8,141,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $9,966,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,748,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,714,000,000.
       (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $57,242,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $52,941,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $55,176,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $54,425,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $53,466,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $54,061,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,206,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $51,830,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,154,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $50,171,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,029,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $49,515,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $50,767,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $49,417,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,348,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $48,695,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,725,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $48,804,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,171,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $48,348,000,000.
       (6) Agriculture (350):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,905,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $20,931,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,776,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $24,641,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,298,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,896,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,980,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,383,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,219,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,618,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,330,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,684,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,669,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,997,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,984,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $23,298,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $24,351,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $23,666,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $24,680_,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $24,002,000,000.
       (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $24,761,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $25,352,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $14,114,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $12,578,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $12,777,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$2,528,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $13,679,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$4,079,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $14,094,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$6,692,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $17,517,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$6,276,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $18,067,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$8,139,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $19,515,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,612,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,088,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $2,580,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,467,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $2,304,000,000.
       (8) Transportation (400):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $146,070,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $98,614,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $111,004,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $107,044,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $117,413,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $110,481,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $124,802,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $115,416,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $131,732,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $120,586,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $138,785,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $125,503,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $135,799,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $129,935,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:

[[Page H2864]]

       (A) New budget authority, $137,806,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $133,322,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $139,808,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $135,946,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $141,837,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $137,422,000,000.
       (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $33,268,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $30,280,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $30,850,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $32,042,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,636,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $33,983,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,932,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $30,924,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $23,002,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,265,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,132,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $24,473,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,527,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $22,716,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $20,405,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $21,676,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $19,550,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $20,834,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $18,694,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $19,871,000,000.
       (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services 
     (500):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $162,170,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $137,087,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $156,253,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $157,082,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $150,772,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $154,070,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $136,408,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $145,567,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $138,450,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $139,096,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $138,547,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $138,321,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $140,926,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $139,220,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $133,294,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $136,944,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $130,228,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $132,292,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $127,437,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $129,047,000,000.
       (11) Health (550):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $391,582,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $372,462,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $403,799,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $396,254,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $481,153,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $464,525,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $535,769,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $529,619,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $580,937,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $588,216,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $624,655,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $629,475,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $666,014,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $663,822,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $706,403,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $706,147,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $759,310,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $747,759,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $800,808,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $798,972,000,000.
       (12) Medicare (570):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $484,164,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $483,987,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $526,142,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $526,322,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $555,844,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $555,703,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $578,812,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $578,618,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $624,585,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $624,750,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $648,117,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $647,966,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $672,500,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $672,290,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $734,998,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $735,149,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $787,821,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $787,654,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $840,868,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $840,674,000,000.
       (13) Income Security (600):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $604,346,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $576,197,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $584,859,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $576,682,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $538,868,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $536,493,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $519,260,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $522,884,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $520,528,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $525,409,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $515,553,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $516,539,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $519,548,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $513,537,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $525,122,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $526,160,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $531,706,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $531,781,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $539,225,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $539,155,000,000.
       (14) Social Security (650):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $54,439,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $54,624,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $29,096,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $29,256,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,701,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $32,776,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $36,261,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $36,311,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $40,171,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $40,171,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $44,263,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $44,263,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $48,717,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $48,717,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $55,275_,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $55,275,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $60,397,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $60,397,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $65,979,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $65,979,000,000.
       (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $162,813,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $156,565,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $158,896,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $158,024,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $157,578,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $157,877,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $151,153,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $152,405,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $157,556,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $157,708,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $153,844,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $153,717,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $147,817,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $147,987,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $157,337,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $156,862,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $160,667,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $160,195,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $164,532,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $163,950,000,000.
       (16) Administration of Justice (750):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $79,444,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $71,155,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $71,187,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $72,396,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $69,823,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $72,175,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $66,095,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $68,593,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $68,518,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $69,819,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $67,289,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $67,995,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $69,071,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $69,083,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $68,541,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $68,612,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $71,174,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $70,936,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $72,773,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $72,477,000,000.
       (17) General Government (800):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $25,647,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $29,209,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $25,562,000,000.

[[Page H2865]]

       (B) Outlays, $26,496,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $26,146,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $26,644,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $26,685,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $26,937,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,361,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,407,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,146,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,948,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $29,025,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $28,709,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $29,991,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $29,453,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $30,700,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $30,241,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $31,497,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $30,922,000,000.
       (18) Net Interest (900):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, $371,094,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $371,094,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, $426,859,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $426,859,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, $490,720,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $490,720,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, $546,940,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $546,940,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, $599,622,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $599,622,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, $642,573,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $642,573,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, $675,253,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $675,253,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, $696,767,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $696,767,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, $714,066,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $714,066,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $718,317,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $718,317,000,000.
       (19) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
       Fiscal year 2012:
       (A) New budget authority, -$77,917,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$77,917,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2013:
       (A) New budget authority, -$80,329,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$80,329,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2014:
       (A) New budget authority, -$81,798,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$81,798,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2015:
       (A) New budget authority, -$84,857,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$84,857,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2016:
       (A) New budget authority, -$85,946,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$85,946,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2017:
       (A) New budget authority, -$91,248,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$91,248,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2018:
       (A) New budget authority, -$97,099,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$97,099,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2019:
       (A) New budget authority, -$101,718,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$101,718,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2020:
       (A) New budget authority, -$105,645,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$105,645,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, -$110,174,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$110,174,000,000.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 223, the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva) and a Member opposed each will control 15 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, the amendment, the budget substitute that 
we have before you, the people's budget, is an honest document 
consistent with our country's values and our country's desires.
  The people's budget does not tell the American people what they want 
to hear; it gives the American people what they want: Fairness, 
protection of our social net for Americans in retirement and at the 
beginning of their lives, jobs, an immediate infusion of job creation 
to put people back to work, investments in education. And this budget 
is balanced by 2021, the deficit is eliminated. It is the only budget 
that accomplishes that that is before you today.
  It does not balance the budget on the backs of the middle class, 
those who aspire to be in the middle class, and those that are 
vulnerable in our society.
  It reverses a practice and it taxes those corporations and the very, 
very 2 percent rich in this country so they pay their just sacrifice to 
keeping this country healthy and turning our country around.
  We end the wars that are draining our national Treasury and our 
people. The Progressive Caucus listened to the American people, and the 
people's budget is what they want.
  I urge approval of this budget. It is a document that represents the 
very best of what the people need, and it represents a departure from a 
practice that has brought us to the brink of a deep recession, to a 
practice that has brought us to joblessness across this country and to 
a practice that has given the privileged all they want and transferred 
that responsibility to working Americans in this country.
  Our budget is a document that is honest, it is straightforward and 
merits your support.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana is recognized for 15 
minutes.
  Mr. ROKITA. The ``people's budget''? This budget, if enacted, would 
end this country as we know it. This budget increases spending, Mr. 
Chairman, by $13 trillion over 10 years. It takes $16 trillion more 
from the American people over 10 years through the biggest tax increase 
this country has ever seen. It increases our debt $3.5 trillion over 10 
years.
  This isn't the people's budget. This country was founded on equal 
opportunity for everyone, not equal outcome. History is littered with 
countries and nations that have failed because they tried for equal 
outcome.
  This country remains the greatest Nation the world has ever seen 
because we pride ourselves and enforce equal opportunity.
  I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Lankford).
  Mr. LANKFORD. I am honored to get a chance to comment. I am very 
grateful we have an honest dialogue back and forth on different 
options.
  This is a unique moment for us as a Nation to be able to look at the 
direction of our country and at the way we are going to do budgeting, 
and I have great respect for those that will come and say let's look at 
other ideas, and I think that's how we should come to the table. Both 
the President, the Senate, and the House should be coming and saying, 
here are the options, here are the voices, because there are different 
voices in America that have different perspectives, and I think that's 
a good, healthy debate.
  Now, there are several areas that we will disagree on with this 
budget. We do agree that we should be working on deficit reduction. We 
do agree that debt is a serious problem in our Nation and we need to be 
able to work it down. It's how to do that.
  The budget that's being presented here, the amendment in the nature 
of a substitute, does tax heavily those that are wealthy, but it also 
has a burden that's on those most vulnerable as well. And let me give 
you an example of that: It increases the transportation tax, that gas 
tax.
  It not only adds an excise tax on gas companies, energy companies, so 
that the tax goes up, but it also adds 25 cents per gallon to the 
actual gas tax, and then at this time removes any other tax subsidies 
that are being piled on to any energy company. All those together are 
going to add a significant amount per gallon at the pump, beginning 
with just the basic option that's there of adding 25 cents. In 
addition, their recommendation is 43.4 cents for the gas tax itself.
  That is clearly a tax that's going to hit very hard on those that are 
most vulnerable in our society, the people that are driving to work, 
that are moms commuting back and forth. I think that's the wrong 
direction to go. That's such a large tax on a group of people that are 
vulnerable.
  So we do want to deal with the nature of our great deficits and of 
our great debt, but I don't think we need to be able to add that 
additional tax burden on the people that are very vulnerable.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I encourage the gentlemen at their next opportunity, 
the gentlemen across the aisle, to explain to the American taxpayer why 
they have to pay thousands of dollars on Tax Day when GE didn't have to 
pay a single cent and, in fact, got money back on Tax Day. Our budget 
is about shared sacrifice.

[[Page H2866]]

  I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from California (Ms. 
Woolsey).

                              {time}  0950

  Ms. WOOLSEY. Mr. Chairman, there is one proposed budget that ends the 
war in Afghanistan, cuts Cold War-era weapons systems, completely 
eliminates the deficit within 10 years and aligns the Tax Code with the 
values of working families. And that's the people's budget submitted by 
the Congressional Progressive Caucus.
  Instead of taking away health care from seniors by gutting Medicare, 
the people's budget provides more affordable health care with a robust 
public option that would save this Nation's taxpayers $68 billion over 
7 years.
  The majority's budget will cost Americans 1.7 million jobs over the 
next 3 years. Our budget puts America back to work with badly needed 
investments in transportation, infrastructure, and a 21st-century 
education system.
  We have a choice. The majority budget which demands more sacrifice 
from struggling families and gives the wealthy a free ride; or the 
progressive budget which invests in people, creates a budget surplus, 
and brings our troops home.
  I urge my colleagues, make a smart, fiscally responsible choice. Vote 
for the people's budget.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn).
  Mrs. BLACKBURN. I appreciate the chairman for yielding to me, and I 
appreciate the opportunity to stand and speak against the Progressive 
Caucus budget because it is a budget that, once again, will spend too 
much money.
  Mr. Chairman, one of the things that we have heard from the American 
people is this: they are tired of the Federal Government spending 
taxpayer money for programs they don't want and spending money that 
they don't have. And it is time for us to put this fiscal house in 
order.
  Now, quite frankly, I think that today is a really great day. When we 
get to the end of this legislative day and the end of this legislative 
week, we will have passed the Ryan budget, which turns an enormous 
corner for our Nation. Over the next 10 years, it will reduce spending 
not by millions and billions, but by trillions--$6.2 trillion over the 
next 10 years.
  Those are the kinds of first steps that the American people are 
wanting to see. That's the kind of fiscal responsibility that the 
American people are holding us accountable for: controlling spending, 
limiting spending, and making certain that there is a stable and secure 
environment in which economic growth and job creation can take place.
  They have spoken loudly and clearly. And they have said reduce what 
you are spending, get your fiscal house in order, begin to focus not on 
the next 6 weeks or 6 months but the next 60 years, and focus on our 
children and our grandchildren, making certain that we are not tapping 
their futures and trading it to the nations that hold our debt. I think 
that it's so important that we begin to arrest this and get it under 
control and to pass the Ryan budget today.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield 15 seconds to the distinguished cochair of the 
Progressive Caucus, the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Ellison).
  Mr. ELLISON. Mr. Chairman, the point was made earlier that the 
Progressive Caucus' budget, which addresses a gas tax, is somehow not a 
good thing to deal with our Nation. But the infrastructure needs of our 
country, over $3 trillion--according to the Society of Engineers, says 
that we need $3 trillion in infrastructure spending.
  Let's do something and put America back to work by rebuilding our 
Nation's infrastructure.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
distinguished gentlewoman from California, Ms. Barbara Lee.
  Ms. LEE. Let me thank our cochairs, Congressmen Ellison and Grijalva, 
for their tremendous leadership.
  Budgets are not just dollars and cents. They are moral documents that 
reflect who we are and what we believe in. The Republican budget is an 
assault on women, seniors, the underserved poor and low-income 
families. It's a shameless attempt to finance tax breaks for 
millionaires on the backs of the most vulnerable. The people's budget, 
however, offers a commonsense fiscally responsible plan that protects 
critical programs and services that millions of Americans depends on.
  Our plan would eliminate the deficit in the next decade, put people 
back to work, and restore our economic competitiveness. In these 
difficult times, it includes additional funding for unemployment 
insurance to help those who've maxed out at 99 weeks to get additional 
benefits, recognizing there are five people to one job.
  Our proposal eliminates the true drivers of our deficit, the unpaid-
for Bush tax cuts and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and it restates 
the law that no permanent bases will be built in Iraq. And we protect 
and preserve Medicare and Social Security for the future, and it 
includes a public option which saves money. The people's budget invests 
in our people, in our communities, and in our Nation.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 10 seconds.
  There has been a lot of talk about budgets being moral instruments. 
The budget that we've proposed through the Budget Committee, the Ryan 
budget, is a responsible budget. And let me say, Mr. Chairman, what is 
immoral is balancing these choices on the backs of our children and 
grandchildren, Americans who haven't even been born yet. That's what's 
immoral.
  I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. 
Mulvaney).
  Mr. MULVANEY. I thank Mr. Rokita for the time.
  I want to applaud my colleagues in the Progressive Caucus for doing 
something which I think is intellectually honest. In fact, I think if 
you look at a couple of budgets that we're going to be looking at over 
the next 2 days, the budget that the Budget Committee has offered, I 
think is a fair and honest representation of where the Republican Party 
is. The Republican Study Committee budget that we'll see in just a few 
minutes is a fair and honest representation of where the Republican 
Study Committee stands. And this budget, I think, is offered as a true 
and honest position, a policy statement, of where the progressives in 
this body and in this country stand. And for that I thank them.
  That being said, it's hard to imagine a document that is more 
different from our document. There are $16 trillion worth of tax 
increases in this document. To the extent that the progressives do 
stand and are honest in their belief that taxing and spending is the 
way to fix the Nation, this document certainly does contain that.
  All of the 2001, 2003 tax cuts, which we affectionately refer to 
around here as the Bush tax cuts, are gone, not just the ones on the 
highest income earners, everybody. This is a tax increase on almost 
everybody. In fact, it is a tax increase on everybody in the entire 
Nation. The top marginal rates under this proposal go from 45 percent 
up to 49 percent. The capital gains rate goes up to as high as 49 
percent.
  We introduced a new concept in this budget, apparently, the 
progressives do, that takes the estate tax to a progressive model, 
where you get estate tax rates that range from 45 percent up to 65 
percent. We heard a few minutes ago, my colleague, Mr. Lankford, talk 
about the fact that there's a 25-cent gas tax increase in this 
particular document.
  This is an avalanche of new taxes. At every single turn, the 
motivation behind the progressives seems to be that the government 
needs more money, that the government needs more money and it is our 
obligation to give it to the government. And we simply, wholeheartedly, 
dismiss that idea.
  But, again, I think it is nice for a change to have honest and open 
debate on an intellectual basis in this Chamber. I thank the 
progressives for at least laying out where they stand. And I think it's 
a good process to go through. I think we'll have a chance later on 
today in just a few minutes to see where we stand as a Nation, at least 
as a body, here on these types of changes.
  I very much hope that this amendment is defeated. I think that the 
Republican Budget Committee alternative is a better course of action. 
And I would like to see this amendment defeated.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I again yield 15 seconds to the gentleman from 
Minnesota (Mr. Ellison).

[[Page H2867]]

  Mr. ELLISON. I have a question for the gentleman: When does the Ryan 
budget create a surplus?
  Mr. ROKITA. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. ELLISON. I yield to the gentleman from Indiana.
  Mr. ROKITA. The budget proposed and voted on by the committee--
  Mr. ELLISON. I reclaim my time.
  Mr. ROKITA. Do you want me to answer the question or not?
  Mr. ELLISON. I will yield for an answer to the question, not for a 
filibuster.

                              {time}  1000

  Mr. ROKITA. With responsible, gradual reforms to the drivers of our 
debt, like Medicare and Social Security, the Ryan budget will balance.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield an additional 15 seconds to the gentleman from 
Minnesota.
  Mr. ELLISON. I asked the gentleman when the Ryan budget created a 
surplus. He could have given me a year; he didn't. That's because he's 
probably embarrassed about when that is.
  Let me tell you when the Progressive Caucus budget comes to surplus: 
2021. That is known as a responsible budget. We are making a surplus by 
2021. And by the way, that is Heritage Foundation mathematics. It's not 
$16 trillion; it is $3.9 trillion over 10 years.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I see where the gentleman from Minnesota is 
going with his question, and I yield myself 10 seconds just to answer 
it.
  He claims responsibility in this budget. The only way they can 
possibly balance, and I don't agree that they will balance in that 
time, is by drastically raising taxes on every American. That's not 
responsibility because it doesn't pose a choice. That is the definition 
of irresponsibility, Mr. Chairman.
  I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Alabama (Mr. Brooks).
  Mr. BROOKS. Mr. Chairman, I have a chart before me, and I hope 
everyone will look at it. It is based on Congressional Budget Office 
numbers. If you go to fiscal year 2001, you'll see that we enjoyed a 
$128 billion surplus. At that time we had a Republican House, a 
Republican Senate, and a Democrat President. Then if you'll notice, 
looking at the bottom, that we had a Republican Congress and a 
Republican President, and we had the beginning of a series of deficits, 
$158 billion in FY 2002, which was immediately after the 9/11 and the 
ramp-up as a result of our efforts to protect Americans from terrorism.
  Then we go to FY '03, '04, '05, '06 and '07, you can see how the 
deficits have increased to a peak of $413 billion, but then the 
Republicans start getting things back under control. $161 billion is 
the deficit that America suffered in FY 2007, and that's not good. As a 
matter of fact, one of the reasons I was dissatisfied with the George 
Bush administration is because of these deficits.
  But let's look at what happened after the elections in November of 
2006 in which Nancy Pelosi became House Speaker and Harry Reid became 
majority leader of the United States Senate. These deficits, which we 
were getting under control, in FY '08, $459 billion; in FY '09, we 
almost go off the chart, $1.4 trillion. Then we lose the White House. 
The Democrats are in total control. In FY '10, a deficit of $1.3 
trillion. In FY '11, a projected deficit of 1.6 or $1.5 trillion, 
depending upon who you pay attention to.
  Folks, we are here today forcing this issue because America is at 
risk. We are at risk of insolvency and bankruptcy because the * * * 
Members of this body choose to spend money that we do not have. They 
believe in wealth transfer programs.
  Mr. ELLISON. Mr. Chair, point of order.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Alabama will suspend.
  The gentleman from Minnesota will state his point of order.
  Mr. ELLISON. I would like the gentleman's words taken down for the 
reference to certain Members of this body as socialists.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman will suspend. The gentleman from 
Alabama will please take his seat.
  The Clerk will report the words.
  Mr. BROOKS. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to strike the 
particular use of one word that the folks on the other side of the 
aisle have objected to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Alabama?
  Without objection, the word is withdrawn.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Alabama may proceed.
  Mr. BROOKS. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  Ladies and gentlemen of America, we all know what we're talking about 
here, and we all know what the definitional terms are, and I am more 
than happy to resume this discussion off the House floor. But for 
whatever reason, I'm not permitted to use one word.
  Having said that, you can look at this chart and you can see the kind 
of deficits that we have sustained over the last 4 years, and the 
threat that this poses to the United States of America.
  Now, this Progressive people's budget, I submit to you, is nothing 
more than a Trojan horse. There is an old saying: Those who do not 
learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Why should anyone believe 
that the folks who have racked of these massive deficits that put 
America at risk are now going to change their stripes?
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for withdrawing the 
word ``socialist'' from his commentary.
  I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from California (Ms. Waters).
  Ms. WATERS. I thank the gentlemen.
  Mr. Chairman and Members, the gentleman from Alabama evidently has 
amnesia. Clinton administration eliminated the deficit and left a 
balanced budget. It was the Bush administration that created the 
deficit.
  I rise in strong support for this, the Progressive Caucus alternative 
balanced people's budget. During the last administration, my colleagues 
on the other side of the aisle maxed out our Nation's credit card for 
wars and tax cuts for the rich, all the while saying deficits don't 
matter. Now they are using our deficit crisis as a rationale to 
undermine programs that they have never supported and push a divisive 
social agenda that is a sideshow to our budget debate.
  Mr. Chairman, this country is not broke. We have spent our money on 
wars and tax credits for the very rich, and now it is time to entertain 
the people's budget, a balanced budget.
  The Ryan budget breaks our promise to these American families by 
expecting them to bear the entire burden of deficit reduction, 
neglecting the fact that just 4 months ago my colleagues on the 
opposite side of the aisle insisted on $80 billion in tax cuts for the 
richest 2 percent of individuals in this country.
  This is a balanced budget. I ask my colleagues to support this very 
responsible, balanced budget.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Lewis).

                              {time}  1010

  Mr. LEWIS of Georgia. I thank my colleague from Arizona for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I have never been one to stand silent in the face of 
injustice. Today, I see before us one of the greatest betrayals in 
American history--the betrayal of our seniors and the disabled who rely 
on Medicare for their health care. We have made a social compact with 
our seniors, and the Republican budget breaks that compact. It is a 
disgrace and a shame.
  Where is our sense of fairness? Where is our outrage? We can and we 
must do better.
  Republicans head down a very dangerous path. We cannot, we must not, 
and we will not balance our budget on the backs of people who can least 
afford it. Our seniors, the disabled, the poor, the hungry--they have 
done nothing wrong. They do not deserve to bear the burden of these 
budget cuts.
  Support and vote for the people's budget. It is the right budget, it 
is fair, and it is just.
  Mr. ROKITA. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlelady from 
Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. My heart pains me for this day and this

[[Page H2868]]

budget for America. Some of us might feel as the President does, that 
it's a question of whether or not we are saying to the American people 
that they are not understanding, or that we who are fighting simply are 
stupid.
  It's a time when you want to reflect on how great a country we live 
in, and it hurts my heart when I see individuals putting on the floor 
of the House a budget that unfairly targets low-income communities and 
senior citizens while protecting the wealthiest Americans, Americans 
who I care about, and simply eliminating any sense of responsibility 
for working and middle class Americans.
  The people's budget saves Medicare. Those are working Americans. 
Those are Americans that are middle class. And then, of course, what 
about our disabled persons? Do you think that they are only classified 
as low-income? These are individuals who become seniors or disabled who 
need to have the kind of sacrifice. Look what happens. The people's 
budget protects those who cannot protect themselves.
  Finally, I ask the individuals, is there any shared sacrifice that 
you can see in the Republican budget. The Republican budget fails to 
help all those who are in need? This is a good budget. Support the 
people's budget.
  Recommendation from CPC:
  Every Member mentions the first talking point below re: deficits. 
Then Members can address the remaining TPs below, as they feel 
comfortable.
  Deficit: Our Budget Eliminates the Deficit by 2021.
  We eliminate the deficit by 2021. Instead of eroding America's hard-
earned retirement plan and social safety net, our budget targets the 
true drivers of deficits in the next decade: the Bush Tax Cuts, the 
wars overseas, and the causes and effects of the recent recession.
  Jobs: Our Budget Puts America Back to Work & Restores America's 
Competitiveness.
  We rebuild America and make it competitive again. We make smart 
investments. We put America back to work. You can't grow the economy by 
slashing programs. Our plan will spark new job growth, improve 
education, accelerate clean energy development and modernize the 
nation's infrastructure.
  Taxes: Our Budget Implements a Fair Tax System.
  We ask the richest and most fortunate Americans to contribute more. 
We stop giving handouts and huge tax giveaways to corporate special 
interests. The ``People's Budget'' implements a fair tax system, based 
on the notion that fairness and equality are integral to our society. 
Our budget restores fairness to a system that unfairly benefits a few 
while hurting the majority of Americans.
  Defense: Our Budget Brings Our Troops Home.
  We bring the troops back home. We ensure that our country's defense 
spending does not continue to contribute significantly to our current 
fiscal burden. It's time to stop bankrupting the country fighting 
unwinnable wars. We end these wars not simply to save massive amounts 
of money or because the majority of Americans favors it, but because 
these wars are making America less safe, reduce our standing in the 
world, and do nothing to reduce America's burgeoning energy security 
crisis.
  Health: Our Budget Keeps Americans Healthy.
  We allow real competition in health care. We will never see health 
care costs decrease until the government can compete and use its 
bargaining power to strike a better deal for Americans.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chair, may I inquire as to the time on both sides?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana has 3\3/4\ minutes 
remaining, and the gentleman from Arizona has 6\1/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. ROKITA. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. We have been greeted with a Republican budget that is 
a profoundly negative view of the future, and you've heard some of the 
reasons. I want to focus on just one. It doesn't just ignore the 
infrastructure deficit of an America that is falling apart--over $2 
trillion of unmet needs as referenced by my friend from Minnesota. It 
makes it worse. A 31 percent cut in already inadequate funding for 
national infrastructure. The Progressive Budget hears the needs of the 
American public and actually agrees with the truckers, the U.S. 
Chamber, local governments, AAA of America, indeed, the deficit 
commission, all suggested that, for the first time since 1993, we raise 
the gas tax.
  My Republican friends have lost track of their Republican roots, for 
Republicans used to believe in infrastructure. Lincoln. Eisenhower. 
Eisenhower raised the gas tax. Even Reagan raised the gas tax. This 
progressive budget is a profound investment in infrastructure. It will 
put millions to work renewing and rebuilding America.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. 
Ellison).
  Mr. ELLISON. Mr. Chair, the people's budget contains a provision for 
infrastructure development and the National Infrastructure Bank. I want 
to agree wholeheartedly with Congressman Blumenauer. We can not only 
put America back to work but we can strengthen the infrastructure that 
will make it safe to go across a bridge. We cannot neglect the bridges 
and the roads, the high-speed optical fiber cables and all these things 
that our country needs for a 21st century infrastructure. It's a jobs 
program. The people's budget is talking about jobs.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield 1 minute to the gentlelady from Hawaii (Ms. 
Hirono).
  Ms. HIRONO. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the people's budget.
  I heard mention that our country was based on the goal of equal 
opportunity. Yes. But what about ``and justice for all''? That is in 
our Pledge of Allegiance. We pledge that on the floor of this House 
every single day. This budget is not justice for all.
  I was visited by advocates from Hawaii, eighth graders, who support 
funding for the disabled, for the blind, for our seniors. They were 
astounded by the anti-people priorities in the Ryan budget.
  A budget has to be fair. That means the multi-millionaires in our 
country have to pay their fair share. That means the oil industry 
that's making money hand over fist, getting billions of dollars, has to 
pay their fair share. That means the companies that ship our jobs 
overseas have to pay their fair share.
  Then we can invest in the future. That means education, energy self-
sufficiency, infrastructure. I urge my colleagues to vote for this 
people's budget.
  Aloha.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlelady from 
California (Ms. Chu).
  Ms. CHU. I rise to support the people's budget. It will create 
millions of jobs and turn the deficit into a surplus in 10 years. 
Republicans have unveiled their 2012 Road to Ruin budget, but instead 
of focusing on creating jobs, Republicans are ripping the bandage off 
our economy before the scar has even healed.
  The people's budget focuses on real solutions. Instead of billion-
dollar handouts to Big Oil, we're investing in job creation and loans 
for higher education. Instead of ending Medicare as we know it, we keep 
our promise of secure health care for seniors. Instead of giving more 
tax breaks to millionaires and billionaires, we're committed to tax 
relief for the middle class.
  We must eliminate the deficit, but we must do it responsibly, and 
that means taking the Republican target off the backs of working 
families.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chair, I yield 2\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Ribble).
  Mr. RIBBLE. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in opposition to the 
Congressional Progressive Caucus substitute budget. One of the concerns 
I have as an American citizen and a small business owner for 30 years 
is this document right here. This is the Internal Revenue Code. It is 
9,959 pages long. This plan that is offered up today will add hundreds 
if not thousands of pages of additional complexity.
  Recently, we all heard about a large U.S. corporation that had 
billions of dollars in profits and paid zero taxes. Mr. Chairman, the 
reason they were able to do that is because their attorneys knew what 
was buried in this document. Do we really need to make it more 
complicated and more complex? I think not.
  I also oppose this because they talk about the benefits to lower 
income Americans. Yet by removing the 2001 and 2000 tax credits and tax 
rates and returning them to their previous levels, you will increase on 
the poorest Americans from 10 percent to 15 percent, a full 50 percent 
increase in their tax rates. On top of it, small business

[[Page H2869]]

owners will see their tax rates go to 45 percent.
  Think of the small business owner in northeast Wisconsin, who will 
also pay an 8 percent State income tax, will pay a 5 or 6 percent sales 
tax, will pay 50 cents a gallon gasoline tax, will pay property tax, 
will pay FICA tax, will pay Social Security tax. I'm beginning to 
wonder if all they will do in their life is pay taxes.
  I urge my colleagues to reject this proposal.

                              {time}  1020

  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield myself 10 seconds.
  If I may, I have a simple inquiry for the gentleman from Wisconsin.
  As part of the fairness in our Tax Code, I would like to ask, is it 
fair that, let's say, Warren Buffett should pay a lower income tax rate 
than his receptionist? Is that fairness in our Tax Code?
  Mr. RIBBLE. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield to the gentleman from Wisconsin.
  Mr. RIBBLE. I would concur that it's not fair.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New York, 
Congressman Rangel.
  Mr. RANGEL. Thank you for giving me this opportunity.
  This substitute budget is listed as the ``Progressive budget.'' For 
reasons that clearly anyone can take a deep breath and see, as opposed 
to what Mr. Ryan is presenting to us as Republican, this is really what 
our country is all about: building on the great things that we've done 
and making certain that the young people who follow us will be able to 
say that we have improved their opportunities.
  Make no mistake about it: Borrowing trillions of dollars and paying 
interest on that money puts us in a very bad economic position, not 
only in our country, but throughout the world. I assume that none of us 
here wants to spend a lot of time pointing fingers at each other about 
how we got to be where we are.
  One thing is abundantly clear: If America is going to be progressive, 
it has to find a progressive solution in order to get out of that.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  The gentleman from Arizona has 1\1/2\ minutes remaining, and the 
gentleman from Indiana has 2 minutes remaining. The gentleman from 
Indiana has the right to close.
  Mr. ROKITA. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I yield for the purpose of making a 
unanimous consent request to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
Fattah).
  (Mr. FATTAH asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. FATTAH. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Progressive budget 
substitute.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona has 1\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Honda).
  Mr. HONDA. Mr. Chairman, in closing, budgets are more than 
collections of numbers; they are a statement of our values. The 
Congressional Progressive Caucus budget is a reflection of the values 
and priorities of working families in this country. Our budget charts a 
path that keeps America exceptional while addressing the most pressing 
problems facing the Nation today.
  Our budget eliminates the deficit and stabilizes the debt by 2021. It 
does this in a manner consistent with the aspirations of the American 
people. It does this by restoring our economic competitiveness so that 
we can all experience the fullest definition of the American Dream: 
that each of our children will do better than we did.
  We did not set these goals arbitrarily. Our budget was crafted by 
listening to the American people. In poll after poll, they are telling 
us that they want us to preserve Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid; 
to make higher education more affordable; to expand job training 
programs; to invest in roads, research and, above all, in great schools 
for our children.
  We can do all of these things and eliminate our deficit. We have a 
moral imperative to do so. The people's budget is fair; it is just; it 
is a step towards moving this debate back to the true center.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on the Progressive budget. It is the people's 
budget. Please vote for our amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana has 2 minutes remaining.
  Mr. ROKITA. In closing, I would like to recall the words of the 
gentleman from South Carolina, who spoke about the honesty of this 
proposed amendment.
  I think it was an appropriate thing to say. This is an honest 
proposal. I believe that the proponents of this amendment believe 
everything that's in the amendment as a possible solution--but honesty, 
Mr. Chairman, does not equal responsibility.
  This isn't the people's budget that is being proposed. It is the 
``blank check'' budget. You see, it doesn't force any choices. It 
spends $13 trillion over 10 years. It taxes the American people. It has 
the Federal Government confiscate from the American people an 
additional $16 trillion over 10 years. That's not forcing choices. 
That's not being responsible. Every family in this Nation understands, 
when they prepare their budgets, they have to make choices. There are 
different priorities. This just opens up by fiat the right of the 
Federal Government to dip into the wallets of every American.
  I heard a lot about tax cuts for the rich, Mr. Chairman. I want to be 
clear that the budget that came out of the Budget Committee calls for 
revenue-neutral tax reform. We are motivated by the same reform 
principles that are in the President's fiscal commission: to broaden 
the tax base and to lower tax rates for everybody.
  I was looking at some statistics. The bottom 50 percent of taxpayers 
pays less than 3 percent of the income taxes. In fact, 47 percent of 
individuals pay no Federal income tax whatsoever.
  Our idea is tax neutral. It's revenue neutral. It lowers the tax 
rates for everybody. It makes all of us pay something, and it doesn't 
give tax cuts to the rich. We are planning to take away the loopholes 
so that those who are better off than we are can't take advantage of 
high-priced lobbyists.
  I ask my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this proposed amendment.
  Mr. STARK. Mr. Chairman, the Republican budget proposal pulls a bait 
and switch on seniors, people with disabilities, the poor, and anyone 
who hopes to grow old with dignity in this country. It dismantles 
bedrock American programs--Medicare and Medicaid--and opens Social 
Security to future attack.
  The Republican plan takes Medicare's promise of guaranteed health 
benefits and swaps it out for a voucher for private insurance--one 
that's intentionally structured to diminish in value. Seniors will be 
at the mercy of big insurance companies and left to pay bigger bills 
out-of-pocket.
  The Republican plan changes Medicaid to a block grant program. 
States' funding will fall far short. They'll be forced to slash 
programs that now cover much-needed health care for kids, the poor, and 
the disabled.
  The Republican plan is morally bankrupt and takes the most cynical 
view of our country's future. It says we should reward the wealthiest 
Americans and corporations with trillions in tax breaks and pay for 
them by slashing essential programs that work.
  I applaud the President for attacking the Republican budget proposal 
and calling it what it is: a plan to reduce the deficit on the backs of 
our most vulnerable populations and middle class families.
  We know there is a better, fairer way.
  The People's Budget--put forth by the Congressional Progressive 
Caucus--works for all Americans and puts people back to work.
  In contrast to the House Republican budget, it balances our budget in 
10 years--while preserving Medicare, improving health reform, 
maintaining our commitment to education, and making the investments in 
our infrastructure that will create jobs.
  It does so by ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and bringing 
sanity to our bloated defense budget.
  Rather than destroying our safety net like the Republican budget 
does, the People's Budget ensures that the wealthiest Americans and 
Wall Street pay their fair share of taxes.
  The People's Budget would end tax breaks for oil companies and 
corporations that ship jobs offshore, and it would require Wall Street 
to pay for the damage it did to our economy.
  I recently sent a survey to my constituents asking how we should cut 
the deficit. The results show that 85 percent want to close loopholes 
benefiting Wall Street and corporations;

[[Page H2870]]

78 percent want the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy to end; and 64 
percent want defense spending cut. In contrast, only 13 percent think 
we should cut domestic spending for education and children, and only 12 
percent want cuts to Medicare or Social Security.
  The People's Budget represents the priorities of my constituents and 
is the real path to prosperity. I'm proud to support it and urge all of 
my colleges to do the same while voting no on the reckless Republican 
budget.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.
  The Committee will rise informally.
  The Speaker pro tempore (Mr. McClintock) assumed the chair.

                          ____________________