STATEMENTS ON INTRODUCED BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS; Congressional Record Vol. 157, No. 115
(Senate - July 28, 2011)

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[Pages S5019-S5023]
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          STATEMENTS ON INTRODUCED BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS

      By Mr. KERRY (for himself and Mr. Franken):
  S. 1435. A bill to amend part A of title IV of the Security Act to 
exclude child care from the determination of the 5-year limit on 
assistance under the temporary assistance for needy families program, 
and for other purposes; to the Committee on Finance.
  Mr. KERRY. Mr. President, today too many families are at risk of 
losing the child care assistance that helps maintain their financial 
stability and ensure the well-being of their children. That is why I am 
introducing the Children First Act to address the growing unmet need 
for affordable and safe child care.
  Until now, most states were able to maintain their child care 
assistance programs through the recession due to the additional $2 
billion in Federal Child Care and Development Block Grant, CCDBG, 
funding for 2009 and 2010 from the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act, ARRA.
  However, with only a portion of these ARRA funds being continued, and 
with persistent state budget gaps, many states are forced to scale back 
child care assistance for families. Some states' waiting lists for 
subsidized child care are beginning to rise and a few states have 
stopped or plan to stop providing child care assistance to families who 
are not receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, TANF, 
together.
  Cuts and restrictions in the availability of child care assistance 
make it harder for parents to afford child care and have forced some 
parents to leave their jobs and turn to welfare programs for support. 
Children lose access to the stable, good-quality child care that 
encourages their learning and development and prepares them for school 
success. And child care programs can find difficulty filling their 
classrooms, leading them to lay off staff or close their doors 
entirely. That is wrong and we can do better.
  Child care consumes a large portion of family budgets, and can cost 
up to $18,773 annually for full-time care depending on where the family 
lives, the type of care, and the age of the child. Child care prices 
are higher than other household expenses and typically exceed the 
average amount families spend on food. In 39 States and the District of 
Columbia, the average annual price for child care for an infant in a 
child care center was higher than even a year's tuition at some 4-year 
public colleges.
  Without assistance, many low-income families can find it impossible 
to secure child care. For example, in 2007, the median monthly income 
of families receiving child care assistance was just $16,680 a year. 
Nearly half, 49 percent, of families receiving child care assistance 
live below the poverty line and 86 percent of these families were 
single parent households. In these challenging economic times, it is 
especially important to help low and moderate-income families with 
their child care costs.
  The Children First Act which I am introducing today will help address 
the growing unmet need for affordable and safe child care. It will 
help--States meet the significant demand for child care assistance by 
increasing funding for mandatory child care by $500 million for fiscal 
year 2012, $700 million in 2013, and $750 million in 2014 thru 2021, 
resulting in an increase of $3.45 billion over 5 years and $7.2 billion 
over 10 years.
  This increase is necessary because only about one in six children 
eligible for Federal child care assistance receives help and there have 
been no increases in mandatory' child care funding since 2007. This 
increased funding will be used to provide approximately 212,000 
additional children access to safe and affordable child care as 
compared to current funding levels.
  The Children First Act would exclude child care from the definition 
of TANF assistance so that unemployed families who receive child care 
assistance will not have it count towards the 5-year time limit for 
Federal TANF assistance. The legislation would also ensure that the 
minimum child care health and safety standards required for providers 
receiving Child Care Development Block Grant, CCDBG, funding also apply 
to providers who receive funding through TANF. In Massachusetts, all 
licensed providers are required to the same health and safety standards 
regardless of subsidy type received.
  This legislation would increase the availability of child care for 
parents who are required to work. States are currently prohibited from 
withholding or reducing assistance to a single parent with children 
under 6 who does not meet work requirements for reasons related to the 
unavailability or unsuitability of appropriate, affordable child care 
arrangements. The Children First Act would prevent States from 
withholding or reducing cash assistance to parents of a child with 
children under age thirteen.
  Enactment of this legislation is incredibly important for my home 
State of Massachusetts which currently has approximately 24,000 
children on a waitlist for child care subsidies. The high cost of child 
care is the most significant issue facing families currently on the 
waitlist in Massachusetts. Massachusetts families pay more on average 
than families in all other states for child care, with the average 
price of full time care in center based settings totaling $18,773 for 
an infant and $13,158 for a preschooler. This legislation will help 
lower the waitlist and help our children become more productive 
citizens.
  I would like to thank a number of organizations who have been 
integral to the development of the Children First Act and who have 
endorsed it today, including the including the American Federation of 
State, County, and Municipal Employees, AFSCME, the Children's Defense 
Fund, CLASP, the National Women's Law Center, and the Service Employees 
International Union, SEIU.
  These reforms would significantly increase access to stable and 
affordable child care to low-income families and would make our 
Nation's children more prepared for school and success later in life. I 
look forward to working with my colleagues in the Senate to pass this 
legislation.
                                 ______
                                 
      By Mrs. BOXER:
  S. 1437. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services to carry out programs to provide youth in racial or ethnic 
minority or immigrant communities the information and skills needed to 
reduce teenage pregnancies; to the Committee on Health, Education, 
Labor, and Pensions.
  Mrs. BOXER. Mr. President, I rise today to introduce the Communities 
of Color Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Act.
  Teen pregnancy is closely linked to a number of issues that affect 
the welfare of children in our Nation, particularly child poverty. A 
child in the United States is nine times more likely to grow up in 
poverty if their mother gave birth when she was a teen, if the child's 
parents are unmarried when they are born, and if the mother did not 
graduate from high school.
  The United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate of any 
developed nation. Each year close to 750,000 teens in the United States 
become pregnant. Despite some progress in reducing teen pregnancy 
overall, many minority communities continue to struggle with 
disproportionately high rates of teen pregnancy.
  Over half of all Latina and African American girls will become 
pregnant at least once before they turn 20. In 2009 the teen birth rate 
for Latinas, African Americans and American Indians/Alaska Natives was 
more than double the teen birth rate of non-Hispanic Caucasians.
  The Communities of Color Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Act takes would 
address teen pregnancy in communities of color by supporting teenage 
pregnancy prevention programs that work with community-based 
organizations that are experienced in serving youth

[[Page S5020]]

in ethnic and racial groups with the highest teen pregnancy rates; 
using multimedia campaigns to provide public health education and 
increase awareness about teen pregnancy, and researching what factors 
contribute to disproportionately high rates of teenage and unintended 
pregnancy in communities of color.
  I am proud that our country has made progress in reducing the rate of 
teen pregnancy by one third over the last decade, but our work is not 
done. We need to strengthen our efforts, especially among the youth in 
communities of color who are now so much more likely to face the 
unexpected and difficult challenges of parenting before they have 
finished growing up themselves.
  I am pleased to be joined in this effort by Representative Lucille 
Roybal-Allard, who is sponsoring this legislation in the House, as well 
as Hispanas Organized for Political Equality, the National Campaign to 
Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, the Futures Without Violence, and 
the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health.
  I urge my colleagues to join us in taking the next step forward in 
preventing teenage pregnancy by supporting this important legislation.
                                 ______
                                 
      By Mr. INOUYE (for himself and Mr. Begich):
  S. 1441. A bill to provide assistance for workforce investment 
activities to unique populations in Alaska and Hawaii; to the Committee 
on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.
  Mr. INOUYE. Mr. President, Mr. Begich and I recognize that Alaska and 
Hawaii's educational and workforce needs are linked to the indigenous 
cultures, learning styles, and geographical realities of our home 
States. We would like to commend the University of Hawaii Maui College 
for their hard work and dedication in developing a Remote Rural Hawaii 
Training Project. Over the years, the University of Hawaii Maui College 
has led the way in education and workforce development. Since the 
inception of the Rural Development Project in 1997, the University has 
supported 300 hundred projects. The initial projects served over 29,000 
participants. We would also like to praise Cook Inlet Tribal Council 
for their dedication and efforts relating to workforce development for 
Native Alaskans. For example, in fiscal year 2010 the Alaska's People 
Career center served 2,269 job seekers and they helped 58 people obtain 
their General Educational Development diploma. These initiatives, many 
made possible by the unique environment created by the natural 
resources of Alaska and Hawaii, have proved to be an invaluable source 
of current and future growth of workforce development and training 
programs. We are truly impressed by the innovative projects developed 
by these two organizations and we need continued support for workforce 
development in these unique populations in Alaska and Hawaii.
  Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the text of the bill be 
printed in the Record.
  There being no objection, the text of the bill was ordered to be 
printed in the Record, as follows:

                                S. 1441

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Workforce Investment for 
     Unique Populations in Hawaii and Alaska Act of 2011''.

     SEC. 2. ASSISTANCE TO UNIQUE POPULATIONS IN ALASKA AND 
                   HAWAII.

       (a) In General.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, the Secretary of Labor is authorized to provide 
     assistance to the Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Incorporated, 
     and the University of Hawaii Maui College, for the unique 
     populations who reside in Alaska or Hawaii, respectively, to 
     improve job training and other workforce investment 
     activities (as defined in section 101 of the Workforce 
     Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.)).
       (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
     to be appropriated to carry out this section such sums as may 
     be necessary for each of fiscal year 2012 and each subsequent 
     fiscal year.
                                 ______
                                 
      By Mrs. FEINSTEIN:
  S. 1443. A bill to extend certain trade preferences to certain least-
developed countries in Asia and the South Pacific, and for other 
purposes; to the Committee on Finance.
  Mrs. FEINSTEIN. Mr. President, I rise today to introduce the Asia-
South Pacific Trade Preferences Act to help some of the world's poorest 
countries sustain vital export industries and promote economic growth 
and political stability.
  This legislation will provide duty free and quota free benefits for 
garments and other products similar to those afforded to beneficiary 
countries under the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act.
  The countries covered by this legislation are 13 Least Developed 
Countries, LDCs, as defined by the United Nations and the U.S. State 
Department, which are not covered by any current U.S. trade preference 
program: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, Kiribati, Laos, 
Maldives, Nepal, Samoa, Solomon Islands, East Timor, Tuvalu, and 
Vanuatu.
  They are among the poorest countries in the world.
  Nepal has per capita income of $240. Unemployment in Bangladesh 
stands at 40 percent. Approximately 36 percent of Cambodia's population 
lives below the poverty line.
  Each country faces critical challenges in the years ahead including 
poor health care, insufficient educational opportunities, high HIV/AIDS 
rates, and the effects of war and civil strife.
  The United States must take a leadership role in providing much 
needed assistance to the people of these countries.
  Yet humanitarian and development assistance should not be the sum 
total of our efforts to put these countries on the road to economic 
prosperity and political stability.
  Indeed, the key for sustained growth and rising standards of living 
will be the ability of each of these countries to create vital export 
industries to compete in a free and open global marketplace.
  We should help these countries help themselves by opening the U.S. 
market to their exports as we have done for other developing countries 
in the past.
  By doing so, we will demonstrate the best of American values: 
reaching out to a neighbor in need and helping him to stand on his own 
two feet.
  Success in this endeavor will ultimately allow these countries to 
become less dependent on foreign aid and allow the United States to 
provide assistance to countries in greater need.
  But make no mistake. These countries will not automatically receive 
the trade benefits provided by this legislation.
  Our efforts to promote economic growth, jobs, and political stability 
will fail if these countries are strangled by human rights abuses, 
corruption, and the absence of the rule of law.
  Instead of lifting the citizens of these countries out of poverty and 
giving hope for a better future, we will ignore our values and sustain 
the status quo.
  So, this legislation has been drafted to ensure that the benefits are 
granted on a performance-driven basis.
  That is, to be eligible, a beneficiary country must demonstrate that 
it is making continual progress toward establishing rule of law, 
political pluralism, the right to due process, and a market-based 
economy that protects private property rights.
  So, this legislation would help promote democracy, human rights, and 
the rule of law while sustaining vital export industries and creating 
employment opportunities.
  The beneficiary countries have a clear incentive to stay on the right 
path or they will lose the benefits of this bill.
  I firmly believe that these benefits will make a difference.
  The garment industry is a key part of the manufacturing sector in 
some of these countries.
  In Nepal, the garment industry is entirely export oriented and 
accounts for 40 percent of foreign exchange earnings. It employs over 
100,000 workers, half of them women, and sustains the livelihood of 
over 350,000 people.
  The United States is the largest market for Nepalese garments and 
accounts for 80-90 percent of Nepal's total exports every year.
  In Cambodia, approximately 250,000 Cambodians work in the garment 
industry supporting approximately one million dependents. The garment 
industry accounts for more than 90 percent of Cambodia's export 
earnings.
  In Bangladesh, the garment industry accounts for 75 percent of export 
earnings. The industry employs 1.8 million

[[Page S5021]]

people, 90 percent of whom are women, and sustains the livelihoods of 
10 to 15 million people.
  Despite the poverty seen in these countries and the importance of the 
garment industry and the U.S. market, they face some of the highest 
U.S. tariffs in the world, averaging over 15 percent.
  In contrast, countries like Japan and our European partners face 
tariffs that are nearly zero.
  Surely we can do better.
  By targeting the garment industry, we can make a real difference now 
in promoting economic growth and higher standards of living.
  This legislation will help these countries compete in the U.S. market 
and lift their and let their citizens know that Americans are committed 
to helping them realize a better future for themselves and their 
families.
  Doing so is consistent with U.S. goals to combat poverty, 
instability, and terrorism in a critical part of the world. We should 
not forget that the vast majority of the people from these beneficiary 
countries are Muslim.
  The impact on U.S. jobs will be minimal.
  Currently, the beneficiary countries under this legislation account 
for only 4 percent of U.S. textile and apparel imports, compared to 24 
percent for China, and 72 percent for the rest of the world.
  These countries will continue to be small players in the U.S. market, 
but the benefits of this legislation will have a major impact on their 
export economies.
  At a time when we are trying to rebuild the image of the U.S. around 
the world, we need legislation such as this to show the best of America 
and American values. It will provide a vital component to our 
development strategy and add another tool to the war on terror. I urge 
my colleagues to support this bill.
  Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the text of the bill be 
printed in the Record.
  There being no objection, the text of the bill was ordered to be 
printed in the Record, as follows:

                                S. 1443

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Asia-South Pacific Trade 
     Preferences Act''.

     SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds the following:
       (1) It is in the mutual interest of the United States and 
     least-developed countries to promote stable and sustainable 
     economic growth and development.
       (2) Trade and investment are powerful economic tools and 
     can be used to reduce poverty and raise the standard of 
     living in a country.
       (3) A country that is open to trade may increase its 
     economic growth.
       (4) Trade and investment often lead to employment 
     opportunities and often help alleviate poverty.
       (5) Least-developed countries have a particular challenge 
     in meeting the economic requirements of and competitiveness 
     necessary for globalization and international markets.
       (6) The United States has recognized the benefits that 
     international trade provides to least-developed countries by 
     enacting the Generalized System of Preferences and trade 
     benefits for developing countries in the Caribbean, Andean, 
     and sub-Saharan African regions of the world.
       (7) Enhanced trade with least-developed Muslim countries, 
     including Yemen, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh, is consistent 
     with other United States objectives of encouraging a strong 
     private sector and individual economic empowerment in those 
     countries.
       (8) Offering least-developed countries enhanced trade 
     preferences will encourage both higher levels of trade and 
     direct investment in support of positive economic and 
     political developments throughout the world.
       (9) Encouraging the reciprocal reduction of trade and 
     investment barriers will enhance the benefits of trade and 
     investment as well as enhance commercial and political ties 
     between the United States and the countries designated for 
     benefits under this Act.
       (10) Economic opportunity and engagement in the global 
     trading system together with support for democratic 
     institutions and a respect for human rights are mutually 
     reinforcing objectives and key elements of a policy to 
     confront and defeat global terrorism.

     SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

       In this Act:
       (1) Asia or south pacific country.--The term ``Asia or 
     South Pacific country'' means a country listed in section 
     4(b).
       (2) Beneficiary asia or south pacific country.--The term 
     ``beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country'' means an Asia 
     or South Pacific country that the President has determined is 
     eligible for preferential treatment under this Act.
       (3) Former beneficiary asia or south pacific country.--The 
     term ``former beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country'' 
     means a country that, after being designated as a beneficiary 
     Asia or South Pacific country under this Act, ceased to be 
     designated as such a country by reason of its entering into a 
     free trade agreement with the United States.

     SEC. 4. AUTHORITY TO DESIGNATE; ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS.

       (a) Authority To Designate.--
       (1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, the President is authorized to designate an Asia or 
     South Pacific country as a beneficiary Asia or South Pacific 
     country eligible for preferential treatment under this Act--
       (A) if the President determines that the country meets the 
     requirements set forth in section 104 of the African Growth 
     and Opportunity Act (19 U.S.C. 3703); and
       (B) subject to the authority granted to the President under 
     subsections (a), (d), and (e) of section 502 of the Trade Act 
     of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2462), if the country otherwise meets the 
     eligibility criteria set forth in such section 502.
       (2) Application of section 104.--Section 104 of the African 
     Growth and Opportunity Act shall be applied for purposes of 
     paragraph (1) by substituting ``Asia or South Pacific 
     country'' for ``sub-Saharan African country'' each place it 
     appears.
       (b) Countries Eligible for Designation.--For purposes of 
     this Act, the term ``Asia or South Pacific country'' refers 
     to the following or their successor political entities:
       (1) Afghanistan.
       (2) Bangladesh.
       (3) Bhutan.
       (4) Cambodia.
       (5) Kiribati.
       (6) Lao People's Democratic Republic.
       (7) Maldives.
       (8) Nepal.
       (9) Samoa.
       (10) Solomon Islands.
       (11) Timor-Leste (East Timor).
       (12) Tuvalu.
       (13) Vanuatu.

     SEC. 5. ELIGIBLE ARTICLES.

       (a) In General.--Unless otherwise excluded from eligibility 
     (or otherwise provided for in this Act), preferential 
     treatment shall apply in accordance with subsections (b), 
     (c), and (d).
       (b) Certain Articles.--
       (1) In general.--The President may provide duty-free 
     treatment to any article described in subparagraphs (B) 
     through (G) of section 503(b)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 
     U.S.C. 2463(b)(1)) if--
       (A) the article is the growth, product, or manufacture of a 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country; and
       (B) the President determines, after receiving the advice of 
     the International Trade Commission in accordance with section 
     503(e) of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2463(e)), that the 
     article is not import-sensitive in the context of imports 
     from beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries.
       (2) Rules of origin.--The duty-free treatment provided 
     under paragraph (1) shall apply to any article described in 
     that paragraph that meets the requirements of section 
     503(a)(2) of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2463(a)(2)), 
     except that for purposes of determining if the article meets 
     the 35-percent requirement under subparagraph (A)(ii) of such 
     section--
       (A) if the cost or value of materials produced in the 
     customs territory of the United States is included with 
     respect to that article, an amount not to exceed 15 percent 
     of the appraised value of the article at the time it is 
     entered that is attributed to such United States cost or 
     value may be applied toward meeting the 35-percent 
     requirement; and
       (B) the cost or value of the materials included with 
     respect to that article that are produced in one or more 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries or former 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries shall be applied 
     toward meeting the 35-percent requirement.
       (c) Textile and Apparel Articles.--
       (1) In general.--The preferential treatment described in 
     subsection (a) of section 112 of the African Growth and 
     Opportunity Act (19 U.S.C. 3721(a)) shall apply with respect 
     to textile and apparel articles described in paragraphs (1), 
     (2), (4), (5), (7), and (8) of subsection (b) of such section 
     and paragraphs (2) and (3) of this subsection that are 
     imported directly into the customs territory of the United 
     States from a beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country 
     except that such section 112 shall be applied and 
     administered with respect to such articles--
       (A) in subsection (a), by substituting ``a beneficiary Asia 
     or South Pacific country (as defined in section 3 of the 
     Asia-South Pacific Trade Preferences Act)'' for ``a 
     beneficiary sub-Saharan African country described in section 
     506A(c) of the Trade Act of 1974''; and
       (B) in paragraphs (1), (2), (4), (5), (7), and (8) of 
     subsection (b), by substituting ``beneficiary Asia or South 
     Pacific country'' and ``beneficiary Asia or South Pacific 
     countries'' for ``beneficiary sub-Saharan African country'' 
     and ``beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries'', 
     respectively, each place such terms appear.
       (2) Textile and apparel articles assembled from regional 
     and other fabric.--
       (A) In general.--Textile and apparel articles described in 
     this paragraph are textile

[[Page S5022]]

     and apparel articles wholly assembled in one or more 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries or former 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries, or both, from 
     fabric wholly formed in one or more beneficiary Asia or South 
     Pacific countries or former beneficiary Asia or South Pacific 
     countries, or both, from yarn originating either in the 
     United States or one or more beneficiary Asia or South 
     Pacific countries or former beneficiary Asia or South Pacific 
     countries, or both (including fabrics not formed from yarns, 
     if such fabrics are classifiable under heading 5602 or 5603 
     of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States and 
     are wholly formed and cut in the United States, in one or 
     more beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries or former 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries, or any 
     combination thereof), whether or not the textile and apparel 
     articles are also made from any of the fabrics, fabric 
     components formed, or components knit-to-shape described in 
     paragraph (1) or (2) of section 112(b) of the African Growth 
     and Opportunity Act (19 U.S.C. 3721(b)) (unless the apparel 
     articles are made exclusively from any of the fabrics, fabric 
     components formed, or components knit-to-shape described in 
     paragraph (1) or (2) of such section 112(b)).
       (B) Limitations on benefits.--
       (i) In general.--Preferential treatment under this 
     subsection shall be extended in the 1-year period beginning 
     January 1, 2012, and in each of the succeeding 10 1-year 
     periods, to imports of textile and apparel articles described 
     in subparagraph (A) in an amount not to exceed the applicable 
     percentage of the aggregate square meter equivalents of all 
     textile and apparel articles imported into the United States 
     in the most recent 12-month period for which data are 
     available.
       (ii) Applicable percentage.--For purposes of this 
     subparagraph, the term ``applicable percentage'' means 11 
     percent for the 1-year period beginning January 1, 2012, 
     increased in each of the 10 succeeding 1-year periods by 
     equal increments, so that for the period beginning January 1, 
     2022, the applicable percentage does not exceed 14 percent.
       (3) Handloomed, handmade, folklore articles and ethnic 
     printed fabrics.--
       (A) In general.--A textile or apparel article described in 
     this paragraph is a handloomed, handmade, folklore article or 
     an ethnic printed fabric of a beneficiary Asia or South 
     Pacific country or countries that is certified as such by the 
     competent authority of such beneficiary country or countries. 
     For purposes of this subsection, the President, after 
     consultation with the beneficiary Asia or South Pacific 
     country or countries concerned, shall determine which, if 
     any, particular textile and apparel goods of the country or 
     countries shall be treated as being handloomed, handmade, or 
     folklore articles or an ethnic printed fabric.
       (B) Requirements for ethnic printed fabric.--Ethnic printed 
     fabrics qualified under this paragraph are--
       (i) fabrics containing a selvedge on both edges, having a 
     width of less than 50 inches, classifiable under subheading 
     5208.52.30 or 5208.52.40 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of 
     the United States;
       (ii) of the type that contains designs, symbols, and other 
     characteristics of Asian or South Pacific prints--

       (I) normally produced for and sold on the indigenous Asian 
     or South Pacific market; and
       (II) normally sold in Asia or South Pacific countries by 
     the piece as opposed to being tailored into garments before 
     being sold in indigenous Asian or South Pacific markets;

       (iii) printed, including waxed, in one or more beneficiary 
     Asia or South Pacific countries; and
       (iv) fabrics formed in the United States, from yarns formed 
     in the United States, or from fabric formed in one or more 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries from yarn 
     originating in either the United States or one or more 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries.
       (4) Special rule.--
       (A) In general.--Preferential treatment under this 
     subsection shall be extended through December 31, 2019, for 
     textile and apparel articles that are wholly assembled in one 
     or more beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries or former 
     beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries, or both, 
     regardless of the country of origin of the yarn or fabric 
     used to make such articles.
       (B) Country limitations.--
       (i) Small suppliers.--If, during a calendar year, imports 
     of textile and apparel articles described in subparagraph (A) 
     from a beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country are less 
     than 1 percent of the aggregate square meter equivalents of 
     all textile and apparel articles imported into the United 
     States during that calendar year, such imports may be 
     increased to an amount that is equal to not more than 1.5 
     percent of the aggregate square meter equivalents of all 
     textile and apparel articles imported into the United States 
     during that calendar year for the succeeding calendar year.
       (ii) Other suppliers.--If, during a calendar year, imports 
     of textile and apparel articles described in subparagraph (A) 
     from a beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country are at least 
     1 percent of the aggregate square meter equivalents of all 
     textile and apparel articles imported into the United States 
     during that calendar year, such imports may be increased by 
     an amount that is equal to not more than \1/3\ of 1 percent 
     of the aggregate square meter equivalents of all textile and 
     apparel articles imported into the United States during that 
     calendar year for the succeeding calendar year.
       (iii) Aggregate country limit.--In no case may the 
     aggregate quantity of textile and apparel articles described 
     in subparagraph (A) imported into the United States during a 
     calendar year under this subsection exceed the applicable 
     percentage set forth in paragraph (2)(B)(ii) for that 
     calendar year.
       (d) Other Restrictions.--The provisions of subsections 
     (b)(3)(B) and (e) of section 112 and section 113 of the 
     African Growth and Opportunity Act (19 U.S.C. 3721 and 3722) 
     shall apply with respect to the preferential treatment 
     extended under this section to a beneficiary Asia or South 
     Pacific country by substituting ``beneficiary Asia or South 
     Pacific country'' for ``beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
     country'' and ``beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries'' 
     and ``former beneficiary Asia or South Pacific countries'' 
     for ``beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries'' and 
     ``former sub-Saharan African countries'', respectively, as 
     appropriate.
       (e) Technical Amendment.--Section 6002(a)(2)(B) of the 
     Africa Investment Incentive Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) 
     is amended by inserting before ``by striking'' the following: 
     ``in paragraph (3),''.

     SEC. 6. REPORTING REQUIREMENT.

       The President shall monitor, review, and report to 
     Congress, not later than 1 year after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, on the 
     implementation of this Act and on the trade and investment 
     policy of the United States with respect to the Asia or South 
     Pacific countries.

     SEC. 7. TERMINATION OF PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT.

       No duty-free treatment or other preferential treatment 
     extended to a beneficiary Asia or South Pacific country under 
     this Act shall remain in effect after December 31, 2022.

     SEC. 8. EFFECTIVE DATE.

       The provisions of this Act shall take effect on January 1, 
     2012.
                                 ______
                                 
      By Mr. AKAKA (for himself and Mr. Lieberman):
  S. 1444. A bill to provide for the presentation of a United States 
flag on behalf of Federal civilian employees who are killed while 
performing official duties or because of their status as Federal 
employees; to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
  Mr. AKAKA. Mr. President, I rise today to introduce the Civilian 
Service Recognition Act of 2011. This bill ensures that the next of kin 
of Federal civilian employees killed in the line of duty are presented 
a United States flag honoring the service and sacrifice of their loved 
one. This legislation is co-sponsored by Senator Lieberman and is a 
companion to a bi-partisan bill introduced by Representative Hanna.  
Representative Hanna's bill was recently reported favorably by the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform by unanimous voice vote.
  Every day, Federal civilian employees serve our nation at home and 
abroad, fulfilling critical roles that protect our citizens, our 
economy, and our freedom. Some put their lives at risk when doing so. 
Approximately 100,000 Federal civilian employees have served alongside 
the U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan over the last decade. Since 
1992, nearly 3,000 Federal civilian employees have died in service of 
their country, including 24 killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Employees 
who make this ultimate sacrifice deserve the utmost gratitude and 
respect from their nation.
  U.S. law currently requires that a United States flag be presented to 
the next of kin of deceased U.S. military veterans, but no law or 
government-wide policy requires that Federal civilian employees killed 
in the line of duty be similarly recognized. Some Federal agencies have 
already established internal practices to honor employees killed in 
service with a U.S. flag, but others have not. Every Federal civilian 
employee who dies as a result of their honorable service to this 
country should at least be recognized with the symbolic but nonetheless 
significant appreciation embodied in the presentation of an American 
flag.
  The bill I am introducing today would remedy the current 
inconsistency. It requires that Federal agencies present a flag to the 
next of kin of Federal civilian employees killed in the line of duty. 
In the unusual circumstance where the national security, such as in the 
case of a covert employee, or employee misconduct dictate otherwise, 
the requirement would not apply. It is a modest but meaningful step in 
expressing our condolences and gratitude to the families of those 
killed while serving this country; reminding Federal employees that 
their service and sacrifices are appreciated; and highlighting the 
important role

[[Page S5023]]

Federal employees play, sometimes at great personal risk, in promoting 
the general welfare of this great Nation.
  I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this legislation.
  Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the text of the bill be 
printed in the Record.
  There being no objection, the text of the bill was ordered to be 
printed in the Record, as follows:

                                S. 1444

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Civilian Service Recognition 
     Act of 2011''.

     SEC. 2. PRESENTATION OF UNITED STATES FLAG ON BEHALF OF 
                   FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES KILLED WHILE 
                   PERFORMING OFFICIAL DUTIES OR BECAUSE OF THEIR 
                   STATUS AS FEDERAL EMPLOYEES.

       (a) Definitions.--In this Act:
       (1) Employee.--The term ``employee'' has the meaning given 
     that term in section 2105 of title 5, United States Code, and 
     includes--
       (A) individuals who perform volunteer services at the 
     discretion of the head of an executive agency; and
       (B) an officer or employee of the United States Postal 
     Service or of the Postal Regulatory Commission.
       (2) Executive agency.--The term ``executive agency'' has 
     the meaning given that term in section 105 of title 5, United 
     States Code, and includes the United States Postal Service 
     and the Postal Regulatory Commission.
       (b) Presentation of Flag.--Upon receipt of a request under 
     subsection (c), the head of an executive agency shall pay the 
     expenses incident to the presentation of a flag of the United 
     States for an individual who--
       (1) was an employee of the agency; and
       (2) dies of injuries incurred in connection with such 
     individual's status as a Federal employee.
       (c) Request for Flag.--The head of an executive agency 
     shall furnish a flag for a deceased employee described in 
     subsection (a) upon the request of--
       (1) the employee's next of kin; or
       (2) if no request is received from the next of kin, an 
     individual other than the next of kin as determined by the 
     Director of the Office of Personnel Management.
       (d) Exceptions.--Subsections (b) and (c) shall not apply 
     if--
       (1) the head of the executive agency determines that 
     fulfilling the requirements of subsections (a) and (b) would 
     endanger the national security of the United States or 
     require the disclosure of classified information; or
       (2) the employee is excluded from compensation for death 
     under section 8102(a) of title 5, United States Code.
       (e) Employee Notification.--The head of an executive agency 
     shall provide appropriate notice to employees of the agency 
     of the flag benefit provided under this Act.
       (f) Regulations.--The Director of the Office of Personnel 
     Management, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense and 
     Secretary of Homeland Security, may prescribe regulations to 
     implement this Act.

                          ____________________