TRANSPARENCY IN REGULATORY ANALYSIS OF IMPACTS ON THE NATION ACT OF 2011; Congressional Record Vol. 157, No. 143
(House of Representatives - September 23, 2011)

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[Pages H6426-H6447]
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  TRANSPARENCY IN REGULATORY ANALYSIS OF IMPACTS ON THE NATION ACT OF 
                                  2011

  The Committee resumed its sitting.


                  Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Dent

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Mr. DENT. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 9, after line 20, insert the following:
       (I) ``National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air 
     Pollutants from the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry 
     and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants'', 
     published at 75 Fed. Reg. 54970 (September 9, 2010).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Dent) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania.
  Mr. DENT. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  This amendment simply adds the National Emission Standards for 
Hazardous Air Pollutants, NESHAP or Cement MACT, to the covered rules 
within H.R. 2401. Reasonable efforts to limit the emissions of 
hazardous pollutants by cement manufacturing facilities are most 
certainly appropriate, but EPA has failed to craft effective and 
efficient regulations.
  These NESHAP standards will be very, very difficult and extremely 
costly for domestic cement manufacturers to meet, severely jeopardizing 
the ability of an essential American basic industry to remain 
competitive with foreign importers. Including NESHAP and H.R. 2401 will 
allow the loss of American jobs and the weakening of domestic 
manufacturers' global competitiveness to become key considerations 
during the completion of the rulemaking process.
  We must understand the impacts of these rules on jobs and our 
manufacturing competitiveness. Here now are some simple, basic facts 
about the American cement industry, and I represent the largest cement-
producing district in America. I'm cochair of the Cement Caucus along 
with cosponsor Mike Ross of Arkansas. This industry employs about 
13,000 Americans. Four thousand of those jobs have been lost since 
2008. There are 97 cement plants in America producing today, and 
there's a presence in nearly every State as well, I might add. Cement 
is an absolutely essential basic industry in American manufacturing. It 
plays a major role in the development of our Nation's infrastructure.
  I think we need to better understand some of this background, too, 
regarding these NESHAP rules.
  NESHAP, of course, amends EPA's maximum achievable control 
technology, or MACT, and performance standards for cement kilns. And 
this is utilizing an unrealistic pollutant-by-pollutant approach for 
application of MACT. MACT requirements are designed to direct 
industries toward the pollution control technology used by the best 
performers in a certain industry sector. It cobbles together a range of 
different performance characteristics applicable to different 
pollutants without determining if it is feasible or even possible for 
any one kiln to comply with all of these standards.
  The truth is there is not a single cement manufacturing plant in 
America that can comply with all of these standards simultaneously. The 
chemical composition, too, of key cement inputs, such as limestone, 
vary from region to region. Consequently, NESHAP will have 
disproportionate impacts on different manufacturing locations across 
the country simply based on the type of limestone being used in the 
process of manufacturing cement.
  We should talk, too, about the impacts on the domestic cement 
industry: $2.2 billion worth of compliance costs, and that's an EPA 
estimate; $3.4 billion in compliance costs, and that's the industry 
estimate. So there's a lot of cost here. We're in the billions.
  There are numerous plants. There are estimates that from 12 to 18 of 
these plants across the country may be idle or permanently shut down. 
And these are massive facilities with tremendous capital investment. 
And we believe that the national price for Portland cement may increase 
by 5.4 percent. Domestic production will fall by 11 percent. Thousands 
of high-quality jobs could or would be lost.
  One major domestic cement producer has already publicly announced 
that, due to other regulatory uncertainties of this NESHAP and other 
pending regulations, it is halting construction of a new state-of-the-
art cement kiln, suspending over $350 million in new investment and the 
creation of over 1,500 construction jobs.
  With respect to global emissions, what will this mean? The reduction 
of domestic production of cement will naturally lead to an increase in 
our Nation's reliance on foreign cement. And I can assure you those 
foreign producers are not going to be complying with the NESHAP rules. 
So this is going to shift overseas production and will likely increase 
global greenhouse emissions in two ways:

[[Page H6427]]

  First, transporting cement to the U.S. from international markets 
will require tremendous amounts of fossil fuels, substantially 
increasing the amount of carbon emitted per unit of cement used; and
  Second, foreign suppliers will be manufacturing in countries with 
little or no environmental protections.
  So it's critically important that EPA produce realistic and 
achievable regulations. Including NESHAP in H.R. 2401 will help EPA 
take into account the economic impact of its flawed regulations, and a 
more thorough economic analysis will lead to a better final rule.
  Finally, I wanted to say one thing. The Federal stimulus law is 
actually helping to finance the construction of a cement importation 
terminal in Staten Island, New York City, designed to displace many 
cement workers in my district and all across the northeastern United 
States, using Federal money to create a handful of jobs while 
displacing many in basic industry and manufacturing. That's got to 
stop.
  Pass this amendment, and then pass the underlying bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman from Pennsylvania has 
expired.
  Mr. RUSH. I claim time in opposition for purposes of debate.
  The ACTING Chair. The gentleman from Illinois is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. RUSH. Thank you.
  Many organizations are on record opposing the TRAIN Act or opposing 
efforts to block rules to reduce pollution from the country's dirtiest 
power plants.
  Numerous public health groups, including the American Lung 
Association, the American Public Health Association, the American 
Thoracic Society, Physicians for Social Responsibility, and Asthma and 
Allergy Foundation of America all sent a letter to Congress expressing 
their support for full implementation of the Clean Air Act and opposing 
``all efforts to weaken, delay, or block progress toward the continuing 
implementation of this vital law.''
  The American Public Health Association stated that it opposes the 
TRAIN Act because it is ``ill-conceived legislation that would prevent 
EPA from protecting the public's health from dangerous and deadly air 
pollution.''
  The National Association of Clean Air Agencies opposes this bill as 
well. NACAA sent a letter expressing its concern that the TRAIN Act 
would ``create regulatory delays that could lead to thousands of 
premature deaths, remove important regulatory tools upon which States 
and localities depend, impose additional costs on government as well as 
small businesses, create regulatory uncertainty, cause job losses and 
defund an important and cost-effective air pollution control program.''

                              {time}  1020

  Groups representing millions of individual Americans who believe in 
protecting our environment strongly oppose this bill and other efforts 
to weaken clean air protections. These groups include the League of 
Conservative Voters, the Sierra Club, National Resources Defense 
Council, Environment America, the National Audubon Society, the 
Environmental Defense Fund, and the Union of Concerned Scientists. They 
stated in a letter to Congress that ``sacrificing tens of thousands of 
American lives will not create more jobs. Poisoning the air our 
children and our families breathe will not stimulate the economy.''
  Three hundred sportsmen's organizations representing our Nation's 
hunters, anglers, and the businesses that depend on our wildlife and 
natural resources support the EPA's effort to cut mercury pollution, 
and I quote them with these words. They said: ``Strongly oppose any 
effort to weaken the Clean Air Act.''
  The Evangelical Environment Network has been running radio ads 
expressing their opposition to efforts to block the Mercury and Air 
Toxics rule. Mercury can damage the developing brain of fetuses and 
children, causing learning disabilities and neurological problems. The 
president of this group stated: ``We believe that mercury offers a 
significant potential for hindering our children from developing a pure 
and wonderful life.''
  The Obama administration strongly opposes the TRAIN Act. The 
administration plans to veto this legislation if it ever reaches the 
President's desk, as the bill would undermine decades of progress in 
cleaning up the Nation's air quality by--and this is a quote from the 
Obama administration--``blocking EPA's ability to move forward with two 
long-overdue Clean Air Act rules.''
  Americans don't support weakening the Clean Air Act or blocking 
efforts to reduce dangerous air pollution from power plants. The 
widespread opposition to the TRAIN Act makes that perfectly clear.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to oppose this horrendous bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Dent).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. RUSH. I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
will be postponed.


           Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Hastings of Florida

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 10, after line 12, insert the following new subsection 
     (and redesignate accordingly):
       (f) Exclusion From Review.--Notwithstanding subsection (e), 
     the Committee may not include in the analyses conducted under 
     section 3 consideration of any rule or guideline promulgated 
     in compliance with Executive Order 12866 (58 Fed. Reg. 51735, 
     relating to regulatory planning and review) or the National 
     Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.).
       Beginning on page 11, line 17, strike section 5 (and 
     redesignate accordingly).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Hastings) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chairman, H.R. 2401 is a toxic bill that 
attempts to dismantle any government regulation to protect our Nation's 
public health and environment.
  To set the stage for my brief remarks, let me cite to the American 
public Executive Order 12866, which says: ``Each agency shall assess 
both the costs and the benefits of the intended regulation, and 
recognizing that some costs and benefits are difficult to quantify, 
propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination that 
the benefits of the intended regulation justify its cause.''
  Now, we've been operating under that particular provision for a 
substantial period of time. And quite frankly, Congress' decisions with 
reference to the Clean Air Act, signed by President Richard Nixon in 
1970, came about as a result of continuing arguments from industry that 
cleaning up air pollution was too expensive or not feasible.
  This bill forbids the Environmental Protection Agency from finalizing 
both the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule and, importantly, the 
Cross-State Air Pollution rule requiring coal-fired power plants 
without modern pollution controls to install controls, to reduce 
emissions of mercury and other toxic air pollutants, fine particulates, 
and the pollutants that cause smog and acid rain.
  In the Rules Committee, I spoke about being in Lavigny in Poland and 
watching the pollution that was destroying the Black Forest in another 
country, in Germany. We've had that take place in our States, where one 
State is offering emissions that come down on another State's 
population, and therefore the Cross-State Air Pollution rule said that 
coal-fired plants should install modern pollution controls. And guess 
what? Sixty percent of them, including one of the largest producers of 
electricity in this country--Exelon in Illinois--do favor these same 
rules that are being sought to be delayed. And they favor them for the 
reason that, among other things, it has produced jobs and it has cured 
the problems that have been pointed out by

[[Page H6428]]

the American Lung Association and countless other organizations that 
favor the Clean Air Act and are opposed to delaying further two 
particularly important measures that would allow for pollution to 
continue to be cleaned up.
  Port Everglades in Florida, right outside my constituency, for all of 
the years that I have lived there--and that nears 50--this coal-powered 
plant has been producing emissions. Over the course of time, they have 
reduced those emissions. And Florida Power & Light recently indicated 
that they're going to do everything that they can to meet the emissions 
standards rather than sit up and try and oppose them because they 
recognize, one, that they do have all of the juice--if you can call 
electricity that.
  And in the final analysis, those of us that benefit from it are going 
to wind up paying more. But to pay more to make sure that children 
don't have asthma and to make sure that people don't have lung 
pollution and to make sure that lakes don't go dead from mercury or 
that fish don't have in them more mercury than they rightly should for 
food consumption, then I'm willing to pay more; and I believe most 
Americans are as well in order that we will have clean air.
  I ask for support of my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Kentucky is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. I have great admiration for the gentleman from 
Florida, who is always eloquent in his remarks.

                              {time}  1030

  He started off his support of his amendment by saying that we are 
trying to dismantle any regulation. I would like to remind everyone, 
once again, that this bill applies to 14 EPA regulations and we do not 
delay in any way 12 of them. And on the other two, we delay one of 
them, both of them, 6 months after the final report is due.
  Now, he had mentioned that Exelon supported the new EPA regulations. 
Exelon is a company that we all admire and respect, but it's a nuclear 
energy company, so there's nothing in these regulations that has any 
impact on them, as far as I know. But all of these regulations are 
trying to drive the coal industry out of business, that still provides 
50 percent of all the electricity in America.
  Now, in the TRAIN Act, we simply ask this independent government 
agency, composed of Obama administration appointees, to examine the 
cumulative impact of all of these rules, because EPA has never been 
quite this aggressive. And I might add that the two rules that we asked 
to delay for further analysis, an independent research group said that 
the annualized cost would be almost $18 billion that utilities would 
have to spend to buy equipment that may not be able to even then 
achieve the standards because the technology is not available.
  The issue is not about mercury. The utilities do a great job of 
cleaning up mercury. EPA itself said that its Utility MACT would only 
benefit--the benefit of the Utility MACT would be only .004 percent 
attributable to mercury because 99 percent of mercury in America comes 
from nature and from outside other countries that the trade winds bring 
in to our country. So utilities don't object to the mercury part of 
this.
  But they're now adding hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen chloride, of 
which there is no technology available to achieve the standard that EPA 
is setting.
  So because of the cost, because of the unique vulnerability of our 
economy today, 12 of these regulations we don't delay at all. We just 
say, let's study the cumulative impact, which the President asked for 
in his Executive order that he issued recently. He said we need to look 
at the cumulative impact. That's what we're trying to do.
  This amendment would basically say, you don't look at the cumulative 
impact, you just take the existing studies that have been made. I would 
also say that EPA didn't even do any study on the greenhouse gas, which 
we're only trying to analyze the full cost of that.
  For those reasons, I would respectfully oppose the gentleman's 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Hastings).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida will 
be postponed.


          Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Connolly of Virginia

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 10, after line 24, insert the following:
       (g) Additional Analyses.--The Committee shall conduct or 
     commission studies to identify pollution control policies 
     that should be adopted and implemented by the United States 
     to provide domestic job growth and ensure that the Nation is 
     internationally competitive in the $5 trillion global energy 
     industry for clean energy technology development and 
     manufacturing.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Connolly) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, Deutsche Bank, the biggest 
bank in Europe, recently issued a report on global clean energy 
investment opportunities in which it stated, ``Countries with more TLC, 
transparency, longevity, and certainty, in their climate policy 
frameworks will attract more investment and build new clean industries, 
technologies, and jobs faster than their policy-lagging counterparts.''
  The TRAIN Act is one more step in the wrong direction by the same 
Republican House which has held over 110 anti-environmental votes. This 
unprecedented assault on the environment has devastating consequences 
for our economy. As the Deutsche Bank report said, ``Germany and China 
have emerged as global leaders in low carbon technologies and 
investment. The net effect is that while Congress stumbles, the U.S. 
stands to fall behind.''
  This investor report, from Europe's largest bank, identified several 
policy failures that are impeding job growth here at home. First, 
Congress has not established a carbon reduction target, or required 
polluters to pay for the cost of greenhouse gas pollution. Congress 
does not have a national renewable standard or even an energy efficient 
standard. The Deutsche Bank report notes that the lack of these 
regulations and incentives has actually forced investors to make 
investments elsewhere, including in China and other countries, rather 
than here at home in America. As a result, we have lost solar and other 
advanced technology market share to our competitors.
  My simple amendment to the TRAIN Act establishes a simple process to 
identify ``policies that should be adopted and implemented by the 
United States to provide domestic job growth, and to ensure that our 
Nation is internationally competitive in the $5 trillion global energy 
industry for clean energy technology, development, and manufacturing.'' 
Business leaders have urged Congress to adopt both a regulatory 
framework and a system of incentives to spur clean energy job creation. 
In addition to the regulation the Deutsche Bank identified as 
supporting investment, American entrepreneurs have called on Congress 
to expand public financing for clean energy.
  This month members of the American Energy Innovation Council visited 
Capitol Hill to express their strong support for just that concept. 
This group included venture capitalist John Doerr, former Lockheed 
Martin CEO Norm Augustine, and Bill Gates of Microsoft. The American 
Energy Innovation Council recently issued a report which stated, ``As 
business leaders, we feel that America's current energy system is 
deficient in ways that cause serious harm to our economy, our national 
security, and our environment.

[[Page H6429]]

To correct these deficiencies, we must make a serious commitment to 
modernizing our energy system with cleaner and more efficient 
technologies.''
  This Republican House is an anchor that's dragging down the American 
economy. It's continued obsession with austerity and opposition to any 
economic recovery programs, including clean energy, mean that America 
falls behind while China surges ahead. We cannot afford to let China 
and Germany dominate industries such as clean technology.
  My simple amendment will establish a process to start restoring 
American leadership in this important sector for economic growth. 
Rather than repealing commonsense public health standards, we ought to 
be focused on measures like my amendment, which support high-tech job 
growth.
  I ask my colleagues to vote for this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Kentucky is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. While I have great regard for the gentleman from 
Virginia, I must rise to oppose this amendment.
  In his 2008 convention speech, Barack Obama promised to create 5 
million green energy jobs. An article in The New York Times headlines, 
``Where the Jobs Aren't,'' talks about all the government money that's 
being spent to subsidize green energy today. They gave an example of 
one government program that provided $300 million to a company. They 
created 150 jobs at what turned out to be a cost of $2 million for 
every job.

                              {time}  1040

  The reason that solar and wind are not taking off is they are too 
expensive and too inefficient. Having said that, I recognize that they 
have a part in our economy and that they have a part in producing 
electricity, but they can never be the base load. That cannot be 
attained. We cannot provide enough electricity without coal, nuclear, 
and natural gas.
  Now, this amendment gives special attention to the green energy 
field. I would remind everyone, once again, that renewable energy 
subsidies increased over the last 3 years by 186 percent: from $5 
billion to $14 billion. Renewables saw, by far, the largest increase in 
Federal benefits. Wind alone received a tenfold increase in subsidies: 
from $476 million to almost $5 billion. Solar increased by a factor of 
6: from $179 million to $1.2 billion.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Will the gentleman yield for a question?
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Let me just finish this one sentence.
  So these strategies can't work without government support. I don't 
object to government supporting them, but they do not need to get even 
more special privileges from this amendment.
  I would be happy to yield to the gentleman.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I would inquire as to what would be the comparable number for oil and 
gas and coal in the United States. You talk about the growth trend; but 
in absolute numbers, is it not true that actually the fossil fuels 
industry gets $70 billion a year?
  Mr. WHITFIELD. The direct expenditure for coal was $42 million last 
year, and for wind it was $3.556 billion.
  I will tell you that oil and gas and coal are willing to give up all 
of their subsidies if green energy wants to give up their subsidies, 
because they're getting a lot more than anyone else.
  At this point, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. I would inquire of the Chair how much time 
is left on this side.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia has 1 minute remaining.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. To conclude on this matter, I have enormous 
respect for my colleague on the other side; but to oppose a simple 
study to require that we look at the benefits of clean energy 
technology, I find that very troubling. That resistance, sadly, is 
going to impede American growth and competitiveness and is actually 
going to cost us jobs.
  There is no question that in the coal industry, in particular, we've 
kind of reached a plateau. In fact, in Kentucky, we've lost a lot of 
jobs relative to, say, 30 years ago; whereas, as my colleague from 
Massachusetts pointed out last night, in wind energy, just in the last 
4 years, we're up to 80,000 jobs. It's a fast-growing, lucrative part 
of our economy. It's clean, and it actually concretely helps create 
jobs.
  That's a worthwhile thing to study if not to invest in, and I regret 
the fact that the manager on the other side finds even a study 
something to be resisted.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Once again, I oppose the amendment.
  Green energy is getting every benefit possible from this 
administration--money, studies, and in every other way. It will never 
be able to meet the base load of our electricity needs. Therefore, 
unless we can continue to have low-cost electricity, we're not going to 
compete in the global marketplace, and we're going to continue to lose 
jobs. The EPA is making direct attacks against an industry. For that 
reason, I respectfully oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Connolly).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
will be postponed.


          Amendment No. 9 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

         Page 11, line 10, strike ``90'' and insert ``120''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. I rise today to support my amendment. I 
call my amendment ``Can We All Get Along?'' It is an amendment simply 
to ask that all of those who are impacted by this proposed legislation 
have an expanded time to be able to present their views.
  It is a ``can we all get along?''-type amendment because it is 
important to note again that those of us who come from different 
States, whether it's Illinois or Texas, recognize that the 
Environmental Protection Agency and the Clean Air Act were formulated 
under a bipartisan Congress and were signed, as my colleague reminded 
us, by President Richard Nixon. Republicans and Democrats voted for the 
Clean Air Act and for the Environmental Protection Agency's 
jurisdiction.
  It's important to note that there is not only a value in what the EPA 
does but that there are organizations, such as the American Lung 
Association, the American Thoracic Society, the Physicians for Social 
Responsibility, the American Public Health Association, and the Asthma 
and Allergy Foundation of America, which need their input and are 
concerned about this legislation.
  So my concern as we move forward on the transparency and regulatory 
analysis of impact is how much time has been given for the public 
comment. My State, in fact, has been impacted for the lack thereof of 
public comment. I believe that there are civilians who are not 
businesses who should be protected and given the opportunity to have 
input.
  For example, it's important to note that the Mercury and Air Toxics 
Standards rule, which I don't think my colleagues can in any way 
dissuade me from believing, has been the basis of preventing 17,000 
premature deaths, 11,000 heart attacks, 120,000 cases of aggravated 
asthma, 12,000 hospital and emergency room visits, 11,000 cases of 
bronchitis, and 850,000 missed days.
  The idea of putting a superlayer over the already existing regulatory

[[Page H6430]]

scheme, to me, sounds like we are adhering to the supercommittee 
concept, which many of us, by way of absolute necessity, voted on 
during the debt ceiling debate; but we realize that the responsibility 
of the purse strings is in the United States House of Representatives. 
Well, the law has given authority to the EPA and to the Clean Air Act 
as its authorizing aspect to be able to control and balance.
  I believe we should create jobs; but the question becomes whether or 
not the TRAIN Act, in the format of adding another layer of review, 
actually does that--or does it create another level of bureaucracy that 
we neither want nor need? At a time when these regulations will both 
decrease health costs and can create thousands of jobs, why would my 
colleagues propose a bill that would only slow job growth?
  It has been 260 days. I think we should, as I started out, get along, 
try to create jobs, recognize the value of the EPA, find a way to be 
able to resolve the present conflict on the Cross-State Air Pollution 
Rule but not eliminate the authority and the oversight of the 
Environmental Protection Agency.
  What I would say to my colleagues is that the EPA has protected all 
of our constituents. Therefore, I think it's important to pass this 
amendment because it's about constituents. It's about constituents no 
matter what side of the aisle they're on. This is an amendment that 
moves the public comment from 90 days to 120 days. There may have been 
some who wanted to comment who cannot comment because they did not have 
the amount of time.
  So I would ask my colleagues to support this ``can we all get 
along?'' amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. I claim time in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Kentucky is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. First, I would like to say to the gentlelady from 
Texas, who does such a great job on all of these issues, that we do not 
intend in any way to remove any of the authority of the EPA to regulate 
the Cross-State Transport Rules. As a matter of fact, of the 14 rules 
that we're examining that EPA has issued, 12 of them we do not delay in 
any way. On the Air Transport Rule, we simply go back to the original 
Air Transport Rule of which EPA talked about all of the marvelous 
benefits. The EPA defended it in court. The environmental groups 
supported it: 67 and 53 percent reductions in SO2 and 
NOX emissions. That will remain in effect.
  As far as the gentlelady's amendment, we would be happy to accept it, 
because I think it's a good amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1050

  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Let me indicate to the gentleman first of 
all that I thank him for accepting the amendment, and I conclude my 
remarks by saying that my asking for a roll call vote is not in any way 
a reflection of my lack of acceptance, but I am just so gratified for 
this timeframe that I hope that the gentleman will encourage those to 
support the amendment.
  Therefore, let me say to the gentleman--I finish on this note--there 
is some thought that we are putting in another regulatory scheme, but I 
think the important point from my perspective is that there was value 
when Richard Nixon signed the bill on how do we find a way to make this 
work so that we save lives and we create jobs.
  I think my amendment provides the opportunity for that kind of input, 
and I thank the gentleman.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of my amendment #4 to H.R. 2401, 
``The Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation 
Act,'' which extends the public comment period from 90 days to 120 
days.
  The Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation 
(TRAIN) Act establishes a committee to conduct studies and review the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations based upon the 
Mercury and Air Toxics Standard Rule (MATS) and the Cross State Air 
Pollution (CSAP) Rule promulgated. This committee is composed of 
Administration officials from different federal agencies and under H.R. 
2401 will analyze the effect of the regulations on the economy, U.S. 
competitiveness in the global market, employment, and energy production 
and cost. In effect this is creating more regulations and more 
bureaucracy at time when Republicans are calling for all of us to 
tighten our belts. So now before us is a Super Committee for the Budget 
and again we are going to have a Super Committee for Clean Air. We 
already have an agency charged with protecting our air. The 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been up to the task for 40 
years. According to the EPA, the pollution reductions required by the 
rule they have proposed will yield health benefits of $120 to $280 
billion per year, which is 150 to 350 times the cost. I have always 
been a stalwart for a firm balance between the needs of the energy 
industry and our environment. But then there is just plain common 
sense. The TRAIN Act goes overboard. It is a extreme response that does 
not add value to ensuring Clean Air.
  The argument proposed by some of my colleagues has been that this 
will cost jobs. Implementing regulations will create jobs. Old power 
plants and other utilities will have to hire workers in order to 
fulfill the requirements of the regulation. The EPA has determined that 
this will not be overly burdensome to the industry. We as a body must 
ensure that the regulations issued by the EPA will not destroy any 
industry but at the same token TRAIN is too extreme. It creates the 
very bureaucracy that we neither need nor want. At a time when these 
regulations will both decrease health costs and can create thousands of 
jobs, why would my colleagues propose a bill that will only slow job 
growth. It has been 260 days and the Republicans, who have been in the 
majority, have not presented a clear and consistent job growth package. 
Instead time and time again they have put forth measures to cut 
Medicare and social security at a time when so many of our constituents 
are dependent upon those resources to cover health costs and living 
expenses.
  The TRAIN Act, which I could easily consider a bill like a steam 
train and it steams right through the power of the EPA to regulate 
clean air, requires that the committee publicly publish its initial 
findings and then provide the public with 90 days to comment. If this 
flawed bill is going to pass at least my amendment is an attempt to 
take into account the number of interested parties who may wish to give 
their input and extends the public comment period from 90 days to 120 
days. I have offered this amendment to ensure that everyone who wishes 
to comment will have ample opportunity to do so.
  My home state of Texas was not initially included in the Cross State 
Air Pollution Rule. When my state was added, there was no time provided 
for public input, a courtesy that was extended to the other 6 states 
included in the Cross State Air Pollution Rule. Stakeholders throughout 
Texas were afforded no opportunity to discuss the impact of including 
Texas at the last minute. Had there been opportunity for public 
comment, the EPA and stakeholders would have been able to work together 
towards a consensus.
  The proposed regulations have different impacts on different 
stakeholders, and it is extremely important that everyone's point of 
view is considered. An open dialogue that encourages frank and 
productive communication can foster compromise.
  As the Representative for Houston, the country's energy capital, I am 
committed to creating an environment in which the energy industry and 
regulating agencies can work together.
  For more than 40 years the EPA has been charged with protecting our 
environment. There has been a consistent theme of chipping away at the 
ability of the EPA to protect our air. We have to consider the long 
term costs to public health if we fail to establish reasonable measures 
for clean air.
  Outdoor air pollution is caused by small particles and ground level 
ozone that comes from car exhaust, smoke, road dust and factory 
emissions. Outdoor air quality is also affected by pollen from plants, 
crops and weeds. Particle pollution can be high any time of year and 
are higher near busy roads and where people burn wood.
  When we inhale outdoor pollutants and pollen this can aggravate our 
lungs, and can lead us to developing the following conditions; chest 
pain, coughing, digestive problems, dizziness, fever, lethargy, 
sneezing, shortness of breath, throat irritation and watery eyes. 
Outdoor air pollution and pollen may also worsen chronic respiratory 
diseases, such as asthma. There are serious costs to our long term 
health. The EPA has promulgated rules and the public should be allowed 
to weigh in to determine if these rules are effective.
  The purpose of having so many checks and balances within the EPA is 
to ensure that the needs of industries and the needs of our communities 
are addressed. Providing a time for individuals to support or oppose 
any regulations is a meaningful first step. This bill is a step in the 
wrong direction.
  The EPA has spent years reviewing these standards before attempting 
to issue regulations. In terms of the Mercury and Air Toxics

[[Page H6431]]

Standard (MATS) Rule the new standard will significantly reduce mercury 
and toxic air pollution from power plants and electric utilities. The 
EPA estimates that for every year this rule is not implemented, mercury 
and toxic air pollution will have a serious impact on public health. 
Think for a moment about the lives that can be saved. We are talking 
about thousands of health complications and deaths. What more do we 
need to know. According to the EPA this rule would prevent the 
following: 17,000 premature deaths; 11,000 heart attacks; 120,000 cases 
of aggravated asthma; 12,000 hospital and emergency room visits; 11,000 
cases of bronchitis; and 850,000 missed work days.
  The second rule that is targeted by this bill is the Cross State Air 
Pollution (CSAP) Rule. As a Representative from the State of Texas, I 
have a few reservations about the rules implementation in my home 
state; however, the rule can be more fairly implemented.
  This rule will significantly cut sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide 
emissions released into the atmosphere. The regulation impacts 27 
states where power plant emissions cause poor air quality that affects 
neighboring states. It is important to know that the EPA designed this 
rule again by keeping the lives of our families, our children, our 
communities and the environment in mind. According to the EPA this rule 
when implemented will prevent up to 34,000 premature deaths, 15,000 
heart attacks, and 400,000 cases of aggravated asthmas.
  Sometimes we can get caught up in the numbers and forget the people 
behind each. If these rules are allowed to be implemented there are 
51,000 more people who will be able to spend another day, week, month 
or year with their families. These are our friends and family members 
who with the implantation of these rules can enjoy another cup of 
coffee.
  The prolonged or indefinite delay of these life saving regulations 
threaten the very air that Americans, our constituents, breathe. I 
cannot speak for my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, but I 
certainly do not want to repeal regulations that protect the 18th 
Congressional District's access to clean air.
  The analysis required by this legislation is focused solely on the 
impact of EPA regulations on economic competitiveness, fuel prices, and 
employment without taking into consideration the public health benefits 
of the regulations. The Mercury and Air Toxics Standard Rule will 
significantly reduce mercury and toxic air pollution from power plants 
and electric utilities.
  The Cross State Air Pollution Rule will significantly cut sulfur 
dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions released into the atmosphere. The 
regulation impacts 27 states where power plant emissions cause poor air 
quality that affects neighboring states.
  My amendment will not affect the intent of the bill; it merely 
ensures that should this ill conceived measure pass that there is 
plenty of time given for our constituents who live in states affected 
by mercury and toxic pollution and cross state air pollution to weigh 
in on the public health aspects of these regulations.
  I have offered this amendment not only to benefit those who live in 
states that would be affected by these regulations, but also to ensure 
that the industry being regulated has ample time to provide their 
input. Throughout my tenure in Congress, I have worked tirelessly to 
foster better relationship between the energy industry and regulating 
agencies. With an open dialogue and productive communication, we can 
forge compromise that will protect the environment without harming 
economic growth, and the intent behind this amendment is to do just 
that.
  As the Representative of the 18th Congressional District of Houston, 
Texas, I can attest to the importance of a healthy energy industry. My 
district is the energy hub of Texas and is recognized worldwide for its 
energy industry, particularly for oil and natural gas, as well as 
biomedical research and aeronautics. Renewable energy sources--wind and 
solar--are also growing economic bases in Houston.
  I understand the economic impacts of regulation, but we must also act 
responsibly. We cannot ignore the public health risks associated with 
breathing polluted air, nor can we pretend that these emissions do not 
exacerbate global warming. Alternatively, we certainly do not want to 
hinder job creation and economic growth.
  Lest we forget that since 1999, Houston has exchanged titles with Los 
Angeles for the poorest air quality in the Nation. The poor air quality 
is attributed to the amount of aerosols, particles of carbon and 
sulfates in the air. The carcinogens found in the air have been known 
to cause cancer, particularly in children. The EPA is the very agency 
charged with issuing regulations that would address this serious 
problem. This bill may very well jeopardize the air that we breathe, 
the water that we drink, our public lands, and our public health by 
deep funding cuts in priority initiatives.
  The least that can be done is to extend the opportunity for the 
committee formed by this bill to hear the concerns of the public. I am 
sure this will certainly go a long way to encourage robust discussion 
on health, job creation and economic improvements without putting the 
environment or the American people at risk.
  I encourage my colleagues to support the Jackson Lee amendment in 
order to strike a balance between the EPA and the energy industry, 
forge compromise that will protect the environment without harming 
economic growth by extending the public comment period from 90 to 120 
days. My amendment does not change the intent of the bill, it creates 
the opportunity for communication and consensus.

                                               September 21, 2011.
       Dear Representative: On behalf of the undersigned public 
     health and medical organizations, we write to state our 
     strong opposition to any efforts under consideration by the 
     U.S. House of Representatives that hinder the Environmental 
     Protection Agency's (EPA's) ability to protect health through 
     the implementation the Clean Air Act.
       Majority Leader Eric Cantor's August 29, 2011 memo to House 
     Republicans specifically called for passage of bills 
     including H.R. 2401, which would indefinitely delay the EPA's 
     proposal to reduce mercury and other toxics from power plants 
     and would block implementation of the Cross-State Air 
     Pollution Rule, a finalized rule that is expected to prevent 
     the premature deaths of thousands of Americans each year and 
     to make it easier for states downwind of pollution sources to 
     achieve healthful air for their residents. The memo also 
     signals plans with H.R. 2250 and H.R. 2861, which would delay 
     EPA efforts to reduce mercury and other toxics from 
     industrial facilities and cement plants. Further, it signals 
     plans to thwart EPA's ability to propose a health standard 
     for particulate matter, calling for passage of HR 1633, a 
     bill that would block the completion of the review of the 
     health effects associated with deadly soot or particulate 
     matter and prevent EPA from even proposing a standard and 
     receiving public comment on that standard.
       We urge you to oppose this plan and ask that you, instead, 
     support protecting public health. This Rep. Cantor-led effort 
     would impact EPA's ability to implement the Clean Air Act: a 
     law that protects public health and reduces health care costs 
     for all by preventing thousands of adverse health outcomes, 
     including: cancer, asthma attacks, strokes, emergency 
     department visits, hospitalizations and premature deaths. A 
     rigorous, peer reviewed analysis, The Benefits and Costs of 
     the Clean Air Act from 1990 to 2020, conducted by EPA, found 
     that the air quality improvements under the Clean Air Act 
     will save $2 trillion by 2020 and prevent at least 230,000 
     deaths annually.
       Additionally, the public supports EPA's efforts to 
     implement and update the Clean Air Act. A recent bipartisan 
     survey, which was conducted for the American Lung Association 
     by the Republican firm Moore Information and Democratic 
     polling firm Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research indicate that 
     those pushing riders or otherwise interfering with EPA are 
     out of touch with voters. The survey shows that over seventy 
     percent of voters do not want Congress to stop the EPA from 
     setting stricter pollution limits and sixty-six percent of 
     voters would prefer that EPA set pollution standards, not 
     Congress.
       We believe that in an ironic twist, the Majority Leader's 
     memo lays out an agenda that will expose the public to levels 
     of air pollution that can make them sick or kill them. This 
     agenda will certainly drive up health costs for all as people 
     continued to be exposed to life-threatening air pollution. We 
     ask you to support full implementation of the Clean Air Act 
     and oppose all efforts to weaken, delay or block progress 
     toward the continued implementation of this vital law.
           Sincerely,
     American Lung Association.
     American Thoracic Society.
     Physicians for Social Responsibility.
     American Public Health Association.
      Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE of Texas. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas will 
be postponed.


               amendment no. 10 offered by mr. whitfield

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike section 5 and insert the following:

[[Page H6432]]

     SEC. 5. ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS RELATING TO CERTAIN RULES.

       (a) Cross-State Air Pollution Rule/Transport Rule.--
       (1) Earlier rules.--The rule entitled ``Federal 
     Implementation Plans: Interstate Transport of Fine 
     Particulate Matter and Ozone and Correction of SIP 
     Approvals'', published at 76 Fed. Reg. 48208 (August 8, 
     2011), and any successor or substantially similar rule, shall 
     be of no force or effect, and shall be treated as though such 
     rule had never taken effect.
       (2) Continued applicability of clean air interstate rule.--
     In place of any rule described in paragraph (1), the 
     Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (in this 
     section referred to as the ``Administrator'') shall continue 
     to implement the Clean Air Interstate Rule.
       (3) Additional rulemakings.--
       (A) Issuance of new rules.--The Administrator--
       (i) shall not issue any proposed or final rule under 
     section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I) or section 126 of the Clean Air 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 7410(a)(2)(D)(i)(I), 7426) relating to 
     national ambient air quality standards for ozone or 
     particulate matter (including any modification of the Clean 
     Air Interstate Rule) before the date that is 3 years after 
     the date on which the Committee submits the final report 
     under section 4(c); and
       (ii) in issuing any rule described in clause (i), shall 
     base the rule on actual monitored (and not modeled) data and 
     shall, notwithstanding section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I), allow the 
     trading of emissions allowances among entities covered by the 
     rule irrespective of the States in which such entities are 
     located.
       (B) Implementation schedule.--In promulgating any final 
     rule described in subparagraph (A)(i), the Administrator 
     shall establish a date for State implementation of the 
     standards established by such final rule that is not earlier 
     than 3 years after the date of publication of such final 
     rule.
       (4) Definition of clean air interstate rule.--For purposes 
     of this section, the term ``Clean Air Interstate Rule'' means 
     the Clean Air Interstate Rule and the rule establishing 
     Federal Implementation Plans for the Clean Air Interstate 
     Rule as promulgated and modified by the Administrator (70 
     Fed. Reg. 25162 (May 12, 2005), 71 Fed. Reg. 25288 (April 28, 
     2006), 72 Fed Reg. 55657 (Oct. 1, 2007), 72 Fed. Reg. 59190 
     (Oct. 19, 2007), 72 Fed. Reg. 62338 (Nov. 2, 2007), 74 Fed. 
     Reg. 56721 (Nov. 3, 2009)).
       (b) Steam Generating Unit Rules.--
       (1) Earlier rules.--The proposed rule entitled ``National 
     Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Coal- 
     and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and 
     Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired Electric 
     Utility, Industrial-Commercial- Institutional, and Small 
     Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam Generating Units'' 
     published at 76 Fed. Reg. 24976 (May 3, 2011), and any final 
     rule that is based on such proposed rule and is issued prior 
     to the date of the enactment of this Act, shall be of no 
     force and effect, and shall be treated as though such 
     proposed or final rule had never been issued. In conducting 
     analyses under section 3(a), the Committee shall analyze the 
     rule described in section 3(e)(1)(E) (including any successor 
     or substantially similar rule) as if the preceding sentence 
     did not apply to such rule.
       (2) Promulgation of final rules.--In place of the rules 
     described in paragraph (1), the Administrator shall--
       (A) issue regulations establishing national emission 
     standards for coal-and oil-fired electric utility steam 
     generating units under section 112 of the Clean Air Act (42 
     U.S.C. 7412) with respect to each hazardous air pollutant for 
     which the Administrator finds such regulations are 
     appropriate and necessary pursuant to subsection (n)(1)(A) of 
     such section;
       (B) issue regulations establishing standards of performance 
     for fossil-fuel-fired electric utility, industrial-
     commercial-institutional, and small industrial-commercial-
     institutional steam generating units under section 111 of the 
     Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 111); and
       (C) issue the final regulations required by subparagraphs 
     (A) and (B)--
       (i) after issuing proposed regulations under such 
     subparagraphs;
       (ii) after consideration of the final report submitted 
     under section 4(c); and
       (iii) not earlier than the date that is 12 months after the 
     date on which the Committee submits such report to the 
     Congress, or such later date as may be determined by the 
     Administrator.
       (3) Compliance provisions.--
       (A) Establishment of compliance dates.--In promulgating the 
     regulations under paragraph (2), the Administrator--
       (i) shall establish a date for compliance with the 
     standards and requirements under such regulations that is not 
     earlier than 5 years after the effective date of the 
     regulations; and
       (ii) in establishing a date for such compliance, shall take 
     into consideration--

       (I) the costs of achieving emissions reductions;
       (II) any non-air quality health and environmental impact 
     and energy requirements of the standards and requirements;
       (III) the feasibility of implementing the standards and 
     requirements, including the time needed to--

       (aa) obtain necessary permit approvals; and
       (bb) procure, install, and test control equipment;

       (IV) the availability of equipment, suppliers, and labor, 
     given the requirements of the regulations and other proposed 
     or finalized regulations; and
       (V) potential net employment impacts.

       (B) New sources.--With respect to the regulations 
     promulgated pursuant to paragraph (2)--
       (i) the date on which the Administrator proposes a 
     regulation pursuant to paragraph (2)(A) establishing an 
     emission standard under section 112 of the Clean Air Act (42 
     U.S.C. 7412) shall be treated as the date on which the 
     Administrator first proposes such a regulation for purposes 
     of applying the definition of a new source under section 
     112(a)(4) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 7412(a)(4));
       (ii) the date on which the Administrator proposes a 
     regulation pursuant to paragraph (2)(B) establishing a 
     standard of performance under section 111 of the Clean Air 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 7411) shall be treated as the date on which 
     the Administrator proposes such a regulation for purposes of 
     applying the definition of a new source under section 
     111(a)(2) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 7411(a)(2));
       (iii) for purposes of any emission standard or limitation 
     applicable to electric utility steam generating units, the 
     term ``new source'' means a stationary source for which a 
     preconstruction permit or other preconstruction approval 
     required under the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) has 
     been issued after the effective date of such emissions 
     standard or limitation; and
       (iv) for purposes of clause (iii), the date of issuance of 
     a preconstruction permit or other preconstruction approval is 
     deemed to be the date on which such permit or approval is 
     issued to the applicant irrespective of any administrative or 
     judicial review occurring after such date.
       (C) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this subsection shall 
     be construed to restrict or otherwise affect the provisions 
     of paragraphs (3)(B) and (4) of section 112(i) of the Clean 
     Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7412(i)).
       (4) Other provisions.--
       (A) Establishment of standards achievable in practice.--The 
     regulations promulgated pursuant to paragraph (2)(A) of this 
     section shall apply section 112(d)(3) of the Clean Air Act 
     (42 U.S.C. 7412(d)(3)) in accordance with the following:
       (i) New sources.--With respect to new sources:

       (I) The Administrator shall identify the best controlled 
     similar source for each source category or subcategory.
       (II) The best controlled similar source for a category or 
     subcategory shall be the single source that is determined by 
     the Administrator to be the best controlled, in the 
     aggregate, for all of the hazardous air pollutants for which 
     the Administrator intends to issue standards for such source 
     category or subcategory, under actual operating conditions, 
     taking into account the variability in actual source 
     performance, source design, fuels, controls, ability to 
     measure pollutant emissions, and operating conditions.

       (ii) Existing sources.--With respect to existing sources:

       (I) The Administrator shall identify one group of sources 
     that constitutes the best performing 12 percent of existing 
     sources for each source category or subcategory.
       (II) The group constituting the best performing 12 percent 
     of existing sources for a category or subcategory shall be 
     the single group that is determined by the Administrator to 
     be the best performing, in the aggregate, for all of the 
     hazardous air pollutants for which the Administrator intends 
     to issue standards for such source category or subcategory, 
     under actual operating conditions, taking into account the 
     variability in actual source performance, source design, 
     fuels, controls, ability to measure pollutant emissions, and 
     operating conditions.

       (B) Regulatory alternatives.--For the regulations 
     promulgated pursuant to paragraph (2) of this section, from 
     among the range of regulatory alternatives authorized under 
     the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.), including work 
     practice standards under section 112(h) of such Act (42 
     U.S.C. 7412(h)), the Administrator shall impose the least 
     burdensome, consistent with the purposes of such Act and 
     Executive Order 13563 published at 76 Fed. Reg. 3821 (January 
     21, 2011).
       Strike subparagraph (A) of section 3(e)(1) and insert the 
     following:
       (A) The Clean Air Interstate Rule (as defined in section 
     5(a)(4)).
       Strike subparagraph (B) of section 3(e)(1) and insert the 
     following:
       (E) ``National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone'', 
     published at 73 Fed. Reg. 16436 (March 27, 2008).
       On page 13, line 17, in the matter before paragraph (1) in 
     section 6(a), strike ``for fiscal year 2012''.
       On page 13, line 18, in section 6(a)(1), insert ``for 
     fiscal year 2012,'' before ``$3,000,000''.
       Strike paragraph (2) in section 6(a) and insert the 
     following:
       (2) to the Environmental Protection Agency--
       (A) for fiscal year 2012, $1,000,000; and
       (B) for fiscal year 2013, $500,000.
       Strike subsection (b) in section 6 and insert the 
     following:
       (b) Offset.--Effective October 1, 2011, section 797(a) of 
     the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as amended by section 2(e) of 
     the Diesel Reduction Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-364), is 
     amended--
       (1) by striking ``2012'' and inserting ``2014'';

[[Page H6433]]

       (2) by inserting ``$45,500,000 for fiscal year 2012, 
     $49,500,000 for fiscal year 2013, and'' after ``to carry out 
     this subtitle''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentleman 
from Kentucky (Mr. Whitfield) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Kentucky.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Thank you.
  It's already been stated today that the TRAIN Act examines 14 EPA 
regulations. On 12 of them, we do not delay in any way, but we do ask 
for a study of the cumulative impact on jobs, on American 
competitiveness, on the price of electricity and the reliability of 
electricity.
  We do that because we are in a very fragile time in our economy. We 
have high unemployment, we've been unable to get out of it; and in 
order to do it, we have to have some certainty on these regulations. 
Business people tell us they are not investing right now because of 
uncertainty about health care, uncertainty about the new financial 
regulations and uncertainty about the plethora of EPA regulations 
coming down the road.
  So although we don't touch 12 regulations, the two that we are 
concerned about--and the reason we're concerned about them--is that 
they are the most expensive ever issued by EPA. Independent analysts 
have indicated that there will be a net, after including job gains, a 
net loss of almost 1.4 million jobs.
  My amendment would do this: it would provide that the Cross-State Air 
Pollution Rule has no legal force or effect, and it does direct EPA to 
continue to apply the Clean Air Interstate Rule, which is in effect 
today.
  As I had indicated earlier, EPA, when they adopted CAIR, they talked 
about the billions of dollars in health benefits, 17,000 premature 
deaths that they would prevent, 22,000 nonfatal heart attacks that they 
would prevent; and I could go on and on and on. And EPA defended the 
CAIR Act in court. The environmental groups supported the CAIR Act.
  Our air transport rules and regulations are still going to be in 
effect; and we simply say that for at least 3 years, EPA cannot change 
the CAIR Act, but during that time do a more detailed analysis of the 
Cross-State Air Pollution Rule because of the enormous cost, the 
enormous impact on jobs and so forth.
  The amendment also requires that the proposed Utility Maximum 
Achievable Control Technology rule has no legal force in effect and 
that any subsequent Utility MACT rule be issued no sooner than 1 year 
after the study called for in the TRAIN Act. So we simply ask the EPA 
to repropose the utility rule.
  Now, people are saying, oh my gosh, if we don't have this utility 
rule in effect, mercury is going to do all of these horrible things.
  I would remind everyone once again EPA says that 99 percent of the 
mercury in America comes from nature and from trade winds coming in 
from other countries. And EPA itself said Utility MACT benefits by 
mercury reductions of that whole bill would be .004 percent.
  I would also say that utility companies have no problem with mercury. 
They're doing a good job on that, and they can do even better. But the 
two gases that they are asking them to regulate have never been 
regulated before--I had the name of them awhile ago and I can't 
remember them--but the technology is not available to meet the 
requirements of the Utility MACT. So you are asking these companies to 
spend this money, provide this uncertainty, and so that's what my 
amendment does. It basically delays the implementation of the Utility 
MACT, asks for a reproposal, and it also maintains the existing CAIR 
air transport rule.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WAXMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WAXMAN. I rise in strong opposition to this Whitfield amendment, 
Mr. Chairman.
  The amendment is objectionable from the standpoint of public health 
and the legislative process. Throughout the debate on this bill, Mr. 
Whitfield has claimed that his bill just requires a study and delays 
two rules for further analysis.
  Well, the indefinite delay of these two rules is terrible for public 
health, but this amendment would be a disaster because this amendment 
nullifies these two critical EPA rules to cut air pollution from old, 
dirty power plants by requiring them to install modern pollution 
technology.
  First, the EPA amendment abolishes EPA mercury air toxics proposal by 
requiring EPA to start scratch on a rule that's long overdue. There are 
two rules at stake. The EPA mercury air toxic rule, which was opposed 
by EPA, would prevent 17,000 deaths, 11,000 heart attacks, 120,000 
cases of aggravated asthma, and 850,000 lost workdays each year. Now, 
that doesn't even include the benefits that are harder to put a dollar 
figure on such as reducing toxic air pollution that can lead to birth 
defects and developmental delays.
  The EPA rule would also prevent 91 percent of the mercury in burned 
coal from being emitted into the air. Mercury is dangerous in tiny 
amounts. It's a powerful neurotoxin that can damage the developing 
brain, leading to learning disabilities and developmental delays in 
children.
  We heard about the delay in letting this rule go forward that was in 
the bill, but this amendment negates these benefits and ensures that 
power plants will not have to reduce their emissions of toxic air 
pollution, including mercury, for at least 7 years.
  The amendment also tosses aside the way EPA has long been setting 
these emission limits for toxic air pollution for two decades, and it 
replaces it within an entirely new approach for power plants that is 
completely unworkable. It guarantees years of litigation and, according 
to the EPA administrator, may well prevent EPA from ever requiring 
power plants to clean up their mercury pollution.
  So this isn't just a delay, as we were told, for further study. It 
may well lead to no rule ever being put in place to stop these mercury 
emissions that cause such terrible public health disasters. The 
Whitfield amendment also nullifies the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule, 
which is designed to reduce emissions from power plants that cause 
ozone and particulate matter violations in downwind States.

                              {time}  1100

  Well, this rule has tremendous health benefits. The EPA cross-state 
rule will prevent 34,000 deaths, 15,000 heart attacks, 400,000 cases of 
aggravated asthma, and 1.8 million lost days of work each year.
  The Whitfield amendment negates these benefits and ensures that power 
plants will not have to reduce their pollution for at least 8 years. 
But this new rule may ensure that it will never happen. The EPA 
administrator testified that the language in the amendment barring 
reliance on modeling likely will block EPA from ever issuing another 
cross-state pollution rule to address ozone and particulate problems in 
downwind States.
  These are two radical proposals, and they're coming to the floor 
without a single day of hearings in the Energy and Commerce Committee. 
The amendment's sponsor, Mr. Whitfield, is the chairman of the relevant 
subcommittee. But he didn't ask for a single day of testimony or debate 
on these proposals. Instead he took a bill that asked for a lot more 
analysis before rules go into effect, and then just dropped this 
amendment on that bill because it was a moving train. He didn't insist 
that the TRAIN Act was requiring a study. He insisted it was only going 
to do a study, and now it is preventing them from implementing 
anything.
  Today we have 10 minutes of debate whether this body should eliminate 
two critical EPA rules that prevent premature death, asthma attacks, 
and other respiratory diseases and fundamentally alter the Clean Air 
Act. I find that inexcusable, both on the substance and the process.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this amendment, and I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  The gentleman from Kentucky has 30 seconds remaining.

[[Page H6434]]

  Mr. WHITFIELD. I would just say that the two gases I was trying to 
think of are hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride. Those are the 
real problems in this Utility MACT: the lack of technology, the 
unachievability of the standards, and that's why this amendment is 
asking that the implementation be delayed for 3 years of this air 
transport rule.
  With that, I urge Members to support my amendment, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Whitfield).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. WAXMAN. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kentucky 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Latta

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       After section 5, insert the following new section (and 
     redesignate the subsequent section accordingly):

     SEC. 6. CONSIDERATION OF FEASIBILITY AND COST IN ESTABLISHING 
                   NATIONAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS.

       In establishing any national primary or secondary ambient 
     air quality standard under section 109 of the Clean Air Act 
     (42 U.S.C. 7409), the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency shall take into consideration feasibility 
     and cost.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentleman 
from Ohio (Mr. Latta) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Chairman, I rise today to urge my colleagues to 
support my amendment to H.R. 2401. This amendment should be one of the 
most noncontroversial EPA-related votes this House has faced in quite 
awhile because it doesn't repeal any EPA rules or regulations and it 
doesn't block the EPA from doing anything. It simply requires the EPA 
administrator to consider the implementation costs and feasibility of 
compliance when setting National Ambient Air Quality Standards. We all 
want clean air.
  The Clean Air Act required the EPA to review these standards in 5-
year intervals and make revisions or set new standards if appropriate. 
Under current law, the EPA administrator is forbidden from taking the 
economic consequences of these rules under consideration when setting 
these standards, which means every 5 years the EPA is required to 
create new regulations, but does not have the legal authority to 
consider how they will affect the economy.
  This approach to regulation is a contributing factor to why 
unemployment numbers refuse to budge in many parts of our country and 
we have millions of Americans still looking for jobs. Last year the EPA 
decided to voluntarily review the National Ambient Air Quality 
Standards for ozone despite being a full 3 years away from review of 
the Clean Air Act's requirements in 2013.
  The standards they discussed would have had a devastating effect on 
my home State of Ohio, putting every one of the 33 counties monitored 
into a state of nonattainment status, as well as over 85 percent of the 
other counties monitored nationwide. States and localities not in 
attainment are required to meet expensive and complex regulatory 
requirements, more stringent permitting requirements, and comply with a 
number of other antigrowth measures.
  Fortunately, President Obama realized the urgency of this situation 
and asked the EPA not to propose a more stringent standard. Perhaps if 
the EPA administrator had considered the cost and feasibility of the 
tighter standard, we would have avoided the situation entirely. Now 
with this amendment we have the opportunity to make sure it doesn't 
happen in the future.
  I sent the President a letter commending his decision and requesting 
his support of the amendment in helping to get it passed both here in 
the House and in the Senate. Now I'm requesting your support.
  This is not a Republican idea or a Democrat idea. Considering the 
economy and the well-being of the unemployed Americans who are looking 
for jobs, it is the right thing to do.
  I urge support of the amendment, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. WAXMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Woodall). The gentleman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. WAXMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise not just in opposition, but strong 
opposition to this amendment. The bill as reported by the Energy and 
Commerce Committee is a bad bill for air quality and public health, but 
this bill appears doomed to get even worse as we continue to amend it 
on the floor.
  If the Latta amendment were adopted, it would eviscerate a 
cornerstone of the Clean Air Act without a single committee hearing to 
discuss the implications of this action, and that's nothing short of 
reckless policymaking.
  The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality 
Standards based on the science of how air pollution affects health and 
the environment. EPA scientists and an independent scientific advisory 
committee then recommend health-based standards. That is peer-reviewed, 
and they look at the impact of air pollution on health overall, and 
then on sensitive groups, such as children and the elderly, because we 
don't want a society where the sensitive people like the children and 
the elderly can't live with the rest of us.
  These national air quality standards essentially identify the level 
of ambient air pollution that's safe for people to breathe. With these 
health-based standards as the goalposts, States develop plans to 
control pollution and meet these goals. Cost is front and center in 
this planning. States can identify which pollution-control measures are 
most cost effective and rule out measures that produce more costs than 
benefits.
  The Latta amendment turns this whole approach upside down. The 
amendment would require EPA to consider industry cost up front when 
determining what level of air pollution is safe for human health. 
That's like a doctor basing your diagnosis on the cost of the 
treatment. If the treatment is expensive, the doctor would tell you 
that you're healthy. For a doctor, that would be malpractice. It's no 
different here.
  The Latta amendment would allow polluters to override scientists and 
require EPA to set air quality standards based on profits rather than 
the public health. The scientific determination of what is safe to 
breathe doesn't depend on the cost of cleaning up the pollution.
  My Republican colleagues throughout the debate on this bill have been 
happy to come to the floor and talk about the tremendous progress in 
reducing air pollution in this country. That's true, but it doesn't 
mean we no longer have a need for the tools that got us here and that 
job is already done. We've made progress because Congress enacted a 
strong and effective Clean Air Act. If we weaken the law, air quality 
will suffer. And anyone who thinks that the air is clean enough isn't 
thinking about the kids who can't play outside on a summer day without 
risking a potentially life-threatening asthma attack.
  For 40 years--and we are celebrating the 40th anniversary of the 
Clean Air Act--the essential basis of the law was to set health-based 
standards as our goals.

                              {time}  1110

  Despite the progress we've made, that job isn't done on air 
pollution. The Latta amendment, if it becomes law, would reverse 
decades of progress in cleaning up the smog and soot pollution that 
triggers asthma attacks, heart attacks, other respiratory diseases, and 
the mercury pollution that causes brain damage and learning 
disabilities in children.
  It is preposterous that we have only 10 minutes to debate this 
fundamental change to the Clean Air Act that would upend 40 years of 
progress.
  I urge my colleagues to vote this amendment down based on its impact

[[Page H6435]]

on public health as well as the mockery it makes of the legislative 
process.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATTA. I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Denham).
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 
2\1/2\ minutes.
  Mr. DENHAM. Mr. Chairman, I rise on this amendment and in support of 
the underlying TRAIN Act.
  The TRAIN Act is a bipartisan plan to analyze cumulative economic 
impacts of EPA's regulations to better understand how these policies 
affect American manufacturing, energy prices, and private industry's 
ability to create jobs.
  The question that Americans want to know is: Why are our jobs 
leaving? Why aren't we making things? This bill will help us to define 
that.
  Here today in support of the TRAIN Act are Jennifer Fraser and Jeff 
Rose from Vantage Data Centers, a NextGen data center and a small 
business from my State of California that has become an industry leader 
in performance efficiency and environmental stewardship. Since its 
inception in 2010, Vantage has sought to minimize electricity 
consumption at their data centers, as electricity is far and away their 
greatest cost.
  The price of electricity has caused many companies in their industry 
to flee to other countries with a more welcoming business climate and 
cheaper electricity prices. Despite this existing competitive 
disadvantage for the United States, the EPA proposes new Utility MACT 
standards that will raise electricity prices and will have an adverse 
effect on even an environmentally friendly data center like Vantage and 
force more jobs overseas.
  The EPA has proposed regulation after regulation that would stifle 
job creation, hurt American economic competitiveness abroad, and 
increase energy prices on families already strained by the tough 
economy. The House Republican jobs agenda focuses on removing these 
barriers to job creation and includes necessary reforms like the TRAIN 
Act.
  The support of job creators like the National Association of 
Manufacturers, the Association of Builders and Contractors, the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce, and Small Business Entrepreneurship Council 
further proves the need for the TRAIN Act to ensure that the 
administration does not continue to hamper the economic recovery and 
job creation of private industry.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. The Chair would remind all Members not to refer to 
occupants of the gallery.
  Mr. WAXMAN. May I inquire how much time is left on each side?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California has 1 minute 
remaining. The gentleman from Ohio has 30 seconds remaining.
  Mr. WAXMAN. I urge my colleagues to vote against this Latta 
amendment. This is a radical, extreme amendment that reverses the Clean 
Air Act which was signed by President Nixon, has been enforced by 
Democratic and Republican administrations, voted almost unanimously on 
a bipartisan basis in the House and the Senate, and it would strip away 
the goalposts of achieving health-based standards.
  I think to have only 10 minutes to debate on this extreme proposal is 
an affront to the legislative process. I urge my colleagues to vote 
``no.''
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Chairman, I urge passage of this amendment.
  When we were all back in our districts in August, I went to 18 
different plants and facilities in my district, and the number one 
issue out there against creating jobs was EPA regulations. EPA. That's 
all I heard. EPA, EPA, EPA.
  We're not going to move this country forward unless we get these 
regulations under control, and it's about time that they start looking 
at what they have to do under this amendment to make sure that we've 
got things back on course. I mentioned this yesterday in committee that 
we've lost 180,000 manufacturing jobs alone, in the Energy and Commerce 
Committee, since earlier this year. We've got to get this economy 
moving.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Latta).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Ohio will be 
postponed.


               Amendment No. 12 Offered by Ms. Richardson

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in House Report 112-213.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 13, line 16, strike ``(a) Authorization.--''.
       Beginning on page 13, line 23, strike subsection (b) of 
     section 6.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 406, the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Richardson) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Mr. Chairman, my amendment is intended to strike the 
provision that reduces the amount of funding to implement the Diesel 
Emissions Reduction program.
  Five years ago, Congress passed the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act as 
a part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The program was authorized at 
$200 million per year for 5 years. In 2011, the Congress acted 
responsibly, and in light of our fiscal crisis situation, we reduced 
that amount by a hundred million per year.
  This amendment brings into question whether it makes sense to reduce 
a proven successful program that is not increasing regulations, as my 
former colleague just mentioned, but in fact is helping companies to be 
able to meet those regulations in a cost-effective way.
  DERA has helped fund more than 360 retrofit projects to date, which 
has reduced well over 1.6 million tons of emissions and provided more 
than $4 billion in public health benefits while employing thousands of 
workers who manufacture, sell, and repair diesel vehicles and their 
components in each of our States.
  Recognizing today's budgetary challenges, industry, environmental, 
and public sector representatives support the return of full-year 2008 
funding levels for DERA, or $50 million for 2012.
  The United States relies upon diesel power to transport commuters, 
tourists, and students, harvest our crops, build infrastructure, and 
move our freight. New clean diesel technology is reaching near zero 
emissions but fleet turnover will take us many more years to come. 
Emissions from older diesel vehicles and equipment can be reduced, and 
we can help to make that happen.
  Some of our program results have been 119 projects affecting more 
than 14,000 diesel-powered vehicles and equipment, new State clean 
diesel grant programs in over 50 States, 2,200 tons of particulate 
matter emissions reduced, 580 million benefits to health, and--this is 
a very important one--3.2 million gallons of fuel that has been saved 
per year by implementing this program.
  This is why in the last Congress I introduced legislation that 
extended DERA for 5 more years. The legislation received bipartisan 
support on both sides of the aisle and was signed by the President.
  In February during debate on H.R. 1, there was an amendment put 
forward by a Representative on the other side of the aisle that would 
have eliminated full funding for DERA. The amendment in the continuing 
resolution at that time was soundly defeated by both of us, both sides 
of the aisle, 352 Members. In fact, the chairman of the Interior, 
Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee, Mr. 
Simpson, called the cuts to DERA--and I'm talking about my colleague 
from the other side--the wrong choice. I'm here to present that this 
cut is still the wrong choice.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TERRY. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Nebraska is recognized for 5 
minutes.

[[Page H6436]]

  Mr. TERRY. I believe that the gentlelady from California's amendment 
is heartfelt and sincere to the DERA program but irresponsible as it's 
produced here today. There are costs associated with the EPA going 
forward with the studies that we are requesting of them.
  Under our rules of the House, there's PAYGO rules. We must offset 
those costs. This is one of those tough decisions made to offset the 
costs. So the first line of irresponsibility would be it will add to 
the deficit but for this offset.

                              {time}  1120

  The second line of irresponsibility would be, well, it may feel 
responsible. And this really is a poison pill because if the offset is 
eliminated, they get to kill the whole bill because of that. So it's 
not as innocent an amendment as it is portrayed on the surface. The 
real issue of this bill in entirety must stand.
  As previous speakers have said, Mr. Chairman, and rightfully so, the 
EPA is a rogue agency. They are producing rules in a fast and furious 
manner that greatly affects this Nation's ability to generate 
electricity. This bill just wraps three of them together and says, take 
a step back and do a cost analysis, as the President has asked of 
agencies. This agency, though, as headed by Ms. Jackson, has said to us 
in our committee that she will not be beholding or follow the 
President's own executive order to look at the cost benefit analysis. 
They say, as we have heard here today, their modeling says that they 
can reduce asthma so, therefore, no cost benefit analysis.
  But there are real effects that I'm concerned with here, and the 
reason why I do believe this needs to be studied before implemented is 
we need to slow down the EPA and Lisa Jackson and their attempts to do 
a cap program without Congress' involvement or approval. They couldn't 
get it done legislatively, so she's doing it by rule and edict from the 
EPA.
  This rule will add significant costs to the ability of small 
generators to generate electricity, which will force them to shut down 
without any path forward to replace that. In fact, they haven't even 
done a study on reliability to determine if electricity can be wheeled 
into the areas that the plants will have to shut down.
  In fact, there are two plants near my district in Nebraska: Grand 
Island and Fremont. Grand Island is saying that these rules of the EPA 
are fast and furious and without any cost benefit analysis will force 
the Grand Island plant to close. How will they get their electricity? 
They will have to find a creative way to do it; yet there's been no 
study on reliability. Secondly, in Fremont, Nebraska, they say what 
they'll do is just lower their plant level, just do a minimum amount of 
electricity. Where are they going to make that up?
  This is a directive. This is part of the radical environmentalist 
agenda being placed on America by one agency and one person, Lisa 
Jackson. We need to slow this down and take a hard look at it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Mr. Chairman, I find it interesting that the 
gentleman would say that this might be irresponsible. What I heard of 
the comments was I didn't talk about the legislation within itself. 
We're talking about the amendment of how this is going to be paid for. 
And so the question before the House is going to be, is it appropriate 
to take additional funds to use DERA as the whipping boy time and time 
again for a program that is helping what my colleague from the other 
side is saying?
  I would actually say that DERA is responsible. What's irresponsible 
is continuing to put the health of Americans in jeopardy. I will repeat 
the quote for my colleagues from the chairman of the Interior, 
Environment and Related Agencies, Mr. Simpson. He called the cuts to 
DERA ``the wrong choice.'' We have already been responsible, and DERA 
has already paid its fair share, and it's being cut as other programs 
have been cut. The question is, is it right to continue to deplete this 
program?
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TERRY. Mr. Chairman, I think it's interesting that she didn't 
refute the point that if the PAYGO is eliminated, hers passes, they 
raise a point of order and kill the bill, which is the real impetus 
behind this amendment.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. TERRY. No.
  I think it's also interesting--you have the right to close--that the 
President's budget, for which there was no pushback by this other side 
of the aisle, zeroed it out. Ours didn't. We're just cutting it by $4 
million, and it's a tough choice. We agree.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Mr. Chairman, in closing, I would say, I think I've 
said twice now, the issue that we have before us is the question of 
this amendment whether DERA is the appropriate funding source that 
would be considered for the offset. That's the question that we have 
before us.
  It's interesting that Mr. Whitfield himself has benefited from this 
program. In Kentucky, the construction ports utilized $1.16 million to 
retrofit 73 pieces of nonroad construction equipment. Also, the 
Kentucky Association General Contractors benefited from retrofitting 87 
pieces of equipment. I would say to you it's irresponsible to have the 
American public driving on our highways and roads and going through our 
airports breathing this air.
  What I've reached out to the other side is that it's important. We're 
talking about EPA regulations. Why would we reduce funding of a program 
that helps companies to meet the regulations? It's counterintuitive and 
it doesn't make sense.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' for the Richardson amendment; 
and the Richardson amendment is intended for exactly that, to eliminate 
cutting this program.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Richardson).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. RICHARDSON. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from California 
will be postponed.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in House Report 112-213 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Welch of Vermont.
  Amendment No. 2 by Mr. McNerney of California.
  Amendment No. 3 by Ms. Moore of Wisconsin.
  Amendment No. 4 by Mrs. Capps of California.
  Amendment No. 5 by Mr. Kinzinger of Illinois.
  Amendment No. 6 by Mr. Dent of Pennsylvania.
  Amendment No. 7 by Mr. Hastings of Florida.
  Amendment No. 8 by Mr. Connolly of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 9 by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas.
  Amendment No. 10 by Mr. Whitfield of Kentucky.
  Amendment No. 11 by Mr. Latta of Ohio.
  Amendment No. 12 by Ms. Richardson of California.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                  Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Welch

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Vermont 
(Mr. Welch) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 173, 
noes 236, not voting 24, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 728]

                               AYES--173

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman

[[Page H6437]]


     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                               NOES--236

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--24

     Bachmann
     Chu
     Clarke (MI)
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Giffords
     Green, Al
     Hanna
     Hirono
     Honda
     Hurt
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Kaptur
     Lee (CA)
     Matsui
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1155

  Messrs. AMODEI, OLSON, Mrs. BLACK, Mr. McHENRY, and Ms. GRANGER 
changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mr. CARNEY and Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas changed their vote 
from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. AL GREEN of Texas. Mr. Chair, today I was unavoidably detained 
and missed the following vote:
  Welch (VT)/Rush (IL) Amendment to H.R. 2401. Had I been present, I 
would have voted ``yes'' on this amendment.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chair, I was unable to cast my vote today 
on the Welch amendment to H.R. 2401, the TRAIN Act. Had I cast my vote 
I would have voted ``yea.''


                Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mr. McNerney

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. McNerney) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 184, 
noes 229, not voting 20, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 729]

                               AYES--184

     Ackerman
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bilbray
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                               NOES--229

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canseco
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner

[[Page H6438]]


     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--20

     Bachmann
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Chu
     Conyers
     Dingell
     Farr
     Giffords
     Hirono
     Honda
     Paul
     Polis
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1202

  Messrs. HANNA and FITZPATRICK changed their vote from ``no'' to 
``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 3 Offered by Ms. Moore

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Wisconsin (Ms. Moore) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 337, 
noes 76, not voting 20, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 730]

                               AYES--337

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gallegly
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Stivers
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     West
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                                NOES--76

     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bartlett
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Canseco
     Chabot
     Coffman (CO)
     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Flake
     Franks (AZ)
     Gohmert
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Huelskamp
     Jenkins
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Palazzo
     Pearce
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rohrabacher
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Scott (SC)
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     Westmoreland
     Woodall

                             NOT VOTING--20

     Bachmann
     Chu
     Conyers
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Herger
     Hirono
     Honda
     Hurt
     Paul
     Polis
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Sherman
     Shuler
     Speier
     Sullivan
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1206

  Mr. JONES changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          PERSONAL EXPLANATION

  Mr. HURT. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 729, 730, I was inadvertently 
detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``no'' on rollcall 729 
and ``yes'' on rollcall 730.


                 Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mrs. Capps

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Capps) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 195, 
noes 221, not voting 17, as follows:

[[Page H6439]]

                             [Roll No. 731]

                               AYES--195

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Stivers
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Woolsey

                               NOES--221

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--17

     Bachmann
     Chu
     Conyers
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Hirono
     Honda
     Miller, George
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Webster
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1211

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


          amendment no. 5 offered by mr. kinzinger of illinois

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Illinois 
(Mr. Kinzinger) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 269, 
noes 145, not voting 19, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 732]

                               AYES--269

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Walz (MN)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--145

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett

[[Page H6440]]


     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hochul
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                             NOT VOTING--19

     Bachmann
     Bass (CA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Chu
     Conyers
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Gohmert
     Hirono
     Honda
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1215

  Mr. HALL changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Dent

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Dent) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 269, 
noes 150, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 733]

                               AYES--269

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--150

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berman
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Filner
     Flake
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Bachmann
     Chu
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Hirono
     Honda
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1220

  Ms. BERKLEY changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


           Amendment No. 7 Offered by Mr. Hastings of Florida

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Hastings) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 165, 
noes 254, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 734]

                               AYES--165

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez

[[Page H6441]]


     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                               NOES--254

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Bachmann
     Chu
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Hirono
     Honda
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1224

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


          Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Connolly of Virginia.

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Connolly) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 186, 
noes 232, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 735]

                               AYES--186

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fitzpatrick
     Foxx
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Gosar
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hochul
     Holt
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                               NOES--232

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney

[[Page H6442]]


     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Bachmann
     Chu
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Hirono
     Honda
     Paul
     Reichert
     Rush
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1228

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                          PERSONAL EXPLANATION

  Ms. HIRONO. Mr. Chair, had I been present for the following rollcall 
Nos., I would have voted as follows: 728, yea; 729, yea; 730, yea; 731, 
yea; 732, no; 733, no; 734, yea; 735, yea.


          Amendment No. 9 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas 
(Ms. Jackson Lee) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 346, 
noes 74, not voting 13 as follows:

                             [Roll No. 736]

                               AYES--346

     Ackerman
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amodei
     Andrews
     Austria
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baldwin
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blumenauer
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Butterfield
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cohen
     Cole
     Conaway
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costello
     Courtney
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (KY)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hall
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harris
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Heinrich
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hurt
     Inslee
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kissell
     Kline
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Landry
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Lynch
     Mack
     Maloney
     Manzullo
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McCotter
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Olson
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Platts
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Reyes
     Ribble
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schilling
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Stearns
     Sullivan
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Webster
     Welch
     West
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woolsey
     Yoder
     Young (FL)

                                NOES--74

     Akin
     Amash
     Berg
     Bishop (UT)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Chabot
     Costa
     Denham
     Duncan (SC)
     Flake
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hayworth
     Herger
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     Keating
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Marchant
     Marino
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Myrick
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Palazzo
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Quigley
     Rokita
     Royce
     Schmidt
     Scott (SC)
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Tiberi
     Walsh (IL)
     Westmoreland
     Woodall
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Bachmann
     Carnahan
     Davis (IL)
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1232

  Mr. TIPTON changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               amendment no. 10 offered by mr. whitfield

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Kentucky 
(Mr. Whitfield) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 234, 
noes 188, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 737]

                               AYES--234

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gallegly
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins

[[Page H6443]]


     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--188

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Woolsey

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Bachmann
     Dingell
     Giffords
     Paul
     Reichert
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1235

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Latta

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
Latta) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 227, 
noes 192, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 738]

                               AYES--227

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--192

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Burton (IN)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Woolsey

[[Page H6444]]



                             NOT VOTING--14

     Bachmann
     Dingell
     Gallegly
     Giffords
     Paul
     Reichert
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1239

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 12 Offered by Ms. Richardson

  The Acting CHAIR (Mrs. Emerson). The unfinished business is the 
demand for a recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Richardson) on which further proceedings were 
postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 181, 
noes 237, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 739]

                               AYES--181

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                               NOES--237

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Hinojosa
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Bachmann
     Dingell
     Gallegly
     Giffords
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paul
     Polis
     Reichert
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1243

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The Acting CHAIR. Under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Woodall) having assumed the chair, Mrs. Emerson, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 2401) to 
require analyses of the cumulative and incremental impacts of certain 
rules and actions of the Environmental Protection Agency, and for other 
purposes, and, pursuant to House Resolution 406, reported the bill back 
to the House with an amendment adopted in the Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment to the amendment 
reported from the Committee of the Whole?
  If not, the question is on the committee amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, as amended.
  The amendment was agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. McCOLLUM. I am opposed to the bill in its current form, Mr. 
Speaker.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. McCollum moves to recommit the bill H.R. 2401 to the 
     Committee on Energy and Commerce with instructions to report 
     the same back to the House forthwith with the following 
     amendment:
       At the end of the bill, add the following new section:

     SEC. 7. PROTECTING GREAT LAKES DRINKING WATER FROM TOXIC 
                   SUBSTANCES.

       The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency 
     shall plan and implement a strategy, consistent with the 
     Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, using existing authority 
     as of the date of enactment of this Act, to control air 
     pollution to be deposited in the Great Lakes, including toxic 
     pollution, in order to ensure safe drinking water and 
     protection of public health and the environment.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Minnesota is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, let me be clear, this amendment does not 
kill the bill or send it back to committee.

[[Page H6445]]

If this amendment is adopted, the bill will immediately be voted on for 
final passage.
  This amendment is about protecting the Great Lakes, one of America's 
greatest treasures and important natural resources. For those of us who 
represent these States adjacent to the Great Lakes, we know and 
understand that any harm done to our lakes threatens the economy and 
the health of our citizens.
  Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario 
make up the largest freshwater system in the entire world. Our Great 
Lakes hold 95 percent of America's freshwater and 20 percent of the 
freshwater on the planet.
  Over 30 million people rely on the Great Lakes for their drinking 
water. There is an estimated 1.5 million jobs that are directly 
connected to the Great Lakes, and these jobs generate $62 billion in 
wages.
  Over 40 years ago, this critical ecosystem and economic engine was on 
the verge of collapse. Time magazine reported in August 1969: ``Lake 
Erie is in danger of dying by suffocation.'' The days when polluters 
dumped toxic chemicals into the air and water without consequence are 
over.
  Because of the responsible cleanup policies like the Clean Air Act, 
the health of the Great Lakes has improved, but threats to the Great 
Lakes have not disappeared. Air pollutants like mercury are emitted 
from power plants and continue to fall on the ground, wash into the 
water, and build up in quantities that threaten the brain development 
of young children and place limits on the amount of fish that we can 
consume.
  Rising mercury levels is one of the mounting threats that motivated 
an unprecedented coalition into action. Governors of the eight Great 
Lakes States, Republicans and Democrats, along with local officials and 
leaders from tribal nations, nonprofits and the private sector came 
together to save the Great Lakes.
  Early last decade, they created a plan for environmental restoration 
and economic recovery of the Great Lakes. In 2004, President Bush 
responded to this bipartisan effort by issuing an executive order that 
called the Great Lakes ``a national treasure,'' and he directed his 
Cabinet to establish an interagency task force to report these State 
and local efforts.
  Now, Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin and Governor Mark Dayton of 
Minnesota never agree about politics, and they certainly don't agree on 
football, but as members of the Council of Great Lakes Governors, they 
agree on the need to reduce air and water pollution in the Great Lakes. 
Years of planning and partnership in the Great Lakes region and in 
Washington are now making a difference on the ground through the Great 
Lakes Restoration Initiative.

                              {time}  1250

  The initiative is protecting drinking water, it's restoring fish and 
wildlife habitat, and it's supporting the growth of small businesses 
that depend on healthy waters. The work under way is 300 projects 
across this region.
  Now, my role as a legislator from the Great Lakes region is to do no 
harm to this effort. The TRAIN Act will make the enforcement of many of 
the environmental protections uncertain, and it will create confusion 
in the EPA about which public health efforts they can pursue.
  And my amendment does not give the EPA any new authority. Instead, it 
directs the EPA to use its existing authority to do what Republican and 
Democratic Governors, mayors, State legislators and other elected 
officials in the Great Lakes have agreed upon must be done: protect 
drinking water and protect public health.
  Our job in Congress is to protect the Great Lakes, not to undo the 
hard work of all these Governors and, yes, industry leaders. My 
amendment makes it clear that the TRAIN Act will not prohibit this work 
from moving forward.
  Let me be clear, my amendment does not kill the bill or send it back 
to committee. If this amendment is adopted, it will immediately be 
voted on on final passage.
  Regardless of your position on the TRAIN Act, this amendment makes 
the bill stronger. Regardless of how you feel about the TRAIN Act, I'm 
sure you agree Congress should protect the safety of drinking water and 
continue to ensure the viability of the economic interests of the Great 
Lakes.
  Again, let me be clear. This amendment does not kill the bill. It 
does not send it back to committee. If this amendment is adopted, it 
will immediately be voted on for final passage.
  Colleagues, let us work together, let us pass this amendment, and let 
us restore the Great Lakes. Let us protect America's public health.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. Mr. Speaker, I claim the time in opposition to the 
motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Kentucky is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mr. WHITFIELD. I would say to the gentlelady that not only are we 
concerned about the Great Lakes, but we're concerned about every body 
of water in America, and we believe that the TRAIN Act protects that 
water, does not take away any authority from the EPA to deal with water 
issues.
  The TRAIN Act is very simple. It asks the government commission to 
study 14 regulations of EPA. On 12 of them we do not delay them in any 
way. On the other two, we delay one for 1 year and the other for 3 
years.
  We have adequate protections in place. We simply think that we should 
examine the cumulative impact of the regulations from the most 
aggressive EPA in recent memory to determine what impact it is going to 
have on jobs; what impact it is going to have on electricity prices; 
what impact it is going to have on electricity reliability, and will it 
damage America's competitiveness in the world marketplace.
  I would urge passage of this legislation.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, the Chair 
will reduce to 5 minutes the minimum time for any electronic vote on 
the question of passage.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 180, 
nays 233, not voting 20, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 740]

                               YEAS--180

     Ackerman
     Altmire
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Barrow
     Bass (CA)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Boren
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardoza
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chandler
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello
     Courtney
     Critz
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donnelly (IN)
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holden
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Ross (AR)
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)

[[Page H6446]]


     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                               NAYS--233

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Bass (NH)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayworth
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--20

     Bachmann
     Barletta
     Butterfield
     Ellison
     Gallegly
     Giffords
     Herger
     Lankford
     Paul
     Polis
     Reichert
     Rush
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Shuler
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1311

  Mr. MEEHAN changed his vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Mr. COHEN changed his vote from ``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. HASTINGS of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 249, 
noes 169, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 741]

                               AYES--249

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Akin
     Alexander
     Altmire
     Amash
     Amodei
     Austria
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barrow
     Bartlett
     Barton (TX)
     Benishek
     Berg
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonner
     Bono Mack
     Boren
     Boswell
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Buerkle
     Burgess
     Burton (IN)
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Canseco
     Cantor
     Capito
     Cardoza
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chandler
     Coble
     Coffman (CO)
     Cole
     Conaway
     Costa
     Costello
     Cravaack
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Critz
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Davis (KY)
     Denham
     Dent
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Donnelly (IN)
     Dreier
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Emerson
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Flake
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herger
     Herrera Beutler
     Holden
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (IL)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Landry
     Lankford
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Latta
     Lewis (CA)
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lungren, Daniel E.
     Mack
     Manzullo
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCotter
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meehan
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Myrick
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pence
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pitts
     Platts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Quayle
     Rahall
     Reed
     Rehberg
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rigell
     Rivera
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross (AR)
     Ross (FL)
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Schilling
     Schmidt
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott (SC)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Sewell
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Southerland
     Stearns
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Sullivan
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner (NY)
     Turner (OH)
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walsh (IL)
     Webster
     West
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (FL)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--169

     Ackerman
     Andrews
     Baca
     Baldwin
     Bass (CA)
     Bass (NH)
     Becerra
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carnahan
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Castor (FL)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke (MI)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly (VA)
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Frank (MA)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Gonzalez
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hayworth
     Heinrich
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hirono
     Hochul
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Inslee
     Israel
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson Lee (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kildee
     Kind
     Kissell
     Kucinich
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren, Zoe
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Michaud
     Miller (NC)
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (CT)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree (ME)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Richardson
     Richmond
     Rothman (NJ)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Sutton
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Tonko
     Towns
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz (MN)
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Woolsey

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Bachmann
     Gallegly
     Giffords
     Miller, George
     Paul
     Polis
     Reichert
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Scalise
     Shuler
     Smith (TX)
     Speier
     Waters
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                              {time}  1318

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  Stated for:
  Mr. SMITH of Texas. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 741 I inadvertently 
missed the final passage of H.R. 2401, the ``Transparency in Regulatory 
Analysis of Impacts on the Nation'' (TRAIN Act) on Friday, September 
23. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yes.''

[[Page H6447]]



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