(Extensions of Remarks - September 13, 2012)

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[Extensions of Remarks]
[Page E1526]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office []



                        HON. WILLIAM R. KEATING

                            of massachusetts

                    in the house of representatives

                      Thursday, September 13, 2012

  Mr. KEATING. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize the Canoe River 
Aquifer Advisory Committee as the organization celebrates its twenty-
fifth year of service.
  The Canoe River Advisory Committee, otherwise known as CRAAC, is 
comprised of representatives from the Massachusetts towns of 
Foxborough, Sharon, Mansfield, Easton, and Norton. Its many duties 
include educating the public about the benefits of preserving the 
beautiful Canoe River Aquifer, a wetland region that flows for nearly 
sixteen miles through these five towns, as well as emphasizing the 
importance of protecting the delicate ecosystem that is found within 
the region. Since CRAAC was formally created by the Massachusetts State 
Legislature in October of 1987, nearly forty individuals have served on 
the committee, ranging from town selectmen to local residents who care 
deeply about their local environment. Currently, each town sends three 
appointed members to the Committee, and these individuals work 
diligently to ensure that the aquifer--which provides the five towns 
with approximately half of their water supplies--remains viable and 
well-cared for. As this region has been declared an Area of Critical 
Environmental Concern by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and 
designated as a Sole Source Aquifer by the federal government, the work 
that this committee does to ensure its protection is essential.
  Today, the work that CRAAC does to protect the Canoe River Aquifer 
ranges from advising municipal officials and residents on developmental 
impacts and conservation practices to sponsoring educational 
conferences and meetings. The committee is highly regarded by the 
people of Massachusetts, and it is seen as a statewide model for a 
volunteer-run regional environmental entity. I have witnessed CRAAC's 
success over the years, and I am confident that the committee will 
continue to serve as an example of what can be done at the local level 
to preserve the unique landscapes of Massachusetts.
  Mr. Speaker, it brings me great joy to recognize the Canoe River 
Aquifer Advisory Committee. I urge my colleagues to join me in thanking 
its members for all that they have done for their local environment, 
and in congratulating the Committee for twenty-five successful years of