COMMEMORATING 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE
(House of Representatives - April 17, 2013)

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[Pages H2105-H2106]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




 COMMEMORATING 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

  (Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania asked and was given permission to 
address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)

[[Page H2106]]

  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Madam Speaker, 100 years ago, Congress 
passed the 1914 Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Appropriations 
Act, which established a separate department within the Library of 
Congress to serve the legislative and resource needs of the United 
States Congress.
  The legislation authorized the Library of Congress to ``employ 
competent persons to prepare such indexes, digests, and compilations of 
laws as may be required for Congress and other official use.''
  In 1946, the Department was renamed the Legislative Reference 
Service, which is today known as the Congressional Research Service, or 
CRS. Over the years, CRS has served the Congress by providing 
comprehensive and reliable legislative research and analyses that are 
timely, objective, and authoritative.
  This year is the 100th anniversary of the Congressional Research 
Service, and today I want to thank these research professionals for the 
work they do and the contributions they make to the United States 
Congress and our Federal legislative process.

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