AUTHORITY FOR MANDATE DELAY ACT
(House of Representatives - July 17, 2013)

Text available as:

Formatting necessary for an accurate reading of this text may be shown by tags (e.g., <DELETED> or <BOLD>) or may be missing from this TXT display. For complete and accurate display of this text, see the PDF.

        

[Pages H4546-H4557]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                    AUTHORITY FOR MANDATE DELAY ACT

  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 300, I call up 
the bill (H.R. 2667) to delay the application of the employer health 
insurance mandate, and for other purposes, and ask for its immediate 
consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Holding). Pursuant to House Resolution 
300, the bill is considered read.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 2667

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Authority for Mandate Delay 
     Act''.

     SEC. 2. DELAY IN APPLICATION OF EMPLOYER HEALTH INSURANCE 
                   MANDATE.

       (a) In General.--Section 1513(d) of the Patient Protection 
     and Affordable Care Act is amended by striking ``December 31, 
     2013'' and inserting ``December 31, 2014''.
       (b) Reporting Requirements.--
       (1) Reporting by employers.--Section 1514(d) of the Patient 
     Protection and Affordable Care Act is amended by striking 
     ``December 31, 2013'' and inserting ``December 31, 2014''.
       (2) Reporting by insurance providers.--Section 1502(e) of 
     the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is amended by 
     striking ``2013'' and inserting ``2014''.
       (c) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section 
     shall take effect as if included in the provision of the 
     Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to which they 
     relate.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Camp) and 
the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Levin) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Camp).

                              {time}  1515


                             General Leave

  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members have 
5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and to 
include extraneous material on H.R. 2667.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Michigan?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 2667, a bill that delays 
the employer mandate.
  While it's encouraging to see the administration has finally 
acknowledged the burdens ObamaCare is placing on employers, we must be 
a Nation of laws, not blog posts, which is how the administration 
announced the delay.
  While this bill provides employers with some temporary relief from 
the health care law, it provides no real relief. Even with this delay, 
small businesses and families will not get what they were promised--
affordable health care.
  Inexplicably, the administration thinks only businesses should be 
exempt from the pain inflicted by ObamaCare. How is that fair? Families 
and individuals are already struggling in this Obama economy. They're 
paying more for gas, more for food, and wages aren't keeping up with 
the ever-increasing costs of everyday life. Don't these hardworking 
Americans deserve the same relief the administration is giving to the 
business community? That's why we must also pass the Fairness for 
American Families Act, which will delay the individual mandate.
  House Republicans believe it's only fair that families and 
individuals receive the same treatment. These two bills will ensure 
that fairness is applied to employers and employees, as well as 
families and individuals.
  The Obama administration claims that they are listening to the 
American people. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid recently said 
``ObamaCare has been wonderful.'' These claims reveal a Democratic 
leadership that is out of touch with reality.
  When I go back to my district, I hear firsthand from constituents 
about the concerns with the law. They ask me: Why are my premiums 
skyrocketing? How can I grow my business with all these new mandates, 
regulations, and red tape? Why am I losing the insurance I have and 
like?
  House Republicans share those concerns, and these bills are a 
positive step forward to protect hardworking taxpayers and businesses 
from some of the most onerous provisions in the health care law.
  The administration's ``time out'' from the law doesn't change the 
fact that ObamaCare is unworkable. Instead, it's an admission that this 
law is unworkable. Just a few months ago, Health and Human Services 
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius pledged before the Ways and Means Committee 
that this law would be ready on time and without delays. Well, now we 
know the truth. This administration cannot make its own law work.
  The American people deserve real reforms that actually make health 
care affordable. During the health care debate, only one bill was 
scored by the Congressional Budget Office as actually lowering 
premiums--the House Republican alternative to the Democrats' health 
care law. It met the top health care priority of American families--
lowering the cost of health insurance premiums. We should scrap this 
law and get back to commonsense, step-by-step reforms on health care.
  I urge my colleagues across the aisle to join us and support this 
legislation. Vote to treat American families and individuals the same 
as businesses. Vote ``yes'' to codify the delay of the employer 
mandate, and vote ``yes'' to delay the individual mandate.
  At this time, I ask unanimous consent that the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Brady) control the remainder of the time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman from Texas 
will control the time.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LEVIN. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Well, here we go again. Another repeal vote, another political 
sideshow, and another blow to bipartisanship, which is so vital to 
addressing a whole host of important issues, including an issue 
important to our committee--tax reform. Instead of moving forward, once 
again my Republican colleagues are looking backwards.
  The fact is that the President has taken an action that my Republican 
colleagues support. The administration determined that a delay of 
employer responsibility requirements was necessary in order to ensure 
effective implementation of the Tax Code, so it exercised its 
authority--longstanding administrative relief used by administrations 
of both parties for many years to grant transition relief.
  The Republican response? The Republicans cannot leave well enough 
alone. They insist on maneuvering for political purposes. Duplicative 
legislation for purely political reasons that will go nowhere in the 
Senate and that serves only to set up their 38th vote to repeal the 
Affordable Care Act.
  After the announcement, my colleague, Chairman Camp, in a new 
populist flourish, said:

       The Obama administration's decision to give corporate 
     America a free pass while continuing to force average, 
     everyday Americans to abide by the law is deeply disturbing.

  And the majority leader, Mr. Cantor, with hyperpopulism, said:

       The President came down on the side of big business, but 
     left the American people out in the cold.

  Out in the cold? Republican hypocrisy is reaching new heights. Under 
the Affordable Care Act, tens of millions of Americans will gain 
previously unavailable access to affordable health insurance. To date--
and I emphasize this--more than 6 million young adults have health 
insurance through their parents' plans, 6 million seniors have

[[Page H4547]]

saved $6.1 billion on prescription drugs, and 105 million Americans 
have received free preventative services.
  And in State to State, Americans buying insurance within the new 
marketplaces will have access to coverage for less than they pay today. 
New Yorkers, for one, learned today that, on average, individual 
premiums within the marketplace will be half what they are today. They 
certainly do not feel left out in the cold.
  Competition under ACA is working, and the Republicans call it 
``socialism.''
  The market reforms from the health law work together to eliminate the 
ability of insurance companies to discriminate on the basis of 
preexisting conditions and gender. But the system will only work and 
remain affordable if everyone has insurance. And the law provides the 
reforms and assistance to put affordable coverage within reach for 
everyone.
  Without the shared responsibility, the law will not work and 
insurance premiums will skyrocket. 129 million people with preexisting 
conditions will once again be priced or forced out of coverage, and we 
will be back where we started.
  Republicans know this. Why? Because the individual mandate was a 
Republican idea going all the way back to the 1980s, when the 
conservative Heritage Foundation originated the idea. Its supporters 
have argued:

       All citizens should be required to obtain a basic level of 
     health insurance. Not having health insurance imposes a risk 
     of delaying medical care. It also may impose costs on others 
     because we, as a society, provide care to the uninsured. The 
     risk of shifting cost to others has led many States to 
     mandate that all drivers have liability insurance. The same 
     logic applies to health insurance.

  But Republicans are not here today to act logically or take 
responsibility. They have never, never, never had a comprehensive 
health care reform plan. Instead, their only goal is to score political 
points.
  So we urge, vote ``no'' on both bills.
  I reserve the balance of my time, and I ask unanimous consent that 
the gentleman from Washington (Mr. McDermott) control the balance of 
the time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman from 
Washington will control the time of the gentleman from Michigan.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BRADY of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  Mr. Speaker, this is just about fairness. What families and workers 
in my district are asking is this: Isn't it unfair to grant businesses 
relief from this Big Government mandate but still force average workers 
to comply with it? If the President's health care law isn't ready for 
business, how is it ready for my family, for my children, for my loved 
one?
  At its heart, both families and workers are worried and wondering: 
Why isn't the White House listening to us? This isn't fair.
  The President has proclaimed the law is working the way it's supposed 
to, and the White House, Treasury Department, and every agency tells us 
things are right on track, but they're not. They miss deadline after 
deadline after deadline in this troubling implementation. The truth is 
it's not ready.
  With the temporary relief from the business mandate, yes, it was 
welcome news, but it didn't solve the problems our local businesses are 
struggling with under ObamaCare. In fact, the President's health care 
law is causing more confusion and more uncertainty.
  Workers are seeing fewer hours and smaller paychecks. That's not 
fair.
  Businesses are struggling to find the money to pay for higher health 
care costs under ObamaCare. That's not fair.
  And our neighbors are struggling to find full-time jobs; 20 million 
Americans can't find them. It's fewer jobs to apply for. That's not 
fair.
  Why is it that, under this White House, Warren Buffett gets a break 
from ObamaCare but Joe Six-Pack, the single mom working at the local 
restaurant, they don't get any kind of break? Well, we just want 
fairness for workers, fairness for families. We're tired of the White 
House picking winners and losers. This is about fairness and equality.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McDERMOTT. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
New York (Mr. Rangel).
  (Mr. RANGEL asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. RANGEL. I've been here over four decades, and I have never seen 
legislation just completely be ignored. I'm thoroughly convinced that 
the Republican majority are not the least bit concerned about health 
care, because if they were, they would have a health care plan.
  The whole idea of talking about repealing ObamaCare and not having a 
substitute for it means that the President can talk about education, he 
can talk about jobs, he can talk about anything, but their plan, their 
legislative plan is just to say ``no,'' just to say ``no'' to the 
President no matter what he comes up with, even if it adversely affects 
the economy of our great country or even if it affects the security of 
our great country.
  I am convinced, as I said this morning, that if the President 
actually walked on water, the first thing the Republicans would say is 
that President Obama can't swim.
  So I think that we've had enough of this politics. Thirty, forty 
times we're talking about repealing it.
  Are you against having preexisting conditions being accepted for 
health insurance?
  Are you against kids being able to stay on the policy of their 
parents until they're 26?
  Are you against having preventive care given to people? I hope you're 
not, because soon--and very soon--the American people are going to get 
fed up with this gridlock politics.
  So I hope the spiritual leaders who are concerned about health, kids, 
and the aged, and I hope the business community would see that, if you 
want to have economic growth, you've got to get the Congress and you've 
got to get government involved. It's not a question of laying on 
people. It's a question of economic growth, which means our 
infrastructure has to be reinvested in.
  We have to be competitive and we have to do the right thing, not by 
Republicans and Democrats, but for all of our people. We can't afford 
to have a day when a person needs health care that someone's got to ask 
whether you're a Republican or whether you're a Democrat. And it's 
abundantly clear the President is for full health insurance.
  Mr. BRADY of Texas. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman 
from Wisconsin (Mr. Ryan), the chairman of the Budget Committee, a 
father of three children who understands how tough it is to make ends 
meet for health care.
  Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Speaker, here's what we're doing: The President himself is 
saying that this employer mandate isn't ready, it can't work, and 
therefore he's delaying it.
  Here's the point: In our Constitution, it is Congress that writes the 
laws and the President that executes the laws. He doesn't get to choose 
which laws he wants to enforce selectively.
  We agree with him on the mandate. That's why the first of these bills 
says, okay, let's delay that. And here's Congress acting to do that 
because that's Congress' job, not the administration's job.
  But while we're doing this, we have to ask this other question: If 
the Fortune 500 companies come to the White House and say this mandate 
is onerous--it's not ready; millions of people are going to lose their 
health insurance; it's going to be a repudiation of your promise that 
if you like what you've got, you can keep it; delay this, great--what 
about the families and small businesses that are going to have the same 
kind of mandate? And that's the second vote we're going to have.

                              {time}  1530

  What about the families and small businesses that are going to have 
the same kind of mandate? That's the second vote we're going to have. 
If it's good for big business, if this is onerous for them, if the 
White House admits it won't work for them, then why are they complicit 
with sticking the same kind of enforcement, the same kind of ``not 
ready for prime time'' mandate on families, on small businesses?
  This law is unraveling before us. What's going to happen at the end 
of the day is when you can't verify a person's employment base health 
insurance, when a person personally attests

[[Page H4548]]

to whatever their income is, you are going to have a lot of people at 
the end of the year get all these subsidies that they weren't supposed 
to get, either by confusion, by waste, even by fraud, and the IRS is 
going to come in with one really big tax bill on families in a year's 
time and that will be a massive rude awakening.
  This law is imploding, this law is unnecessary, this law needlessly 
raises health care costs, and this law will cause millions of people to 
lose the health insurance that they have that they want to keep. Not 
only delay this mandate, delay the other mandate, so we can fix this 
once and for all with real health care reform.
  Mr. McDERMOTT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  We are back in the theater of the absurd. What we are hearing right 
now is the sound of Republican heart rates going up: ``ObamaCare is 
coming.'' These last benefits are going to happen, like it or not. And 
worse, they are going to work. We are seeing the time-honored political 
tactic of confusion. The sleight of hand. Direct people's attention 
over here so they won't see what you are doing over there. Shout about 
delaying the employer mandate and confuse the people when the more 
corrosive bill comes next, the tool that makes reform possible: the 
individual mandate.
  Maybe they're so scared because it's already working. Washington, 
Oregon, and California are already reporting lower rates in 2014. 
Today, New York premiums were cut by 50 percent. Sick children are 
getting covered. Consumers are getting reimbursements from their 
insurers. There is no evidence of the sticker shock you will hear 
about. The promise we made Americans is being fulfilled and Republicans 
see a giant election map slowly losing red blocks.
  This bill isn't about employers. It's a frenetic expression of their 
anxiety over the President's signature legislation working. I thought 
38 times trying to repeal it would be enough, but apparently not. We 
have got to try one more time. You haven't learned it isn't going to 
work.
  Do you know why there's no fuss in this town about these bills? 
Because the insurance industry knows it's all nonsense. They know it 
won't work without an individual mandate, and you will not get it 
repealed. We ought to just get on with it and vote ``no'' on this bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BRADY of Texas. Madam Speaker, I would like to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from Louisiana, a physician who practiced medicine for 30 
years, chairman of the Oversight Subcommittee, Dr. Boustany.
  Mr. BOUSTANY. Madam Speaker, ObamaCare is massively flawed and that's 
why it needs to be repealed or replaced with sensible reforms. Now 
after 3 years, some very smart administration lawyers have come to the 
conclusion that the employer mandate is too complex and it won't work. 
It is pretty clear to me and others across America that it is going to 
cause hourly workers across America to see a drop in the number of 
hours they work and will force even more businesses to hold off on 
hiring.
  Frankly, the employer mandate needs to be repealed, not delayed. It 
should be fully repealed. That's why I introduced H.R. 903, to fully 
repeal it. Until we can do that, I will surely and gladly vote for this 
delay.
  At a time when our economy is showing sluggish growth, horribly 
sluggish growth, with high unemployment, record unemployment, 
businesses across this country face uncertainty. Frankly, I will say 
this is about fairness. Getting rid of this employer mandate, if we 
delay it or even repeal it, it's about fairness to hardworking small 
business owners who are struggling every day, it's about hardworking 
workers who hope to keep their jobs or hope not to be reduced in their 
hours.
  Mr. BRADY of Texas. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
gentleman from Georgia, Dr. Price, control the remainder of the time 
for us.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen). Without objection, the 
gentleman from Georgia will control the remaining time.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. McDERMOTT. Madam Speaker, I submit for the Record two records 
which show that hundreds of thousands of constituents in the First 
District of Wisconsin and the Eighth District of Texas would benefit 
from the Affordable Care Act.

    Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 1st Congressional 
                         District of Wisconsin


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
            the Workforce Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Ryan's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly created following 
     the 2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       4,500 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 9,800 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $14 million, an average 
     discount of $650 per person in 2011, $730 in 2012, and $780 
     thus far in 2013.
       123,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       213,000 individuals in the district--including 50,000 
     children and 84,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       165,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 36,300 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $1.8 million in 
     insurance company rebates in 2012 and 2011.
       Up to 42,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.
       259,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       Up to 61,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition. In addition, the 34,000 
     individuals who currently purchase private health insurance 
     on the individual or small group market will have access to 
     more secure, higher quality coverage and many will be 
     eligible for financial assistance.
                                  ____


    Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 8th Congressional 
                           District of Texas


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
            the Workforce Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Brady's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly created following 
     the 2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       8,600 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 9,400 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $12.9 million, an average 
     discount of $630 per person in 2011, $700 in 2012, and $620 
     thus far in 2013.
       111,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       183,000 individuals in the district--including 46,000 
     children and 71,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       169,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 46,700 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $6.6 million in 
     insurance company rebates in 2012 and 2011--an average rebate 
     of $95 per family in 2012 and $187 per family in 2011.
       Up to 44,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.

[[Page H4549]]

       225,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       Up to 143,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition. In addition, the 31,000 
     individuals who currently purchase private health insurance 
     on the individual or small group market will have access to 
     more secure, higher quality coverage and many will be 
     eligible for financial assistance.

  I now yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Speaker, this is the latest chapter in a long-
running process of deliberately trying to sabotage health care reform.
  The delay of the employer mandate for 5 percent of American 
businesses that employ only 1 percent of American workers is not Earth-
shattering, not entirely unforeseen, but more to the point, given a 
concerted effort by my Republican friends to dismantle health care 
reform, you would think that they would embrace it.
  It is being attacked instead because there is no interest by my 
Republican friends in a comprehensive approach to making health care 
work better. They have no plan. This is simply a tactic to gain 
political advantage by fanning flames of discontent.
  They want to take credit, actually, for many of the features of 
ObamaCare that are supported by the public, but they have no intention 
of either paying for them or providing a framework comprehensive reform 
so that it will work.
  ObamaCare is actually working where it is allowed to work. In Oregon, 
we are seeing improvements in health care coverage, reduction in health 
insurance premiums, and we are on track to save tax dollars while 
improving the quality of health care. If everybody practiced medicine 
the way that it is being practiced in metropolitan Portland, people 
would get sick less often, they would get well faster, they would live 
longer, and there would be no Medicare funding crisis.
  Instead of working to fine-tune the reform which embodies many of the 
principles that have been advanced, embraced, and implemented by 
Republican Governors--not just Mitt Romney, they have chosen instead to 
make it fail.
  It is another illustration of a party without ideas, opposing 
comprehensive immigration reform, opposing agricultural reform. House 
Republicans won't even allow a conference committee to be appointed so 
that we can have a budget agreed to, while putting sand in the gears at 
every turn for efforts to get more value out of the health care system. 
It is not just sad and unfortunate, it is shameful.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 2 minutes 
to the chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Upton).
  Mr. UPTON. Madam Speaker, 2 weeks ago, as Americans were gathering 
with loved ones to celebrate our Nation's independence, a Treasury 
bureaucrat quietly posted a blog detailing a major policy shift in the 
administration's signature health care law--the delay of the employer 
mandate. While it appeared to be a sudden turnabout, today we learned 
the administration had made the decision in June and that ``it was 
considered in a very careful way for a while.''
  This is a direct contradiction to previous testimony before Congress. 
Every single time that we asked the administration witness if 
implementation was on track, they looked us in the eye and said, 
``Absolutely, yes.''
  Why did the ``most transparent administration in history'' mislead 
Congress and try to dupe the public? Because it knew that the law is 
bad for business and bad for jobs.
  Today, we give the administration authority in full view of the 
American public to delay the employer mandate for a year. The House 
will stand up for the millions of young adults, working families, and 
older Americans who cannot afford the health care law's looming rate 
shock. Fair is fair. If businesses aren't subject to the same burdens 
and penalties under the health care law next year, average Americans 
shouldn't face them either.
  Many middle class families are going to pay dramatically higher 
premiums as a result of the Affordable Care Act. The Energy and 
Commerce Committee surveyed 17 of the Nation's leading insurers and 
found many consumers in the individual market could see their premiums 
nearly double, with potential highs eclipsing 400 percent.
  The broken promises are many. Missed deadlines and delays have become 
routine. This law is so off the rails that the administration is now 
disregarding entire sections of the statute. This debate is about jobs 
and it is about fairness.
  We continue to believe a permanent delay of these damaging policies 
is the best course of action. For today, let's join together and 
protect Americans for at least another year.
  I ask my colleagues to support H.R. 2667 and H.R. 2668 so that we can 
delay and dismantle these policies that will hurt American jobs.
  Mr. McDERMOTT. Madam Speaker, I yield back to the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Levin).
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Levin) will control the time.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LEVIN. Madam Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.
  I just want to put in the facts on the Sixth District where my friend 
Mr. Upton comes from, the Sixth District of Michigan:
  6,700 young adults in the district now have health insurance through 
their parents' plan;
  9,100 seniors have received prescription drug discounts;
  131,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for preventive 
services without paying;
  197,000 individuals now have health insurance that covers preventive 
services;
  Up to 41,000 children in the district with preexisting health 
conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health insurers.
  I now yield 2 minutes to a member of our committee, the gentleman 
from Wisconsin (Mr. Kind).
  Mr. KIND. Madam Speaker, I rise today again with disappointment at 
the fact that these two bills are nonsense and completely unnecessary.
  One is doing what the Obama administration has already said they 
would do, and that is to delay the employer reporting requirements 
because of the feedback they got from businesses large and small and 
from associations who said not that they can't do it; they just need a 
little bit more time in implementing it.
  The other would do away with the individual responsibility component.
  But the real story today, Madam Speaker, is not what's happening on 
the House floor or the votes that these two bills are going to get. It 
was what announcement came out of the State of New York and was 
reported in The New York Times:

       ``Health plan costs for New Yorkers set to fall 50 
     percent.''

  This is because of the creation of the health insurance exchanges 
under the Affordable Care Act. Individual policy rates are going to be 
at least 50 percent less than what individuals are currently paying 
today because the exchanges are doing what they were meant to do, 
increase competition and transparency, making it more affordable for 
uninsured Americans to go out and obtain affordable coverage.
  My father gave me some pretty good advice early on in my life when he 
said, Son, you are going to encounter two forms of critics in your 
life: one who criticizes you because they want to see you fail, and the 
other is going to criticize you because they want to see you succeed, 
and being able to differentiate between the two is going to determine 
how successful you are in life.
  That has been the problem with the Affordable Care Act from the very 
beginning. We have a major political party who does not want to see 
this succeed, and they're doing everything they can to undermine it, 
even if it brings increased pain and difficulty to more businesses, 
families, and individuals throughout the country. Today's demonstration 
with these two bills just reaffirms that proposition.
  I encourage my colleagues to vote ``no'' on H.R. 2668.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I am now pleased to yield 1\1/2\ 
minutes to a pivotal member of the Ways and Means Committee, the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Reichert).
  Mr. REICHERT. Madam Speaker, 2 weeks ago, the administration 
announced a delay of a crucial piece of

[[Page H4550]]

ObamaCare: the employer mandate. Why? Because they were petitioned by 
businesses from across this great Nation of ours to do that. Why did 
they petition the White House to waive the employer mandate? Because 
they recognize, Madam Speaker, that this was a burdensome law on their 
business; that this was a tax burden that they couldn't bear; that this 
would slow their businesses, slow hiring, and slow growth. They 
recognize that. My constituents in Washington State recognize that. 
Even the President's biggest allies--labor unions--agree. They have 
warned that ObamaCare will ``destroy the health and wellbeing of 
hardworking Americans.''

                              {time}  1545

  But, Madam Speaker, this legislation also recognizes another 
dangerous precedent that this administration has been setting in that 
this legislation will delay the employer mandate for 1 year so that the 
law is in line with what the President decided to do. This is not how 
our government should work, but that's how this President operates, and 
we've seen this from him time and time again: A problem with the health 
care law? Let's just delay it. Welfare-to-work requirements? I'll just 
waive those. A change in unemployment insurance laws? I don't have to 
implement that.
  I know about enforcing laws. I was a cop for 33 years. You don't pick 
and choose. You enforce the law. That's what this President should do, 
and we're making a law in line with what the President wants.
  Mr. LEVIN. Madam Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.
  I just want to review the benefits of the gentleman's district that 
he represents:
  5,400 young adults now have health insurance through their parents' 
plans;
  more than 6,900 seniors receive prescription drug discounts;
  100,000 seniors are now eligible for Medicare preventative services 
without paying any co-pays, coinsurance, or deductibles;
  209,000 individuals now have health insurance that covers 
preventative services without pay;
  Up to 42,000 children in the district with preexisting health 
conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health insurers.
  That's what the ACA is doing.
  It is now my privilege to yield 2 minutes to another distinguished 
member of our committee, the gentleman from New York (Mr. Crowley).
  Mr. CROWLEY. Madam Speaker, I thank my friend for yielding me this 
time.
  Here we are once again, wasting our constituents' time by voting on 
the exact same action the administration has already taken. Apparently, 
we must vote yet again to dismantle important parts of the Affordable 
Care Act. We keep hearing that these votes are necessary because of the 
``burden'' that's out there for individuals and their families. Let me 
tell you about what I worry about in terms of burdens for my 
constituents:
  the burden of a young worker knowing that she is stuck in a job 
that's bad for her, but she keeps it because it's the only place she 
can get health insurance;
  the burden of a father trying desperately to find an insurance plan 
that will cover his son even though his son has diabetes;
  the burden of a mother living in constant fear that her family could 
lose their home because, without insurance, one unexpected medical 
episode could lead to bankruptcy.
  Relieving those burdens is why I supported the Affordable Care Act, 
and I don't understand why my colleagues on the other side of the aisle 
are so eager to tear that down.
  Later today, we will be voting on whether to undermine one of the key 
pieces of the law that is responsible for actually making coverage more 
affordable. In fact, just this morning, as the gentleman from 
Wisconsin, Ron Kind, mentioned earlier, it was announced that in my 
State of New York these very provisions are cutting the cost for a 
family to buy their own insurance by half--by over 50 percent.
  I know that was a difficult article for you all to read this morning; 
but instead of applauding this critical relief for families, my 
colleagues on the other side of the aisle plan to attack the parts of 
the very law that made that possible in the first place. I've even 
heard reports that some opponents of the law are urging people to burn 
their so-called ``ObamaCare cards'' and, in protest, to not buy 
insurance. As an aside, I want to point out for my colleagues that 
there is no such thing as an ``ObamaCare card,'' so be careful not to 
burn your fingers when you're using your imaginary prop.
  I just don't understand why they wouldn't want their constituents to 
have access to affordable, quality insurance that these people 
currently can't get now.
  Please do not vote for these bills. They undermine the spirit of this 
country.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute 
to the chief deputy whip of the Republican Conference and a member of 
the Ways and Means Committee, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Roskam).
  Mr. ROSKAM. I thank the gentleman.
  Let's talk about burdens--the burden of listening to the President of 
the United States, Madam Speaker, on June 7 of this year say that this 
bill is working the way it's supposed to.
  No, it's not.
  Then, within the twinkling of an eye, the White House has to say, Oh, 
it's not working the way it's supposed to. We need to have this delayed 
for a year.
  Let's talk about the burden of signing a tax return form under 
penalties of perjury and all of that burden that presses down with the 
force of the law when you make a misrepresentation and when you're 
trying to follow up on 200 pages of an individual mandate, and people 
don't know if they're on foot or on horseback on this thing. That's a 
burden. That's a burden that the country can't sustain, and that's the 
burden that we can relieve by voting ``aye.''
  Mr. LEVIN. Madam Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.
  The application, Mr. Roskam, is three pages. Let me also mention 
what's in play in your district and why ACA matters:
  5,200 young adults have insurance through their parents;
  7,800 seniors have discounts for prescription drugs;
  87,000 seniors are now eligible for preventative services without 
paying;
  243,000 individuals now have health insurance covering preventative 
services without these co-pays;
  234,000 individuals are saving money.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. LEVIN. I yield myself an additional 15 seconds.
  Due to ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
more than 20 percent of their premiums, now 35,000 individuals have 
insurance that cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage.
  So when you pick up a book with hundreds of pages, tell your 
constituents what it means for them.
  I am now privileged to yield 2 minutes to a gentleman from Energy and 
Commerce who has played such a decisive role in the reform of health 
care, the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Pallone).
  Mr. PALLONE. Madam Speaker, I have to say that I am so sick and tired 
of the time that the House Republicans continue to waste on their anti-
ObamaCare message--repeal, defund, obstruct. You pick the tactic. Our 
country has some pressing issues that we should be addressing here 
today, like rising student loan rates, immigration reform, budget 
issues, or a jobs bill. Yet the Republicans insist on focusing on 
politicizing this health care fight over and over again. ObamaCare is 
here to stay. Let's face it. If you have to make some improvements at 
some point after it's fully implemented, we'll look at them but not now 
before it has even taken place.
  Let me talk to you about this individual mandate. The requirement 
that individuals obtain coverage is the most critical part of the law. 
In order for our health care system to operate in a sustainable and 
cost-effective way, we have to get Americans covered so the insurance 
marketplace must include both sick and healthy individuals in order to 
ensure that the system is sustainable. Repealing the individual 
responsibility provision will only raise health insurance premiums and 
increase the number of uninsured Americans. That's why that New York 
State

[[Page H4551]]

report says that premiums for those in the individual market have gone 
down 50 percent. It's because you do have the individual requirement 
now and because everybody sick and healthy is part of a much larger 
pool.
  Now, as to this other issue of the employer-reporting requirements, 
that has already been delayed by the administration. It's a done deal. 
Nothing that we're going to do here today in the House is going to 
change that. Also, the effect of that is minimal because the vast 
majority of large employers already provide health coverage. I think 
less than 4 percent do not. If someone is not covered, he can go into 
the exchange, and he can probably qualify for tax credits and get 
affordable coverage.
  As Mr. Levin has said, this has already had a major impact on 
providing health coverage for individuals. Whether they're children, 
students, seniors, families, small business owners, so many have 
already gotten affordable coverage. Once this kicks in in October, 
you'll be able to go into an exchange; and by next year, the vast 
majority--almost every American--will have affordable coverage with 
good benefits, and what people pay will not be based on preexisting 
conditions.
  Leave it alone. This is the law and it's a good law.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Madam Speaker, how much time remains on both 
sides?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Georgia has 17\1/2\ 
minutes remaining, and the gentleman from Michigan has 10\3/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I am pleased now to yield 2 
minutes to the author of H.R. 2667, a gentleman who recognizes where 
the authority ought to come from for this piece of legislation, the 
gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Griffin).
  Mr. GRIFFIN of Arkansas. Madam Speaker, the employer mandate 
provisions in the Affordable Care Act are already stifling job growth. 
We don't have to wait to see what's going to happen. In my district, I 
was approached by a 21-year-old Hispanic American. He contacted me.
  He said, I'm a franchise owner. I'm the vice president of a small 
franchise that I inherited from my mother.
  He said that his business has grown about 25 percent each year over 
the past 2 years and that he is one of the top franchisees in his 
group. He is a rising senior in college who is managing a small 
business. He said that he currently has 45 employees; and according to 
him, right now would be the perfect time to add another 10 or 20 full-
time, good-paying jobs--but this is a small business owner. He said he 
can't do it because of the employer mandate. It makes him choose 
between increasingly expensive insurance premiums or punitive tax 
penalties for each employee. He contacted me for relief. If this 
mandate cannot be repealed, he said, could he please make the 50 
threshold 250 so as not to strangle his business. The 21-year-old said 
it best:

       The government should be my partner so I can help my 
     employees prosper. I can help them more than the government, 
     but I'm literally not able because of taxes, the Affordable 
     Care Act and other regulations.

  After 3 years of pain, the President has finally realized that the 
employer mandate is a bad idea. It is already costing jobs and lowering 
wages for millions of hardworking Americans. Americans who are forced 
to be part of ObamaCare deserve more than to be governed by blog posts 
from the Treasury Department. Only Congress can change the law. 
Personally, I want to repeal and replace the law; but today we can join 
with the President and vote for my bill.
  Mr. LEVIN. I yield myself 45 seconds.
  I would just like to ask the gentleman from Arkansas if the small 
business person he mentioned has any health coverage for his employees. 
What we need to do is to continue this law and its implementation so 
that those employees will have some health insurance.
  In his district, because of ACA, 9,500 young adults have insurance 
through their parents;
  3,400 seniors have received prescription drug discounts;
  125,000 seniors are now eligible for preventative services without 
paying co-pays, et cetera.

    Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 2nd Congressional 
                          District of Arkansas


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
           the Workforce, Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Griffin's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly create following the 
     2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       9,500 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 3,400 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $7.6 million, an average 
     discount of $600 per person in 2011, $730 in 2012, and $990 
     thus far in 2013.
       125,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       195,000 individuals in the district--including 41,000 
     children and 81,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       158,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 34,200 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $3.2 million in 
     insurance company rebates in 2012 and 2011--an average rebate 
     of $49 per family in 2012 and $114 per family in 2011.
       Up to 42,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.
       223,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       113,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition. In addition, the 40,000 
     individuals who currently purchase private health insurance 
     on the individual or small group market will have access to 
     more secure, higher quality coverage and many will be 
     eligible for financial assistance.

  It is now my privilege to yield 2 minutes to the ranking member on 
Small Business, who has worked so hard on health care reform and with 
sensitivity to the small businesses of this country, the gentlelady 
from New York (Ms. Velazquez).
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I rise in opposition to this legislation. The American people are 
tired of political gimmicks and games. They want to see real efforts to 
create jobs and grow our economy. This legislation does nothing to 
advance these goals.
  The President has already taken steps to alleviate the burden on 
small businesses by delaying the employer mandate. This step will 
ensure small firms have the time, resources, and tools they need to 
provide coverage to their employees before the mandate kicks in. At 
best, the legislation before us today is duplicative of that effort. At 
worst, it amounts to political grandstanding.
  Let's be absolutely clear--even if these measures pass the House, we 
know they will go nowhere in the Senate. If, in some distorted reality, 
the Senate somehow approves this legislation, it will not be signed 
into law by the President. So the only real purpose of this bill and 
the debate is to score cheap political points. Passing this bill will 
do nothing to help Americans who are struggling to find work, afford 
rent, or put groceries on the table. Instead, we are bringing up yet 
another bill to repeal health care reform--the 38th such bill of this 
Congress--but I forgot: it's the summer, so we're showing reruns.
  The Affordable Care Act is already providing valuable benefits to the 
American people. It was just reported today that New Yorkers will see a 
50 percent cut in their insurance premiums thanks to this landmark law. 
Millions of young adults who are graduating from college can remain on 
their parents' plans as they enter the job market. Children with life-
threatening ailments are no longer denied coverage under preexisting-
condition rules. Women are no longer paying

[[Page H4552]]

more due to discriminatory insurance company practices.
  These are the benefits that our Republican colleagues would deny the 
American people. Vote ``no.'' This debate is over.

                              {time}  1600

  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased now to yield 1 minute 
to the chairman of the Oversight Subcommittee on Energy and Commerce, 
the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Murphy).
  Mr. MURPHY of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, right before the Fourth of 
July, the administration admitted the Affordable Care Act wasn't ready, 
and as we just heard from the other side of the aisle, the bill is a 
burden. So they waived the mandate tax for employers, but not the 
American people.
  The White House says remain calm, all is well, but there are many 
signs the law is not ready: the Small Business Health Insurance 
Exchange is delayed; in States that don't expand Medicaid, we're going 
to delay the mandates for some; for some insurance rates, they'll raise 
90 percent to 400 percent; and if you want to qualify for subsidies, 
they tell us you don't have to tell the truth on your paperwork because 
no one's going to check.
  Don't force Americans to be taxed on something they don't want and is 
not ready.
  They told us we had to pass the bill in order to find out what's in 
it, and now they're telling the Americans you have to buy the policy to 
find out what's in it or else be taxed.
  Be fair. Delay the mandate tax for employers and the American people.
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Speaker, could you tell us the time on each side, 
please.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Collins of Georgia). The gentleman from 
Michigan has 8 minutes remaining, and the gentleman from Georgia has 
14\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. LEVIN. At this time, I insert into the Record the benefits of 
health care reform in the 18th District of Pennsylvania.

   Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 18th Congressional 
                        District of Pennsylvania


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
           the Workforce, Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Murphy's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly created following 
     the 2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       3,800 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 15,300 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $23.1 million, an average 
     discount of $620 per person in 2011, $800 in 2012, and $730 
     thus far in 2013.
       133,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       230,000 individuals in the district--including 45,000 
     children and 97,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       181,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 35,800 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $3.6 million in 
     insurance company rebates in 2012 and 2011--an average rebate 
     of $77 per family in 2012 and $165 per family in 2011.
       Up to 35,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.
       266,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       Up to 49,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition. In addition, the 40,000 
     individuals who currently purchase private health insurance 
     on the individual or small group market will have access to 
     more secure, higher quality coverage and many will be 
     eligible for financial assistance.

  I now yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Meeks).
  Mr. MEEKS. Mr. Speaker, I tell my colleagues on the other side it's 
time to stop chasing the ghost; 38, 39 times in trying to repeal 
ObamaCare? Give up chasing the ghost.
  I also tell my friends stop being confused by the facts. The facts 
are, as The New York Times indicated today in New York, that the cost 
of health care insurance, because of the Affordable Care Act, will go 
down 50 percent. The fact is, as Mr. Levin has indicated time after 
time, that preventive care will be available for all Americans. The 
fact is that you will not be discriminated against because you're a 
woman. The fact is the American people want the Affordable Care Act.
  How do I know? They reelected President Obama again, understanding 
that President Obama stood for health care for all Americans and 
bringing down the cost of health care in America. That's what this is 
about.
  Thirty-eight times? Give up chasing the ghost.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased now to yield 2 minutes 
to the chair of the Health Subcommittee on Energy and Commerce, the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Pitts).
  Mr. PITTS. Mr. Speaker, today I rise in support of delaying both the 
employer and individual mandates.
  According to a new Gallup poll, 4 in 10 uninsured Americans don't 
even realize that they'll be subject to fines under the Affordable Care 
Act. They're about to find out that they're required to purchase 
insurance that is now even more expensive than it was in the past.
  In California, one of the few States to release detailed data about 
the cost of ObamaCare coverage, individual market premiums will double 
for many residents.
  Researchers compared the estimated cost of health insurance plans on 
the new exchanges with what is currently available on the individual 
market in the State, and astonishingly they found that current health 
plans cost significantly less than comparable plans that will be sold 
on the exchanges come October 1. In other words, some people will be 
paying more for the same thing because of the new complexity of 
federally supported exchanges. Now, some individuals will be eligible 
for subsidies, but many will get no help at all. In fact, they'll be 
paying more in order to support the subsidies. They will just have to 
watch their take-home pay get smaller.
  The administration heard from business owners about the chaos being 
caused by the law. Some employers are laying off employees; some 
employers are shifting to part-time employees; some employers are 
deciding not to expand their businesses; and many employees can't get a 
job. Employees are losing their health insurance, losing benefits, 
losing income, trying to find another part-time job just to survive, 
and the administration panicked and is unlawfully delaying the employer 
mandate.
  It's deeply unfair to subject individuals to a mandate that they can 
neither comprehend nor afford.
  Today, we're fighting for fairness, but we will continue the fight to 
completely stop this train wreck before it finally wrecks family 
budgets, health care, and our economy.
  Mr. LEVIN. I now yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. 
Barrow).
  Mr. BARROW of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for the 
time.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the legislation before us to 
delay the employer and individual mandates in the Affordable Care Act. 
These burdensome provisions are a drag on our economy and hurt the job 
creators in my district in Georgia and across the country.
  Studies have shown that the employer mandate could cost our economy 
an estimated 3.2 million jobs. On top of that, businesses of all sizes 
have indicated this mandate will cause them to reduce the size of their 
businesses or, worse, close their doors. In an economy as fragile as 
ours, that's the exact opposite of what we want.
  Today's vote is a step in the right direction, but we can go further. 
I'm leading the effort in the House with two of my Republican 
colleagues to

[[Page H4553]]

fully repeal the employer mandate. If repeal and replace really is the 
will of the majority, then I urge my colleagues to support today's 
legislation and quickly bring up a full repeal of the employer mandate.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased now to yield 1 minute 
to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Bilirakis), a member of the Energy 
and Commerce Committee.
  Mr. BILIRAKIS. Mr. Speaker, last week the administration announced it 
would delay the employer mandate under ObamaCare. Even though the 
administration does not have the authority to do this, it is a sign 
that even the law's authors are realizing the law is unworkable.
  Under ObamaCare, Americans' premiums are skyrocketing and employers 
are being forced to cut jobs, hours, and wages. Individuals, families, 
and businesses all deserve relief from this bad law.
  This is about fairness--fairness for both hardworking taxpayers and 
American businesses.
  While I have long opposed ObamaCare and believe the best solution is 
full repeal and replacement of the law, we must pass the Authority for 
Mandate Delay Act to provide greater certainty to all Americans.
  Mr. LEVIN. At this time, I insert into the Record a document showing 
the benefits of health care reform in the 12th Congressional District 
of Florida.

   Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 12th Congressional 
                          District of Florida


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
            the Workforce Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Bilirakis's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly created following 
     the 2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       6,100 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 10,200 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $12.9 million, an average 
     discount of $550 per person in 2011, $660 in 2012, and $720 
     thus far in 2013.
       153,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       190,000 individuals in the district--including 41,000 
     children and 79,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       164,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 53,500 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $7.6 million in 
     insurance company rebates in 2012 and 2011--an average rebate 
     of $132 per family in 2012 and $168 per family in 2011.
       Up to 36,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.
       216,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       Up to 97,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition. In addition, the 45,000 
     individuals who currently purchase private health insurance 
     on the individual or small group market will have access to 
     more secure, higher quality coverage and many will be 
     eligible for financial assistance.

  It's now my pleasure to yield as much time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Larson), a leader on the health care 
issue.
  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. I want to thank the gentleman from 
Michigan.
  Most importantly, I'm here today because I want to thank my 
colleagues on the other side of the aisle for their embrace of 
ObamaCare. After 38 attempts to repeal it, we see at least, however 
grudgingly, an acceptance and understanding of the importance and 
significance of this very important care.
  Whether this embrace is the kiss of Judas, as some may say, or some 
may say this is just merely a charade, I commend them for understanding 
that Medicare isn't an entitlement. After all, it's the insurance that 
people have paid for. Every American knows this because all they have 
to do is go to their pay stub to check it out.
  So we thank our colleagues for this embrace of this very important 
issue before us today. I thank them because I see an opportunity here. 
I see an opportunity to bring forward the best of public health, the 
best of science and innovation and technology, the best of 
entrepreneurialism, kind of like what the Heritage Foundation came up 
with and that a Republican Governor piloted in a Democratic State, 
which is what we now today call the ``Affordable Health Care Act.''
  There are studies that suggest that there is over $700 billion to 
$800 billion annually in fraud, abuse, waste, and inefficiencies. Let's 
work together to drive out the inefficiencies.
  Thanks for the embrace today and the understanding that if we do 
this, we cannot only pay down the national debt, we can end 
sequestration and we can provide an opportunity for our citizens to 
make sure they live out their lives in dignity by having the most 
important program for their retirement--Medicare--there for the future.
  I thank my colleagues.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to yield 1\1/2\ 
minutes to the vice chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, the 
gentlelady from Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn).
  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman for the 
recognition.
  I'm rising today to support the legislation that is in front of us.
  I have to tell you, my constituents are wanting to know: When did the 
President decide he could pick and choose what laws he's going to 
enforce and what laws he's going to waive?
  Over the course of 3 days, this administration decided they were just 
going to waive and rewrite this law, and it took them 3 years to try to 
implement it. I think what we're seeing is they're finally admitting 
this is a train wreck and it is not ready for prime time.
  However, it is not fair that the President is choosing to protect big 
business from ObamaCare, but not hardworking American taxpayers, 
individuals, families. It is also eerily similar to the closed-door 
manner in which the law was written and passed. And now that people are 
reading it, they're finding out what is in it.
  This legislation before us today would delay the requirements that 
nearly all Americans purchase minimum essential health insurance 
coverage or pay a tax penalty until 2015. The delay of the individual 
mandate is needed.
  Due to the administrative delay of the employer mandate, my 
constituents overwhelmingly oppose this law, and I work each and every 
day to stop the harmful effects it's having on American families and 
businesses and to continue the fight for solutions to spur economic 
growth, create new jobs, and provide a more secure future for all 
Americans.
  I encourage support of the legislation.
  Mr. LEVIN. I will reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Renacci), a member of the Ways and Means 
Committee.
  Mr. RENACCI. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of both the 
Authority for Mandate Delay Act and the Fairness for American Families 
Act.
  Thanks to ObamaCare, premiums in my home State of Ohio are expected 
to increase 88 percent, leaving taxpayers on the hook for those 
significant rate hikes.
  Now the administration has decided to delay only the employer 
mandate, while leaving the individual mandate intact. That is blatantly 
unfair to my constituents and all Americans.
  Why does the administration suddenly find it acceptable to give big 
companies a better deal than the average Ohioan? Come January 1, 
individuals could still face stiff penalties if they do not carry 
insurance, insurance an employer may decide they may no longer provide. 
With these two bills, we can provide individuals the same opportunity 
the administration is giving

[[Page H4554]]

businesses, by allowing them to opt out of ObamaCare next year, too.
  I ask my colleagues to come together and pass this legislation. The 
people we represent are depending on it.
  Mr. LEVIN. At this time, I insert into the Record a document showing 
benefits of the health care reform law in the 16th Congressional 
District of Ohio.

   Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 16th Congressional 
                            District of Ohio


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
           the Workforce, Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Renacci's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly created following 
     the 2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       4,800 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 10,100 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $13.7 million, an average 
     discount of $510 per person in 2011, $770 in 2012, and $990 
     thus far in 2013.
       104,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       228,000 individuals in the district--including 51,000 
     children and 92,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       200,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 10,200 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $800,000 in insurance 
     company rebates in 2011 and 2012--an average rebate of $133 
     per family in 2012 and $139 per family in 2011.
       Up to 40,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.
       272,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       Up to 68,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition.
       In addition, the 37,000 individuals who currently purchase 
     private health insurance on the individual or small group 
     market will have access to more secure, higher quality 
     coverage and many will be eligible for financial assistance.

  Mr. Speaker, how much time do we have remaining?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Michigan has 4 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield the balance of 
our time on this bill to the gentleman from California (Mr. Waxman), 
the ranking member of Energy and Commerce and who is proudly one of the 
coauthors of health care reform after so many years of his efforts.
  Mr. WAXMAN. Mr. Speaker, the Affordable Care Act is the law of the 
land. The Republicans never liked it. They didn't want to support it, 
and they did everything they could to try to stop it. They thought the 
courts would throw it out; the U.S. Supreme Court upheld it. They 
thought President Obama would be defeated; President Obama was 
reelected. This is the law of the land, and it's important to implement 
it.
  Even my Republican colleagues don't know or are willfully ignoring 
the benefits this law provides to their constituents. I want to tell 
them and anybody watching this debate that, if they would go to the Web 
site for the Democrats on the Energy and Commerce Committee, which is 
democrats. energycommerce.house.gov, we have a district-by-district 
impact of the law.

                              {time}  1615

  I urge my colleagues to actually take a look at the benefits they are 
so eager to take away from their constituents.
  What are these benefits?
  People will not be denied health insurance because of preexisting 
conditions. The insurance companies will not be able to put in lifetime 
caps or go in and try to take away the insurance when they get sick. 
All of the abuses by the insurance companies will be stopped, and then 
people will be able to buy insurance in a marketplace where they can 
choose between different private insurance plans. And if some are low 
income, they'll get some help, but everybody is going to see an 
opportunity they've never had before because every insurance plan will 
have a minimum benefit package.
  Mr. Speaker, 7,500 adults in my district are already getting 
insurance by being able to stay on their parents' plan up to age 26; 
12,000 seniors in my district alone are getting prescription drug 
discounts under Medicare, and there are millions around the country 
that will benefit from that. People, whether they're on Medicare, Medi-
Cal, Medicaid or private insurance will not be asked to make copayments 
for prevention. Preventive care will be emphasized so we can try to 
prevent diseases rather than have to pay to have people treated.
  People will get money back if their insurance companies are spending 
no more than 20 percent on their overhead. We have had private 
insurance companies spending 30 and 40 percent on their salaries for 
their executives and less on the actual benefits. Every insurance plan 
will have to provide 80 percent of the premiums to go for the insurance 
coverage for health care services. This is an important bill.
  Now, if you take away the individual requirement to get insurance, 
the people that are going to get insurance for sure are the people who 
are already sick. If you don't have full participation, you can't 
spread the costs out to make it all affordable. Republicans would like 
to take away the requirement that everybody get insurance so that they 
can have a failure of the law because people with preexisting positions 
will be put into their own category, and the insurance will be too much 
for them to afford. They're trying to undermine the whole law.
  The President does not need legal authority to put off for a year the 
requirement that employers of 50 employees or more cover their 
employees or pay into the system. Most of those employers already cover 
their employees; 95 percent of those employers already cover their 
employees, and we hope to give tax breaks to others so they will join 
in and be able to cover their employees.
  This is a bill that's going to benefit all Americans. Republicans 
opposed Medicare; they're opposed to ObamaCare. They don't want people 
to get fair treatment for their health insurance. Vote ``no'' on both 
bills today.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from Iowa (Mr. King).
  Mr. KING of Iowa. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Georgia for 
yielding and leading this.
  Mr. Speaker, I despise ObamaCare--just about everybody in America 
knows that. I think it should be ripped out by the roots. A minority of 
the Supreme Court, the clear-thinking constitutionalists, though, agree 
with me.
  The gentleman from California says, however, ObamaCare is the law of 
the land. All right, I'm going to agree with that for this argument--
the law of the land. The law of the land is the Constitution. It's the 
supreme law of the land, and article II, section 3 says the President 
shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed. Well, the 
President of the United States has decided he's going to write his own 
law and waive the language that's clear statute in the bill that 
carries his name, ObamaCare, and his signature. It's appalling to me 
that the President could have such contempt for the Constitution and 
that this Congress would seek to conform to the President's whim.
  We needed to bring, first, Scott Garrett's resolution that declares 
and rejects this idea, this unconstitutional act of legislating from 
the executive branch of government. And I would point out the height of 
audacity, Mr. Speaker, is the President's veto threat for us to be 
conforming with his unconstitutional act.

[[Page H4555]]

                   Statement of Administration Policy


               H.R. 2667--Authority for Mandate Delay Act

               (Rep. Griffin, R-Ark., and 26 cosponsors)


             H.R. 2668--Fairness for American Families Act

                (Rep. Young, R-Ind., and 23 cosponsors)

       The Administration strongly opposes House passage of H.R. 
     2667 and H.R. 2668 because the bills, taken together, would 
     cost millions of hard-working middle class families the 
     security of affordable health coverage and care they deserve. 
     Rather than attempting once again to repeal the Affordable 
     Care Act, which the House has tried nearly 40 times, it's 
     time for the Congress to stop fighting old political battles 
     and join the President in an agenda focused on providing 
     greater economic opportunity and security for middle class 
     families and all those working to get into the middle class.
       The Affordable Care Act gives people greater control over 
     their own health care and has already improved many aspects 
     of the Nation's health care system. Because of the Affordable 
     Care Act, tens of millions of Americans who have previously 
     been denied coverage due to a pre-existing medical condition 
     will now be covered. The nearly one in two Americans under 
     the age of 65 with pre-existing medical conditions will have 
     the peace of mind that comes from knowing that they can't be 
     dropped from their health plan or denied coverage because of 
     those conditions. House passage of H.R. 2667 and H.R. 2668 
     will undermine this security for tens of millions of 
     Americans with pre-existing conditions.
       H.R. 2667 is unnecessary, and H.R. 2668 would raise health 
     insurance premiums and increase the number of uninsured 
     Americans. Enacting this legislation would undermine key 
     elements of the health law, facilitating further efforts to 
     repeal a law that is already helping millions of Americans 
     stay on their parents' plans until age 26, millions more who 
     are getting free preventive care that catches illness early 
     on, and thousands of children with pre-existing conditions 
     who are now covered.
       If the President were presented with H.R. 2667 and H.R. 
     2668, he would veto them.

                            H. Con. Res. 45

       Whereas section 1 of article I of the Constitution states 
     that ``All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested 
     in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a 
     Senate and House of Representatives'';
       Whereas section 3 of article II of the Constitution states 
     that the President ``shall take Care that the Laws be 
     faithfully executed'', which imposes a duty upon the 
     President to enforce the law, regardless of difficulty of 
     enforcement or displeasure with the statute;
       Whereas the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was 
     signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010;
       Whereas such Act contains a provision commonly referred to 
     as the ``employer mandate'', which requires businesses that 
     employ 50 or more full-time employees to provide health 
     insurance to its employees upon threat of financial penalty;
       Whereas section 1513(d) of such Act states that the 
     employer mandate ``shall apply to months beginning after 
     December 31, 2013'';
       Whereas the executive branch announced on July 2, 2013, 
     that it would unilaterally delay the enforcement of the 
     employer mandate until January 2015;
       Whereas the principle of separation of powers is a 
     constitutional safeguard of liberty as asserted by James 
     Madison in Federalist No. 47 in which he stated, ``The 
     accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and 
     judiciary, in the same hands . . . may justly be pronounced 
     the very definition of tyranny''; and
       Whereas the executive branch's unilateral decision to delay 
     the implementation of a law sets a dangerous precedent under 
     which legislation that is enacted through the passage of that 
     legislation by the democratically elected Members of Congress 
     and the signing of that legislation into law by the President 
     will no longer have the force of law and will instead be 
     relegated to having the status of a mere recommendation, 
     which the President may choose to ignore: Now, therefore, be 
     it
       Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
     concurring), That it is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) President Barack Obama has violated section 3 of 
     article II of the Constitution by refusing to enforce the 
     employer mandate provisions of the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care Act;
       (2) the perpetuation of republican government depends upon 
     the rule of law;
       (3) the executive branch, which has no constitutional 
     authority to write or rewrite law at whim, has invaded upon 
     the exclusive legislative power of Congress;
       (4) the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has 
     proven to be unworkable; and
       (5) such Act should be repealed by Congress immediately.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to refrain from 
improper references toward the President.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, how much time remains on our side?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Georgia has 8 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Am I correct that the other side is out of 
time?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. That is correct.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Walberg).
  Mr. WALBERG. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Georgia.
  Mr. Speaker, this must come as a shock to the administration and 
Democrat Senate leadership who have recently described ObamaCare as 
``wonderful for our country.'' But not to us in the House and the 
American people. Today, employers are cutting jobs, hours, and wages 
because they won't be able to comply with the law. Individuals are 
seeing premiums climb, and families are losing health insurance they 
like.
  An administrative train wreck has become so likely that on July 2, 
the President announced a year delay for the employer mandate in his 
own law. This evokes a question for the President: if businesses are 
being given relief, shouldn't the same relief be given to the American 
people?
  I rise in support of today's legislation to delay both the employer 
and individual mandate. It's only fair that all taxpayers, whether 
businesses or families, receive relief from these hurtful mandates.
  I look forward to continuing to work with my colleagues to revive our 
economy, create jobs, and put the American people first so they can 
make their own health care decisions. And by the way, wouldn't it be 
great if personal responsibility, creativity, and liberty reigned again 
in America.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentlewoman from Kansas (Ms. Jenkins), a member of the Ways and 
Means Committee.
  Ms. JENKINS. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding and 
thank him for his leadership on this very important issue. And I'm 
pleased President Obama finally acknowledged how damaging the employer 
mandate will be to American businesses. I agree delaying ObamaCare's 
implementation and the economic setbacks that go with it make sense.
  However, while that delay may temporarily help people like Mary from 
northeast Kansas, who was recently informed that her job will be 
transitioned from full time to part time in order to avoid the employer 
mandate, unless we also delay the individual mandate, she will still 
need to find a new insurance plan or risk paying the new law's 
insurance tax.
  It simply is not fair to exempt big businesses from the law while 
leaving folks like Mary to pick up the tab. I urge my colleagues to 
support this bill which grants American families relief from this very 
unpopular provision.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Garrett).
  Mr. GARRETT. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Georgia.
  The President's unilateral refusal to implement ObamaCare's employer 
mandate for 1 year presents us with a question: Can the President 
suspend a law that was enacted by Congress and signed into law by that 
President? On this question, the Constitution and the principles of 
this Republic could not be clearer. The answer is an emphatic no, he 
cannot. Article II, section 3--it's called the ``take care'' clause of 
the Constitution--imposes a duty upon the President to execute the laws 
of the land, regardless of the difficulty of enforcement or his 
displeasure of the law.
  Not only has this President refused to enforce the law, but he has 
effectively rewritten the law, violating the separation of powers and 
infringing upon the exclusive right of this legislative body of this 
Congress.
  The executive branch has no constitutional right to write a law or to 
rewrite the law. So by refusing to enforce and effectively rewriting 
it, the President is setting a dangerous precedent under which laws 
enacted by a democratically elected Congress will no longer have the 
force of law, but will instead be relegated to the status of mere 
recommendations, which the President may choose to ignore at his whim.
  Mr. Speaker, this is not the rule of law; this is lawlessness, and 
that is why I have introduced House Concurrent Resolution 45 saying as 
much.
  Finally, if President Obama finds ObamaCare to be as unworkable as he

[[Page H4556]]

says it is, then he should call upon this Congress to do the right 
thing and to repeal the law immediately.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from New York (Mr. Reed), a member of the Ways and Means 
Committee.
  Mr. REED. Mr. Speaker, I rise today and ask my colleagues on the 
other side of the aisle to join us in this employer mandate relief 
because what is happening here first of all is the President is 
unilaterally ignoring the law of the land, and he's not going to be 
President forever. So when a President of a different party, my party, 
is in that office, I hope they remember the action taken today. And 
I'll put it to the American people that it makes sense for us in this 
body to require the passage of this legislation so the President's 
power is put in check.
  As to the individual mandate, Mr. Speaker, this is just fair. If 
we're going to relieve the burden on employers, then we need to relieve 
the burden on hardworking taxpayers and families across America. To me, 
it's just not right. It's fair to both pass this employer mandate 
relief bill as well as the individual relief bill that accompanies it 
later for discussion.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to 
the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Stutzman).
  Mr. STUTZMAN. Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague and 
friend from Georgia for yielding and for his hard work on this very 
important issue.
  Mr. Speaker, Mr. Harry Reid might have said that ObamaCare is 
wonderful for America, but Hoosiers back home aren't buying the spin. 
ObamaCare was sold as a benefit to hardworking Americans, but it is 
increasingly clear on both sides of the aisle that ObamaCare is hurting 
the very people it was intended to help. There is nothing wonderful 
about the situation hardworking Americans face--fewer hours, more 
taxes, soaring premiums, and smaller paychecks.
  ``Just trust the bureaucrats'' is what the Democrats said when they 
forced this mess on the American people. Three years later, they're 
asking for more time. By unilaterally delaying the employer mandate for 
a year, the White House admitted what Hoosiers already know: if they're 
willing to exempt businesses, shouldn't every hardworking family get an 
exemption as well? Let's delay both ObamaCare mandates and continue to 
work towards fully repealing a failed law that is hurting Hoosiers and 
Americans across the country and holding back our economy.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, how much time remains?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Georgia has 2 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. PRICE of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield the balance 
of my time to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Kelly).
  Mr. KELLY of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, what truly makes America 
unique is that everybody is treated fairly and equally under the law. 
That's what makes us so great. That's why people say, at least if I'm 
in America, I know I'm going to be treated the same way as everybody 
else. It's not going to matter what the color of my skin is; it's not 
going to matter how I worship; it's not going to matter whether I'm 
wealthy or poor; I'm going to be treated equally and fairly under the 
law.
  And yet today, we're talking about something that is going on in our 
government right now where the President has decided to pick winners 
and losers. The President has decided that he is going to divide the 
country even further now because he's not going to do what is fair and 
what's equal, he's going to do what's convenient.
  Now, it's pretty easy to understand what fair is. Fair is marked by 
impartiality and honesty. It's free from self-interest, prejudice, or 
favoritism. Equal means of the same measure, quantity, amount, or 
numbers, as in any other person, any other group, any other class, or 
any other part of society.
  So I ask you, How in the world can you say businesses don't have to 
comply? We're going to go ahead and give them a year off. But yet the 
individual is going to be held to the letter of the law. If we are 
truly a country of laws, if we are truly going to treat everybody 
equally and fairly under the law, then how in the world can we be here 
today discussing this and debating this on this great floor. It just 
doesn't make sense.
  A piece of legislation that continues to unravel before our very 
eyes, that creates uncertainty in our society, that creates uncertainty 
in our businesses, and now, we wonder when's the next shoe going to 
drop? What else is going to be changed? What laws will we enforce, what 
laws will we walk away from?
  I would just tell my friends on both sides of the aisle, do what we 
all believe. Let's treat people fairly and equally under the law. Could 
there be anything more American than that? And the answer is, no; it's 
self-evident. So I ask all of us today to do what's right for America. 
What's good for the goose is good for the gander.

                              {time}  1630

  If it's not good for business, why should it be good for individuals?
  Pass both pieces. Let the American people put their head on the 
pillow tonight with some kind of surety that they're going to be 
protected under the law and treated fairly and equally.
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Speaker, I submit this report, which shows that 
hundreds of thousands of constituents in the 7th district of Tennessee 
benefit from various provisions in the Affordable Care Act.

    Benefits of the Health Care Reform Law in the 7th Congressional 
                         District of Tennessee


 Committees on Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, and Education and 
           the Workforce, Democratic Staff Report, July 2013

       The landmark Affordable Care Act (ACA) began delivering 
     important new benefits and protections to tens of millions of 
     American families almost immediately after it was signed into 
     law by President Obama. But the largest benefits of the law 
     will become available to consumers on October 1, 2013, when 
     health insurance marketplaces open in all 50 states. These 
     marketplaces will offer individuals, families, and small 
     businesses an efficient, transparent one-stop shop to compare 
     health insurance policies, receive financial assistance, and 
     sign up for high-quality, affordable, and secure insurance 
     coverage.
       This fact sheet summarizes new data on the significant 
     benefits of the health care reform law in Rep. Blackburn's 
     district. It also provides the first picture of the impacts 
     of the law in districts redrawn or newly created following 
     the 2010 Census. As a result of the law:
       5,900 young adults in the district now have health 
     insurance through their parents' plan.
       More than 8,000 seniors in the district received 
     prescription drug discounts worth $10 million, an average 
     discount of $580 per person in 2011, $610 in 2012, and $960 
     thus far in 2013.
       116,000 seniors in the district are now eligible for 
     Medicare preventive services without paying any co-pays, 
     coinsurance, or deductible.
       191,000 individuals in the district--including 50,000 
     children and 75,000 women--now have health insurance that 
     covers preventive services without any co-pays, coinsurance, 
     or deductible.
       181,000 individuals in the district are saving money due to 
     ACA provisions that prevent insurance companies from spending 
     more than 20% of their premiums on profits and administrative 
     overhead. Because of these protections, over 27,900 consumers 
     in the district received approximately $4 million in 
     insurance company rebates in 2012 and 2011--an average rebate 
     of $69 per family in 2012 and $201 per family in 2011.
       Up to 44,000 children in the district with preexisting 
     health conditions can no longer be denied coverage by health 
     insurers.
       208,000 individuals in the district now have insurance that 
     cannot place lifetime limits on their coverage and will not 
     face annual limits on coverage starting in 2014.
       Up to 91,000 individuals in the district who lack health 
     insurance will have access to quality, affordable coverage 
     without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of a 
     preexisting health condition. In addition, the 39,000 
     individuals who currently purchase private health insurance 
     on the individual or small group market will have access to 
     more secure, higher quality coverage and many will be 
     eligible for financial assistance.

  Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in advance of the back-to-back 
votes brought to the floor by House Republicans to delay two key pieces 
of the Affordable Care Act: the individual responsibility and employer 
mandates.
  Today I will vote for the 38th time against a partisan attempt by 
Republicans to partially or completely repeal portions of the 
Affordable Care Act.
  The debate on these bills has added to the already 80+ hours spent on 
repeal efforts in the House, which has cost the American taxpayer $55 
million.
  If the Majority were to succeed in their efforts to repeal the 
Affordable Care Act, 129

[[Page H4557]]

million Americans with pre-existing conditions would lose the security 
of knowing they cannot be denied coverage. 25 million Americans will 
miss out on the opportunity to receive quality, affordable health 
insurance coverage through the new health insurance marketplaces. 6.6 
million young adults would lose coverage provided through their 
parents' plans, including 3.1 million who were previously uninsured. 
105 million Americans could again worry about lifetime limits on their 
health insurance coverage.
  Many constituents of Michigan's 13th District are among those already 
benefiting from Obamacare. So far, 121,000 of our neighbors who 
previously lacked health insurance have access to quality coverage 
without fear of discrimination or higher rates because of preexisting 
conditions, including 43,000 children who can no longer be denied 
coverage. 136,000 individuals--including 26,000 children and 61,000 
women--now have health insurance that covers preventative services 
without any copays, coinsurance, or deductibles. And 103,000 13th 
District residents are saving money directly because of ACA provisions.
  All the while, the Majority has made no meaningful attempt to repeal 
damaging across-the-board sequestration cuts or come to the table to 
discuss legislation to create quality jobs with living wages.
  Mr. Speaker, it's long past time to end the dysfunction epitornized 
by repeated efforts to repeal Obamacare, so that we can turn our focus 
to addressing the serious problems facing everyday Americans.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate on H.R. 2667 has 
expired.
  Pursuant to House Resolution 300, the previous question is ordered on 
the bill.
  The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 1(c) of rule XIX, further 
consideration of H.R. 2667 is postponed.

                          ____________________