FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS RESOLUTION, 2014
(House of Representatives - October 09, 2013)

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[Pages H6435-H6441]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




 FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS RESOLUTION, 
                                  2014

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 373, I call up 
the joint resolution (H.J. Res 90) making continuing appropriations for 
the Federal Aviation Administration for fiscal year 2014, and for other 
purposes, and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 373, the joint 
resolution is considered read.
  The text of the joint resolution is as follows:

                              H.J. Res. 90

       Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
     United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
     following sums are hereby appropriated, out of any money in 
     the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and out of 
     applicable corporate or other revenues, receipts, and funds, 
     for the Federal Aviation Administration for fiscal year 2014, 
     and for other purposes, namely:
       Sec. 101. (a) Such amounts as may be necessary, at a rate 
     for operations as provided in the Further Continuing 
     Appropriations Act, 2013 (division F of Public Law 113-6) and 
     under the authority and conditions provided in such Act, for 
     continuing projects or activities (including the costs of 
     direct loans and loan guarantees) that are not otherwise 
     specifically provided for in this joint resolution, that were 
     conducted in fiscal year 2013, and for which appropriations, 
     funds, or other authority were made available by such Act 
     under the heading ``Department of Transportation--Federal 
     Aviation Administration''.
       (b) The rate for operations provided by subsection (a) for 
     each account shall be calculated to reflect the full amount 
     of any reduction required in fiscal year 2013 pursuant to--
       (1) any provision of division G of the Consolidated and 
     Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-
     6), including section 3004; and
       (2) the Presidential sequestration order dated March 1, 
     2013, except as attributable to budget authority made 
     available by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 
     (Public Law 113-2).
       Sec. 102.  Appropriations made by section 101 shall be 
     available to the extent and in the manner that would be 
     provided by the pertinent appropriations Act.
       Sec. 103.  Unless otherwise provided for in this joint 
     resolution or in the applicable appropriations Act for fiscal 
     year 2014, appropriations and funds made available and 
     authority granted pursuant to this joint resolution shall be 
     available until whichever of the following first occurs: (1) 
     the enactment into law of an appropriation for any project or 
     activity provided for in this joint resolution; (2) the 
     enactment into law of the applicable appropriations Act for 
     fiscal year 2014 without any provision for such project or 
     activity; or (3) December 15, 2013.
       Sec. 104.  Expenditures made pursuant to this joint 
     resolution shall be charged to the applicable appropriation, 
     fund, or authorization whenever a bill in which such 
     applicable appropriation, fund, or authorization is contained 
     is enacted into law.
       Sec. 105.  This joint resolution shall be implemented so 
     that only the most limited funding action of that permitted 
     in the joint resolution shall be taken in order to provide 
     for continuation of projects and activities.
       Sec. 106.  Amounts made available under section 101 for 
     civilian personnel compensation and benefits in each 
     department and agency may be apportioned up to the rate for 
     operations necessary to avoid furloughs within such 
     department or agency, consistent with the applicable 
     appropriations Act for fiscal year 2013, except that such 
     authority provided under this section shall not be used until 
     after the department or agency has taken all necessary 
     actions to reduce or defer non-personnel-related 
     administrative expenses.
       Sec. 107.  It is the sense of Congress that this joint 
     resolution may also be referred to as the ``Flight Safety 
     Act''.
        This joint resolution may be cited as the ``Federal 
     Aviation Administration Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 
     2014''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The bill shall be debatable for 40 minutes, 
equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member 
of the Committee on Appropriations.
  The gentleman from Iowa (Mr. Latham) and the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Pastor) each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Iowa.


                             General Leave

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and 
include extraneous materials on H.J. Res. 90, and that I may include 
tabular material on the same.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Iowa?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

[[Page H6436]]

  Mr. Speaker, today I present H.J. Res. 90, a bill providing the FAA 
with critical funding to ensure safe air travel for the American public 
and providing critical support for the aviation industry, our Nation's 
leading exporter.
  This bill funds the FAA at the current fiscal year 2013 sequester 
level through December 15 or until enactment of a full-year 
appropriation for the Transportation-HUD bill, whichever comes first.
  The bill would bring back over 6,000 aviation safety inspectors who 
are currently not working due to the shutdown. These safety inspectors 
perform critical aircraft certifications that support American jobs by 
certifying new aircraft for sale in the U.S. and abroad.
  The FAA's aviation safety workforce is also essential to ensuring 
safety in the national airspace by reinspecting and recertifying the 
operation aircraft fleets that transport millions of Americans every 
day.
  The bill would also reopen the aircraft registry service, assuring 
that American-made aircraft can move off the production lines and onto 
the markets in the U.S. and around the world.
  The bill would reopen the FAA Academy to resume the training of new 
air traffic controllers and ensure that our air traffic controller 
workforce is fully staffed.
  The bill will ensure that air traffic control modernization 
investments resume, ensuring that our NextGen development and 
deployment continues on schedule.
  This is not a comprehensive FY 2014 bill but, rather, a CR to 
continue funding the FAA at the current fiscal year 2013 sequester 
levels. This brings the FAA back to work to ensure the safety of the 
flying public until we can come to an overall resolution on the FY 2014 
funding levels.
  I urge the quick passage of this important legislation so that we can 
send it on to the Senate. Let's get the FAA back to work.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.

                              {time}  1315

  Here we go again. This week, the House has considered bill after bill 
to fund pieces of the Federal Government. We can open the entire 
government if the House would simply pass the clean continuing 
resolution passed by the Senate nearly 2 weeks ago. Instead, we are 
considering a bill to fund the Federal Aviation Administration, but we 
are leaving many other agencies within the Department of Transportation 
in shutdown status.
  I strongly support the mission of the FAA. The controllers, 
technicians, and safety inspectors are highly skilled and dedicated 
public servants. However, I cannot support this piecemeal approach to 
funding our transportation system.
  For example, 94 percent of the Federal Transit Administration's 
employees are furloughed. More than 1,300 transit agencies across the 
country are not receiving grants for capital and operating assistance. 
No funds are provided for the Capital Investment Grant Program, which 
helps create construction jobs and relieves congestion in our major 
cities.
  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's vehicle safety 
program is shut down. Defects in cars and trucks are not being 
investigated. Crash tests and safety rulemakings have been suspended.
  What about assistance for Amtrak? Operating and capital assistance is 
discontinued at a time when more than 30 million passengers rely on 
Amtrak to get to destinations all over this country.
  The Maritime Security Program gets no relief in this piecemeal 
approach. This program provides vital support by helping move the cargo 
that is necessary to support our national defense efforts overseas.
  Finally, the National Transportation Safety Board has furloughed most 
of its employees. Investigations into last week's tragic bus crash in 
Tennessee will go undone. Today, we reported a gas explosion in 
Oklahoma, which would be the responsibility of this agency to 
investigate. Will it be investigated? Probably not--only because of the 
shutdown.
  The reckless and irresponsible shutdown that has been masterminded by 
a small faction of the House is disruptive for our Nation's 
transportation system and for the programs that support our most 
vulnerable citizens.
  For this reason, Mr. Speaker, I would ask for opposition to this 
piecemeal approach to this piece of legislation.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
Kentucky (Mr. Rogers), the chairman of the full Appropriations 
Committee.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. I thank the chairman for yielding me this 
time.
  Mr. Speaker, we have heard from the other side of the aisle on all of 
these bills that attempt to reopen many aspects of the Federal 
Government. We hear them say, well, I am in favor of that program, but 
I want to vote against it until they bring the entire government 
funding bill before us.
  I would love to do that. I would love to bring the entire budget 
here. In fact, we did, and we can't get the Senate to act on it. But in 
the meantime, the other side is saying, I will vote against this 
because I want to save and vote for the entire Federal Government.
  That may work in some of the agencies, but this is safety. This is 
the safety of people flying the skies of this country and the world. 
You don't want to delay safety until you can vote on a bigger bill. I 
think it is irresponsible not to support the safety of our people in 
the skies.
  This bill provides funding to resume operations within FAA that are 
critical to the safety of our skies and our aircraft fleet. It would 
bring back 7,000 aviation safety inspectors currently not working, 
restart aircraft certification activities, resume training for air 
traffic controllers, reopen the aircraft registry service, and continue 
air traffic control modernization.
  Mr. Speaker, you don't want to mess around with the safety of our 
people. This bill cures that problem. I can't imagine anyone wanting to 
oppose this bill.
  The sum total of these efforts will help guarantee safe, efficient, 
and reliable air travel for the American public.
  This funding is provided at an annual rate of $12 billion and will 
last until December 15, or until the Congress enacts and the President 
signs full-year appropriations bills.
  The language in this bill is yet again nearly identical to what was 
included in the CR I offered back in September--nearly a month ago.
  Once again, we are calling on the Senate to consider and pass this 
bill. Our colleagues on the other side of the Capitol continue to call 
for a clean CR; yet they continue to act on these ``clean'' mini-CRs.
  The House has put forward a plethora of options to fund the Federal 
Government: first, the four annual appropriations bills to fund the 
government in regular order; then three different continuing 
resolutions prior to September 30; and now the short-term CRs to reopen 
parts of the Federal Government--in fact, more than a third of it so 
far.
  But the Senate is committed to inaction. They didn't pass any regular 
appropriations bills; they will not pass our clean, short-term funding 
bills; and they so far have refused to join us at the negotiating 
table.
  Mr. Speaker, that completely puzzles me. It goes against the grain of 
what has gone on in this country since we have been a country. When the 
two bodies differ, the Founding Fathers said, if you can't agree, 
appoint conference members from either body--both bodies--and let them 
go out and recommend a solution to the problem. It has always worked, 
except now the Senate refuses to do their duty.
  I hope they will consider this bill as a steppingstone toward ending 
the shutdown. We need to come together in a productive way with open 
ears and open minds to find a way to clean up this mess.
  I urge my colleagues to preserve the safety of American skies. Vote 
for this bill.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Speaker, it is interesting in that I 
believe many months ago the Senate, which no one thought would pass a 
budget, we persuaded them through our votes here in the House to pass a 
budget, and the House leadership refused to have a conference to 
appoint conferees so that we could have had regular order, had done

[[Page H6437]]

the appropriations bills--and I know the chairman of Appropriations 
wanted to do that--and today here we are talking about safety when most 
of the air traffic controllers are already on the job.
  I yield as much time as she may consume to the gentlewoman from New 
York (Mrs. Lowey), the distinguished ranking member of the 
Appropriations Committee.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to this reckless 
Republican shutdown.
  As if we need any more proof of a broken Republican government 
funding strategy, today we are considering a fix to a sequester Band-
Aid. This is deja vu, Mr. Speaker, and further admission that the 
Republican budget strategy just is not working. While this bill puts 
furloughed FAA workers back on the job, it does nothing for the rest of 
our transportation system. This shutdown affects our transit, vehicle 
safety, railroad, pipeline and hazardous materials, and maritime 
programs, too.
  For example, at the Federal Transit Administration, 94 percent of the 
employees have been furloughed. No grants are being issued to more than 
1,300 transit agencies around the country. Additionally, at the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, vehicle safety 
activities, like consumer testing of new vehicles and investigations to 
identify defects in automobiles, have been suspended.
  Now, all of these points aren't to say that Democrats have no desire 
to avoid flight delays and cancellations because of furloughed 
controllers. Earlier this year, despite our opposition to the broader 
FY '14 T-HUD bill, we supported the inclusion of language to prevent 
controller furloughs. Unfortunately, that effort never advanced because 
the allocation for the T-HUD bill under the Republican budget forced 
cuts so deep to very important popular initiatives like the Community 
Development Block Grant and Amtrak programs that not even Republicans 
could support the broader bill, and it was Republicans that pulled the 
bill from the House floor.
  We could end FAA furloughs and all other furloughs if the Speaker 
allowed a vote on the clean CR to end the shutdown. Democrats have 
negotiated. Let's remember that. We didn't just meet in the middle; we 
agreed to the Republican spending level in the stopgap bill. Look no 
further than a recent headline from the National Journal yesterday: 
``Nineteen times Democrats tried to negotiate with Republicans. The 
GOP's biggest talking point of the shutdown is only true if you ignore 
everything that has happened before last week.''
  I want to make one other point. I woke up this morning listening to 
the voice of a furloughed worker with two kids in college who was 
talking about how in the world he is going to pay his expenses and put 
food on the table without the dollars that he and his wife count on in 
their accounts.
  Let's look at the facts. Let's listen to these stories in our 
districts. It is fine to be so cavalier here in Washington and shut 
down the government, talking about getting rid of our important 
obligation to pay our debts, but let's look at the impact of this. 
Let's look at what is happening back home in our districts and think of 
how critical these workers are, these programs are.
  Let's get the bill on the floor that would fund the entire 
government. This piecemeal effort may sound good. I don't know if it 
sounds good to your constituents. I don't know if you can fool them 
that way, but let's put the entire bill on the floor that was at your 
level that passed the Senate and let's move forward.
  Vote ``no'' on this irresponsible bill, and demand a House vote to 
immediately end the reckless Republican shutdown.
  Mr. LATHAM. At this time, Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from Michigan (Mrs. Miller).
  Mrs. MILLER of Michigan. I thank the gentleman for yielding the time.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in very strong support of this bill to fully fund 
the FAA, the Federal Aviation Administration. It is so absolutely 
critical, both to our economy as well as to our security in the 
airways, not only on commercial flights but general aviation as well.
  Mr. Speaker, during this shutdown, we keep hearing a lot about 
ObamaCare, but this bill has nothing to do with ObamaCare. It has no 
strings attached. It just funds the FAA.
  I know that many of our colleagues on the other side will say, well, 
they can't vote for this unless they have an entire clean CR funding 
the entire government, because they want exactly what they want, and 
nothing else will do. Yet, they call Republicans ``absolutists.''
  Fortunately, many on the other side will support this bill. In fact, 
I think it is of note that with all the various CRs, clean CRs, that we 
have been passing since this shutdown began, all with no strings 
attached, all that have nothing to do with ObamaCare, we actually now 
have funded a large part--if not more than half--of the entire 
discretionary Federal budget.
  Unfortunately, the President and the Senate Majority Leader keep 
saying that they will not negotiate; they won't consider any of these 
things.
  I urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting this important 
funding bill.

                              {time}  1330

  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Larsen), the ranking 
member of the Aviation Subcommittee of the Transportation and 
Infrastructure Committee.
  Mr. LARSEN of Washington. Mr. Speaker, as ranking member of the 
Aviation Subcommittee, I know how important it is to end the shutdown 
of the FAA, but I do have to ask the question, if safety were so 
important, why wasn't this the first bill brought to the floor in this 
piecemeal approach that the Republican side has taken?
  Now, look. A safe and efficient aviation system isn't just good for 
travelers; it's the lifeblood of the economy where I come from. In our 
State, 131,000 people across over 1,200 companies work in the aerospace 
industry, but these folks don't just depend on the FAA. Is it safety to 
say that police departments that need Federal grants to put cops on the 
beat should have to wait? Is it safety to say that our functioning 
transit systems have to wait for grants to make the transit systems 
more safe? Is it safety to say that the EPA can't issue grants in my 
district or around the country to make sure that we have safe and clean 
drinking water? This bill funds none of these priorities.
  We should not be opening just parts of the government to serve just 
some of the people. We should open the entire government for all 
Americans. The Republican solution to the Republican shutdown, this 
piecemeal approach picking winners and picking losers, is no solution 
at all.
  It's great that this House wants to make sure that air travel is 
safe, but why should we stop there? What about safety on our highways?
  In the last 10 days, there have been three major, fatal 
transportation accidents across this country. A plane crashed in Santa 
Monica, California, killing four; a bus crashed in Tennessee, killing 
eight and injuring another 14; and less than a mile from this building, 
one person died and two others were injured during a Metro repair 
accident this week. But the National Transportation Safety Board can't 
investigate because this Congress sent the investigators home on 
furlough.
  Let's end this piecemeal approach and move on to a vote on a Senate 
bill that opens all of the government for all Americans. If it's about 
safety, let's do it that way. This continued unwillingness to allow one 
vote--just one vote--to open the government for all Americans and not 
just some needs to stop. One bill, one vote for all Americans.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, at this time, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Pompeo).
  Mr. POMPEO. I thank the chairman for bringing this important piece of 
legislation to the floor.
  Mr. Speaker, it troubles me that the administration is once again 
going out of its way to cause pain for the American people and at great 
risk to America's safety. We see this up close and personal in my 
district with this incomprehensible closure of the FAA registry office. 
That is the office that allows air flights to be transferred, to be 
sold and bought and purchased and entered into service. In previous 
shutdowns, this office was deemed essential. It was kept open and for 
good reason. It is the equivalent of DMV for

[[Page H6438]]

aircraft; you have to keep this pipeline moving. It is important for 
safety and for workers. It is affecting thousands of families all 
across the country who build these airplanes--engineers and workers and 
manufacturers and sheet metal benders--especially in the Fourth 
District, the air capital of the world.
  There are thousands of families, many of them hardworking union 
families folks across the aisle tell me they care deeply about, and I 
know that I do, too. I would urge these folks on the other side of the 
aisle to recognize the importance to our labor force, to keep America 
safe, to get the aircraft registry back open, and to pass this 
legislation on the floor today.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, at this time, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Benishek).
  Mr. BENISHEK. I thank the chairman.
  Mr. Speaker, I come to the floor today in support of H.J. Res. 90, 
the Flight Safety Act. This commonsense bill will restore critical 
funding to the FAA and help protect airports in northern Michigan and 
throughout our Nation.
  Like so many people in our country, I am deeply frustrated by this 
government shutdown. I don't want to see air travelers in northern 
Michigan hurt because the Senate and the President refuse to negotiate 
on a spending plan. All that needs to be done is for both sides to come 
to the negotiating table, but the Senate refuses to talk to us. It's 
ridiculous.
  We've already seen this mess in Washington impact airports in my 
district, like the Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City. Just this 
past weekend, dozens of flights were canceled because of this 
government shutdown. Families shouldn't be stranded at the airport for 
hours just because Washington can't get its act together. But it 
doesn't have to be this way. We could fix this problem at our airports 
right now with this simple piece of legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support the Flight Safety Act 
today. I also urge our colleagues in the Senate to take action and pass 
this measure as soon as possible.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Speaker, I would say to my colleague that 
we could fund the entire government if my colleague could persuade his 
leadership to bring H.J. Res. 59 to the floor. We could have a straight 
up-or-down vote. It would probably pass in a bipartisan manner, and we 
could stop the shutdown, and people could go back to work.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, it's interesting that we've talked about bringing our 
employees back from the shutdown. We were told by the chairman of the 
Appropriations Committee that this is very important because here we 
are dealing with safety, and the reality is that probably the majority 
of the air traffic controllers and safety personnel, as required by 
FAA, are working. I can't imagine that the administrator, Mr. Huerta, 
would put the American public in any kind of danger.
  Again, if we would have had a budget conference several months ago, 
we could have done the appropriations process and probably funded the 
entire government using regular order, but I keep hearing that if this 
vote were to come to the floor that it would pass in a bipartisan 
manner.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to take H.J. Res. 59 from the 
table and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under guidelines consistently issued by 
successive Speakers, as recorded in section 956 of the House Rules and 
Manual, the Chair is constrained not to entertain the request unless it 
has been cleared by the bipartisan floor and committee leaderships.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Well, Mr. Speaker, next time I bring it up, I 
will try to clear it since there is such enthusiasm to bring the 
Federal Government back to work.
  With that, Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I urge the passage of the bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I rise to speak about H.J. Res. 90, 
the so-called ``Flight Safety Act,'' which provides limited and 
insufficient funding for the Federal Aviation Administration, and is 
test gimmick of the Tea Party dominated Republican majority to 
extricate themselves from the fiasco they created when they voted to 
shut down the government.
  I am a senior member of the Homeland Security. I chaired the 
Transportation Security Subcommittee in the 111th Congress and was its 
Ranking Member in the last Congress. I represent Houston, which is home 
to one of the nation's busiest and most important airports. So I know 
the importance of the air transit industry to our economy. And I know 
that the health of the air transit industry depends upon security of 
air travel. I support robust funding for the FAA. I support robust 
funding for TSA. I support and worked to secure increased funding to 
modernize airport runways, reduce noise, increase the number of air 
marshals, and to develop NextGen.
  NextGen is the name given to the new airspace system to be phased in 
between 2012 and 2025. NextGen will transform America's air traffic 
control system from an aging ground-based system to a satellite-based 
system that shortened routes, save time and fuel, reduce traffic 
delays, increase capacity, and permit controllers to monitor and manage 
aircraft with greater safety margins. So while I take a back seat to no 
one in my support for a modern and secure air transportation system, 
the bill before us is the wrong way for this House to deal with the 
pressing budgetary priorities of the nation.
  Mr. Speaker, I call upon our Republican colleagues to abandon their 
current strategy of wasting valuable floor time bring miniCRs to the 
floor. They know the Senate will not accept them and the President will 
veto them. This strategy will not reopen the government they voted to 
shut down.
  There are the votes in this House to pass the clean CR from the 
Senate and send it to the President today. That will reopen the 
government today. And that is what we should do. Every day we delay 
passing a clean CR is another day of unneccessary pain and hardship and 
burden inflicted on the American people.
  People like Ramon Encarnacion of Texas, whose 11-year-old son doesn't 
understand why his father, an FAA aviation safety inspector, was able 
to greet him when he got home from school this week. ``When he came 
home and saw me here and not working, Mr. Encarnacion said `But you're 
always at work.' '' Mr. Encarnacion worked for 25 years at American 
Airlines without ever being furloughed and he never thought he would be 
out of work when he took a job at the Federal Aviation Administration 
as a safety inspector last year. But with the government shutdown, Mr. 
Encarnacion and hundreds of other Texas employees who work for the FAA 
are getting an unplanned and unpaid leave of absence.
  Mr. Speaker, there is much more to the nation's transportation system 
and infrastructure than the small portion of FAA safety inspectors 
funded by this piece-meal mini-CR.
  The shutdown of the government has crippled many of the safety 
enforcement and grant-making functions of the Federal Transit 
Administration, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Federal 
Railroad Administration, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.
  This mini-CR does not end the adverse effects that the government 
shutdown has had on other transportation safety and infrastructure 
investments. As long as House Republicans abandon their shutdown 
strategy: The Federal Transit Administration cannot process or award 
operating and capital grants to roughly 1,300 transit agencies.
  The FTA cannot fund or review major transit capital projects which 
create construction jobs and relieve congested areas. And FTA cannot 
implement its authorized safety oversight responsibilities provided in 
MAP-21. FTA cannot perform these critical functions because more than 9 
in 10 (94 percent) of its employees have been furloughed.
  There are no funds in this mini-CR for the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration so the agency has had to: Suspend investigations 
into safety defects in vehicles; halt all vehicle safety enforcement, 
research, data analysis, and consumer testing programs; Delay 
compliance testing of vehicles and equipment; and Defer safety research 
on crash avoidance technologies, occupant protection and alcohol 
detection.
  Since there are no funds for the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration in this bill, the agency lacks funds to conduct 
pipeline and hazardous materials safety inspections or to award 
pipeline safety grants to state and local governments.
  The National Transportation Safety Board has had to furlough 95 
percent of employees and suspend investigations into new crashes and 
incidents.

[[Page H6439]]

  The same is true for the Federal Railroad Administration, which has 
no funds for FRA safety inspectors and has furloughed more than half of 
its employees.
  Mr. Speaker, the lack of funding for the Maritime Administration has 
resulted in the shutdown of the United States Merchant Marine Academy 
and a suspension of the Maritime Security Program, which ships cargo to 
support our national defense efforts overseas.
  Finally, Mr. Speaker, this mini-CR claims funds portions of the 
Transportation Security Administration but it provides no funds for 
commercial aviation screening or Federal Flight Deck Officer Training 
or Federal Air Marshals travel and training.
  Democrats are and have been willing to negotiate over honest 
differences--but not before House Republican vote to open the 
government and remove the threat of government default.
  Mr. Speaker, people are hurting. Our economy is suffering. The 
shutdown has cost our economy $8.5 billion in lost productivity already 
and that number increases by $1.5 billion everyday.
  Mr. Speaker, it is time to end the madness. Let the House vote today 
on H.J. Res. 59, as passed by the Senate and reopen our government and 
put our people back to work.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate has expired.
  Pursuant to House Resolution 373, the previous question is ordered.
  The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the joint 
resolution.
  The joint resolution was ordered to be engrossed and read a third 
time, and was read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the joint 
resolution?
  Ms. ESTY. I am opposed.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. Esty moves to recommit the joint resolution H.J. Res. 
     90 to the Committee on Appropriations with instructions to 
     report the same back to the House forthwith with the 
     following amendment:
       Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the 
     following:
     That upon passage of this joint resolution by the House of 
     Representatives, the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 59) making 
     continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2014, and for other 
     purposes, as amended by the Senate on September 27, 2013, 
     shall be considered to have been taken from the Speaker's 
     table and the House shall be considered to have (1) receded 
     from its amendment; and (2) concurred in the Senate 
     amendment.

  Ms. ESTY (during the reading). I ask unanimous consent to dispense 
with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentlewoman's motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. A point of order is reserved.
  Pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from Connecticut is recognized 
for 5 minutes in support of her motion.
  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, this is the ninth day of the unnecessary 
government shutdown and the 12th time we've made a motion to bring a 
clean continuing resolution to the floor--12 times to allow this House 
to vote on a measure that has passed the Senate, 12 times to allow the 
House to vote on a budget figure that the Republicans asked for and 
that has already passed this House--a measure that, based on public 
statements by Members of this body, would pass and reopen the 
government immediately.
  Across my district and across the country, workers have been 
furloughed, and veterans and seniors are seeing their earned benefits 
delayed. People in Connecticut and across America are suffering the 
consequences of this reckless, unnecessary shutdown in very real ways.
  For months, groups in Connecticut that partner with NIH to conduct 
research that we need to find breakthrough treatments for children and 
adults with cancer have been asking that we end the budget sequester. 
Last week, university hospitals and researchers like those in my State 
came together to oppose the piecemeal approach, and they asked this 
House to end the government shutdown.
  The shutdown means that loans for small businesses to help them grow 
and create jobs are being delayed. In fact, the average loans for small 
businesses approved per day in my district are $188,000, and those 
businesses put those loans to work in creating jobs, ordering new 
equipment, exporting their goods, but they can't when the SBA is shut 
down.
  Business travelers need the entire Federal budget reopened, not a 
gimmick piecemeal bill limited to parts of the FAA. Piecemeal gimmicks 
are not a solution for families and children who need the entire 
Federal Government reopened so that Head Start classrooms aren't 
closed. Piecemeal gimmicks are not a solution for our veterans who need 
the entire Federal Government reopened so that they don't face even 
more unnecessary, harmful delays for the benefits they have earned.
  Tax-paying Americans are right to expect their hard-earned tax 
dollars are used responsibly. What sense does it make for taxpayers to 
be footing the bill for furloughed workers who are prohibited from 
working when we can vote today for this motion which would lead to the 
entire Federal Government's reopening?
  Yesterday, I received a report that 801 unemployment claims have been 
filed in Connecticut from furloughed workers. Taxpayers will be paying 
unemployment instead of paying people to work. One vote is all it would 
take, and this motion could be that vote.
  It's time to end the shutdown. It's time to send a short-term funding 
bill to the President. It's time to reopen the entire Federal 
Government. It is time to be responsible. This is what I hear from 
folks across my district: Reopen the entire government. A manufacturer 
in my district let me know that the shutdown is causing uncertainty in 
its business and its customers' businesses. The shutdown has put a 
chilling effect on its customers and is harming confidence.
  Piecemeal gimmicks are not the solution to this problem, and this 
disingenuous, piecemeal approach is not acceptable to the Chamber of 
Commerce or to a coalition of over 250 associations representing 
multiple private sector job-creating industries. They sent a letter to 
us even before the shutdown, urging this body to promptly pass a 
continuing resolution to fund the government and raise the debt 
ceiling. We need to reopen the Federal Government for all of the 
American people.
  Make no mistake: I want the FAA reopened. I have contract towers in 
my district. I want the FAA reopened. I want the VA reopened. I want 
the entire Federal Government reopened. I ask my colleagues to be 
reasonable and to vote to pass this motion to reopen the entire Federal 
Government.
  I will remind my colleagues who claim that we won't meet part way, we 
have. Mr. Speaker, the budget figure in this temporary spending bill is 
your proposal. The Republican budget number is much, much lower, 
frankly, than what Democrats prefer, but we want to end the shutdown 
and stop the pain for all of the American people. So we come before 
this House with the Republicans' own budget figure and ask all House 
Members to do the right thing. Join us. Join us in reopening the 
Federal Government. I urge all House Members to vote ``aye'' on this 
motion.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1345


                             Point of Order

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I make a point of order that the 
instructions contained in the motion violate clause 7 of rule XVI, 
which requires that an amendment be germane to the bill under 
consideration.
  As the Chair recently ruled on October 2, 3, 4, 7, and 8, 2013, the 
instructions contain a special order of business within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Rules, and, therefore, the amendment 
is not germane to the underlying bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I insist on my point of order.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Does the gentlewoman from Connecticut wish 
to be heard on the point of order?
  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, doesn't the bill before us fund a portion of 
the Federal Government?
  My motion to recommit would open up the entire Federal Government so 
that all of the benefits taxpayers have paid for with their hard-earned 
dollars are available.

[[Page H6440]]

  Can the Chair explain why it is not germane to open all of the 
Federal Government instead of just one portion of the government?
  We have voted to pay workers furloughed during a shutdown--I 
supported that bill--but what sense does it make to have workers paid 
to sit at home and not able to do their jobs? What kind of a strange 
House is this that would force that situation on our workers and 
taxpayers?
  Mr. Speaker, if you rule this motion out of order, does that mean we 
will not be opening the entire Federal Government today? Can the Chair 
please explain why we can't open the entire Federal Government today?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair is prepared to rule.
  The gentleman from Iowa makes a point of order that the instructions 
proposed in the motion to recommit offered by the gentlewoman from 
Connecticut are not germane.
  The joint resolution extends funding relating to the Federal Aviation 
Administration. The instructions in the motion propose an order of 
business of the House.
  As the Chair ruled on October 2, October 3, October 4, October 7, and 
October 8, 2013, a motion to recommit proposing an order of business of 
the House is not germane to a measure providing for the appropriation 
of funds because such a motion addresses a matter within the 
jurisdiction of a committee not represented in the underlying measure.
  Therefore, the instructions propose a non-germane amendment. The 
point of order is sustained.
  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, I appeal the ruling of the Chair.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is, Shall the decision of the 
Chair stand as the judgment of the House?
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I move to lay the appeal on the table.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to table.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of Rule 
XX, this 15-minute vote on the motion to table will be followed by 5-
minute votes on passage of the joint resolution, if arising without 
further proceedings in recommittal, and the motion to suspend the rules 
and pass House Joint Resolution 91.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 228, 
nays 194, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 536]

                               YEAS--228

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NAYS--194

     Andrews
     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Ellmers
     Gabbard
     Grijalva
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     McCarthy (NY)
     Meeks
     Rush
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1412

  Mr. CARSON of Indiana and Ms. SINEMA changed their vote from ``yea'' 
to ``nay.''
  So the motion to table was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mrs. ELLMERS. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 536, I was unavoidably 
detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yes.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the joint 
resolution.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. FARR. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 252, 
noes 172, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 537]

                               AYES--252

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)

[[Page H6441]]


     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Keating
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Miller, Gary
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Nunnelee
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Radel
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--172

     Andrews
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clarke
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watt
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     McCarthy (NY)
     Rush
     Young (FL)


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining.

                              {time}  1419

  So the joint resolution was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________