NATIONAL BASEBALL HALL OF FAME COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT AMENDMENT
(House of Representatives - April 24, 2013)

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[Pages H2260-H2261]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




    NATIONAL BASEBALL HALL OF FAME COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT AMENDMENT

  Mr. BACHUS. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill (H.R. 1071) to specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that 
will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame 
commemorative coins.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 1071

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SIZE OF PRECIOUS-METAL BLANKS.

       Section 3(a) of the National Baseball Hall of Fame 
     Commemorative Coin Act (Public Law 112-152) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1)(B), by striking ``have'' and inserting 
     ``be struck on a planchet having a''; and
       (2) in paragraph (2)(B), by striking ``have a'' and 
     inserting ``be struck on a planchet having a''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Alabama (Mr. Bachus) and the gentlewoman from Alabama (Ms. Sewell) each 
will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Alabama.


                             General Leave

  Mr. BACHUS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks 
and submit extraneous materials for the Record on H.R. 1071.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Alabama?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BACHUS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 1071, introduced by our 
colleague from New York (Mr. Hanna), along with Mr. Doyle and Mr. 
Gibson, two other Representatives from the State of New York.
  This is a two-line amendment of the most technical sort. It amends 
the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act, sponsored by 
Mr. Hanna and Mr. Doyle, and passed last year by this Congress. The 
legislation calls for the Mint to strike and issue next year's coins in 
commemoration of the Hall of Fame's 75th anniversary.
  The coin will be domed, Mr. Speaker, the first of that kind ever done 
by the Mint. As they did the technical work of preparing to produce the 
coin, the Mint discovered that using a standard coin blank and stamping 
the center part into a dome drew the edges of the coin inward a few 
thousandths of an inch; not a big deal, but enough to be out of spec 
with the finished size of the coin designated in the legislation.
  To avoid making a coin not in compliance with the law, or having to 
purchase expensive custom coin blanks, this bill simply eliminates the 
requirement for the finished size and specification that the coins be 
struck on standard commemorative coin blanks. The result will be a less 
expensive coin and less work for the Mint.
  This is truly a technical amendment, Mr. Speaker. I urge its quick 
passage.
  With that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 1071. The bill corrects the 
specification of the precious metal blanks to be used by the U.S. Mint 
in making the National Baseball Hall of Fame coins which Congress 
authorized last term. This correction will result in a cost savings, 
permitting the U.S. Mint to implement the design specifications using 
standard-sized blanks and produce the coins by January 2014, the 
required deadline.
  Last Congress, I voted in favor of minting the National Baseball Hall 
of Fame commemorative coin. Proceeds from the coin will go to the 
National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, to help 
fulfill its mission of preserving history, honoring excellence, and 
connecting generations through the rich history of our national 
pastime.
  One of the most popular exhibits at the Hall of Fame is that of 
Jackie Robinson, who broke the color barrier in 1947, bringing his 
amazing skills from the Negro League to win Rookie of the Year his 
first year. He led the Brooklyn Dodgers to 6 pennants in 10 seasons, 
including their own World Series in 1955. He was the 1949 National 
League Most Valuable Player. Jackie Robinson was elected to the Hall of 
Fame in 1962, after his phenomenal career. Most importantly, he showed 
tremendous grace and poise as he integrated the major leagues and 
served as an inspiration to so many of us in generations to come. The 
number he wore--42--as a Brooklyn Dodger has been retired in his honor, 
and no other ball player can wear that number again.
  Baseball is also a wonderful pastime in my own district of 
Birmingham, Alabama, where we have a minor league team, the Birmingham 
Barons, and enjoy the baseball.
  I ask for passage of H.R. 1071 and urge my colleagues to approve this 
bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BACHUS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Hanna), who is the sponsor of this legislation.
  Mr. HANNA. I thank the chairman emeritus for yielding and for his 
strong support of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coin 
bill.
  Mr. Speaker, the United States Mint is working hard to produce 
spectacular coins next year honoring the National Baseball Hall of 
Fame's 75th anniversary.
  As called for in the legislation I authored in last year's Congress, 
the coin will be unique in the history of the Mint. It will be domed, 
with the back of the coin depicting stitches that appear on a major 
league baseball.
  In doing the production work, the Mint discovered that the work to 
make the coin domed would make the finished coin slightly smaller than 
the standard finished commemorative coin. I am pleased the Mint has 
brought this to our attention and asked that we do a technical 
amendment to allow them to use standard coin blanks, instead of having 
to secure expensive custom ones.
  Since all production costs of commemorative coins are passed on to 
the consumer, this will keep the cost of these coins down for baseball 
fans around the world who want to commemorate 75 years of collecting, 
displaying, and honoring our national pastime.
  Mr. Speaker, this is a good bill that actually saves money and 
effort, and I urge its immediate passage.
  Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. BACHUS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Gibson).
  Mr. GIBSON. I thank the gentleman for yielding. And it's a great 
privilege to rise today in support of this bill.
  I'm proud to represent Cooperstown in upstate New York, home of the 
Baseball Hall of Fame. Baseball, America's pastime, is something that 
unites us and I think also something that engenders hope throughout our 
country, the feeling that we all have in April, the possibility that 
our team could go all the way and win the World Series, something, 
indeed, that unites us.
  A coin is a fitting way to honor the Hall of Fame and also help our 
efforts for tourism in central New York. And this bill and this coin 
are able to do all that at no cost to the taxpayer.
  I might also say that this competition where we now have children 
from across the country that are involved in this competition to 
provide the best design is, I think, going to kindle even more support 
for baseball. And so I urge my colleagues to support the bill.
  I thank Mr. Hanna for his leadership and the chairman for the 
opportunity to speak this morning in support of it.
  Mr. BACHUS. Mr. Speaker, I want to commend my New York colleagues for

[[Page H2261]]

bringing this bill. Obviously, those of us who visited Cooperstown, 
it's a wonderful place, and I can really think of no better way to 
start the celebration of the 75th anniversary than to go view the film, 
``42,'' about Jackie Robinson.

                              {time}  1240

  Baseball has a rich history. It has a history, as with other sports, 
of bringing people together, putting aside their personal, emotional, 
or ideological differences. It is a wonderful movie and a lesson for 
all of us.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Alabama (Mr. Bachus) that the House suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, H.R. 1071.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

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