ROLL CALL OF HEROES
(House of Representatives - September 18, 2013)

Text available as:

Formatting necessary for an accurate reading of this text may be shown by tags (e.g., <DELETED> or <BOLD>) or may be missing from this TXT display. For complete and accurate display of this text, see the PDF.

        

[Pages H5632-H5641]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                          ROLL CALL OF HEROES

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Yoho). Under the Speaker's announced 
policy of January 3, 2013, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Rodney 
Davis) is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority 
leader.


                             General Leave

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
that all Members may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and 
extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the subject of 
my Special Order.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Illinois?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, it is again an honor for 
me to be here today with my colleagues to honor the 79 living 
Congressional Medal of Honor recipients.
  To continue what we started earlier, I'd like to yield to my 
colleague from the great State of Illinois (Mr. Shimkus).


                     Honoring Captain Howard V. Lee

  Mr. SHIMKUS. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague and friend for 
the recognition and for the opportunity to recognize Captain Howard V. 
Lee from Virginia Beach, Virginia.
  Captain Lee was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry 
above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy in 
Vietnam.
  When Lee realized that the unit had suffered numerous casualties, 
depriving it of effective leadership, and being fully aware that the 
platoon was even then under more heavy attack by the enemy, Major Lee 
took seven men and proceeded by helicopter to reinforce the beleaguered 
platoon. Major Lee disembarked from the helicopter with two of his men, 
and braving withering enemy fire, led them into the perimeter, where he 
fearlessly moved from position to position, directing and encouraging 
the overtaxed troops. Although painfully wounded by fragments from an 
enemy grenade in several areas of his body, including his eye, Major 
Lee continued undauntedly throughout the night to direct the valiant 
defense, coordinate supporting fire and apprising higher headquarters 
of the plight of the platoon. The next morning, he collapsed from his 
wounds and was forced to relinquish command.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Captain Howard V. Lee. Semper Fi.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, my good friend Mr. Shimkus.
  At this point, I would like to yield to my colleague from the 20th 
Congressional District of the great State of New York (Mr. Tonko).


          Honoring Sergeant First Class Francis Sherman Currey

  Mr. TONKO. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Illinois and the 
gentlewoman from Hawaii for bringing us together in a bipartisan, 
spirited way to recognize the living Medal of Honor winners, who are 
much applauded and much recognized and deeply loved by this Nation.
  I rise this evening to honor the heroic efforts of Sergeant First 
Class Francis Sherman Currey of the United States Army.
  Sergeant Currey served with the 30th Infantry Division and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for acts of conspicuous gallantry on 
December 21, 1944, near Malmedy, Belgium.
  While defending a strong point, Sergeant Currey's platoon was overrun 
by German tanks, leading to the withdrawal of his platoon. Sergeant 
Currey was able to obtain a bazooka despite taking heavy fire from 
enemy tanks and infantrymen just a short distance away. Pushing 
forward, Sergeant Currey eliminated one tank and cleared three German 
soldiers from a house. In discovering five trapped American soldiers, 
Sergeant Currey acquired several anti-tank grenades. In driving the 
tank men from their vehicles, he provided enough cover fire to free the 
five soldiers.
  It is for his indomitable heroism and consummate devotion to duty 
that I am proud to honor and remember the actions of Sergeant First 
Class Sherman Currey. I thank you for the opportunity to share with you 
this evening on behalf of this wonderful gentleman.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much for 
being here to honor a true hero.
  I would like to now yield to my colleague from Florida (Mr. 
Buchanan).


       Honoring Private First Class Hector Albert Cafferata, Jr.

  Mr. BUCHANAN. I want to thank the gentleman from Illinois and the 
gentlelady from Hawaii.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor Private First Class Hector Albert 
Cafferata, Jr., of the United States Marine Corps.
  Private Cafferata was awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery in 
action in Korea on November 28, 1950, while serving with the famed 1st 
Marine Division.
  As the only unwounded member of his squad, he singlehandedly engaged 
the enemy while under heavy fire from machine guns, mortars and 
grenades. For over 7 hours, he was able to successfully fend off wave 
after wave of enemy attacks until reinforcements could arrive. However, 
as reinforcements moved in, an enemy grenade landed in his trench. The 
private immediately grabbed the grenade and threw it from the trench 
before it detonated. Though wounded by the blast,

[[Page H5633]]

he saved the lives of many of his men serving with him that day.
  It is for his supreme bravery and courageousness in carrying out his 
duties that I am proud to honor and remember the actions of Private 
First Class Hector Albert Cafferata, Jr.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you to my colleague from Florida.
  I would like to now yield to my colleague Mr. Heck from Washington's 
10th Congressional District.


            Honoring Sergeant First Class Leroy Arthur Petry

  Mr. HECK of Washington. Thank you.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to add my expression of gratitude both to 
the gentleman from the State of Illinois and to the gentlelady from the 
State of Hawaii for the honor of participating in this.
  I rise now to acknowledge the gallantry of a couple of more residents 
of Washington State's 10th Congressional District who are recipients of 
the Congressional Medal of Honor. I've had the great privilege of 
meeting both of these gentlemen.
  First, I rise to honor the heroic efforts of Sergeant First Class 
Leroy Arthur Petry of the United States Army.
  Sergeant First Class Petry was with the 75th Ranger Regiment and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for exceptional bravery in action on May 26, 
2008, in Afghanistan.
  Though seriously wounded following an enemy attack, Sergeant First 
Class Petry was able to move himself and a companion to safety and 
communicate the situation to the rest of the squad. When another Ranger 
moved forward to assist them, a grenade fell between the men. Sergeant 
First Class Petry unhesitatingly sprang for it and attempted to throw 
it away. Although he saved the lives of the two men with him, the 
grenade exploded and seriously wounded Sergeant First Class Petry. 
Indeed, he lost a good part of his right arm, and his right hand is a 
prosthetic.

                              {time}  1900

  I've shaken that hand on multiple occasions, and I cannot explain the 
magic that it is among the warmest handshakes I've ever experienced.
  It is for his extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty thought I'm 
proud to honor and remember the actions of Sergeant First Class Leroy 
Arthur Petry, a resident of Steilacoom, Washington.


              Honoring Master Sergeant Wilburn Kirby Ross

  Mr. HECK of Washington. Finally, Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor 
the heroic efforts of Master Sergeant Wilburn Kirby Ross of the United 
States Army.
  Master Sergeant Ross was with the 3rd Infantry Division and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in action on 
October 30, 1944, near Saint-Jacques, France.
  After his company had attacked a German company, Master Sergeant Ross 
placed his machine gun in front of their line in order to absorb the 
initial impact of a counterattack. Master Sergeant Ross then fired with 
deadly effect on the assaulting force and repelled it. He continued to 
man his machine gun, holding off six more German attacks. Master 
Sergeant Ross killed 40 and wounded 10 of the enemy, broke the assault 
single-handedly, and forced the Germans to withdraw. Master Sergeant 
Ross remained at his post that night and the following day for a total 
of 36 hours.
  In a coda to his story, he was a careerist in the United States Army 
and was inadvertently shipped to Korea after World War II, which was 
against Department of Defense policy. Not discovered until he was 
halfway to Korea, his commanding officer asked him what he was doing 
there. He said, Well, I can hardly swim back now, sir. On the very 
first day in Korea, Sergeant Ross was wounded again, for which he 
received the Purple Heart.
  It is for his extraordinary bravery that I'm proud to honor and 
remember the actions of Master Sergeant Wilburn Ross, a resident of 
Dupont, Washington.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I now yield to my good 
friend from the great State of New Jersey (Mr. Lance).


                    Honoring Colonel Jack H. Jacobs

  Mr. LANCE. Mr. Speaker, I rise this evening to honor the military 
service record of Colonel Jack H. Jacobs of Far Hills, New Jersey.
  Colonel Jacobs was awarded the U.S. Army's Medal of Honor for 
conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in action 
against the enemy in Vietnam.
  Under intense heavy machine gun and mortar fire from a Viet Cong 
battalion, Colonel Jacobs called for and directed air strikes on the 
enemy positions to facilitate a renewed attack. Due to the intensity of 
the enemy fire and heavy casualties to the command group, including the 
company commander, the attack stopped.
  Although wounded by mortar fragments, Colonel Jacobs assumed command 
of the allied company, ordered a withdrawal from the exposed position, 
and established a defensive perimeter. He returned under intense fire 
to evacuate a seriously wounded adviser to the safety of a wooded area 
where he administered lifesaving first aid. He then returned through 
heavy automatic weapons fire to evacuate the wounded company commander.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Colonel Jack H. Jacobs.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, Mr. Lance.
  Mr. Speaker, since the first Medal of Honor was given on March 25, 
1863, only 3,461 men have also earned it. Today, as has been mentioned, 
only 79 living recipients remain.
  In order to properly honor these heroes, as you know, we've invited 
our fellow Members of Congress in bipartisan fashion to come to the 
floor and speak on each one of the living recipients of this great 
Medal of Honor. But I'd first would like to personally thank my 
colleague, Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, for joining me in this effort 
across the aisle. As a veteran and a current member of the Hawaii 
National Guard, Tulsi exemplifies the values and discipline of our 
armed services.
  I would also like to recognize Garrett Anderson, my district staffer, 
who handles veteran issues and who was able to join me tonight for this 
special occasion. Garrett is a veteran of the Iraq war and has become a 
leader for all veterans and wounded warriors not only in his home 
community of Champaign-Urbana, but throughout our Nation.
  Representative Tulsi Gabbard and Garrett Anderson are not only role 
models to young folks across this great country, but to my own children 
as well. I'm honored to have their support tonight.
  I now yield to my colleague, Tulsi Gabbard.
  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, I'm so proud personally to be able to join 
with my friend and colleague, Representative Rodney Davis, as we lead 
this bipartisan Special Order to remember and to honor the 
extraordinary sacrifice and displays of true love of country that have 
been exemplified by the proud warriors who served in conflicts past and 
present.
  President Kennedy once said:

       A Nation reveals itself not only by the men it produces, 
     but also by the men it honors and the men it remembers.

  I had the privilege last year as the reunion was held in Hawaii for 
these remaining living Medal of Honor recipients. We had a dinner on 
the bow of the Mighty Mo at Pearl Harbor, and it was so incredible and 
moving to be there in the presence of people I had read about, been 
inspired by, and been motivated by as a child but also throughout my 
time training when those days felt dark and you felt tired and you felt 
like maybe I just can't do this. It was these men who truly exemplified 
and gave us, as we were training, energy to move forward.
  Each of these 79 living veterans has been awarded the Congressional 
Medal of Honor, our Nation's highest military decoration for valor in 
combat. As we stand here this evening, we represent our constituents 
and the sentiments and appreciation of a grateful Nation.


             Honoring Staff Sergeant Allan Jay Kellogg, Jr.

  Ms. GABBARD. The select few, like Staff Sergeant Allan Jay Kellogg 
from my State of Hawaii, who also lives in my hometown of Kailua, 
consciously made the decision, at the point when it mattered most, to 
do an extraordinary thing: that if need be, they would give their lives 
for others. And what is so incredible about all of these men we have 
had the honor to meet is they are humble heroes who would do it in a 
heartbeat again if necessary.

[[Page H5634]]

  They made tremendous sacrifices protecting our ideals and freedoms to 
keep our Nation safe. It's because of their sacrifice and their service 
that we can be here today to speak our minds--sometimes agreeing, 
sometimes disagreeing--where we can practice our faith, and pursue our 
dreams. That's the reason we gather today--Members of Congress from 
both parties and from across the country--to stand in awe of their 
sacrifice and to pay tribute to their heroic actions.
  We also remember the parents and the community that raised these 
heroes, the families that stood behind them, the military that trained 
them, and their battle buddies, the men and women who served by their 
side.
  I think I can safely say that I speak for all Americans when I say 
that we are incredibly grateful for what they have done for us and what 
they have done for our country. The courage they have shown, the 
example they have set for us is truly special. None of the words that 
we can say will ever be truly worthy of their sacrifice or their 
service, but we do our best to pay our tribute and express our 
gratitude.


                   Honoring Senator Daniel K. Inouye

  Ms. GABBARD. While tonight we're honoring the remaining living 
veterans who have been recipients of the Medal of Honor, I would like 
to take a moment to remember a Medal of Honor recipient who is near and 
dear to my heart, to the State of Hawaii, to the country, and who is no 
longer with us.
  Senator Daniel K. Inouye enlisted in the U.S. Army at age 17 just 
after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He served with E Company of the 442 
Regimental Combat Team, made up entirely of Americans of Japanese 
ancestry at a time when our country was putting Japanese Americans in 
concentration camps. In 1945, Senator Inouye lost his arm and suffered 
multiple injuries as he charged a series of German machine gun nests on 
a hill in Italy. His selfless acts during this battle later earned him 
the Medal of Honor. Continuing his lifelong commitment of service to 
Hawaii and the Nation, Danny Inouye was Hawaii's very first Congressman 
and served in the Senate since 1963. Senator Inouye was a true servant 
leader and an American hero of the highest order, and he continues to 
be an inspiration to me and countless others around the world.
  Congressman Davis and I now have the honor to be joined by some of 
our colleagues as we continue to honor these courageous heroes.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, Tulsi. It is an honor to be 
standing here with you in this great Chamber to honor our heroes.
  I now yield to my good friend from the great State of Washington (Mr. 
Kilmer).


                      Honoring Sergeant John Hawk

  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank Representative Davis 
and Representative Gabbard for organizing this important time.
  It's my honor to stand on the floor and recognize the heroic actions 
of two distinguished recipients of the Medal of Honor that I have the 
pleasure of representing, John Hawk and Bruce Crandall.
  Sergeant Hawk was with the 90th Infantry Division and awarded the 
Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry while serving in France during 
World War II and particularly for his actions on August 20, 1944.
  While manning a light machine gun, Sergeant Hawk successfully pushed 
back the infantry forces with his machine gun fire. When an artillery 
shell knocked out his gun and wounded his thigh, Sergeant Hawk secured 
a bazooka and pursued the remaining tanks, forcing them into a wooded 
section. While organizing two machine gun squads and facing intense 
enemy fire and with tanks in close proximity, Sergeant Hawk repeatedly 
climbed to an exposed knoll in order to direct fire until two of the 
tanks were knocked out and the third was driven off. Even while 
suffering a painful wound, Sergeant Hawk continued to direct fire until 
the enemy surrendered.
  He showed that day, like many of our soldiers do, fearless initiative 
and heroic conduct.


            Honoring Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Perry Crandall

  Mr. KILMER. That heroism was also displayed by Lieutenant Colonel 
Bruce Perry Crandall of the United States Army. Assigned to A Company, 
229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, Lieutenant Colonel Crandall was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in Vietnam.
  On November 14, 1965, then-Major Crandall led the first major 
division operation of air mobile troops into Landing Zone X-Ray, 
bringing ammunition and supplies and evacuating the wounded. Flying 
more than 14 hours in a single day in unarmed helicopters, Major 
Crandall and his team rescued more than 70 wounded soldiers. Under the 
most extreme fire, his brave decision to land under fire instilled in 
the other pilots the will to continue and ensured that the ground 
forces would be resupplied.
  It's for his indomitable heroism I'm proud to honor and remember the 
actions of Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Crandall.
  Let me just say in closing that our Nation is stronger for the 
service and sacrifices of these two distinguished Medal of Honor 
recipients, for all of the recipients of the Medal of Honor, and for 
all of those who serve our country.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you.
  Now I yield to my colleague from the great State of California (Mr. 
McClintock).


                Honoring Sergeant Major Jon R. Cavaiani

  Mr. McCLINTOCK. I thank my friend for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the courageous acts of Sergeant 
Major Jon R. Cavaiani. Sergeant Major Cavaiani earned his Medal of 
Honor during the war in Vietnam.
  On the morning of June 4, 1971, Sergeant Major Cavaiani's camp came 
under intense enemy fire. Repeatedly exposing himself to that enemy 
fire in order to move about the perimeter, Cavaiani was able to direct 
the platoon's fire in a desperate fight for survival. When the platoon 
was called to be evacuated, Sergeant Major Cavaiani volunteered to 
remain on the ground and to direct the evacuation. The following 
morning, the enemy attack continued. Unable to slow down the assault, 
Sergeant Major Cavaiani ordered his platoon to escape while he stayed 
behind to provide cover fire, thus protecting the men of his platoon.
  On behalf of a grateful Nation and a respectful and loving community, 
I'm proud to salute the heroism and recount the actions of Sergeant 
Major Jon R. Cavaiani of Columbia, California.

                              {time}  1915

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, Mr. McClintock.
  Right now I would like to yield to my good friend from the great 
State of Indiana (Mr. Messer).


                    Honoring Sergeant Sammy L. Davis

  Mr. MESSER. Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor the heroic efforts of a 
great Hoosier, Sergeant Sammy L. Davis of the United States Army. 
Sergeant Davis, then Private First Class Davis, distinguished himself 
while serving in a remote support base in Vietnam.
  On November 18, 1967, Sergeant Davis' support base came under enemy 
mortar attack, and he was also threatened with a ground assault from 
across the river. Detecting a nearby enemy position, Sergeant Davis 
seized a machine gun and provided cover for his gun crew. But the enemy 
managed a direct hit. Ignoring warnings to seek cover, Sergeant Davis 
returned to the howitzer, which was burning furiously.
  Although he was painfully injured by enemy mortar, Sergeant Davis 
relentlessly continued firing. Disregarding his injuries and his 
inability to swim, Sergeant Davis crossed the river on an air mattress, 
where he aided in returning three soldiers to the support base. 
Refusing medical attention for his own wounds, he joined another gun 
crew, firing at the enemy until they fled.
  I am proud to honor and remember the extraordinary heroism of 
Sergeant Sammy L. Davis.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, Mr. Messer.
  I would like to now yield to my colleague from the great State of 
Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).


                    Honoring Clarence Eugene Sasser

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, let me thank my colleagues for allowing 
me to join you this evening in what I think is an enormously important 
tribute.
  As I present this distinguished gentleman, this hero, I just want to 
make mention of my friend Clarence Eugene

[[Page H5635]]

Sasser, a Medal of Honor winner born September 12, 1947, who received 
his Medal of Honor for his actions in the Vietnam War. He's now passed, 
and I know that those who live recognize their fellow recipients for 
their heroism.
  But we are honoring tonight those who live. And so it is my privilege 
to be able to salute Sergeant Major Kenneth E. Stumpf of Tomah, 
Wisconsin.


             Honoring Sergeant Major Kenneth Edward Stumpf

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor the heroic efforts of 
Sergeant Major Kenneth Edward Stumpf of the United States Army. 
Sergeant Major Stumpf was with Company C of the 25th Infantry Division 
and received the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action on April 25, 
1967.
  Might I just say, Mr. Speaker, we know that as our Vietnam vets came 
home, the response was not an American response. I'm grateful to be 
able to stand on the floor today to say that their valiant service 
evidenced by so many, and certainly through the honoring of this great 
Medal of Honor winner, now comes to the full attention of America where 
we will never, never welcome our soldiers home in any other manner than 
to say ``thank you.''
  Sergeant Major Stumpf's company approached a village and encountered 
a well-fortified bunker complex. Three men were wounded in front of a 
hostile machine gun emplacement. Sergeant Major Stumpf and his squad 
successfully eliminated two bunker positions, but one still remained a 
serious threat.
  Armed with hand grenades, Sergeant Major Stumpf ran through enemy 
fire, and as he reached the bunker, he pulled the pins on two grenades 
and directed them directly into it. With the bunkers eliminated, 
Sergeant Major Stumpf was able to rescue the three wounded servicemen.
  It is for his fighting spirit and ultimate concern for the lives of 
his fellow soldiers that I am proud to honor and remember the actions 
of Sergeant Major Kenneth Edward Stumpf. We will always remember the 
valiant efforts of our soldiers. Wars have agreement and disagreement, 
but no one, no one in America ever disagrees with the service, the 
sacrifice, the love, the valiant efforts of our men and women in the 
United States military.
  Sergeant Major Kenneth Edward Stumpf, Medal of Honor winner, we 
salute you.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you to the gentlelady from Texas.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to now be in the process where Ms. Gabbard 
and I are going to read some of the remaining speeches in honor of some 
of our heroes who are living today. And I would first like to go 
through a few for my colleagues that are going to be submitted for the 
Record but are unable to be here tonight due to extenuating 
circumstances.


            Honoring Sergeant First Class Gary Lee Littrell

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. My good friend Bill Young from Florida 
submitted for the Record a speech in honor of Sergeant First Class 
Littrell of Florida. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous 
gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam 
on April 8, 1970.
  Sergeant First Class Littrell was assigned to the United States 
Military Assistance Command, and he distinguished himself while serving 
as a light weapons infantry adviser with the 23rd battalion.


               Honoring Colonel Roger Hugh Charles Donlon

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. I would also like to submit for the 
Record in honor of my colleague Lynn Jenkins from the State of Kansas, 
to honor Colonel Roger Hugh Charles Donlon of Leavenworth, Kansas, who 
was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1964 for distinguished service in 
Vietnam. While defending a U.S. military installation against an attack 
by hostile forces, Colonel Donlon directed the defense operations in 
the midst of an enemy barrage.


               Honoring Major General Patrick Henry Brady

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Also submitting for the Record on 
behalf of my colleague from Texas, Lamar Smith, we are going to honor 
Major General Patrick Henry Brady. Major General Brady was awarded the 
Medal of Honor for extreme heroism on January 6, 1968, in Vietnam as a 
member of the 54th Medical Detachment. He rescued dozens of seriously 
wounded men from an enemy-held territory blanketed by fog and braved 
enemy fire to save his comrades.


                  Honoring Petty Officer Robert Ingram

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Also, on behalf of my colleague Ander 
Crenshaw from the great State of Florida, I would like to honor Petty 
Officer Robert Ingram from Jacksonville, Florida, for the valiant 
efforts of Hospital Corpsman Third Class Robert Ingram, who was in the 
United States Navy and was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous 
gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in the 
Republic of North Vietnam on March 28, 1966. He accompanied a point 
platoon as it engaged an outpost of a North Vietnamese battalion. As 
the fighting moved from a ridge to a rice paddy, the tree line exploded 
with a hail of bullets from 100 North Vietnamese regulars. In mere 
moments, the platoon ranks were decimated, but he proceeded to collect 
the ammunition from the dead and offered aid to the wounded.
  I would also like to now yield to my colleague from the great State 
of Hawaii to honor some more of our heroes.
  Ms. GABBARD. Thank you. Also, on behalf of two of my colleagues who 
unfortunately could not be here, I will honor their honorees.


                Honoring First Lieutenant Brian Thacker

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, on behalf of Chris Van Hollen from the 
State of Maryland, I would like to honor First Lieutenant Brian Thacker 
of the United States Army. He was with the 92nd Field Artillery 
Regiment and received his Medal of Honor for actions on March 31, 1971, 
in Vietnam.
  When his base was attacked, he assisted in its defense and remained 
in position when it became apparent that the evacuation of the base was 
necessary. He organized and directed the withdrawal of the remaining 
friendly forces with complete disregard for his personal safety. 
Lieutenant Thacker remained inside the perimeter alone to provide 
covering fire until all friendly forces had escaped. Due to his 
selfless acts, he remained trapped behind enemy lines for 8 days before 
he was finally rescued.


      Honoring Chief Warrant Officer Four Hershel Woodrow Williams

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, also on behalf of my colleague Congressman 
Rahall from West Virginia, I, with great pleasure, rise to honor 
Hershel Woodrow Williams and his heroic efforts and service.
  I had the honor of meeting Hershel last year when he and the other 
Medal of Honor recipients were in Hawaii and heard directly from him. 
Even as he sat in a wheelchair, his courageous and bold spirit was 
alive and well. And it was such an honor to meet him, I asked him for 
his autograph.
  He was with the Third Marine Division when he was awarded the Medal 
of Honor for gallantry on February 23, 1945, on the island of Iwo Jima. 
Flanked by just four riflemen, time and again Corporal Williams 
advanced into the enemy defenses to set charges and wipe out enemy 
positions with a flamethrower. He brazenly charged pillboxes and enemy 
defenses to pave the way for his fellow soldiers. Truly, his 
``unyielding determination and extraordinary heroism'' are legendary.
  But Woody's devotion did not end there. Back home, upon returning to 
his family, he served as a civilian counselor and as a volunteer in his 
church, community, and with veterans' organizations. He continued to 
dedicate his life to repay those who gave all so that he and countless 
others could come home, resulting in a lifelong commitment to service.
  For his valiant devotion to our Nation, I'm so proud to honor Chief 
Warrant Officer Four Hershel Woodrow Williams.


             Honoring Private First Class Thomas J. Kinsman

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. I would like to now, Mr. Speaker, rise 
today to honor the valiant efforts of Private First Class Thomas J. 
Kinsman of the United States Army.
  Private First Class Kinsman was awarded the Medal of Honor for 
conspicuous gallantly and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty 
in action against the enemy in Vietnam.

[[Page H5636]]

As his company was proceeding up a narrow canal in armored troop 
carriers, it came under sudden and intense rocket attack, automatic 
weapons and small arms fire from a well-entrenched Vietcong force. The 
company immediately beached and began assaulting the enemy bunker 
complex. As they were moving through heavy enemy fire to effect a link-
up, an enemy soldier in a concealed position hurled a grenade into 
their midst. Mr. Kinsman immediately alerted his comrades of the 
danger, then unhesitatingly threw himself on the grenade and blocked 
the explosion with his body. As a result of his courageous action, he 
received severe head and chest wounds.
  Through his indomitable courage, complete disregard for his personal 
safety, and profound concern for his fellow soldiers, Private First 
Class Kinsman averted loss of life and injury to the other seven men of 
his element. It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that 
I am proud to honor and remember the actions of Private First Class 
Thomas J. Kinsman.


               Honoring Lieutenant Colonel Joe M. Jackson

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Lieutenant Colonel Joe M. Jackson was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity 
above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy in 
Vietnam.
  Colonel Jackson volunteered to attempt the rescue of a three-man U.S. 
Air Force combat control team from the Special Forces camp at Kham Duc. 
Hostile forces had overrun the forward outpost and established gun 
positions on the airstrip. The camp was engulfed in flames, and 
ammunition dumps were continuously exploding and littering the runway 
with debris. To further complicate his landing, the weather was 
deteriorating rapidly, thereby permitting only one airstrike prior to 
his landing.
  Although fully aware of the extreme danger and likely failure of such 
an attempt, Lieutenant Colonel Jackson elected to land his aircraft and 
attempt the rescue. Displaying superb airmanship and extraordinary 
heroism, he landed his aircraft near the point where the combat control 
team was reported to be hiding. Once that team was onboard, Colonel 
Jackson succeeded in getting airborne despite the hostile fire.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant General Joe M. Jackson.


                   Honoring Chaplain Angelo J. Liteky

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the 
valiant efforts of Chaplain Angelo J. Liteky of the United States Army. 
Chaplain Liteky was awarded the Medal of Honor.
  Chaplain Liteky was participating in a search and destroy operation 
when Company A came under intense fire from a battalion-size enemy 
force. Observing two wounded men, Chaplain Liteky moved to within 15 
meters of an enemy machine gun position to reach them, placing himself 
between the enemy and the wounded men. Inspired by his courageous 
actions, the company rallied and began placing a heavy volume of fire 
upon the enemy's positions. In a magnificent display of courage and 
leadership, Chaplain Liteky began moving upright through the enemy 
fire, administering last rites to the dying and evacuating the wounded. 
Upon the unit's relief on the morning of December 7, 1967, it was 
discovered that, despite his painful wounds in the neck and foot, 
Chaplain Liteky had personally carried over 20 men to the landing zone 
for evacuation during the savage fighting. Through his indomitable 
inspiration and heroic actions, Chaplain Liteky saved the lives of a 
number of his comrades and enabled the company to repulse the enemy.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Chaplain Liteky. And for reasons 
unbeknownst to many of us, Chaplain Liteky has renounced his Medal of 
Honor, but still on this floor of the House deserves to be honored for 
the heroism that he demonstrated that day in 1967.


                Honoring Master Sergeant Nicholas Oresko

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Master Sergeant Nicholas Oresko was a 
platoon leader with the Company C, 94th Infantry Division of the United 
States Army and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his action on 
January 23, 1945, in Germany.
  While Company C was conducting an attack, it came under heavy enemy 
fire from its flanks, pinning the unit down. Master Sergeant Oresko 
swiftly moved forward alone, engaging the first bunker at point blank 
range and eliminating the enemy. Despite being wounded by grenade 
shrapnel, he pushed forward and managed to eliminate a second bunker 
with a grenade and clearing the remaining enemy with rifle fire.

                              {time}  1930

  Although severely wounded, Master Sergeant Oresko refused to leave 
the field until the mission was complete. It's for his quick thinking, 
indomitable courage, and devotion to duty in this attack that I'm proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Master Sergeant Nicholas Oresko.


                 Honoring Sergeant Einar H. Ingman, Jr.

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to submit, 
for the Record, on behalf of my colleague from the great State of 
Wisconsin (Mr. Duffy), in honor of the valiant efforts of Sergeant 
Einar H. Ingman, Jr., of the United States Army.
  Sergeant Ingman's company was pinned down by enemy fire that wounded 
all squad leaders and several other men. Then-Corporal Ingman assumed 
the command, reorganized and combined the two trapped squads, and 
proceeded to charge the enemy machine guns alone.
  He took out one crew with a grenade before being hit by a second 
machine gun. Seriously injured, and with incredible courage and 
stamina, Corporal Ingman rose and killed the entire gun crew, using 
only his rifle, before falling unconscious from his wounds.
  As a result of this singular action, the defense of the enemy was 
broken, his squad secured its objective, and more than 100 hostile 
troops abandoned their weapons and fled in disorganized retreat.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion that I'm proud to 
honor, on behalf of my good friend and colleague from Wisconsin (Mr. 
Duffy), and remember the actions of Sergeant Einar H. Ingman, Jr.


                  Honoring Private George Taro Sakato

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Private George Taro Sakato served with the 
442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most highly decorated unit in the 
United States Army's history to this day. He was awarded the Medal of 
Honor for extreme gallantry on October 29, 1944, in France.
  During a devastating assault by his platoon, Private Sakato killed 
five enemy soldiers and captured four. When his unit became pinned down 
by enemy fire, and without regard for that enemy fire surrounding him, 
Private Sakato charged forward and encouraged his squad to advance as 
well.
  During the maneuver, Private Sakato's squad leader was killed. In 
taking charge, Private Sakato relentlessly pushed his men forward. 
Private Sakato and his unit were ultimately victorious in halting the 
enemy's attack. During this entire action, he managed to kill 12 enemy 
soldiers, while wounding two others.
  It is for his gallant courage and fighting spirit that I am proud to 
honor and remember the actions of Private George Taro Sakato.


               Honoring Lieutenant Thomas Rolland Norris

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the 
heroic efforts of Lieutenant Thomas Rolland Norris of Hayden Lake, 
Idaho, on behalf my colleague from Idaho (Mr. Labrador.)
  Lieutenant Norris was a SEAL Advisor, and was awarded the Medal of 
Honor for supreme bravery in action from April 10 to April 13, 1972, in 
Vietnam.
  During the 3-day period, Lieutenant Norris and a 5-man team 
established a Forward Operating Base deep within heavily-controlled 
enemy territory to conduct a rescue of several downed pilots. Although 
the first pilot was located and rescued on the evening of the first 
night, a second pilot was missing.
  On the last day, Lieutenant Norris and one Vietnamese, dressed in 
fishermen disguises, traveled in a sampan up-river and located the last 
pilot. Lieutenant Norris and his companion were then able to safely 
return the pilot for medical care and evacuation.
  It is for his outstanding display of leadership and courage that I am 
proud

[[Page H5637]]

to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant Thomas Rolland Norris.


            Honoring Private 1st Class Robert Ernest Simanek

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Private 1st Class Robert Ernest Simanek was 
serving in Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, 
and received his Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in Korea on 
August 17, 1952.
  When his unit came under attack by mortar and small arms fire, this 
private displayed an enormous level of commitment to his fellow troops 
by throwing himself on a grenade that was hurled in the midst of his 
unit. Although sustaining serious wounds, Private 1st Class Simanek's 
valiant action saved his fellow Marines from serious injury and death.
  It is for his act of great personal valor and service to his country 
that I am so proud to honor the actions of Private 1st Class Robert 
Ernest Simanek.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I now yield to my friend 
and colleague from the great State of South Carolina (Mr. Sanford).


            Honoring Major General James Everett Livingston

  Mr. SANFORD. I thank both of you for what you're doing tonight.
  Mr. Speaker, as we well know, there are many heroes from across this 
country. Most recently we've seen them here in the Capitol with the 
tragedy of the Naval Yard. But I think that you all are doing something 
very special by recognizing military heroes in their different acts of 
heroism and courage over the years.
  I'd like to single out a resident from my home State of South 
Carolina, Major General James Everett Livingston. And his story's an 
interesting one, as are so many of the stories that you've read.
  But back on May 2 of 1968, he found himself as a young captain in the 
most unenviable of positions, in that a Marine company had been, 
basically, partitioned and was separated, and he and other men 
courageously went in to basically extract that Marine company.
  In the process, he was hit twice by grenade shrapnel, but he, 
himself, declined medical help until they were able to go in, extract 
those Marines, and get them out.
  I think it's in keeping with the military tradition of never leaving 
a man or a woman behind, and it says a lot about his personal courage, 
that he would, again, keep in the fight, even after withstanding 
personal injury, until those Marines were, again, up, out and 
extracted.
  And so with that, I would simply like to single out his 33 years in 
the Marines, single out his wife, Sara, and his daughters, Melissa and 
Kimberly, for what they know, which is they have a hero for a dad and, 
indeed, a recipient of the Medal of Honor.
  Thank you again for what you all are doing.


                  Honoring Lieutenant Joseph R. Kerrey

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Lieutenant Joseph Kerrey, of the United 
States Navy, was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry 
in taking action against the enemy in Vietnam.
  Kerrey led his SEAL team on a mission to capture important members of 
the enemy's area political cadre, known to be located on an island in 
the bay of Nha Trang.
  Splitting his team into two elements, and coordinating both, 
Lieutenant Kerrey led his men in the treacherous downward descent to 
the enemy's camp. Just as they neared the end of their descent, intense 
enemy fire was directed at them, and Lieutenant Kerrey received massive 
injuries from a grenade which exploded at his feet and threw him 
backward onto the jagged rocks.
  Utilizing his radioman, Lieutenant Kerrey called in the second 
element's fire support, which caught the confused Viet Cong in a 
devastating crossfire. Lieutenant Kerrey resolutely directed his men, 
despite his near unconscious state, until he was eventually evacuated 
by helicopter.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am so 
proud to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant Joseph R. Kerrey.


                Honoring Colonel Bernard Francis Fisher

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my colleague 
from the great State of Idaho (Mr. Labrador), I rise to honor the 
heroic efforts of Colonel Bernard Francis Fisher of the United States 
Air Force and of Kuna, Idaho.
  Colonel Fisher was with the 1st Air Commando Squadron, and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for his conspicuous gallantry on March 10, 
1966, in the Republic of Vietnam.
  A Special Forces camp was under attack, and hostile troops had 
positioned themselves between the airstrip and the camp. Colonel Fisher 
observed a fellow airman crash on the airstrip. In the belief that the 
pilot was injured and in danger of capture, Colonel Fisher decided to 
land and attempt a rescue. Directing his own cover, he landed and 
taxied the full length of the runway to rescue the pilot.

  Colonel Fisher's aircraft was struck 19 times. In the face of fire, 
he applied power and took off at the overrun airstrip.
  It is for the risking of his life above the call of duty that I am 
proud to honor and remember the actions of Colonel Bernard Francis 
Fisher.


                  Honoring Lieutenant Thomas G. Kelley

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Lieutenant Thomas G. Kelley was awarded the 
Medal of Honor for his actions, and going above and beyond the call of 
duty, against the enemy in Vietnam.
  Lieutenant Kelley was in charge of a column of eight river assault 
aircrafts which were extracting one company of U.S. Army infantry 
troops on the east bank of the Ong Muong Canal in Kien Hoa province 
when one of the armored troop carriers reported a mechanical failure of 
a loading ramp.
  At approximately the same time, Viet Cong forces opened fire from the 
opposite bank of the canal. After issuing orders for the crippled troop 
carrier to raise its ramp manually and for the remaining boats to form 
a protective cordon around the disabled craft, Lieutenant Commander 
Kelley, realizing the extreme danger to his column and its inability to 
clear the ambush site until the crippled unit was repaired, boldly 
maneuvered the monitor in which he was embarked to the exposed side of 
the protective cordon, in direct line with the enemy's fire, and he 
ordered the monitor to commence firing.
  Sustaining serious head wounds from the blast which hurled him to the 
deck of the monitor, Lieutenant Commander Kelley disregarded his severe 
injuries and attempted to continue directing the other boats.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant Thomas G. Kelley.


               Honoring Master Sergeant Ronald E. Rosser

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of 
my colleague from Ohio (Mr. Stivers) to honor the heroic efforts of 
Master Sergeant Ronald Eugene Rosser of the United States Army.
  Master Sergeant Rosser was serving with the 2nd Infantry Division and 
received his Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in action on 
January 12, 1952, in Korea.
  When Master Sergeant Rosser's platoon came under heavy enemy fire 
from two sides, he charged the enemy's positions, taking the hill, and 
killing seven. Master Sergeant Rosser then descended to rearm and 
retake the hill once more, while eliminating enemies along the way.
  After he had taken the hill a third time, and killed at least 13, 
Master Sergeant Rosser helped retrieve the wounded men and make a 
successful withdrawal.
  It is for his gallant actions and courageous and selfless devotion to 
duty that I am proud to honor and remember the actions of Master 
Sergeant Ronald Eugene Prosser.


  Honoring Corporal Tibor Rubin and 2nd Lieutenant Walter David Ehlers

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, it is on behalf of my colleague from 
California, Alan Lowenthal, that I am proud to honor two of his 
constituents who've been recipients of this prestigious Medal of Honor.
  The first is Corporal Tibor Rubin, who served in the United States 
Army with the 1st Cavalry Division and received his Medal of Honor for 
his actions on July 23, 1950, to April 20, 1953, in Korea.
  While the regiment was withdrawing, Corporal Rubin singlehandedly 
held off

[[Page H5638]]

enemy charges, allowing the 8th Cavalry to complete its withdrawal. On 
October 30, a number of Chinese forces mounted an assault on Corporal 
Rubin's unit. He maintained his firing position until he had exhausted 
all of his ammunition.
  Although inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy, Corporal Rubin was 
eventually captured. While in prison camp however, the Corporal 
continued his resistance and selflessness by caring for his sick 
comrades.
  Also from Congressman Lowenthal's district is one of our heroes, 2nd 
Lieutenant Walter David Ehlers. He served with the 1st Infantry 
Division of the United States Army and was awarded the Medal of Honor 
for his service in France.
  Second Lieutenant Ehlers was part of the second wave on D-day. When 
the first wave became pinned down, his unit was sent forward to assist. 
On June 9, he led his unit's attack against German forces and defeated 
several enemy machine gun nests.
  The very next day his platoon came under heavy fire, and he 
singlehandedly diverted enemy fire so his fellow servicemen could 
withdraw. Despite being wounded, 2nd Lieutenant Ehlers carried another 
wounded rifleman to safety. Even after he was treated, he refused to be 
evacuated so that he could return to leading his squad.
  It's for his display of indomitable courage that I'm so proud to 
honor and remember the actions of 2nd Lieutenant Walter David Ehlers.


            Honoring Technician 5th Grade Robert D. Maxwell

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise on behalf of my 
colleague from the great state of Oregon (Mr. Walden) to honor 
Technician 5th Grade Robert Dale Maxwell of the United States Army.
  Technician 5th Grade Maxwell was in the 3rd Infantry Division and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for supreme bravery in action on September 
7, 1944, in France.
  Technician 5th Grade Maxwell and three others, armed only with .45 
caliber sidearms, defended the battalion headquarters against an 
overwhelming onslaught by an enemy platoon. Despite withering enemy 
fire, Maxwell aggressively fought off the advancing enemy and inspired 
his fellow soldiers to continue. When an enemy hand grenade landed 
among the squad, Mr. Maxwell unhesitatingly hurled himself upon it, 
using his blanket and body to absorb the full force of the explosion. 
The act of incredible heroism permanently maimed Technician 5th Grade 
Maxwell but saved the lives of his comrades and enabled vital 
communications to continue during the withdrawal from the headquarters.
  It is for his valiant efforts and relentless spirit that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Technician 5th Grade Robert Dale 
Maxwell.


                 Honoring Captain Thomas J. Hudner, Jr.

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Captain Thomas Jerome Hudner, Jr., served 
with the United States Navy's Fighter Squadron 32 and was awarded the 
Medal of Honor for his brave actions on December 4, 1950, in the air 
over Korea.
  When Captain Hudner's wingman was shot from the air and crash-landed 
behind enemy lines, he courageously circled his comrade and attempted 
to fight off enemy advancing on his wingman's position. Upon noticing 
that his wingman was stuck in his burning plane, Captain Hudner crash-
landed his own plane into the rough mountains and in close proximity to 
the enemy's position in an attempt to save his buddy. Captain Hudner 
ran to his wingman's position and attempted to free him from the 
burning wreckage. Unable to free him, Captain Hudner returned to his 
aircraft to call in a rescue helicopter and support personnel.
  It is for his exceptionally valiant actions that I am proud to honor 
and remember the actions of Captain Thomas Jerome Hudner, Jr.

                              {time}  1945


                Honoring Sergeant Gary Burnell Beikirch

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the 
bravery and courage of Sergeant Gary Burnell Beikirch of the United 
States Army.
  Sergeant Beikirch was with the 1st Special Forces and was awarded the 
Medal of Honor for extreme gallantry in action on April 1, 1970, in 
Vietnam. When an enemy force launched an attack, the allied defenders 
suffered a multitude of casualties. Without regard for his own well-
being, Sergeant Beikirch sprinted from position to position to treat 
the wounded servicemen. Upon receiving notice that an American officer 
had been wounded and left exposed, Sergeant Beikirch charged through 
enemy fire and carried the officer to safety. Instead of allowing for 
his own wounds to be treated, Sergeant Beikirch continuously ran 
between the aid station and the field of battle to retrieve the 
wounded.
  It is for his complete and utter devotion to the welfare of his 
fellow soldiers that I'm proud to honor the actions tonight of Sergeant 
Gary Burnell Beikirch.


           Honoring Lieutenant General Robert Franklin Foley

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Lieutenant General Robert Franklin Foley 
served in the United States Army, where he received the Medal of Honor 
for leading his unit, Company A, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry 25th 
Division, on November 5, 1966, in the Republic of Vietnam. While moving 
to aid a besieged unit, Lieutenant General Foley's company clashed with 
a strong enemy defense post. Lieutenant General Foley, directing three 
platoons, was able to attend to the wounded soldiers while advancing 
them. Coming under intense fire, the Lieutenant General, alone, 
continued to advance until the wounded had been evacuated. Then, after 
being struck by a grenade himself, Lieutenant General Foley refused 
medical aid and led an assault to destroy three enemy positions.
  It is for his outstanding leadership and selflessness that I'm so 
proud to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant General Robert 
Franklin Foley.


              Honoring Colonel Harvey Curtiss Barnum, Jr.

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the 
supreme heroism of Colonel Harvey Curtiss Barnum, Jr., of the United 
States Marine Corps. Colonel Barnum was with the 3rd Marine Division 
and was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in action 
on December 18, 1965, in Vietnam.
  Colonel Barnum's company became pinned down by enemy fire. Upon 
discovering the company commander and radio operator were seriously 
wounded, he took control of the radio and assumed command of the rifle 
company. Colonel Barnum began positioning the men into firing positions 
and began identifying targets to engage. Behind his leadership, the 
units maintained their composure in the face of extreme danger and 
potential disadvantage. Colonel Barnum took point and led the platoon 
on a successful counterattack, eliminating key positions, and evacuated 
the wounded.
  It is for his extraordinary courage that I'm proud to stand here to 
honor and remember the actions of Colonel Harvey Curtiss Barnum, Jr.


                  Honoring Colonel Gordon Ray Roberts

  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, Colonel Gordon Ray Roberts was a rifleman 
in the 101st Airborne Division and awarded the Medal of Honor for his 
service on July 11, 1969, in Vietnam.
  Colonel Roberts' platoon was sent to provide assistance to a sister 
company. When his platoon became pinned down by heavy gun and grenade 
fire, Colonel Roberts, with utter disregard for his own well-being, 
charged forward beyond the perimeter and safety of his unit. Without 
fear or concern, Colonel Roberts eliminated four enemy positions and 
linked up with the imperiled company. He assisted with evacuating the 
wounded and supervised the withdrawal from the position before 
returning to his own unit.
  It is for his gallant and selfless actions contributing directly to 
saving the lives of his fellow soldiers that I'm proud to honor and 
remember the actions of Colonel Gordon Ray Roberts.


              Honoring Lieutenant John James McGinty, III

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor 
Lieutenant John James McGinty, III, of the United States Marine Corps, 
who is from Beaufort, South Carolina. He was with Company K and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action on July 18, 1966, in 
Vietnam.
  While providing rear security to guard the withdrawal of the 
battalion, Lieutenant McGinty's 32-man platoon came under heavy fire. 
During the barrage, two of McGinty's squads became

[[Page H5639]]

separated. Disregarding his own safety, McGinty ran through automatic 
weapons and mortar fire to convene with the separated squads. Upon 
arriving, he found 20 men wounded and the medical corpsman killed. He 
quickly reloaded ammunition for the wounded men and, though wounded, 
continued to encourage his troops and direct their fire. Through 
multiple close encounters, Lieutenant McGinty was able to adjust 
artillery and effectively fight off the enemy.
  It is for his indomitable heroism and devotion to duty that I'm proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant John James McGinty, 
III.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to yield to Ms. Gabbard for some closing 
comments.
  Ms. GABBARD. Mr. Speaker, it has truly been a privilege and a high 
note of my service as a Member of Congress to be able to stand here 
with my friend and colleague, Congressman Davis, to be able to read the 
highlights of the courageous actions of heroes whose service has 
allowed us to be here today. This is a moment that I will never 
forget--a moment that I look forward to sharing with many of my battle 
buddies, my servicemembers back home.
  It's a time for us to reflect. As we've heard through reading through 
these courageous actions, it's like reading through a storybook. These 
are the actions of heroes and legends that maybe we imagined as 
children. But we know that these are living heroes who not only put 
their lives on the line in the service of our country overseas, but 
have come home and continued that service. They have only accepted this 
Medal of Honor in a humble way, and we honor those who did not make it 
home.
  I look forward to us in our work here in Congress to be able to live 
up to the standard that they have set and to honor their service and 
sacrifice as we do our best working in the people's House to serve our 
country.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, this would not happen 
without great people helping to put this information together to honor 
these true heroes. I want to thank some folks who have worked with me: 
Nick Cozzo, Jordan Wellinghoff, Cathryn Ayers, Shontee Pant, Jenny 
Baldwin, Drew Collins, Frank Santana, and Osborne Crosby, among many 
others that I'm sure I'm going to forget to mention tonight.
  Remember, this is an honor tonight. We are not Republicans. We are 
not Democrats. We are Americans coming together to honor in a 
bipartisan fashion 79 individuals who fought to protect the freedoms 
that we enjoy and to be able to stand here on this House floor in 
freedom and to be Americans and to govern.
  It is with great pride that I was able to be joined tonight by my 
colleague, my friend, Tulsi Gabbard, also a member of our military 
today. Thank you for your service, Tulsi. Thank you for your service to 
your country here and your service as a member of the Hawaii National 
Guard.
  It is with great privilege that I was honored to stand here tonight 
to recognize so many true American heroes. And it's a privilege that I 
will never forget throughout my career.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                   Honoring Colonel Bernard F. Fisher

  Mr. LABRADOR. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts 
of Colonel Bernard Francis Fisher of the United States Air Force.
  Colonel Fisher was with the 1st Air Commando Squadron and was awarded 
the Medal of Honor for his conspicuous gallantry on March 10, 1966 in 
the Republic of Vietnam.
  A Special Forces camp was under attack and hostile troops had 
positioned themselves between the airstrip and the camp. Colonel Fisher 
observed a fellow airman crash on the airstrip. In the belief that the 
pilot was injured and in danger of capture, Colonel Fisher decided to 
land and attempt a rescue. Directing his own cover, he landed and 
taxied the full length of the runway to rescue the pilot. Colonel 
Fishers' aircraft was struck 19 times. In the face of fire, he applied 
power and took off at the overrun airstrip.
  It is for the risking his life above the call of duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Colonel Bernard Francis Fisher.


                  Honoring Lieutenant Thomas R. Norris

  Mr. LABRADOR. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts 
of Lieutenant Thomas Rolland Norris of the United States Navy.
  Lieutenant Norris was a SEAL Advisor and was awarded the Medal of 
Honor for supreme bravery in action from April 10 to April 13, 1972 in 
Vietnam.
  During the three-day period, Lieutenant Norris and a 5-man team 
established a Forward Operating Base (``FOB'') deep within heavily 
controlled enemy territory to conduct a rescue of several downed 
pilots. Although the first pilot was located and rescued on the evening 
of the first night, a second pilot was still missing. On the last day, 
Lieutenant Norris and one Vietnamese, dressed in fishermen disguises, 
travelled in a sampan up-river and located the last pilot. Lieutenant 
Norris and his companion were then able to safely return the pilot for 
medical care and evacuation.
  It is for his outstanding display of leadership and courage that I am 
proud to honor and remember the actions of Lieutenant Thomas Rolland 
Norris.


                Honoring First Lieutenant Brian Thacker

  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts 
of First Lieutenant Brian Thacker of the United States Army.
  First Lieutenant Thacker was with the 92nd Field Artillery Regiment 
and received his Medal of Honor for actions of great gallantry on March 
31, 1971 in Vietnam.
  When First Lieutenant Thacker's base was attacked he assisted in its 
defense and remained in position when it became apparent that 
evacuation of the base was necessary. He organized and directed the 
withdrawal of the remaining friendly forces with complete disregard for 
his personal safety. First Lieutenant Thacker remained inside the 
perimeter alone to provide covering fire until all friendly forces had 
escaped. Due to his selfless acts, First Lieutenant Thacker remained 
trapped behind enemy lines for eight days before he was finally 
rescued.
  It is for his valiant efforts and selfless spirit in service to our 
nation that I am proud to honor and remember the actions of First 
Lieutenant Brian Thacker.


                     HONORING CORPORAL TIBOR RUBIN

  Mr. LOWENTHAL. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts 
of Corporal Tibor Rubin of the United States Army.
  Corporal Rubin was with the 1st Cavalry Division and received his 
Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism in action from July 23, 1950 
to April 20, 1953 in Korea.
  While the Regiment was withdrawing, Corporal Rubin single-handedly 
held off enemy charges allowing the 8th Cavalry to complete its 
withdrawal. On October 30, 1950, a number of Chinese forces mounted an 
assault on Corporal Rubin's unit. Corporal Rubin maintained his firing 
position until he had exhausted all his ammunition. Although inflicting 
heavy casualties on the enemy, Corporal Rubin was eventually captured. 
While in a prison camp, however, the Corporal continued his resistance 
and selflessness by caring for his sick comrades.
  It is for his unyielding courage and bravery that I am proud to honor 
and remember the actions of Corporal Tibor ``Ted'' Rubin.


           HONORING TECHNICIAN FIFTH GRADE ROBERT D. MAXWELL

  Mr. WALDEN. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor Technician Fifth Grade 
Robert Dale Maxwell of the United States Army.
  Technician 5th Grade Maxwell was in 3rd Infantry Division and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for supreme bravery in action on September 
7, 1944 near Besancon, France.
  Technician 5th Grade Maxwell and 3 others, armed only with .45 
caliber side arms, defended the battalion headquarters against an 
overwhelming onslaught by an enemy platoon. Despite withering enemy 
fire Maxwell aggressively fought off the advancing enemy and inspired 
his fellow soldiers to continue. When an enemy hand grenade landed 
among the squad, Technician 5th Grade Maxwell unhesitatingly hurled 
himself upon it, using his blanket and body to absorb the full force of 
the explosion. The act of incredible heroism permanently maimed 
Technician 5th Grade Maxwell, but saved the lives of his comrades and 
enabled vital communications to continue during the withdrawal from the 
headquarters.
  It is for his valiant efforts and relentless spirit that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Technician Fifth Grade Robert Dale 
Maxwell.


            HONORING SERGEANT FIRST CLASS GARY LEE LITTRELL

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the 
Congressional Medal of Honor Society, comprised solely of Medal of 
Honor recipients. During this week, the recipients will assemble to 
honor and remember all who have served our country and to further the 
brotherhood among one another. This year, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania has 
been chosen as the site for the convention and Sergeant First Class 
Litterell of the United States Army and his valiant efforts will be 
recognized and he will be the featured hero of this year's convention.
  Sergeant First Class Littrell was awarded the Medal of Honor for 
conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty 
in Kontum province, Republic of Vietnam, on 4-8 April 1970. Sergeant 
First Class Littrell was assigned to the United States Military 
Assistance Command, Vietnam, and Advisory

[[Page H5640]]

Team 21. He distinguished himself while serving as a Light Weapons 
Infantry Advisor with the 23d Battalion, 2d Ranger Group, Republic of 
Vietnam Army, near Dak Seang. After establishing a defensive perimeter 
on a hill on April 4, the battalion he was assigned was subjected to an 
intense enemy mortar attack which killed the Vietnamese commander, one 
advisor, and seriously wounded all the advisors except Sergeant First 
Class Littrell. During the ensuing four days, Sergeant First Class 
Littrell exhibited near superhuman endurance as he single-handedly 
bolstered the besieged battalion. Repeatedly abandoning positions of 
relative safety, he directed artillery and air support by day and 
marked the unit's location by night, despite the heavy, concentrated 
enemy fire. His dauntless will instilled in the men of the 23rd 
Battalion a deep desire to resist. Assault after assault was repulsed 
as the battalion responded to the extraordinary leadership and personal 
example exhibited by Sergeant First Class Littrell as he continuously 
moved to those points most seriously threatened by the enemy, 
redistributed ammunition, strengthened faltering defenses, cared for 
the wounded and shouted encouragement to the Vietnamese in their own 
language. When the beleaguered battalion was finally ordered to 
withdraw, numerous ambushes were encountered. Sergeant First Class 
Littrell repeatedly prevented widespread disorder by directing air 
strikes to within 50 meters of their position. Through his indomitable 
courage and complete disregard for his safety, he averted excessive 
loss of life and injury to the members of the battalion. The sustained 
extraordinary courage and selflessness displayed by Sergeant First 
Class Littrell over an extended period of time were in keeping with the 
highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on 
him and the U.S. Army. It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to 
duty that I am proud to honor and remind our fellow Americans of the 
actions of Sergeant First Class Littrell.


              Honoring Second Lieutenant Walter D. Ehlers

  Mr. LOWNETHAL. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts 
of Second Lieutenant Walter David Ehlers of the United States Army.
  Second Lieutenant Ehlers was with the 1st Infantry Division and was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in action near 
Goville, France.
  Second Lieutenant Ehlers was of part of the second wave on D-Day. 
When the first wave became pinned down, his unit was sent forward to 
assist. On June 9th he led his unit's attack against German forces and 
defeated several enemy machinegun nests. The next day, his platoon came 
under heavy fire and he singlehandedly diverted enemy fire so his 
fellow servicemen could withdrawal. Despite being wounded, Second 
Lieutenant Ehlers carried another wounded rifleman to safety. After 
treatment, he refused to be evacuated and returned to leading his 
squad.
  It is for his display of indomitable courage that I am proud to honor 
and remember the action of Second Lieutenant Walter David Ehlers.


      Honoring Chief Warrant Officer Four Hershel Woodrow Williams

  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor Hershel Woodrow 
Williams and his heroic efforts and continued selfless service to his 
fellow veterans.
  Corporal Williams was with the 3rd Marine Division when he was 
awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in action on 
February 23, 1945, on the island of Iwo Jima. Flanked by only four 
riflemen, time and again, Corporal Williams advanced into the enemy 
defenses to set charges and wipe out enemy positions with a 
flamethrower. He brazenly charged pillboxes and enemy defenses to pave 
the way for his fellow soldiers. His ``unyielding determination and 
extraordinary heroism'' are legendary.
  But Woody's devotion nor did he feel his duty ended there. Back home 
he served as a civilian counselor and as a volunteer in his church, 
community and with veterans' organizations. A lifetime dedicated to 
repay those who gave all so that he and countless others could come 
home; a lifelong commitment to assisting veterans, their spouses and 
children.
  For all his valiant devotion to our Nation, I am proud to honor Chief 
Warrant Officer Four, Hershel Woodrow Williams.


                 Honoring sergeant einar h. ingman, Jr.

  Mr. DUFFY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the valiant efforts of 
Sergeant Einar H. Ingman, Jr. of the United States Army.
  Sergeant Einar H. Ingman, Jr. was awarded the Medal of Honor for 
conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty 
in action against the enemy in Korea.
  Members of Sergeant Ingman's company were pinned down by pinned down 
enemy fire that wounded all squad leaders and several other men. Then 
Cpl. Ingman assumed command, reorganized and combined the two trapped 
squads, and proceeded to charge the enemy machine guns alone. He took 
out one crew with a grenade before being hit by a second machine gun. 
Seriously injured, and with incredible courage and stamina, Cpl. Ingman 
rose and killed the entire gun crew using only his rifle before falling 
unconscious from his wounds. As a result of this singular action, the 
defense of the enemy was broken, his squad secured its objective, and 
more than 100 hostile troops abandoned their weapons and fled in 
disorganized retreat.
  It is for his courage and unwavering devotion to duty that I am proud 
to honor and remember the actions of Sergeant Einar H. Ingman, Jr.


               honoring major general patrick henry brady

  Mr. SMITH of Texas. Mr. Speaker, today we honor Major General Patrick 
Henry Brady of the United States Army.
  Major General Brady was awarded the Medal of Honor for extreme 
heroism on January 6, 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam as a member of 
the 54th Medical Detachment.
  Major General Brady rescued dozens of seriously wounded men from an 
enemy-held territory blanketed by fog. He braved heavy enemy fire and 
risked his own life to save the lives of them. By the end of the day, 
Major General Brady had employed three different aircraft to evacuate 
51 wounded men, most of whom would otherwise have perished.
  It is for his unwavering courage that we are proud to honor and 
appreciate the actions of Major General Patrick Henry Brady, who lives 
in New Braunfels, Texas.


               honoring colonel roger Hugh charles donlon

  Ms. JENKINS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts of 
Colonel Roger Hugh Charles Donlon of the United States Army.
  Colonel Donlon was with Army Special Forces Detachment A-726 and 
awarded the Medal of Honor for supreme gallantry in action on July 
1964, in Vietnam.
  While defending a U.S. military installation against an attack by 
hostile forces, Colonel Donlon directed the defense operations in the 
midst of an enemy barrage.
  He marshaled his forces and ordered the removal of needed ammunition 
from a blazing building. He then dashed through small arms fire, 
detected the enemy and quickly dispatched them.
  Colonel Donlon sustained a severe stomach wound and disregarded his 
own injury for the wellbeing of his men.
  As daylight brought defeat to the enemy, Colonel Donlon reorganized 
his defenses and administered first aid to the wounded.
  It is for his extreme display of bravery that I am proud to honor and 
remember the actions of Colonel Roger Hugh Charles Donlon.


                Honoring Petty Officer Robert R. Ingram

  Mr. CRENSHAW. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the valiant efforts 
of Hospital Corpsman Third Class Robert R. Ingram of the United States 
Navy.
  Petty Officer Ingram was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous 
gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in Republic 
of North Vietnam on 28 March 1966.
  Petty Officer Ingram accompanied a point platoon as it engaged an 
outpost of a North Vietnamese battalion. As the fighting moved from a 
ridge to a rice paddy, the tree line exploded with a hail of bullets 
from 100 North Vietnamese regulars.
  In mere moments, the platoon ranks were decimated. Oblivious to the 
dangers, Petty Officer Ingram crawled across the bullet-spattered 
terrain to reach a downed Marine.
  Ingram was injured, but he proceeded to collect ammunition from the 
dead and offered aid to the wounded.
  From 4 pm until just prior to sunset, Petty Officer Ingram pushed, 
pulled, cajoled, and doctored his Marines. Despite pain and the 
probability of his own death, Petty Officer Ingram's actions, 
initiative and dedication to duty saved many lives.
  In 2001, I was honored to be able to dedicate the Medical clinic at 
our local Navy base in honor of his courage and unwavering devotion to 
duty.
  In Jacksonville, he continues his work as a nurse and is considered a 
local hero. I am proud to recognize the bravery and heroism of Petty 
Officer Ingram.


               honoring master sergeant ronald e. rosser

  Mr. STIVERS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the heroic efforts of 
Master Sergeant Ronald Eugene Rosser of the United States Army.
  Master Sergeant Rosser was serving with the 2nd Infantry Division and 
received his Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry in action on 
January 12, 1952 in Korea.
  When Master Sergeant Rosser's platoon came under heavy enemy fire 
from two sides, he charged the enemy's positions, taking the hill, and 
killing 7. Master Sergeant Rosser then descended to rearm and retake 
the hill once more while eliminating enemies along the way. After he 
had taken the hill a third time and killed at least 13, Master Sergeant 
Rosser helped retrieve the wounded men and make a successful 
withdrawal.

[[Page H5641]]

  It is for his gallant actions and courageous and selfless devotion to 
duty that I am proud to honor and remember the actions of Master 
Sergeant Ronald Eugene Rosser.

                          ____________________