TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2015
(House of Representatives - June 10, 2014)

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[Pages H5212-H5239]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




  TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2015

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Culberson). Pursuant to House Resolution 
604 and rule XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration 
of the bill, H.R. 4745.
  Will the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Marchant) kindly take the chair.

                              {time}  1506


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 4745) making appropriations for the Departments of 
Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and related agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, 
with Mr. Marchant (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose earlier today, 
an amendment offered by the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. Fleming) had 
been disposed of, and the bill had been read through page 156, line 16.


                  Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Royce

  Mr. ROYCE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used for the Housing Trust Fund established under section 
     1338 of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and 
     Soundness Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4568).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ROYCE. Mr. Chairman, I rise, yet again, to raise the alarm over 
taxpayer-funded housing policy.
  This straightforward amendment that you have before you would 
prohibit Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from using funds to pay housing 
advocacy groups or others through the housing trust fund at a time when 
they continue to owe money to the American people.
  Beginning in 2008, the U.S. taxpayers bailed out the GSEs to the tune 
of $189 billion. That number is expected to grow to over $200 billion 
by 2015; but as the housing market has begun to recover, so, too, have 
Fannie's and Freddie's profits.
  At the first sign of money rolling in, some housing advocates are 
pressuring the Federal Housing Finance Agency to get a piece of the 
taxpayer-funded pie. They have gone to extraordinary lengths, even 
filing a lawsuit last summer to try to force contributions to the trust 
fund.
  Originally slated to receive funds siphoned off from the GSEs, the 
trust fund was never capitalized due, of course, to the fact that the 
GSEs went into conservatorship. Without passage of this amendment, the 
director of the FHFA could turn on that spigot at any moment.
  Contrary to what Fannie and Freddie apologists may claim, the GSEs 
have yet to repay any of the taxpayer-funded bailout. The cash 
injection into the GSEs was made in the form of a draw from the U.S. 
Treasury, not a loan to be repaid. No so-called repayment can be made 
as long as American taxpayers are on the hook for future losses.
  Let us also not overlook the fact that the failure of this public-
private housing scheme was at the center of the financial crisis, a 
collapse that destroyed trillions of dollars in household wealth and 
left millions unemployed. How much money would it take to repay those 
losses?
  It is clear to any observer that the money that is now coming in from 
the GSEs is a small pittance for what they have cost the American 
economy. Any profits remain directly attributable to extensive and 
continued taxpayer support. That is the point, hence the need for this 
amendment.
  I would urge an ``aye'' vote, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The underlying bill contains no funds for the housing trust fund, yet 
the gentleman's amendment would create a prohibition on using funds 
that don't exist in the bill. This is simply a messaging amendment that 
has no practical purpose.
  I oppose the amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Royce).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Chairman, as cochair of the Native American Caucus, 
I am standing with my colleagues here today to support investing in 
Native American housing.
  The United States cannot fulfill its Federal trust obligation to 
Indian Country without increasing investments in Native American 
housing.
  Here are two facts about Indian country: almost 9 percent of the 
homes in Indian country still lack complete plumbing facilities and 30 
percent of the homes in Indian Country rely on wood for heating.
  Another fact is that Native Hawaiian grants have been completely 
zeroed out of this bill. The Native American Housing Block Grant is a 
primary Federal source to address housing backlogs and provide 
sufficient maintenance throughout Indian Country, but this bill flat-
funds this account from 2014 at $650 dollars.
  While level funding is better than a cut, my colleagues should know 
that this is the same level of funding provided in fiscal year 2004. We 
can and we must do better.
  Again, to meet its treaty obligations, the United States must 
increase this investment for Indian housing.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. Mr. Chairman, I agree with the gentlelady. 
Housing is important for the American Indian community. It should be 
funded. This bill is a decent bill, but flatlining

[[Page H5213]]

this funding back to the 2004 level is not acceptable.
  We need this housing in rural areas, as the gentlelady mentioned. I 
represent approximately 400 small villages. Most do not have running 
water and the facilities that you are used to every day when you get 
up. They have the problem of many diseases because of the lack of good 
facilities. We need new housing. We need the money to be spent.
  My argument is, if we are putting money in Afghanistan like we have 
done in the last few years, we ought to be able to put the money into 
our own Nation and States to have the housing for the native 
communities.
  This is an important piece of legislation, but we ought to fund it to 
the full extent. It is time that we recognize that we have to help 
those who do not have, especially our first citizens of the United 
States.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. HECK of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. HECK of Washington. Mr. Chairman, in order to keep a new, healthy 
housing market, we must be committed to affordable housing. All 
citizens should have access to it.
  For 16 years, NAHASDA has provided funding for tribes to implement 
their own strategies to address housing needs that are, quite frankly, 
unique to their own communities.
  Under the program, they can use funds to address their housing needs 
through a variety of activities, including construction, 
rehabilitation, modernization, rental assistance, lending programs, 
crime prevention, and a host of other strategies.
  The Puyallup Tribe in my own home State and district recently used 
NAHASDA funds to construct housing that reflects their culture with a 
traditional longhouse design and structure.
  It is a 10-unit building that is environmentally friendly and 
features energy-efficient systems that keep costs out. It is beautiful. 
It is cost effective. It is economical. Most importantly, it meets a 
basic need.

                              {time}  1515

  In fiscal year 2012 alone, the 369 tribal recipients of grants used 
that funding to build or acquire more than 1,450 affordable homes and 
rehabilitate another 4,700. Since the inception of the program, 
recipients have built, acquired, or rehabilitated more than 110,000 
homes; but as has been suggested, the funding has failed to keep up 
with inflation, and it has not met the demonstrated need for the 
program. In fact, a lot of the funds end up being used for maintenance 
and operation because it has been flatlined. Meanwhile, the need for 
the program grows as the money, in relative terms, shrinks. In the 10 
years between 2002 to 2012, the number of overcrowded households 
increased by 14 percent, and 10 percent of all homes in Indian Country 
are overcrowded. It is notably higher than the national average.
  The Federal Government has a trust obligation to promote the 
wellbeing of Native Americans. It is a trust obligation. It is a legal 
obligation. Frankly, it is a sacred obligation. Ensuring the proper 
funding of NAHASDA is a critical component towards meeting those 
obligations.
  As you consider the 2015 Transportation, Housing and Urban 
Development appropriations bill, I ask all of you to please support the 
robust funding for NAHASDA.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Michigan is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Chairman, I would like to join my colleagues in 
support of this important NAHASDA program within this appropriations 
bill.
  As has been stated, our country--this Nation, this government--has an 
important trust responsibility that it is obligated to live up to, and 
the full funding of NAHASDA is an important way to manifest that 
obligation.
  Just as in any community, housing is an essential component of a 
civil society. What NAHASDA provides is to not only deal with the 
backlog of housing needs, which are many--certainly, the dollars that 
are presently available are not keeping up with the need that is out 
there in these tribal communities, for sure--but to also allow for the 
maintenance of the housing that is currently in place.
  The difficulty, of course, with a funding level which is the same as 
it was a decade ago and with a backlog of housing needs is that, as the 
housing that has been developed ages, more and more of the dollars are 
necessarily placed into maintaining and improving existing housing, 
which further increases the backlog of available housing.
  I would just suggest to my colleagues--and I know many of my 
colleagues have done this--to visit the communities. Talk to them about 
their housing needs, and take a look at the conditions that many are 
left to live in. You will find that, while this program has been quite 
successful, as has been said, in providing 110,000 housing units since 
its inception, there is so much more that needs to be done. We have an 
obligation as Members of Congress to make sure that we live up to the 
commitments that we have made, to the trust obligation that we have. It 
is more than words. In this case, it actually means putting our money 
where our mouth is and putting the resources behind this program as it 
should be.
  This is an important program. It is one that we are obligated to 
fund. Obviously, I would prefer that we meet the full obligation that 
we have committed to. This appropriation does not go as far as it 
should in doing that. We really need to make sure that, in the future, 
we do.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. HANABUSA. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Hawaii is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. HANABUSA. Mr. Chairman, the speakers before me have all said the 
fundamental issue that we are looking at here, which is of the trust 
and treaty obligations that this great Nation has created with the 
native people--the indigenous people and the first people--of this 
Nation. Yet, for now and for many years, the Appropriations Committee 
has seen fit to remove any and all funding from a critical program that 
greatly benefits my home State of Hawaii, and that is the Native 
Hawaiian Housing Block Grant.
  This program is an essential source of funding because it not only 
helps the native people on their own land, but it fulfills a trust 
obligation created by Congress in 1920 by way of the Hawaiian Homes 
Commission Act. The act recognized the importance of returning Native 
Hawaiians to the land to preserve their culture, their traditions, and 
their values, and the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant has helped to 
facilitate that.
  Similar to what NAHASDA has done for American Indians and Alaska 
Natives, the Native Hawaiian title of NAHASDA has opened the door to 
increased partnerships with financial institutions and has enabled the 
Federal policy of self-determination to be extended to all native 
populations across this great Nation.
  Through the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant, the Department of 
Hawaiian Home Lands has been able to assist over 400 low-income 
families through infrastructure development, down payment assistance, 
and direct loans for first-time home buyers, construction programs, and 
the development of renewable energy projects. There are Native Hawaiian 
housing lots on each of the Hawaiian Islands. These funds have also 
been able to address the growing issue of homelessness by 
rehabilitating older units to make them safe and sanitary.
  As we all know, the foundation for the success of millions of 
American families is a secure home. The Native Hawaiian Housing Block 
Grant has given hundreds of Native Hawaiian families that same 
foundation to succeed by assisting them with affordable homeownership 
opportunities in Hawaii, which serve as the groundwork for self-
sufficiency and future prosperity.
  A disruption to the stream of funding for the Native Hawaiian Housing 
Block Grant would have a dire impact on dozens of ongoing development 
projects, including alternative energy resources for homes, investments 
in infrastructure, and low interest rate loans that seek to benefit the 
thousands of families living on Hawaiian homelands.

[[Page H5214]]

  I ask the committee to reconsider its decision to remove this vital 
program from the bill every year, and I pledge to work with the 
committee to see that it is restored.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Chairman, I rise to express my concern about the need 
for fully supporting Native American housing programs.
  I recognize that my colleagues faced a number of difficult choices 
when crafting this bill, and I specifically want to thank the chairman 
and ranking member for their work in fully funding the 
President's request for Native American Housing Block Grants at $650 
million. I am pleased to stand here today along with such strong 
advocates for Indian housing programs, and I am grateful for the 
leadership that each of the speakers today has shown.

  I do share my colleagues' concerns over the adequate funding for our 
Native Hawaiian housing needs, and I am hopeful that, as this 
legislation moves forward, Congress can work to address this need as 
well as to resolve some serious issues with other parts of the bill.
  Now, as the members of this committee well know, the challenges 
facing adequate housing for Indian Country are profound. The district 
that I represent is home to nine tribes. I have seen firsthand what a 
difference these housing programs make to individual families and to 
their communities, and the statistics bear out just how substantial the 
need is here.
  In 2012, the Department of Housing and Urban Development found that 
more than 25 percent of Indian housing units lack basic facilities, are 
overcrowded, or cost more than 50 percent of residents' incomes. There 
is a need today for 200,000 more housing units in Indian Country. That 
is why I am hoping that this body will soon hold a hearing on the 
reauthorization of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-
Determination Act, or NAHASDA.
  I know that there has been bipartisan work both in the House and in 
the Senate on identifying ways to increase the effectiveness of these 
programs and to reduce duplicative bureaucratic requirements; but there 
is another element of NAHASDA that I think is absolutely important not 
only to Indian Country but also to those who have worn the uniform in 
service to our country. That element is homelessness among our tribal 
veterans.
  In December 2012, the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness found 
that, while Native Americans make up 0.7 percent of the total 
population of veterans, they represent 2\1/2\ percent of veterans 
experiencing homelessness. In other words, homelessness 
disproportionately affects our tribal veterans.
  Unfortunately, as I stand here today, we don't have the tools we need 
to help fight homelessness among our tribal veterans. The HUD-Veterans 
Affairs Supportive Housing program, which has made real and significant 
progress in tackling veterans' homelessness, does not have the 
authorities and flexibilities to provide support to the native veterans 
who are facing homelessness.
  That is why I was pleased to join with Representative Cole--a true 
champion for Indian Country--in introducing H.R. 3418, the Housing 
Native Heroes Act. Our legislation doesn't cost any new money, but it 
would, instead, authorize existing funds to support a demonstration 
project that would allow tribes to manage this voucher program 
directly. In both the House and the Senate, the proposed 
reauthorization bills advance this proposal, making critical progress 
in the fight to reduce homelessness among tribal veterans.
  We have an obligation--a trust obligation--to our tribes but also a 
sacred obligation to all of our veterans, which is to take care of them 
when they return home. We simply cannot turn a blind eye to the needs 
of our native veterans. If this Chamber can make progress in advancing 
the NAHASDA reauthorization, I am confident that we can end this 
anomaly that leaves our tribal veterans without the support they need.
  I would like to conclude by noting that the underlying bill before us 
today provides $75 million for the HUD-VASH program, which is in line 
with the President's budget request.
  I thank the chairman and the ranking member for their continued 
support for this program.
  I ask, as this committee continues its work of combating homelessness 
among our veterans, that the challenges facing our tribal veterans not 
be forgotten.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Denham

  Mr. DENHAM. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used for high-speed rail in the State of California or for 
     the California High-Speed Rail Authority.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DENHAM. Mr. Chairman, this is a very simple amendment. Again, it 
reads: ``None of the funds made available by this Act may be used for 
high-speed rail in the State of California or for the California High-
Speed Rail Authority.''
  As chair of the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous 
Materials, I am a big supporter of high-speed rail. I have seen some of 
the greatest high-speed rail in other countries, and here, even in the 
United States, we are going to see the first high-speed rail in Texas 
and then in Florida--two projects that are moving forward with private 
dollars.
  Yet, in California, in 2008, we passed Proposition 1A, which was a 
guarantee to the voters that a $33 billion project would not only be 
built but would be built on time, with equal parts of funding from the 
State voters, from the Federal Government, hopefully, and then from the 
private investors. Today, 5 years later, after $3.8 billion in stimulus 
funds for shovel-ready projects were dedicated to this, still not one 
shovel is in the ground. It is a project that has been held up in 
court. The $9.95 billion cannot be used, and there are no private 
investors.
  So the question is: Why should the Federal Government be putting more 
money into a project that is nonexistent today?
  It is a project that, even by its own definition, is $32 billion 
short, not in the project, but in the initial operating segment, which 
is guaranteed to the voters to be completed. This is a project that has 
grown out of control. When they found out that they were in default in 
April, rather than fixing the problem, they committed to next year's 
budget, utilizing $250 million in cap-and-trade funding.
  There is a reason the judges have struck this down to this point, and 
there is a reason that voters wanted to have this go back before them: 
it is a project that has no end in sight. Again, no shovels have been 
put into the ground even though the Federal Government has obligated 
$3.8 billion--money that could be used for other priorities. Today, we 
are in a situation. With a $32 billion shortfall, there is no proposal 
from the President to fill that gap, and there is no proposal from the 
Governor to fill that gap. Yet there is the hope that the Federal 
Government will continue to find new money to throw at something that 
is nonexistent.
  This doesn't meet the Prop 1A guarantee. There is no State match, and 
the cost has more than doubled. Again, the jobs that have continued to 
be talked about for the last 5 years are nonexistent.
  Mr. Chairman, I would urge an ``aye'' vote on this amendment. We have 
got to stop this train wreck.
  I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1530

  Ms. LOFGREN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. LOFGREN. Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the California Democratic 
congressional delegation, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  This misguided amendment would prohibit additional Federal investment 
in California's high-speed rail project. As we know, California is in 
the midst of constructing the Nation's first truly high-speed rail 
system.

[[Page H5215]]

  The project was approved by a strong majority of California voters in 
2008 because we Californians know that high-speed rail is the most 
effective and environmentally sustainable way to increase mobility 
across the State.
  Now, the project is already creating jobs for Californians. In fact, 
more than 70 firms that have committed to performing work on this 
project have offices in the Central Valley, and many of these firms, 
happily, are veteran-owned.
  In San Jose, the California high-speed rail project is already 
providing immediate benefits by investing $1.5 billion in the Caltrain 
Modernization Program. This program will create over 9,500 jobs, over 
90 percent in the San Francisco Bay area.
  Now, the government's independent watchdog, the GAO, conducted an 
extensive audit of the project. And you know what? They gave high marks 
to the authority's business plan for high-speed rail.
  Members of Congress are right to conduct proper oversight of 
infrastructure projects across the country. However, regardless of your 
views on the merits of this project, I think most of us would agree 
that attempting to kill a single project through the appropriations 
process is bad public policy and sets a horrible precedent.
  I would note that electrified trains are really part of the future. 
China already has 5,000 miles of high-speed rail, and they intend to 
double that. Spain has 1,600 miles of high-speed rail, and they are 
building more. More than a dozen other countries have their own 
successful high-speed rail systems. Even Morocco is building a high-
speed rail system. But we don't have anything in the United States 
except for what California is doing.
  I would note that California is almost always on the leading edge of 
progress for our country. We are leading in energy conservation. We are 
leading in alternative energy, and we have the best public university, 
the University of California, in the entire United States. We always 
lead.
  Now, it is important that the State of California has identified an 
ongoing source of funds to support high-speed rail, and that is the 
cap-and-trade funds. Is that appropriate?
  Yes, it is, because the cap-and-trade funds are generated through 
energy conservation, and the high-speed rail system is going to help 
move Californians in an environmentally suitable way.
  It is important to be visionary here. You know, when we started 
building the interstate highway system, when the first mile of highway 
was built, we didn't know that 50 years later we would still be 
identifying interstates to build.
  We need to begin with high-speed rail in California. California is 
behind this project. The California Democratic delegation is behind 
this project.
  I urge my colleagues to reject the amendment, put our neighbors back 
to work, and allow California to continue building the Nation's first 
true high-speed rail project. We will all be proud of that project as 
it nears completion.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LaMALFA. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LaMALFA. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of Mr. Denham's 
amendment.
  High-speed rail has been a boondoggle in California pretty much since 
day one. The voters, when they had it presented in front of them as 
Prop 1A in the 2008 election, they were shown a $33 billion project 
that would connect San Francisco to Los Angeles with a continuous high-
speed rail project.
  What we found out, within 3 years, was after the price went up 
initially $45 billion, that a true audit turned out it would be $98.5 
billion. After that, the Governor real quick decided to change the 
project and use the connectivity of the Bay Area and Los Angeles, their 
local systems, to make up for it, which is illegal under Prop 1A. It 
has to be continuing from San Francisco to LA. You can't use local 
transit systems under Prop 1A.
  So now what we see is that they were able to downsize the cost to 
only $68 billion over what the voters, by a 52 percent, not an 
overwhelming margin, merely 52 percent, approved.
  They were sold a bill of goods. That is why we shouldn't spend 
another Federal dollar or State dollar which enables--the Federal 
dollars enable the State dollars to be spent. We need to stop that here 
until they come up with a real plan that shows the financing.
  They haven't shown the financing yet. We can identify $3 billion 
worth of Federal money, $9.95 billion worth of State money, 
approximately $13 billion for a project in the downsized illegal form 
that is only $68 billion, they say.
  Where does the other $55 billion come from?
  They have no idea. There is no private sector money. There is no more 
Federal money that is going to happen, other than the $3 billion that 
has been captured from the stimulus package of a couple of years ago.
  We need to take that money and channel that into something else that 
we need to do desperately, such as our transportation infrastructure 
which we are speaking about here this week. Or in California we have a 
desperate need for water supply during our drought, instead of a 
boondoggle which is going to pave through a bunch of our ag land in 
California, as well as important other infrastructure.
  What do we hear about it?
  Oh, it is going to save CO2. It is going to be a panacea 
for global warming. You know, for 30 years it won't even help toward 
this project of global warming. Instead, part of their plan is they are 
going to have to plant trees to offset the construction of high-speed 
rail because it is going to have a higher CO2 footprint than 
what we already have.
  It is boondoggle after boondoggle. We talk about jobs. These aren't 
real jobs. The numbers have been inflated since day one. They tried to 
tell us 3 years ago that it was going to cause a million new jobs for 
California.
  When we finally pinned them down in a State committee, they said, 
well, that means a million job years. It turns out to be it might be 
5,000, 10,000 jobs under construction, not a million jobs. It is deceit 
after deceit.
  We need to plow this money that we have federally back into something 
that would help our transportation infrastructure in California or in 
the Nation, help build water supply, anything but this project here, 
which is full of deceit and empty promise after empty promise.

  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment, and I yield to the gentlewoman from California (Ms. 
Lofgren).
  Ms. LOFGREN. I thank the gentleman from Arizona.
  I just wanted to make a couple of quick points. First, it is easy to 
be a critic and it is hard to be a builder. The high-speed rail project 
is a big project, it is difficult to do, but we are going to get it 
done.
  Sometimes I wonder, when people say don't do high-speed rail, how 
they plan to deal with the millions of additional Californians that are 
anticipated to clog our roads and need transportation infrastructure.
  It has been suggested by dispassionate engineers that we would need 
at least two or three additional airports in California. We would need 
several, as many as five, additional lanes, north-south, in the middle 
of California to match the capacity of high-speed rail.
  How are we going to do that?
  Do we think that that is not going to be expensive?
  The alternative to high-speed rail is not nothing. That is impossible 
for a State as vibrant as California, with an economy as booming as it 
is, and a future as bright as we have.
  I would note also that the idea that it is inappropriate to use cap-
and-trade funds, I just simply disagree with. California is among the 
first in the Nation, I would say, and it has got wide approval in the 
State, to do this cap-and-trade system, to bring down carbon emissions.
  Funds will be generated through that project. Some of those funds 
will go to this very worthy project.
  So I disagree very much with this amendment. I don't believe that we 
will be successful--my God, I hope we

[[Page H5216]]

are not--in stopping this visionary project that is going to allow the 
State of California to continue to prosper and for transportation 
north-south needs to be met into the future.
  I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Denham).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. DENHAM. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.
  Ms. MOORE. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wisconsin is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. MOORE. Mr. Chair, I rise today to highlight the tragic shortage 
of suitable housing on tribal lands, and to call for increasing funding 
for the highly successful Native American Housing and Self 
Determination Act.
  Now, in 1996, Congress reorganized native housing programs into 
NAHASDA, a block grant system administered by tribes in cooperation 
with HUD. NAHASDA has proven to be an extremely effective tool for 
tribes to help tribal members increase the quality and quantity of 
housing.
  NAHASDA not only works, but fosters tribal self-determination and 
affirms the trust relationship that exists between Congress and tribal 
nations.
  Mr. Chairman, a bipartisan coalition of Members, Representatives 
Cole, Hanabusa, Heck, Kildee, and Representative Young and I, have 
introduced a bipartisan reauthorization NAHASDA, which is extremely 
similar to a draft that Representative Pearce has introduced.
  Now, both bills, Mr. Chairman, make prudent changes to increase the 
efficiency of the delivery of the program dollars, and I strongly 
believe that the changes will have a very positive impact.
  But, Mr. Chairman, increased efficiency will not replace the need for 
more money. The top three poorest counties in the United States of 
America are primarily populated by Native Americans.
  However, despite overwhelming need, we are not increasing funding for 
the program, and the current appropriation bill does not include 
funding for all Native peoples. The program funding has been flat for 
years and, at current level funding levels, we are falling way behind.
  Mr. Chairman, opponents of NAHASDA reauthorization point to the slow 
spend-down rate of a single tribe, giving the false sense that there is 
a surplus. However, the overall spend-down rate in NAHASDA exceeds that 
of other HUD programs, indicative of the dire housing needs.
  The first people of this Nation suffer in crushing poverty on remote 
reservations, outside of the view of most Americans. The National 
Congress of American Indians finds that 40 percent of on-reservation 
housing is substandard, compared to 6 percent outside of Indian 
Country.
  The homes are overcrowded, and too many basic utilities like access 
to the sewer system or even indoor plumbing is missing.
  I call on Congress to put these first Americans in their hearts and 
to consider helping these communities by supporting both NAHASDA 
reauthorization and increased funding for this extremely successful 
Native housing program.
  By supporting funding for the Native American Housing and Self 
Determination Act, we are working towards increasing the quality of 
housing for Native Americans, and that is good for all of our 
districts.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


               Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mrs. Blackburn

  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  Each amount made available by this Act is hereby 
     reduced by 1 percent.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Tennessee is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank the chairman of the 
committee for the diligent work that they have done to do their part to 
get this funding bill, this appropriations bill, to begin to bring the 
costs down. I think that it truly shows how dedicated many of us on 
this side of the aisle are to having government get its spending under 
control.

                              {time}  1545

  We all know Washington does not have a revenue problem. It has an 
acute spending and priority problem. We see it every single day. My 
constituents in Tennessee see it, and they talk about it a lot.
  Last week, I heard a lot about the outside spending that takes place 
in this town, and the thing that really offends my constituents is that 
Congress spends, D.C. spends money that they don't have. All of it is 
taxpayer money, and it is so inappropriate that the spending continues 
to grow year by year, and the taxpayer has to pay more.
  Quite frankly, Mr. Chairman, I think that there is something immoral 
about citizens and taxpayers struggling to live within their means, so 
they can pay taxes to a government that refuses to live within its 
means.
  That is why, every year, I come to the floor and offer bills for 1, 
2, and 5 percent across-the-board cuts, and then during appropriations 
season, I know I kind of wear a path in the carpet here, offering 
amendments that would cut a penny on the dollar, 1 percent across the 
board, and that is the nature of this amendment that I offer today.
  I do it because my constituents know that Washington spends too much 
money, that we borrow too much money and, therefore, what we are doing 
is capping and trading our children's future to the people that own our 
debt because we couldn't be spending it if we weren't borrowing it.
  Go talk to China, Japan, OPEC, the top holders of our debt, and they 
own a lot of it right now. They are the ones who will be making the 
decisions--probably decisions we won't like--and at some point, they 
may call that bill due.
  Now, across-the-board spending cuts are not a partisan issue. In 
2010, Peter Orszag, who was the President's pick for Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget, turned to the executive departments 
and agencies and said: I want you just to go in and cut 5 percent 
across the board.
  Governor Christie of New Jersey is well known for turning around that 
State. It was a 9 percent across-the-board cut; Governor Cuomo of New 
York, a 10 percent across-the-board cut; Governor Perry of Texas, a 10 
percent across-the-board cut.
  States do it because it works. What it does is it engages the rank-
and-file employees who know where you can make these cuts, so I think 
it is time for the Federal Government to begin to do this.
  In our history, we have had six across-the-board cuts. They have 
ranged from 0.22 percent to 1 percent of covered appropriations. At 
those times, it saved us from $1.1 billion to $8.5 billion.
  For this bill, we need to be doing the same thing; and yes, we are 
below the funding levels, to the credit of the appropriators who have 
worked on this. We are below the 2014 funding levels. That is a good 
thing, but we need to do a little bit more because we are borrowing way 
too much.
  It is time to get our spending under control. I encourage my 
colleagues to support the 1 percent across-the-board spending reduction 
to this bill, and let's take one more step to bring this spending 
problem under control and move to a balanced budget.
  With that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, we have already crafted this bill to our 302(b) 
allocation, which is in compliance with the Ryan-Murray budget 
agreement.

[[Page H5217]]

  While I agree with the gentlewoman's desire to reduce spending, the 
proper time to consider reductions to overall spending is when the 
budget is being crafted, not on individual appropriations bills.
  This bill continues the investment in our Nation's transportation 
infrastructure, as well as serving as a critical safety net for some of 
our most vulnerable populations by trying to make sure all Americans 
have a roof over their head.
  This amendment would cut the FAA air traffic controllers, cut 
infrastructure, highway spending, transit grants, section 8 vouchers, 
VASH vouchers for our homeless veterans, safety inspectors for all 
modes of transportation, and also homeless grants.
  We have done our cutting based on hearings, meetings with the 
departments and the stakeholders, and analyzing the budget 
justifications, rather than just an arbitrary across-the-board cut.
  For those reasons, Mr. Chairman, I would urge a ``no'' vote, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Mr. Chairman, just to remind my colleagues, 
this bill is $1.8 billion below the 2014 bill in spending.
  We had a number of our colleagues speak about the lack of funding for 
their particular programs, and throughout this evening, we are going to 
have other speakers talk about the lack of funding and programs.
  This amendment would cut programs in transportation and housing, 
without any thought to the relative merit of the programs contained in 
the bill, so for that reason, I would oppose this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mrs. BLACKBURN. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Tennessee 
will be postponed.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Garamendi

  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

        At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. 417.
       (a) In General.--None of the funds made available by this 
     Act may be used in contravention of this section or the 
     amendments made by this section.
       (b) Buy-American Preferences.--Chapter 501 of title 49, 
     United States Code, is amended by striking the chapter 
     heading and inserting ``BUY AMERICA''.
       (c) Enhancements To Buy America Requirements.--Section 
     50101 of such title is amended to read as follows:

     ``Sec. 50101. Buy America

       ``(a) Domestic Source Requirement for Steel, Iron, and 
     Manufactured Goods.--
       ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, and except as provided in paragraph (2), funds made 
     available to carry out section 106(k), 44502(a)(2), or 44509, 
     subchapter I of chapter 471 (except section 47127), or 
     chapter 481 (except sections 48102(e), 48106, 48107, and 
     48110) of this title may not be obligated for a project 
     unless the steel, iron, and manufactured goods used for the 
     project are produced in the United States.
       ``(2) Special rules for certain facilities and equipment.--
     With respect to a project for the procurement of a facility 
     or equipment, funds made available to carry out the 
     provisions specified in paragraph (1) may not be obligated 
     for the project unless--
       ``(A) the cost of components and subcomponents produced in 
     the United States--
       ``(i) for fiscal year 2015 is more than 60 percent of the 
     cost of all components of the facility or equipment;
       ``(ii) for fiscal year 2016 is more than 70 percent of the 
     cost of all components of the facility or equipment;
       ``(iii) for fiscal year 2017 is more than 80 percent of the 
     cost of all components of the facility or equipment;
       ``(iv) for fiscal year 2018 is more than 90 percent of the 
     cost of all components of the facility or equipment; and
       ``(v) for fiscal year 2019, and each fiscal year 
     thereafter, is 100 percent of the cost of all components of 
     the facility or equipment; and
       ``(B) final assembly of the facility or equipment occurs in 
     the United States.
       ``(3) Scope.--The requirements of this section apply to all 
     contracts for a project carried out within the scope of the 
     applicable finding, determination, or decision under the 
     National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et 
     seq.), regardless of the funding source of such contracts, if 
     at least one contract for the project is funded with amounts 
     made available to carry out a provision specified in 
     paragraph (1).
       ``(b) Exceptions.--
       ``(1) Issuance of waivers.--The Secretary of Transportation 
     may waive the requirements of subsection (a) only if the 
     Secretary finds that--
       ``(A) applying subsection (a) would be inconsistent with 
     the public interest, as determined in accordance with the 
     regulations required under paragraph (2);
       ``(B) the steel, iron, or manufactured goods required for a 
     project are not produced in the United States--
       ``(i) in sufficient and reasonably available quantities; or
       ``(ii) to a satisfactory quality; or
       ``(C) the use of steel, iron, and manufactured goods 
     produced in the United States for a project will increase the 
     total cost of the project by more than 25 percent.
       ``(2) Regulations.--Not later than October 1, 2015, the 
     Secretary shall issue regulations establishing the criteria 
     that the Secretary shall use to determine whether the 
     application of subsection (a) is inconsistent with the public 
     interest for purposes of paragraph (1)(A).
       ``(3) Labor costs.--For purposes of this section, labor 
     costs involved in final assembly are not included in 
     calculating the cost of components.
       ``(4) Requests for waivers.--An entity seeking a waiver 
     under paragraph (1) shall submit to the Secretary a request 
     for the waiver in such form and containing such information 
     as the Secretary may require.
       ``(5) Preference for american-assembled facilities and 
     equipment.--In the procurement of a facility or equipment 
     subject to a waiver issued under paragraph (1), the Secretary 
     shall give preference to a facility or equipment for which 
     final assembly occurred in the United States.
       ``(6) Limitation on waiver authority.--In the procurement 
     of a facility or equipment, if the Secretary finds that a 
     component of the facility or equipment is not produced in the 
     United States in sufficient and reasonably available 
     quantities or to a satisfactory quality, the Secretary may 
     issue a waiver under paragraph (1) with respect to such 
     component.
       ``(c) Waiver Requirements.--
       ``(1) Public notification of and opportunity for comment on 
     request for a waiver.--
       ``(A) In general.--If the Secretary receives a request for 
     a waiver under subsection (b), the Secretary shall provide 
     notice of and an opportunity for public comment on the 
     request at least 30 days before making a finding based on the 
     request.
       ``(B) Notice requirements.--A notice provided under 
     subparagraph (A) shall--
       ``(i) include the information available to the Secretary 
     concerning the request, including whether the request is 
     being made under subsection (b)(1)(A), (b)(1)(B), or 
     (b)(1)(C); and
       ``(ii) be provided by electronic means, including on the 
     official public Internet Web site of the Department of 
     Transportation.
       ``(2) Detailed justification in federal register.--If the 
     Secretary issues a waiver under subsection (b), the Secretary 
     shall publish in the Federal Register a detailed 
     justification for the waiver that--
       ``(A) addresses the public comments received under 
     paragraph (1)(A); and
       ``(B) is published before the waiver takes effect.
       ``(d) State Requirements.--The Secretary may not impose a 
     limitation or condition on assistance provided with funds 
     made available to carry out a provision specified in 
     subsection (a)(1) that restricts--
       ``(1) a State from imposing requirements that are more 
     stringent than those imposed under this section with respect 
     to limiting the use of articles, materials, or supplies 
     mined, produced, or manufactured in foreign countries for 
     projects carried out with such assistance; or
       ``(2) any recipient of such assistance from complying with 
     such State requirements.
       ``(e) Consistency With International Agreements.--
       ``(1) In general.--This section shall be applied in a 
     manner that is consistent with United States obligations 
     under international agreements.
       ``(2) Treatment of foreign countries in violation of 
     international agreements.--The Secretary shall prohibit the 
     use of steel, iron, and manufactured goods produced in a 
     foreign country in a project funded with funds made available 
     to carry out a provision specified in subsection (a)(1), 
     including any project for which the Secretary has issued a 
     waiver under subsection (b), if the Secretary, in 
     consultation with the United States Trade Representative, 
     determines that the foreign country is in violation of the 
     terms of an agreement with the United States by 
     discriminating against steel, iron, or manufactured goods 
     that are produced in the United States and covered by the 
     agreement.''.
       (d) Prohibition on Contracting Upon Falsification of 
     Label.--Section 50105 of such

[[Page H5218]]

     title is amended by inserting ``steel, iron, or 
     manufactured'' before ``goods''.
       (e) Review of Nationwide Waivers.--Not later than 1 year 
     after the date of enactment of this Act, and at least every 5 
     years thereafter, the Secretary shall review each standing 
     nationwide waiver issued under section 50101 of title 49, 
     United States Code, to determine whether continuing such 
     waiver is necessary.

  Mr. GARAMENDI (during the reading). Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from California?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chairman, the gentlelady from Tennessee spoke 
about the American taxpayer and the money that is being spent by 
Congress, and I would like to pick up on that subject because I am 
deeply concerned about where and how we spend our taxpayer money. It is 
not our money. It is the American public's money, and it ought to be 
spent wisely, and it ought to be spent on American-made goods and 
services.
  This amendment would build off of the current law dating back to 
1933, the Buy American laws. This amendment is necessary, and I will 
tell you why it is necessary.
  This is a picture of the new San Francisco Bay Bridge, built by the 
Chinese Government--several billion dollars of American taxpayer money, 
California bridge tolls, and Federal taxpayer dollars spent to buy 
steel products to build this bridge from the Chinese Government. It was 
a steel company in Shanghai, owned by the Chinese Government--actually, 
by the Chinese military--that built this bridge.
  This bridge should have been built by Americans--American steel 
companies, American workers. It should not have been built by the 
Chinese Government. Three thousand jobs in Shanghai, zero jobs in 
America--and a very shoddy job done on the bridge, thousands upon 
thousands of faulty welds, over budget, and it went over on time.
  We need to strengthen the Buy American laws. We need to bring it 
home. We need to Make It In America, and this amendment would 
strengthen the Buy American laws in the transportation portion of this 
bill.
  It would simply say that 60 percent is good. 70, 80, 90, and 100 
percent is where we ought to be. We ought not any longer contract out 
to foreign companies and specifically not to the Chinese Government to 
build American bridges.
  We are going to spend $50 billion in this bill. Is that money going 
to be spent here in America on American-made goods and services? Or is 
it going to be spent somewhere overseas, perhaps China?
  No more, I say. Build it in America. Use American taxpayer dollars to 
buy American goods and services. This ought to be the mantra of this 
Congress: Buy America. Employ Americans. Give American companies here 
in the United States the opportunity to bid on these jobs.
  It is not going to be more expensive, and this is the proof, way over 
budget, way beyond the timeframes, and way beyond what is reasonable.
  Build it in America, American jobs, spend American taxpayer money on 
American-made equipment, goods, and services. That is what this 
amendment does.
  It also eliminates one of the problems that led to the segmentation, 
but we will not go there. We will simply say it is going to be made in 
America. That is what this amendment is all about.
  I know we are going to get a point of order, but really, we ought to 
waive that point of order and put on the floor the issue: Is this House 
willing to Make It In America, to bring the American jobs back home? Is 
this House willing to allow American taxpayer money to be spent on 
American-made goods and services? Or are we simply going to do a point 
of order and avoid the fundamental question that was raised by my 
colleague in her previous discussion, how are we to spend the American 
taxpayer money? I say spend it on American-made goods and services.
  I yield back the balance of my time.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Chairman, I make a point of order against the 
amendment because it proposes to change existing law and constitutes 
legislation in an appropriation bill and, therefore, violates clause 2 
of rule XXI.
  The rule states in pertinent part:
  ``An amendment to a general appropriation bill shall not be in order 
if changing existing law.''
  The amendment directly amends existing law.
  I ask for a ruling from the Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point 
of order?
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chairman, we could use the rules of this House to 
promote policies that are beneficial to the American Government, 
beneficial to the American taxpayer, and, most importantly, beneficial 
to the American workers, whether they are employed in the steel 
industry or the construction industry, or we could use the rules of the 
House to deny American workers the opportunity for jobs.
  We are spending $50 billion in this legislation, and we ought not use 
the rules of this House to deny American workers, to deny American 
companies the opportunity to use the American taxpayer dollars to build 
America. The rules of this House are flexible. They can be used to 
benefit America and American workers or they can be used to the 
detriment.
  The question the Chair has before it is, How will we use those rules? 
Will we, in this House, strengthen the American economy by requiring 
that the American taxpayer dollars be used here in America? Or will we 
use the rule in the opposite way, to the harm of American workers?
  I suggest, Mr. Chairman, you rule in favor of American workers and 
override the request.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point 
of order?
  If not, the Chair is prepared to rule.
  The Chair finds that this amendment directly amends existing law.
  The amendment, therefore, constitutes legislation in violation of 
clause 2 of rule XXI.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment is not in order.
  Mr. MICA. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. MICA. Mr. Chairman, I would ask the chairman of the T-HUD 
Subcommittee to rise and engage in a colloquy.
  First of all, I have to commend Chairman Latham, Ranking Member 
Pastor, and the Appropriations Committee staff for their great efforts 
in bringing this measure to the floor.

                              {time}  1600

  I would like to take just a moment at this opportunity to share with 
the committee and my colleagues a concern that I have regarding the 
recommendation in report language that is contained in this bill that 
provides funding for capital investment grants that have signed a full 
funding grant agreement, FFGA, by the start of the 2015 fiscal year on 
September 30, 2014.
  Unfortunately, some delays and miscommunications with the Department 
of Transportation on several projects, including an important Florida 
project, has caused the signing of a FFGA, full funding grant 
agreement, to be delayed several months beyond the date in the report 
language. And, again, without congressional action, Florida's project 
and other national projects could be impacted.
  I have received assurances that this issue can be resolved in the 
final legislation.
  Mr. Chairman, would you join us in our effort to ensure that these 
critical national infrastructure projects continue to move forward?
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. MICA. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. I thank the gentleman. As we move forward to conference, 
we will work with the gentleman to ensure that any project ready for 
full funding grant agreements will receive funds under our conference 
allocation.
  Mr. MICA. I thank the chairman and look forward to working with him 
to maintain and expand our national infrastructure. I am pleased to 
yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H5219]]

                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Grijalva

  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mrs. Black). The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to enter into a contract with any person whose 
     disclosures of a proceeding with a disposition listed in 
     section 2313(c)(1) of title 41, United States Code, in the 
     Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System 
     include the term ``Fair Labor Standards Act.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, no hardworking American should ever have 
to worry that her employer will refuse to pay her when she works 
overtime or take money out of her paycheck, especially if she works for 
a Federal contractor. The practice is known as wage theft.
  Right now, Federal contractors who violate the Fair Labor Standards 
Act are still allowed to apply for Federal contracts. My amendment 
would deny Federal contracts to those who violate the Fair Labor 
Standards Act to deny workers the pay that they have earned.
  The amendment ensures that those in violation of the law do not get 
taxpayer support. We should be in the business of rewarding good actors 
and not rewarding cheaters.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. We would accept the amendment.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Schock

  Mr. SCHOCK. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to implement, administer, or enforce paragraph (c)(3) 
     of section 982.503, Code of Federal Regulations.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Illinois is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. SCHOCK. Madam Chairman, I rise today to offer an amendment to the 
T-HUD appropriation bill really to address a problem that we have 
identified in our State of Illinois. Many of us are familiar with the 
Housing Choice Voucher program, often known as section 8. Throughout 
our communities, over 2 million households in America receive some form 
of benefit through section 8 vouchers. In many localities around the 
country, and particularly in my home State of Illinois, there are long 
wait lists of people who would qualify for and desperately need access 
to affordable housing and particularly the assistance they get under 
section 8 vouchers through the T-HUD appropriations bill.
  Unfortunately, there have been some abuses and stretching of 
permission that Congress has given specifically to the Housing and 
Urban Development Secretary. I am speaking about a program commonly 
referred to as super vouchers, where the agency has basically used 
Congress' latitude it has given it to allow it to go up to 125 percent 
of what is deemed to be the cost of affordable housing in a particular 
community.
  Obviously, from community to community, the cost of affordable 
housing differs, and the value of a voucher differs for a family 
member. But we have seen in the city of Chicago, for example, in my 
home State, of vouchers now going up to over 300 percent of the average 
cost of affordable housing and a voucher value approaching over $4,000 
a month for a single voucher recipient.
  Now, I know that each State's real estate values are different, each 
State's rental costs are different, and certainly Illinois may be more 
expensive than other States, but I would submit to my colleagues that 
for every one of these super vouchers that we give out, for every 
family that is given over 300 percent of what they should be given, 
there are tens of thousands of families waiting in line patiently and 
desperately needing some assistance, and there is only so much money in 
the pot that Congress appropriates.
  So what my limited amendment really does is instruct the Secretary to 
go up to that 125 percent limit, but really to allow that those dollars 
of money that Congress appropriates in a bipartisan way for section 8 
housing ensure that we help as many families as possible, and that we 
don't allow some families to, in essence, hit the lottery and get over 
$4,000 a month when others--for example, in the city of Chicago, we 
have over 40,000 people on a waiting list who meet the qualifications 
for section 8 housing.
  It is time that they get the assistance that they need and their 
families need. It is time that they get into and have access to 
affordable housing, and it is time that we eliminate these super 
vouchers, which, really, reward a few at the expense of so many.
  So, with that, I would urge a ``yes'' vote, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, reluctantly I must rise in opposition to 
the amendment. I share the gentleman's concern, and that is why we have 
included language in our committee report directing HUD to review 
instances of payments for housing that exceed 120 percent of fair 
market rates.
  The big problem is I have concerns about the potential unintended 
consequences of this funding prohibition, in particular, the elderly 
and disabled populations which could be displaced with an amendment 
such as this.
  I really appreciate the gentleman's attention to this issue and will 
continue to work with HUD to address any excessive, unwarranted 
overpayments for assistance to our most vulnerable citizens.
  I reluctantly must urge a ``no'' vote on the amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairman, we rise also in opposition to 
this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Schock).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SCHOCK. Madam Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Illinois 
will be postponed.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Higgins

  Mr. HIGGINS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to terminate the status of a unit of general local 
     government as a metropolitan city (as defined in section 102 
     of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 
     U.S.C. 5302)) with respect to grants under section 106 of 
     such Act (42 U.S.C. 5306).

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. HIGGINS. Madam Chair, since the creation of the Community 
Development Block Grant in 1974----
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. HIGGINS. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. We will accept the amendment.
  Mr. HIGGINS. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Higgins).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  Mr. GERLACH. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GERLACH. Madam Chairman, I rise to engage the gentleman from 
Iowa, Chairman Latham, in a colloquy.

[[Page H5220]]

  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GERLACH. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. I would be happy to enter into a colloquy with the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania.
  Mr. GERLACH. I thank the chairman. First of all, Mr. Chairman, thank 
you for your hard work on this legislation, but I do have a concern 
about funding for the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety, or 
DADSS, program that supports research of advanced alcohol detection 
technology. MAP-21 authorized and Congress provided $5.44 million for 
this program in fiscal year 2014. For fiscal year 2015, the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration requested $5.72 million. 
Unfortunately, the report attached to the T-HUD bill specifies only 
$2.72 million for this program.
  The DADSS program supports a cooperative agreement between the 
Automotive Coalition for Traffic Safety and the National Traffic 
Highway Safety Administration to work together to create a passive, in-
vehicle technology that can determine the driver's--and only the 
driver's--blood alcohol content. If the driver is at or above 0.08, the 
illegal limit in all 50 States, the car would be inoperable.
  The current operating plan for the program runs through 2018, and the 
goal at this time would be to have ready a commercially viable 
technology by then. While great progress has been made, more research 
must take place. Full funding for this research should be a priority 
for this Congress because each year, over 10,000 Americans are killed 
due to drunk driving--nearly one-third of all traffic fatalities.
  Madam Chairman, Mothers Against Drunk Driving has called the DADSS 
program its highest legislative priority. The Insurance Institute for 
Highway Safety has looked at the potential of this technology and said 
it could save over 7,000 lives per year. Every major traffic safety 
group in this country supports this, including the National 
Transportation Safety Board. The National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration has identified this project as one of its highest 
priorities.
  The authorized funding level is not a tremendous sum when you 
consider the fact that drunk driving costs Americans over $132 billion 
each year, and I believe that fully funding this project and including 
the administration's request of $5.72 million--which is already 
included in the Senate fiscal year 2015 Transportation-HUD 
Appropriations bill--is a small price to pay for a project with this 
much potential.
  I would respectfully ask the chairman that we work together to 
restore this critical funding.
  Mr. LATHAM. I appreciate the gentleman's attention to this important 
safety issue and for highlighting the promise of this research 
initiative. I look forward to working with you as our bill moves 
through the legislative process to make certain DADSS research is 
adequately funded.
  Mr. GERLACH. I thank the gentleman.
  Madam Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Grayson

  Mr. GRAYSON. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. _. None of the funds made available in this Act may be 
     used to make incentive payments pursuant to 48 CFR 16.4 to 
     contractors for contracts that are behind schedule under the 
     terms of the contract as prescribed by 48 CFR 52.211 or over 
     the contract amount indicated in Standard Form 33, box 20.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 
minutes.

                              {time}  1615

  Mr. GRAYSON. Madam Chair, this is simply a good government amendment 
that is reflected in a different form in the Senate Transportation-
Housing bill. I am seeking to provide a similar provision in the House 
bill.
  This was offered in a different form yesterday. There were objections 
to it that were sustained. We have worked with the Parliamentarian to 
overcome those objections.
  This provision refers to none of the funds available in this act may 
be used for incentive payments pursuant to a particular regulatory 
provision to contractors for contracts that are behind schedule under 
the terms of another regulatory provision or over the contract amount 
as indicated in a standard form used in contracting.
  That is standard form 33, box 20, subject to modification in standard 
form 30, box 14--sorry, box 12. This will rein in contractors who are 
late and working over budget and prevent them from getting extra 
payments.
  We are simply speaking about extra payments here, payments they would 
not normally be receiving, except for the fact that they are asking for 
them and claim some entitlement to them. Too often, the government 
engages in waste, fraud, and abuse with contracting. This will help to 
rein that in.
  I respectfully ask for the support of my colleagues on this 
amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Grayson).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  The amount otherwise made available by this Act 
     for ``Department of Housing and Urban Development--Management 
     and Administration--Executive Offices'' is hereby reduced by 
     $2,000,000.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment to save 
taxpayers money and to hold a disorganized and wasteful department 
accountable for its actions and inactions.
  My amendment is very simple. It reduces the funding to the executive 
offices at the Department of Housing and Urban Development by $2 
million, which brings their funding levels back to fiscal year 2014 
levels.
  As always, I appreciate the work the committee does to put these 
bills and committee reports together. It is not an easy job, but I am 
also glad that Members are able to read their work and offer further 
input here on the House floor.
  Since Republicans took the House majority in 2012, we have done our 
best to bring regular order and an open process to the House 
proceedings. I am happy to see a return to regular order, and I am 
further grateful that I and my colleagues are able to participate in 
the appropriations process.
  For the second year in a row, I have read the committee's report on 
the administrative offices at HUD and was stunned to see that, yet 
again, HUD is running in an inefficient manner and has, again, likely 
violated the Antideficiency Act.
  Further, HUD did not notify or request permission from Congress for 
certain budget reprogramming activities and hired more people than they 
could afford to pay.
  I would like to quickly cite excerpts from the committee report on 
this issue:

       HUD must have systems in place to track fundamental 
     budgetary resource data, including budget authority and FTE 
     levels.
       A lack of essential information at HUD has, in the past, 
     led to Antideficiency Act violations in which HUD hired more 
     people than it had resources to pay.
       While the committee recognizes deficiencies caused by 
     antiquated enterprise systems and acknowledges HUD's effort 
     to address these deficiencies, proper management of agency 
     resources is a fundamental responsibility and antiquated 
     systems are no excuse for the violation of Federal law.
       The committee also directs HUD to clearly identify in its 
     budget justifications the movement or transfer of budgetary 
     resources from one account to another account, so that year-
     over-year comparisons are possible.

  The fact that the committee must specifically spell out and direct an 
executive department or agency to conduct its affairs properly is, 
quite frankly, embarrassing and deplorable.
  Then again, I suppose government inefficiency is the status quo these 
days. These same inefficiencies have been identified year after year 
now. HUD cannot get its affairs in order. As such, Congress should not 
be increasing funding for paper pushers and other bureaucrats.

[[Page H5221]]

  I would also demand that HUD stop hiring more people than they can 
pay, stop reprogramming money within their accounts to fix self-imposed 
mistakes and then withhold that information from Congress, and finally, 
stop breaking Federal law. Congress must not reward bad behavior with 
increased funding levels.
  The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office stated this amendment 
reduces both the budget authority in the bill and the 2015 outlays by 
$2 million. With a Federal debt surpassing $18 trillion, it is 
irresponsible to throw more money at a department that cannot manage 
its own affairs.
  I ask my colleagues to support this commonsense amendment. I thank 
the chairman and ranking member for their continued work on the 
committee.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment. While 
I appreciate the gentleman's effort to further reduce spending, this 
account is already below the enacted funding level, and further cuts in 
this account are unwarranted.
  This account primarily funds employee salaries and benefits, and an 
additional 14 percent reduction would result in the furlough or layoff 
of key HUD employees. Disruption of the leadership offices at HUD would 
jeopardize the welfare of millions of vulnerable families and billions 
of dollars in taxpayer investments. Therefore, I cannot support the 
gentleman's amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I oppose the amendment.
  The levels provided for salaries and expenses at HUD in the base bill 
are insufficient. Many offices will need to furlough or terminate 
employees to make these levels work, and this amendment would aggravate 
this problem further.
  As it is, the funding level in this bill will require HUD to furlough 
its personnel in this office for 12 days. This amendment would increase 
the number of furlough days required. At these levels, HUD's ability to 
carry out their mission would be jeopardized. I oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  Each amount otherwise made available by this Act 
     for ``Department of Housing and Urban Development--Management 
     and Administration--Administrative Support Offices'' is 
     hereby reduced by 4.2 percent.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I rise today to offer one last amendment to 
save taxpayers money and hold a disorganized and wasteful department 
accountable for its actions and inactions.
  Following to the heels of my previous amendment, this amendment 
reduces funding for ineffective bureaucrats at HUD by $21 million, 
bringing their funding levels to the level recommend by the House 
Appropriations Committee in fiscal year 2014.
  The current bill funds these HUD bureaucrats through the 
administrative support offices at a staggering $500 million. My 
amendment reduces each subaccount by 4.2 percent, so that the sum of 
each reduction to each subaccount equals the $21 million reduction to 
the overall account. Again, this is the amount recommended by this 
committee for the overall account in fiscal year 2014.
  As I mentioned, I appreciate the work that the committee does to put 
these bills and committee reports together, but the committee report 
associated with the appropriations bill, once again, for the second 
year in a row, highlighted major deficiencies in the Housing and Urban 
Development management Offices.
  At minimum, this mismanaged agency should at least include those 
reprogramming efforts in their budget justifications. They failed to do 
so and are far from being considered a model of transparency.
  HUD's bureaucracy is not only massive, it is extremely wasteful and 
inefficient. The associated committee report--which I cited in my 
comments on my previous amendment a moment ago--is quite harsh to HUD 
and rightfully so.
  These same inefficiencies within the agency have been identified year 
after year after year. Again, Congress must not reward bad behavior 
with increased finding levels.
  The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office stated this amendment 
reduced budget authority in the bill by $21 million and reduces the 
2015 outlays by $16 million. With an $18 trillion debt that continues 
to grow, it is irresponsible to throw more money at a department that 
cannot manage its own affairs.
  I ask my colleagues to support this commonsense amendment. I thank 
the chairman and the ranking member for their continued work on the 
committee.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I must rise in opposition to this amendment 
also. While I appreciate the gentleman's efforts to further reduce 
spending, this account is already $6 million below the enacted level 
from last year and over $30 million below the President's request.
  Additional cuts would require HUD to furlough or lay off employees 
which undermines the Department's ability to adequately serve millions 
of low-income, elderly, and disabled households and puts billions of 
taxpayer dollars at risk.
  Unfortunately, the way the amendment is written, it would not reduce 
the deficit at all. It doesn't go to the deficit reduction account. It 
would basically just stay in the bill, to be spent by someone else, 
somewhere else; so it doesn't really save the taxpayers any money in 
the end. I urge a ``no'' vote on the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I oppose this amendment. Again, 
the levels provided for salaries and expenses at HUD in the base bill 
are insufficient. As it is, the funding level in this bill will require 
HUD to furlough its personnel in these offices for up to 90 days. 
Nearly all will be under a hiring freeze.
  This amendment would increase the number of furlough days required 
and would lead to reductions in force. At these levels, HUD's ability 
to carry out its mission would be jeopardized. I oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Schiff

  Mr. SCHIFF. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act 
     shall be used to enforce section

[[Page H5222]]

     47524 of title 49, United States Code, or part 161 of title 
     14, Code of Federal Regulations, with regard to noise or 
     access restrictions or to enforce section 47107 of title 49, 
     United States Code, with regard to access restriction on the 
     operation of aircraft by the operator of Bob Hope Airport in 
     Burbank, California.

  Mr. SCHIFF (during the reading). Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent 
to dispense with the reading.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from California?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from California is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SCHIFF. Madam Chair, I rise today to urge my colleagues to 
support the amendment I am offering, along with my southern California 
colleagues, Mr. Brad Sherman and Mr. Henry Waxman. The amendment would 
allow the Burbank Bob Hope Airport to implement a nighttime curfew 
between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.
  Thousands of residents of southern California's San Fernando Valley, 
who live under the flight paths or near the terminals at Bob Hope 
Airport, endure the house-shaking noise of air traffic during the day 
and suffer the jarring interruption of their sleep caused by roaring 
jets, sometimes late at night.
  To address the concerns of those affected by airport noise across the 
Nation, the FAA established a process to consider an individual 
community's request for a curfew. However, the process was designed to 
be difficult, so difficult that, in the decades since it was 
established by the FAA, only one airport in the Nation has successfully 
completed an application--Bob Hope Airport--and then it was summarily 
turned down.
  When Congress enacted the 1990 Airport Noise and Capacity Act, ANCA, 
it intended for ANCA to permit airports to obtain noise restrictions if 
they met certain requirements.
  At that time, Congress exempted several airports from the law's 
requirements for FAA approval of new noise rules, if they had 
preexisting noise rules in effect to address local noise problems.
  Bob Hope Airport, located in Burbank, California, was one of the 
first airports in the country to impose a curfew and has a long history 
of curfews, but was unfortunately not given the protection of the 
grandfather provision of ANCA that several other similar airports 
received.
  My amendment would correct this inequity and put Bob Hope on the same 
footing as several other airports across the country that had curfews 
before ANCA's passage by correcting the omission of not allowing Bob 
Hope Airport to implement, on a permanent and mandatory basis, the 
curfew which it had in effect informally since the 1980s.

                              {time}  1630

  After spending $7 million and 9 years of effort, the FAA rejected Bob 
Hope's request for a curfew, erroneously contending that the small 
number of flights impacted by the curfew would impose too great a 
strain on the country's aviation system and impose too great a cost on 
users. In reality, the FAA approached the process in reverse, beginning 
with its conclusion, the one it wanted to reach, and working backwards 
to try to justify its intended and desired result.
  It is important that my colleagues understand the impact of this 
amendment on aviation in southern California. There will be no impact 
on commercial flights. Almost all commercial airlines already 
voluntarily abide by the voluntary nighttime curfew of Bob Hope; and 
the impact on general aviation will be limited to 2 nighttime landings, 
4 days a week by large jet aircraft, and a handful of nighttime 
turboprop takeoffs.
  Because of the FAA's dismissive attitude toward legitimate local 
concerns, it is clear to us the only way to provide relief to our 
residents is through this legislative action. Madam Chair, I strongly 
urge my colleagues to support this amendment to correct an omission in 
ANCA. Local problems require local solutions, not solutions imposed by 
a Federal agency with a predetermined agenda.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I withdraw my reservation, and I rise in 
opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment. 
Unfortunately, I wish the gentleman would have brought it up maybe in 
full committee as a member of the committee to address it then. I don't 
believe that this bill is really the venue to address what is a local 
issue.
  The affected airport serves the Greater Los Angeles area. I simply 
don't know the impact of this action that it would have on trans-
Pacific flights, trade, or commerce throughout the area. So, for those 
reasons, I would urge a ``no'' vote on the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Arizona is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. I rise in support of this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Schiff).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SCHIFF. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Cassidy

  Mr. CASSIDY. Madam Chair, I offer an amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec.__. None of the funds made available by this Act may be 
     used to promulgate or enforce rules, orders, or consent 
     agreements or to fund approved projects under the 
     Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery 
     (TIGER) Discretionary Grant program unless the Department of 
     Transportation implements the recommendations provided in the 
     preliminary report of the Government Accountability Office 
     numbered GAO-14-628R TIGER Grants.

  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from Louisiana is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CASSIDY. Madam Chair, the point of this amendment is to bring 
transparency and accountability to the process of awarding TIGER 
grants. Now, TIGER grants were created in 2009 with money from the 
stimulus bill to provide competitive grants that were to fund 
infrastructure projects and supposedly on a merit-based criteria.
  There has been about $3.6 billion in TIGER grants awarded since 2009 
going to States, local governments, and other entities for highway, 
transit, rail, and port authorities. DOT is currently reviewing grant 
applications to award $600 million for a sixth round of TIGER grant 
funding, applications due April 28, 2014.
  Last month, the GAO reported numerous problems with the awarding of 
TIGER grants. The findings found in the report that DOT continued to 
accept specific applications for 30 days after the notice of funding 
availability deadline and did not notify the public. The DOT policy 
office did not follow its own guidelines and advanced projects with 
lower technical ratings instead of more highly-rated projects, 
providing no documentation or evidence of the factors that led to these 
decisions.
  This leads me to why we are offering this amendment, again to bring 
transparency and accountability to the process of awarding TIGER 
grants.
  In 2011, GAO recommended that DOT should develop a strategy to 
document decisions and work with Congress to disclose how it makes its 
decisions. The Government Accountability Office further recommended 
that the DOT limit the influence of geographic considerations and 
instead have a merit-based process. In their most recent report, the 
Government Accountability Office again made similar recommendations to 
provide transparency to the process.

[[Page H5223]]

  Now, my amendment does not do away with TIGER grants. Private sector 
partners, State and local governments, metropolitan planning 
organizations, transit agencies in Louisiana and elsewhere have applied 
for these. This amendment will not prevent them from the opportunity to 
receive funding, nor do I wish to prevent consideration of the hundreds 
of applications that have been offered for this current cycle. However, 
this amendment requires that the Department of Transportation follow 
the Government Accountability Office recommendations to be transparent 
and objective in the management and decisionmaking process when 
selecting applications for funding under the TIGER grant program.
  We cannot have DOT have a process which is suspected to be political 
and not merit-based when there are Federal tax dollars at stake and 
when communities in Louisiana and elsewhere with meritorious projects 
are having theirs not considered when those with less merit are 
receiving prioritization. That is wrong. It is not what we should be 
pushing. Again, I push this amendment to bring transparency and 
accountability to the awarding of TIGER grants.
  With that, Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I have great appreciation for the 
gentleman's point. The report was very shocking as far as the 
transparency and how some of these grants have been given. I am in a 
position where I must insist on being consistent in opposing all 
legislation on the appropriation bill.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I make a point of order against the 
amendment because it proposes to change existing law and constitutes 
legislation in an appropriation bill and, therefore, violates clause 2 
of rule XXI.
  The rule states in pertinent part:
  ``An amendment to a general appropriation bill shall not be in order 
if changing existing law.''
  The amendment imposes additional duties.
  I ask for a ruling from the Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point 
of order? If not, the Chair is prepared to rule on the point of order.
  The amendment imposes new duties on the Department of Transportation 
to implement a Government Accountability Office report.
  The amendment, therefore, constitutes legislation in violation of 
clause 2 of rule XXI.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment is not in order.


                     Amendment Offered by Ms. Titus

  Ms. TITUS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following:
       Sec. ___.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to issue rules or regulations to allow an individual 
     on an aircraft to engage in voice communications using a 
     mobile communications device during a flight of that aircraft 
     in scheduled passenger interstate or intrastate air 
     transportation except for use by a member of the flight crew 
     on duty on an aircraft, flight attendant on duty on an 
     aircraft, or Federal law enforcement officer acting in an 
     official capacity.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Nevada is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. TITUS. Madam Chair, after speaking with the committee, I plan to 
withdraw my amendment, but I want to take a moment to speak on the 
underlying issue because I think it is very important.
  Madam Chair, my amendment would prohibit the Department from engaging 
in rulemaking to allow the use of voice communication devices in 
flight, in other words, cell phones.
  When the Federal Communications Commission first floated the idea of 
allowing cell phone usage on airplanes, the response from the American 
people was so clear you could hear a pin drop, something that would not 
be possible if you were surrounded by people chatting on their phones 
on an airplane. Polling has consistently shown 2-1 opposition to 
allowing passengers to make voice calls in flight.
  In February of this past year, I, along with my colleagues on the 
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, voted unanimously to 
approve H.R. 3676, which was introduced by Chairman Shuster, that has 
the same goal of the amendment I put forward today.
  At a time when we document every moment of our lives over Twitter and 
Facebook and Instagram, the last thing the traveling public needs is to 
sit next to someone having a loud, one-sided conversation on a cross-
country flight.
  Now, this isn't just a matter of comfort and good manners; it is also 
a matter of safety. For our flight attendants who are charged with the 
safety and security of travelers in-flight, cell phone use will 
exacerbate potential conflict among passengers and will create 
distractions from crew instructions both prior to takeoff and during 
flights, so it would be dangerous for all on board.
  I thank the chairman and the ranking member for this opportunity to 
speak on this important issue, and I hope that although this amendment 
doesn't move forward, H.R. 3676 will receive floor consideration in due 
time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. TITUS. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. I really appreciate the gentlewoman bringing this issue 
to our attention. I know the authorizing committee has looked into the 
issue of voice communications on flights and unanimously voted out a 
bill out of the committee addressing the same concerns. I look forward 
to working with the gentlewoman and the authorizers as we move forward 
on this very, very important issue as far as you and I and all 
travelers are concerned.
  So, thank you very much.
  Ms. TITUS. Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to withdraw the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Nevada?
  There was no objection.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Yoho

  Mr. YOHO. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to promulgate, implement, or enforce any regulations 
     that would mandate Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking 
     or event data recorders in light-duty noncommercial passenger 
     motor vehicles.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Florida is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. YOHO. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. I would gladly accept your amendment.
  Mr. YOHO. I thank the chairman, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  My amendment would prohibit any funds made available under this act 
to be used to implement any Administration mandate for GPS or event 
data recording devices in ``light-duty, non-commercial'' passenger 
motor vehicles.
  In the recent past, the Department of Transportation and the 
President have both indicated their support of a mandate, a mandate 
which would require every car to have a recording device installed. 
These recording devices are more commonly referred to as ``black 
boxes.'' Within the past year, our nation has been rocked by evidence 
of surveillance techniques that have been used, unconstitutionally, by 
government agencies to collect information on law-abiding Americans. It 
is understandable then, that the revelation that a black box installed 
in a vehicle, often times without consumer knowledge, is concerning.
  Additionally, there is a need to provide clarity to the confusion 
surrounding who is the owner of the data collected by these event data 
recorders. I believe that ownerships resides with the owner of the 
vehicle. However, until such time as this issue is resolved, I must 
defer to my constituents back home who are adamantly opposed to these 
black boxes. I ask that my colleagues join me in supporting my 
amendment to protect the personal liberties of a public that is 
increasingly weary of government surveillance and privacy intrusions.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Yoho).
  The amendment was agreed to.

[[Page H5224]]

                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Ellison

  Mr. ELLISON. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Page 156, after line 16, insert the following new section:


   providing funding for affordable rental housing for extremely low-
 income families by improving targeting of mortgage interest deduction

       Sec. 417.  (a) Replacement of Mortgage Interest Deduction 
     With Mortgage Interest Credit.--
       (1) Nonrefundable Credit.--Subpart A of part IV of 
     subchapter A of chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code of 
     1986 (relating to nonrefundable personal credits) is amended 
     by inserting after section 25D the following new section:

     ``SEC. 25E. INTEREST ON INDEBTEDNESS SECURED BY QUALIFIED 
                   RESIDENCE.

       ``(a) Allowance of Credit.--In the case of an individual, 
     there shall be allowed as a credit against the tax imposed by 
     this chapter for the taxable year an amount equal to 15 
     percent of the qualified residence interest paid or accrued 
     during the taxable year.
       ``(b) Qualified Residence Interest.-- For purposes of this 
     section:
       ``(1) In general.--The term `qualified residence interest' 
     means interest which is paid or accrued during the taxable 
     year on--
       ``(A) acquisition indebtedness with respect to any 
     qualified residence of the taxpayer, or
       ``(B) home equity indebtedness with respect to any 
     qualified residence of the taxpayer.

     For purposes of the preceding sentence, the determination of 
     whether any property is a qualified residence of the taxpayer 
     shall be made as of the time the interest is accrued.
       ``(2) Overall limitation.--The aggregate amount of 
     indebtedness taken into account for any period for purposes 
     of this section shall not exceed $500,000 ($250,000 in the 
     case of a married individual filing a separate return).
       ``(3) Acquisition indebtedness.--The term `acquisition 
     indebtedness' means any indebtedness which--
       ``(A) is incurred in acquiring, constructing, or 
     substantially improving any qualified residence of the 
     taxpayer, and
       ``(B) is secured by such residence.

     Such term also includes any indebtedness secured by such 
     residence resulting from the refinancing of indebtedness 
     meeting the requirements of the preceding sentence (or this 
     sentence), but only to the extent the amount of the 
     indebtedness resulting from such refinancing does not exceed 
     the amount of the refinanced indebtedness.
       ``(4) Home equity indebtedness.--
       ``(A) In general.--The term `home equity indebtedness' 
     means any indebtedness (other than acquisition indebtedness) 
     secured by a qualified residence to the extent the aggregate 
     amount of such indebtedness does not exceed--
       ``(i) the fair market value of such qualified residence, 
     reduced by
       ``(ii) the amount of acquisition indebtedness with respect 
     to such residence.
       ``(B) Limitation.--The aggregate amount treated as home 
     equity indebtedness for any period shall not exceed $100,000 
     ($50,000 in the case of a married individual filing a 
     separate return).
       ``(c) Special Rules.--For purposes of this section:
       ``(1) Qualified residence.--The term `qualified residence' 
     means--
       ``(A) the principal residence (within the meaning of 
     section 121) of the taxpayer, and
       ``(B) 1 other residence of the taxpayer which is selected 
     by the taxpayer for purposes of this subsection for the 
     taxable year and which is used by the taxpayer as a residence 
     (within the meaning of section 280A(d)(1)).
       ``(2) Married individuals filing separate returns.--If a 
     married couple does not file a joint return for the taxable 
     year--
       ``(A) such couple shall be treated as 1 taxpayer for 
     purposes of paragraph (1), and
       ``(B) each individual shall be entitled to take into 
     account 1 residence unless both individuals consent in 
     writing to 1 individual taking into account the principal 
     residence and 1 other residence.
       ``(3) Residence not rented.--For purposes of paragraph 
     (1)(B), notwithstanding section 280A(d)(1), if the taxpayer 
     does not rent a dwelling unit at any time during a taxable 
     year, such unit may be treated as a residence for such 
     taxable year.
       ``(4) Unenforceable security interests.--Indebtedness shall 
     not fail to be treated as secured by any property solely 
     because, under any applicable State or local homestead or 
     other debtor protection law in effect on August 16, 1986, the 
     security interest is ineffective or the enforceability of the 
     security interest is restricted.
       ``(5) Special rules for estates and trusts.--For purposes 
     of determining whether any interest paid or accrued by an 
     estate or trust is qualified residence interest, any 
     residence held by such estate or trust shall be treated as a 
     qualified residence of such estate or trust if such estate or 
     trust establishes that such residence is a qualified 
     residence of a beneficiary who has a present interest in such 
     estate or trust or an interest in the residuary of such 
     estate or trust.
       ``(d) Coordination With Deduction.--In the case of any 
     taxable year beginning in calendar years 2014 through 2018, 
     the taxpayer may elect to apply this section in lieu of the 
     deduction under section 163 for qualified residence 
     interest.''.
       (2) Phaseout of Deduction.--Section 163(h) of such Code is 
     amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(6) Phaseout.--
       ``(A) In general.--In the case of any taxable year 
     beginning in a calendar year after 2013, the amount otherwise 
     allowable as a deduction by reason of paragraph (2)(D) shall 
     be the applicable percentage of such amount.
       ``(B) Applicable percentage.--For purposes of subparagraph 
     (A), the applicable percentage shall be determined in 
     accordance with the following table:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          The applicable
     ``For taxable years beginning in calendar year:         percentage
                                                                is:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2014....................................................            100%
2015....................................................             80%
2016....................................................             60%
2017....................................................             40%
2018....................................................             20%
2019 and thereafter.....................................          0%.''.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       (3) Phasedown of Mortgage Limit.--Subparagraph (B) of 
     section 163(h)(3) of such Code is amended by adding at the 
     end the following:
       ``(iii) Phasedown.--

       ``(I) In general.--In the case of any taxable year 
     beginning in calendar years 2014 through 2018, clause (ii) 
     shall be applied by substituting the amounts specified in the 
     table in subclause (II) of this clause for `$1,000,000' and 
     `$500,000', respectively.
       ``(II) Phasedown amounts.--For purposes of subclause (I), 
     the amounts specified in this subclause for a taxable year 
     shall be the amounts specified in the following table:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Amount       Amount
   ``For taxable years beginning in calendar    substituted  substituted
                     year:                           for          for
                                                $1,000,000:   $500,000:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2014..........................................   $1,000,000     $500,000
2015..........................................     $900,000     $450,000
2016..........................................     $800,000     $400,000
2017..........................................     $700,000     $350,000
2018..........................................     $600,000     $300,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       (4) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for subpart 
     A of part IV of subchapter A of chapter 1 of such Code is 
     amended by inserting after section 25D the following new 
     item:

``Sec. 25E. Interest on indebtedness secured by qualified residence.''.

       (5) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this subsection 
     shall apply with respect to interest paid or accrued after 
     December 31, 2013.
       (b) Use of Mortgage Interest Savings for Affordable Housing 
     Programs.--
       (1) Use of Savings.--For each year, the Secretary of the 
     Treasury shall determine the amount of revenues accruing to 
     the general fund of the Treasury by reason of the enactment 
     of subsection (a) of this section and shall credit an amount 
     equal to such remaining revenues as follows:
       (A) Housing trust fund.--The Secretary shall credit the 
     Housing Trust Fund established under section 1338 of the 
     Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness 
     Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4568) with an amount equal to 40 
     percent revenues.
       (B) Section 8 rental assistance.--The Secretary shall 
     credit an amount equal to 40 percent of the amount of such 
     remaining revenues to the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
     Development for use only for providing tenant- and project-
     based rental assistance under section 8 of the United States 
     Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f).
       (C) Public housing capital fund.--The Secretary shall 
     credit an amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of such 
     remaining revenues to the Public Housing Capital Fund under 
     section 9(d) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 
     U.S.C. 1437g(d)).
       (2) Changes to Housing Trust Fund.--Not later than the 
     expiration of the 6-month period beginning on the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
     Development shall revise the regulations relating to the 
     Housing Trust Fund established under section 1338 of the 
     Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness 
     Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4568) to provide that such section is 
     carried out with the maximum amount of flexibility possible 
     while complying with such section, which shall include 
     revising such regulations--
       (A) to increase the limitation on amounts from the Fund 
     that are available for use for operating assistance for 
     housing;
       (B) to allow public housing agencies and tribally 
     designated housing entities to be recipient of grants amounts 
     from the Fund that are allocated to a State or State 
     designated entity; and
       (C) to eliminate the applicability of rules for the Fund 
     that are based on the HOME Investment Partnerships Act (42 
     U.S.C. 1721 et seq.).
       (3) Expansion of Rental Assistance Demonstration.--The 
     fourth proviso in the heading ``Rental Assistance 
     Demonstration'' in title II of the Transportation, Housing 
     and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations 
     Act, 2012 (division C of Public Law 112-55; 125 Stat. 673) is 
     amended by striking ``60,000'' and inserting ``250,000''.

  Mr. ELLISON (during the reading). Madam Chair, I ask that the 
amendment be considered read.

[[Page H5225]]

  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Minnesota?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 minutes.

                              {time}  1645

  Mr. ELLISON. Madam Chair, the budget for the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development we consider today does not meet our Nation's 
affordable housing problems.
  If this budget passes, more than half of the renters will still pay 
more than one-third of their income for housing. If this budget passes, 
fewer than four in 10 low-income elderly will receive the housing 
assistance they are entitled to. If this budget passes, we will still 
only provide housing assistance to one in four families who are 
eligible--tens of thousands will continue to linger on waiting lists 
for an affordable rental apartment that will never arrive. If this 
budget passes, there will still be more than 11 million families, Madam 
Chairman, paying more than half of their income for rent and utilities. 
There will still be a significant gap between incomes and housing 
costs.
  The HUD budget is tens of billions short in order to meet American 
families' housing needs. That is why my amendment replaces the mortgage 
interest deduction with a flat-rate 15 percent tax credit.
  My amendment lowers the maximum amount of mortgage interest that can 
receive a tax offset from $1 million to $500,000. About 4 percent of 
homes in this country sell for more than $500,000.
  My amendment dedicates the revenue generated from these changes to 
increasing our investments in affordable rental housing for extremely 
low-income families.
  My amendment provides for housing for veterans who find themselves 
homeless. It provides housing for people who are elderly and people 
with disabilities who cannot find affordable appropriate housing. It 
provides money to repair public housing facilities to provide homes to 
low-income families with children, seniors, and people with 
disabilities. It funds the national housing trust fund, repairs public 
housing, provides thousands of new vouchers, and raises the rental 
assistance demonstration cap.
  Unfortunately, my amendment will likely be ruled out of order today. 
Why? Because the rules set by the majority in the House refuse to allow 
any tax changes to pay for a change in the appropriated budget.
  This technical decision made by the majority in this Congress is 
inconsistent with previous Congresses, which realized that money is 
fungible.
  By refusing to allow tax changes to offset the cost of needed 
programs, Congress stacks the deck.
  Congress preserves the generous tax benefits for most financially 
successful households while ensuring that there is never anywhere close 
to the level of affordable rental housing we need.
  For every dollar we spend on housing programs through the 
appropriations side of the budget, we spend more than $3 on the tax 
side.
  The mortgage interest deduction itself is more than twice as large as 
the entire HUD budget we consider today. Yet, the vast majority of the 
mortgage interest deduction benefit the top income quintile--about 80 
percent of the benefit goes to 20 percent of the households.
  I want to keep a tax benefit for homeownership. I want one that is 
more accessible and more generous to working families. Nearly half the 
homeowners with a mortgage do not benefit from the deduction. That is 
because almost half of the people who pay mortgage interest do not 
itemize. Only 5 percent of the homeowners with incomes of $50,000 take 
a deduction. Contrast the 5 percent of homeowners with incomes beneath 
$50,000 and the two-thirds of households with incomes above $125,000 
who get a tax benefit. The flat rate credit will benefit about 16 
million current homeowners who do not currently benefit from a 
deduction but who will benefit from a flat tax credit.
  I know that my amendment will be ruled out of order today.
  Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to withdraw my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Minnesota?
  There was no objection.


           Amendment No. 28 Offered by Mr. Gingrey of Georgia

  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk, printed in the Congressional Record, No. 28.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to provide mortgage insurance under title II of the 
     National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) for any 
     mortgage on a 1- to 4-family dwelling to be used as the 
     principal residence of a mortgagor who provides only an 
     individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN) for 
     identification.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I rise today to offer an 
amendment that will prohibit funds in the underlying bill from being 
used to provide mortgage insurance under title II of the National 
Housing Act for any mortgage on a single-family dwelling--to be used as 
a principal residence--to a potential borrower who provides only an 
individual taxpayer identification number--called ITIN--for 
identification.
  This includes usage for mortgage loans available under the FHA to 
ensure that an individual must use a Social Security number rather than 
an ITIN--individual taxpayer identification number--in order to secure 
government-backed mortgage insurance.
  The ITIN was first implemented by the IRS and is a 9-digit tax 
processing number. The IRS issues the ITIN to individuals who are 
required to have a taxpayer identification number but who do not have--
and are not eligible to obtain--a Social Security number. The IRS has 
indicated that the ITIN's only purpose should be Federal tax reporting. 
However, that has not always been the case.
  Unfortunately, Madam Chairman, it is relatively easy for illegal 
immigrants to attain an ITIN because proof of legal residency in the 
United States is not a requirement. Due to this practice, illegal 
immigrants have the incentive to obtain an ITIN as a means to become 
permanent residents by showing the United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Services that they have been paying taxes while residing 
illegally in the country.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Of course I will yield to the chair.
  Mr. LATHAM. We will gladly accept your amendment.
  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. I thank the chairman, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last 
word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  This amendment solves a problem that does not exist.
  Currently, the FHA requires a Social Security number and legal 
citizenship for all insured loans. FHA does not allow for individual 
taxpayer identification numbers to be used for mortgages.
  What this amendment does is create uncertainty in the FHA 
underwriting process. It would allow FHA to use individual taxpayer 
identification numbers only with loans on investment properties.
  The FHA has already addressed this issue, and this amendment would 
create unintended consequences.
  I oppose the amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Gingrey).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Conyers

  Mr. CONYERS. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:

[[Page H5226]]

       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to pay any FHA mortgage insurance claim or in 
     connection with the sale of any mortgage insured by the FHA 
     before compliance with existing FHA loss mitigation 
     requirements, documentation of such compliance by the 
     Department of Housing and Urban Development, and provision of 
     such documentation to the mortgagor.

  Mr. CONYERS (during the reading). Madam Chairman, I ask unanimous 
consent that the reading be dispensed with.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Michigan?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I reserve a point of order on the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentleman from Michigan is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. CONYERS. Ladies and gentlemen, this amendment fights foreclosures 
by limiting payment of the FHA insurance claims in cases in which 
borrowers have not been through the full FHA loss mitigation process.
  Our Nation's foreclosure crisis is not only an economic calamity, but 
it is also a social and public health calamity as well.
  While we all know that foreclosures cause downward spirals in 
property values and tax revenue, new research has shined a light on 
foreclosures as a cause of massive and debilitating anxiety and 
illness.
  According to a recent study in the American Journal of Public Health, 
foreclosures have even been a likely cause of an increase in suicides 
in America. I offer this amendment today to help end the terrible 
scourge of foreclosures.
  When the Nation's largest banks--Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and 
Chase--sell delinquent FHA-insured loans into the Distressed Asset 
Stabilization Program, HUD pays them the outstanding balance of the 
loan. Only the loans that have fully complied with HUD's foreclosure 
provision and loss mitigation requirements are supposed to be sold 
through the Distressed Asset Stabilization Program. Yet, many of the 
loans banks are selling through the program have not met this standard.
  I with great pleasure yield to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
Cartwright).
  Mr. CARTWRIGHT. Madam Chairman, I thank my friend from Michigan for 
yielding.
  I rise to ask for support for our amendment to stop unnecessary 
foreclosures and ensure oversight of HUD's Distressed Asset 
Stabilization Program, the DASP.
  When the Nation's largest banks sell delinquent FHA-insured loans 
into DASP the taxpayers have to pay the outstanding balance on the 
loan. HUD turns around and sells the loans at deep discounts to private 
investors. Many times banks don't comply with the law, and FHA 
inappropriately pays out claims. This is not an insignificant issue.
  HUD has sold more than 70,000 of these mortgages in the past 3 years. 
Despite ongoing efforts to improve the program, HUD has not exercised 
sufficient oversight in this matter.
  Our amendment would help ensure more rigorous oversight of the DASP 
so that only loans that have met all of HUD's loss mitigation 
requirements are sold through this DASP program.
  Mr. CONYERS. Ladies and gentlemen, this amendment would help ensure 
prudent oversight over the program so that only loans that have truly 
met all of HUD's loss mitigation requirements are sold through the 
Distressed Asset Stabilization Program.
  I hope my colleagues on the other side will join us in supporting 
this very commonsense amendment.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chair, I make a point of order against the 
amendment because it proposes to change existing law and constitutes 
legislation in an appropriation bill and, therefore, violates clause 2 
of rule XXI.
  The rule states in pertinent part:
  ``An amendment to a general appropriation bill shall not be in order 
if changing existing law.''
  The amendment imposes additional duties.
  I ask for a ruling from the Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point 
of order?
  Mr. CONYERS. Madam Chairman, I wish to speak on the point of order.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Michigan is recognized.
  Mr. CONYERS. Madam Chairman, my initial response to the point of 
order made by the distinguished gentleman is that this is already in 
the law. To argue now that a modification of it is inappropriate I do 
not think should allow this point of order to be sustained.
  The amendment is a straightforward attempt to ensure that our Federal 
agencies are in full compliance with their own codes of conduct related 
to foreclosure prevention. These foreclosures and evictions are not 
only responsible for massive anxiety, but also for downward spirals in 
property values.
  My response to the point of order is that this provision is totally 
in order and that the point of order should not be sustained.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does any other Member wish to be heard on the point 
of order? If not, the Chair is prepared to rule on the point of order.
  The Chair finds that this amendment imposes new duties to provide 
documentation of certain activities to mortgagors.
  The amendment, therefore, constitutes legislation in violation of 
clause 2 of rule XXI.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment is not in order.


           Amendment No. 29 Offered by Mr. Gingrey of Georgia

  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk, printed in the Congressional Record, No. 29.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:
       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to pay a Federal employee for any period of time 
     during which such employee is using official time under 
     section 7131 of title 5, United States Code.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I rise today to offer a 
commonsense amendment to H.R. 4745.
  The Gingrey-Bridenstine amendment would prohibit funds in the 
underlying bill from being used to pay a Federal employee for any 
period of time that such an employee is using official time.

                              {time}  1700

  As the author of H.R. 107, the Federal Employee Accountability Act, 
this amendment is a continuation of the work I have done over the last 
three Congresses to repeal the governmentwide use of official time.
  Under current law, Federal employees can use official, taxpayer-
funded time to perform union functions or to participate in union 
activities when they would otherwise be on official duty status.
  Madam Chair, according to a FOIA request by the Americans for Limited 
Government, there are 35 employees at the Department of Transportation 
alone--making an average, by the way, of almost $140,000 a year--who 
spend 100 percent of their workday working on behalf of a union.
  These employees were hired to perform duties on behalf of the 
taxpayer--several are engineers or air traffic controllers--yet they 
are working exclusively for the union at the taxpayers' expense.
  In fiscal year 2011, the most recent year for which we have official 
time data, the Department of Transportation spent more than $17 million 
on official time.
  In the same year, the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
spent more than $2 million on official time.
  Across the entire Federal Government, more than 3 million official 
time hours were used in collective bargaining or arbitration of 
grievances against an employer--who, by the way, is us--in fiscal year 
2011. These union activities were performed at taxpayer expense to the 
tune of $155 million for the same time period.
  While we are not voting on veterans funding today, it is timely, 
given recent events, to mention the impact that the use of official 
time has on the

[[Page H5227]]

Department of Veterans Affairs. The VA is one of the largest abusers of 
official time, spending more than $42.5 million on this cost in fiscal 
year 2011.
  In 2012, more than 250 VA employees worked 100 percent of their day 
for the union, rather than working on behalf of our Nation's heroes. 
Over 100 of those same employees were health care professionals, 
including nurses, technicians, and mental health therapists.
  In the wake of the nationwide scandal of the VA, it is unthinkable 
that employees there are allowed to work on behalf of the union, rather 
than focusing on serving our veterans.
  It is particularly shocking that the use of official time by medical 
professionals and others at the VA continues, when the VA claims a 
shortage of health care professionals is what is contributing to the 
problems like the long waiting lists for people that are suicidal 
because of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress syndrome.
  Madam Chair, we must demand accountability at the VA and across 
government to be sure civil servants are focusing on their positions of 
record, not serving unions at taxpayer expense.
  That is why stand-alone legislation I have introduced, H.R. 107, 
would repeal the governmentwide use of official time, saving over $1.5 
billion over 10 years.
  While we are not considering my stand-alone legislation on the floor 
today, I am proud to offer this amendment as a small step toward 
reining in the use and abuse of official time.
  Simply put, a Federal employee hired to work as an air traffic 
controller should spend his or her time at work performing his or her 
duties as an air traffic controller, not serving as a taxpayer-funded 
union official.
  Madam Chair, I want to make it very clear that I am not proposing to 
do away with unions. However, I am working diligently to increase the 
efficiency of the Federal workforce. This amendment limits Federal 
activity during normal business hours to simply working, not carrying 
out union activities.
  We should not be forcing taxpayers to support private and often very 
politically active organizations. At $140,000 a year, Federal employees 
should spend their days performing the duties for which taxpayers hired 
them.
  While families all over the Nation are tightening their belts and 
cutting their own spending, it should not be the practice of the 
Federal Government to allow expensive, special interest handouts; 
rather the Federal Government should be reining in its spending and 
looking for ways to save money and function more efficiently. This 
amendment is an important first step.
  I urge my colleagues to support the Gingrey-Bridenstine amendment, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Connecticut is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Chairman, I rise in strong opposition to this 
purely ideological amendment by my colleague from Georgia, which aims 
to eliminate the use of official time for representational activities 
for employees covered by the T-HUD bill before us.
  This is yet another attempt to accelerate a race to the bottom and to 
deny workers their fundamental right to bargain collectively. 
Specifically, this amendment aims to prevent effective union 
representation by attacking the use of official time by employees.
  Use of reasonable amounts of official time has been supported by 
government officials of both parties for 50 years.
  In exchange for the legal obligation to provide the same services to 
those who pay as those who choose not to pay, the Civil Service Reform 
Act of 1978 allowed Federal employee unions to bargain with agencies 
over official time.
  Under this law, Federal employees who volunteered to serve as union 
representatives are permitted to use official time to engage in 
negotiation and perform representational activities while on duty 
status.
  Using official time increases efficiency and is beneficial to both 
Federal employees and the Federal Government. These types of informal 
meetings save the government money by allowing the parties to avoid 
costly arbitration and other less efficient means of dispute 
resolution.
  At the FAA, for example, official time is essential for the 
collaborative process between employees and management. At a time when 
we are overhauling our Nation's air traffic control system, eliminating 
official time is inappropriate, fiscally irresponsible, and an 
unnecessary violation of workers' basic rights.
  At a time when we face so many challenges, when we are in massive 
need of infrastructure improvements, I wish that the majority would 
find something more constructive to do than attack the fundamental 
right to bargain collectively.
  I urge a ``no'' vote, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairwoman, I move to strike the last 
word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairwoman, I also rise in strong 
opposition to this amendment.
  First of all, this amendment violates a collective bargaining 
agreement that has been negotiated by the Federal Aviation 
Administration and other agencies within the Department of 
Transportation and HUD.
  For example, there are three groups at FAA that utilize official 
time: air traffic controllers, the inspectors, and the technicians that 
repair the air traffic control system.
  Official time has been helpful in allowing controllers and 
technicians to participate in workgroups with the FAA management team 
to advance NextGen technologies, which all of us are supportive of. It 
is critical to modernize our air traffic control system.
  I oppose this amendment because it would violate collective 
bargaining contracts, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Gingrey).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Amendment Offered by Ms. DeLauro

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to enter into any contract with an incorporated 
     entity if such entity's sealed bid or competitive proposal 
     shows that such entity is incorporated or chartered in 
     Bermuda or the Cayman Islands, and such entity's sealed bid 
     or competitive proposal shows that such entity was previously 
     incorporated in the United States.

  Ms. DeLAURO (during the reading). Madam Chair, I ask unanimous 
consent that we dispense with the reading.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Connecticut is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Chair, my amendment would prohibit Federal 
contracts issued by the agencies under the jurisdiction of this bill--
namely, the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban 
Development--from going to entities that were incorporated in the 
United States, but reincorporated in the most notorious tax havens--
Bermuda and the Cayman Islands.
  According to a joint study issued last week by the U.S. Public 
Interest Research Group and Citizens for Tax Justice, 70 percent of the 
companies in the Fortune 500 used tax havens last year. These companies 
stashed nearly $2 trillion offshore for tax purposes, with almost two-
thirds of that total--62 percent--being hidden away by just 30 
companies.
  According to that same study, approximately 64 percent of U.S. 
companies with subsidiaries in tax havens registered at least one in 
Bermuda or the Cayman Islands.
  The profits these companies claimed were earned in these two island 
nations in 2010 totaled over 1,600 percent of these countries' entire 
yearly economic output.
  Of course, it defies logic and credulity to believe these companies 
conducted such a large amount of business there. What these companies 
are really doing is avoiding U.S. taxes by stashing profits in these 
tax havens.
  According to a 2009 GAO report, 63 of the 100 largest publicly traded 
U.S.

[[Page H5228]]

Federal contractors reported having subsidiaries in tax havens in 2007. 
I and others have long fought for--and succeeded in passing through the 
appropriations process--a ban on Federal contracts for inverted 
corporations.
  These are U.S. companies that acquire a business in a lower tax 
jurisdiction and claim their headquarters there, despite still being a 
U.S. company, yet U.S. companies can still simply claim to the IRS that 
their profits were made in places like Bermuda and the Cayman Islands, 
and companies incorporated in these and other tax havens still find 
ways to receive Federal contracts.
  We need to stop allowing companies to game our system. They take 
advantage of our education system, our research and development 
incentives, our skilled workforce, and our infrastructure--all 
supported by U.S. taxpayers--to build their businesses and then turn 
around and invert or otherwise avoid paying taxes by abusing these tax 
havens.
  These companies should not be allowed to pretend that they are an 
American company when it is time to get contracts, then claim to be an 
offshore company when the tax bill comes.
  We can start putting an end to this right here, right now, with this 
amendment. It will ensure that future contracts are not awarded to U.S. 
companies that incorporate in the most egregious tax havens--Bermuda 
and the Cayman Islands.
  Madam Chairman, in 2010, U.S. companies earned $129 billion on three 
tiny island nations--Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, and the British 
Virgin Islands.
  As The New York Times recently pointed out, these islands have a 
total population of 147,400 individuals. That means, if you believe 
U.S. companies really earned that much in these locations, their 
profits worked out to be $873,000 per person. This is, of course, 
nonsense.
  Some of my colleagues may echo the cries of these tax-avoiding 
companies and say the real need here is for corporate tax reform, but 
many of these companies are currently paying a tax rate of zero 
percent--zero percent--so unless you believe corporate tax reform 
should eliminate taxes for U.S. companies, the argument simply does not 
hold water.
  Again, the amendment simply bans corporations, once incorporated in 
the United States, but have since incorporated in Bermuda or the Cayman 
Islands--a maneuver that is undertaken to avoid taxes--from receiving 
Federal contracts.
  We need to send a clear message that, if a company is going to abuse 
tax loopholes at the expense of businesses that are paying their fair 
share, they will not be rewarded with government contracts.
  I urge my colleagues to make a stand with me and pass this amendment, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. DOGGETT. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. DOGGETT. Madam Chair, I am in favor of the amendment. Hopefully, 
from the silence that we have heard, there is bipartisan support for 
this amendment because I know there is a bipartisan commitment here 
that competition is very much the American way.
  If you have two companies, as happens all over America, competing on 
different government contracts, we usually come out with the best 
result from that competition. But the question with this amendment, 
which I am pleased to join the gentlelady from Connecticut in offering 
today, is whether we ought to advantage companies that renounce their 
American citizenship in favor of finding an office on the beach in 
Bermuda or in Ugland House in the Cayman Islands.

                              {time}  1715

  The other company is an American company, not only when it comes time 
to put its hand out for a government contract but also when it comes 
time to put its hand out to pay the taxes that it earned on its 
American business.
  Which one of these companies should have a competitive advantage?
  I think it is the one that stayed home and was an American, patriotic 
company and did not dodge its part of the responsibility for paying for 
our national security, which is so important to international commerce, 
and for other vital services.
  American companies that stay and contribute to building America and 
that keep her secure at home and abroad deserve a level playing field, 
and that is all that this amendment does. If a Cayman company doesn't 
have to pay taxes on some of its income, of course it can underbid the 
company that stayed in America, that made it in America, that paid its 
taxes, and then asked to have a level playing field to compete for 
American business.
  The history in this Congress, unfortunately, is that many very large 
companies pay their lobbyists more to lobby this Congress than they pay 
to the Treasury in taxes, and it has been a very wise investment 
because they have been able to have one loophole, one special 
preference, one advantage, one exception--one more bit of complexity to 
our Tax Code--in order to avoid paying their fair share.
  The companies that are operating in the Cayman Islands and in Bermuda 
are reporting huge amounts of income earned in those countries, largely 
from stripping off earnings that they have here in America and shifting 
them there through interest gimmicks, through dividend gimmicks, 
through intellectual property gimmicks. They avoid paying taxes not 
only on the tiny amount that they might have earned from an occasional 
sale in the Cayman Islands but from all of the sales from which they 
are able to strip off earnings and shift them to this island paradise.
  They are looking for, basically, a shell game. I am not talking about 
seashells on the beach in the Cayman Islands. I am talking about the 
shell game that exists when these companies come in, renounce their 
American citizenship, keep the form and operation of their business 
here in America, but claim that they are suddenly no longer citizens 
under the American flag that we honor but are under the flag of some 
foreign nation. They basically are sending Uncle Sam a postcard that 
reads: ``Sorry. You can find me on the beach. Glad you are not here.'' 
That is the answer that they give when it comes time to pay their 
taxes, but then they have the audacity to come and ask other 
taxpayers--other taxpaying businesses and individuals who have done 
their fair share, and then some, for American security--they ask for 
government business at taxpayer expense.
  This amendment is set to send the executives a message: they can play 
all they want to on the beach to avoid taxes, but Congress is not going 
to put its head in the sand. They can have fun in the sun, but Congress 
refuses to let the rest of the Americans, who are working hard to pay 
their taxes, get burned by having to pay not only for the taxes that 
these tax dodgers haven't paid but for government contracts that are 
paid for with taxpayer money.
  Let's support competition, and let's support American companies that 
are paying their fair share. Let's adopt this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro).
  The amendment was agreed to.


              Amendment Offered by Mr. Gingrey of Georgia

  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Madam Chair, as the designee of Mr. Mica of 
Florida, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following:
       Sec. 417.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used in contravention of section 24305(c)(4) of title 49, 
     United States, Code.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. GINGREY of Georgia. Madam Chairwoman, I rise today to offer an 
amendment to H.R. 4745. This amendment would prohibit funds from being 
used to subsidize Amtrak food and beverage service.
  As my colleagues know, Amtrak operates at a loss every year, 
partially due to millions lost in the food service cost. In 2012, 
Amtrak lost $72 million

[[Page H5229]]

on its food and beverage service, and that loss is just one in a 
consistent series of losses. This loss on its own would be cause for 
concern, but even more concerning is that the loss directly violates 
the law.
  Madam Chairwoman, in 1981, Federal law mandated that Amtrak break 
even on its food and beverage service by the following year, 1982. 
Despite this, Amtrak not only failed to break even, but it contracted 
with high-end chefs to develop gourmet recipes for Amtrak meals, to the 
tune of more than $905 million in the last decade.
  Heavily subsidized routes feature dishes such as lamb shank and 
Atlantic salmon, and Amtrak has a Culinary Advisory Team to develop new 
high-end recipes. In 2012, a hamburger cost Amtrak $16.15, with riders 
paying $9.50. This means that we, the taxpayers, are forced to pick up 
the tab for the remaining $6.65 through subsidies provided to Amtrak. 
On some routes, first-class passengers are offered complimentary 
cheese, wine, and champagne. While the passenger may enjoy these luxury 
items, it is not fair that the taxpayer is forced to subsidize these 
extravagances.
  Each spring, Amtrak brings together some of the best chefs in the 
country for a retreat of sorts. These chefs--several of them, of 
course, award-winning--come together for what The Washington Post has 
called ``an intensive 3-day session of cooking and brainstorming.'' At 
last year's gathering, chefs tasted more than 100 offerings. Of the 
recipes tested, including recipes for braised pork chop and a spinach 
and mushroom frittata, several will be deemed unsuitable for offering 
on Amtrak either due to kitchen limitations or due to a lack of 
cohesiveness with the rest of the menu.
  Madam Chairwoman, I ask you: When the average American is struggling 
to make ends meet, why are we throwing away money at Amtrak for these 
luxuries, especially when Amtrak consistently operates at a loss?
  If a private company wants to host a brainstorming weekend for top 
chefs, that is its prerogative, but the taxpayer should not be on the 
hook for a getaway focused on developing lavish meals for Amtrak 
passengers.
  Taxpayers should not be forced to subsidize Amtrak, and they 
certainly should not be forced to cover tens of millions of dollars in 
costs to pay for gourmet meals and first-class service on Amtrak. 
Amtrak's food and beverage losses violate the law. Yet this is 
flagrantly disregarded. Rather than taking steps to correct the 
problem, the service goes after more upscale options.
  We must end this cycle of wasteful spending and enact real change to 
get our fiscal house back in order. With a national debt of more than 
$17 trillion, we cannot afford to keep throwing money away, 
particularly on luxuries such as gourmet meals on a federally 
subsidized train service.
  For that reason, Mr. Mica and I are offering this amendment to 
prohibit funds made available by this act from being used to subsidize 
Amtrak food and beverage service. I urge my colleagues to support the 
Gingrey-Mica amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. TONKO. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. TONKO. Madam Chair, in the last 5 years, moving crude oil by 
train has grown exponentially from a virtually nonexistent industry to 
a booming one with no signs of slowing down; but after a number of 
high-profile derailments, the need for increased safety regulations on 
shipping hazardous materials via rail could not be clearer.
  Last week, I had the privilege of attending a first responder 
training course that was focused on crude oil trains at the Port of 
Albany, which has become a major hub for crude oil shipments, 
processing more than 40,000 carloads last year. I know rail carriers 
and emergency planners are taking it upon themselves to prepare for 
handling hazardous materials in increased volumes, but regulatory steps 
are also needed.
  We need a comprehensive approach to address this issue, including 
expanding route planning and selection requirements, requiring response 
plans for rail carriers and ensuring shippers and rail carriers are 
testing and classifying their shipments appropriately. Many of these 
suggestions have been recommended by the National Transportation Safety 
Board.
  Many of the reforms I support are common sense. For example, 
comprehensive oil spill response plans are currently required for oil 
shipments greater than 1,000 barrels per tank car, but most tank cars 
only hold 700 barrels; therefore, trains, some with as many as 120 cars 
that are carrying crude oil, are not required to have comprehensive 
response plans because of this outdated threshold. Among other safety 
issues, tank car safety, particularly in regard to the DOT-111s, is a 
major concern for many of my constituents.
  Every day, trains transporting Bakken crude oil move and idle next to 
public housing and the highway near Albany's South End before entering 
the Port of Albany. Everyone agrees--railroads, suppliers and the NTSB, 
to name a few--that we need a higher safety standard on new tank car 
orders and an aggressive phaseout or retrofit of the old DOT-111s, 
which have no business transporting hazardous materials. Only 14,000 of 
92,000 DOT-111 tank cars are currently built to the latest industry 
standards. The remaining 78,000 have demonstrated that they are prone 
to splitting open during derailments.
  The rail industry has taken meaningful and voluntary steps to account 
for the DOT-111s' inadequacies, including raising the industry standard 
for cars built after October of 2011, but we need higher Federal 
standards. This is long overdue, and DOT must act.
  I know this is an issue my good friend from New York, Ranking Member 
Lowey, is passionate about as well. Earlier this year, we sent a letter 
to Secretary Foxx, urging him to move forward with a rulemaking process 
that includes phasing out the DOT-111s. We should harmonize our 
regulations with Canada's already announced plan, which includes a 3-
year phaseout or retrofit of DOT-111s. Just this morning, I had the 
opportunity to speak with Secretary Foxx about DOT's rulemaking 
process. I know this is a top priority for him, and I have been assured 
that it is moving forward aggressively. I encourage a speedy but 
appropriate resolution.
  I also appreciate that the chair included language urging a 
comprehensive approach to rail safety. The language directs the 
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration to update 
emergency spill response planning thresholds and to finalize a rule on 
tank cars by the end of this fiscal year. The bill also fully funds the 
President's request for FRA's safety and operations account and PHMSA's 
hazardous materials account.
  Finally, the manager's amendment, during the full committee markup, 
designated some funds to hire additional safety staff to monitor 
routing and to make safety improvements on grade crossings that carry 
energy products. This, indeed, is a positive step. However, I would 
have preferred the inclusion of $40 million, as in the President's 
budget request, to establish a safe transportation of energy products 
fund within the Office of the Secretary of Transportation in order to 
support prevention and response activities.
  Aside from the crude-by-rail issues, I understand the challenges of 
the current funding allocations, but I must strongly oppose this bill's 
shortfalls in numerous infrastructure and transit accounts. The FTA's 
Capital Investment Grant program is $809 million below the request. 
Amtrak's capital grants are cut by $200 million, and TIGER only 
receives $100 million, shamefully shortfalling what we need.
  It is my hope that we can improve this bill during conference, and I 
urge my colleagues in the Senate to include appropriate levels for 
underfunded programs while building upon this bill's rail safety 
provisions.
  Again, I want to thank Chairmen Rogers and Latham and Ranking Members 
Lowey and Pastor for their attention to this critical rail safety 
issue.
  With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Gingrey).
  The amendment was agreed to.

                              {time}  1730


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Sessions

  Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.

[[Page H5230]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. 417.  None of the funds made available by this Act 
     shall be used to support Amtrak's route with the highest 
     loss, measured by contributions/(Loss) per Rider, as based on 
     the National Railroad Passenger Corporation Fiscal Years 
     2013-2017 Five Year Plan from May 2013.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. SESSIONS. Madam Chairman, my amendment is really straightforward 
and one which I have offered year after year after year after year on 
the floor of the House of Representatives.
  It would eliminate funding for the absolute worst performing line, 
one line, on the Amtrak system, a line that is known as the Sunset 
Limited, and it runs from New Orleans to Los Angeles.
  Madam Chairman, the Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act of 1997 
required that Amtrak operate without any Federal assistance after 2002. 
Amtrak was supposed to be free of Federal operating subsidies.
  Yet, despite this commonsense requirement that Amtrak cease their 
financial irresponsibility and mismanagement, instead, it costs the 
taxpayers $396.31 per rider, per year, on this line. That is $396.31 to 
subsidize the travels of passengers from New Orleans to Los Angeles, a 
trip that takes nearly 48 hours, assuming the train is on time.
  Madam Chairman, we could buy everybody a free ticket on an airline 
from New Orleans to Los Angeles and probably end up saving money.
  However, according to Amtrak's most recent performance report, the 
Sunset Limited only arrives on time 46 percent of the time. So it might 
even make sense for somebody to get there not only quicker, but also 
cheaper.
  This places the Sunset Limited as one of the top 10 worst on-time 
routes for any of Amtrak's routes in its latest performance report.
  Madam Chairman, taxpayers should be happy that the train really 
doesn't run more often. But when it does run, the route loses an 
average of $40 million a year.
  So my amendment is the first step, once again, in instilling just a 
small measure, joining the gentleman from Georgia, in fiscal discipline 
that Amtrak should be told today that it has to establish.
  If it cannot manage itself with its worst, most expensive performing 
line, then God help us all. If they won't do it, we are going to. 
Failure to do so will only allow Amtrak to continue misusing and 
wasting taxpayer dollars.
  Look, it is just very simple. I am asking that my colleagues join 
with me and say that the worst-performing, the most cost-prohibitive 
line would be stopped by Amtrak. So, I think it makes sense to say, no 
more Sunset Limited.
  So I urge all my colleagues to support this amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to this 
amendment. This Amtrak route, the Sunset Limited, runs through 8 
States, Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
Alabama, and Florida, and if we start picking lines, individual lines 
in terms of terminating, what we begin doing is a downward spiral for 
the demise of Amtrak.
  So, for the reasons that I want to ensure that my colleague from 
Texas, his constituents are able to travel on this line, as well as the 
ones from Arizona, I rise in opposition.
  Madam Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Sessions).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 32 Offered by Ms. Bass

  Ms. BASS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill before the short title, insert the 
     following:
       Sec. ____.  None of the funds made available in this Act 
     may be used by the Secretary or the Federal Transit 
     Administration to implement, administer, or enforce section 
     18.36(c)(2) of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, for 
     construction hiring purposes.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from California is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. BASS. Madam Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment that will 
spur local job creation through federally-funded transit projects 
nationwide.
  Specifically, this amendment would provide the necessary flexibility 
for transit agencies to implement geographically targeted hiring and 
procurement preferences.
  My amendment will help to ensure construction and operations jobs 
contribute to the local economic development and of cities and towns 
where the transportation projects exist, instead of outsourcing these 
new jobs. Flexibility to implement local hire policies will also 
provide local and State agencies the ability to address unemployment in 
our hardest-hit regions.
  For example, the Los Angeles Transit Corridor Light Rail Line is 
currently under construction in Los Angeles. This project is expected 
to be a significant economic engine for development, generating an 
estimated 7,000 jobs during its 5-year construction period.
  Los Angeles Metro, our local transit agency, would like to encourage 
construction contractors to hire within the local community in order to 
help address unemployment in the area.
  However, according to current regulations, local transit agencies are 
restricted from implementing local hiring and procurement policies for 
federally-funded transportation projects, even when the vast majority 
of the project funds are State or locally generated.
  This is a commonsense amendment. It will limit burdensome regulations 
placed on local government agencies, and it will allow State and local 
agencies to more easily generate employment and economic development, 
and it preserves the competition mandates in our current grant rules 
governing Federal transit projects.
  Again, this is not a mandate. This just allows local agencies the 
flexibility.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chairman, I rise in support of this 
amendment. It would allow transportation agencies to advance 
construction projects through the use of local workers.
  Every year, cities and local communities must contribute their own 
resources in the form of a local match for projects that receive 
Federal funds. At a time when many communities are still struggling 
from the economic distress, it is understandable that these local 
agencies would want transportation dollars to benefit local workers and 
benefits businesses.
  It will help ensure construction and operation jobs contribute to the 
local economic development within the cities and towns where the 
transportation projects exist, instead of outsourcing jobs to other 
countries or States.
  Madam Chairman, I support the amendment, and I yield back the balance 
of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Bass).
  The amendment was agreed to.


 =========================== NOTE =========================== 

  
  June 10, 2014, on page H5230, the following appeared: The 
amendment was rejected.
  
  The online version should be corrected to read: The amendment 
was agreed to.


 ========================= END NOTE ========================= 



                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Sessions

  Mr. SESSIONS. Madam Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill, before the short title, insert the 
     following new section:
       Sec. 417.  None of the funds made available by this Act 
     shall be used to support any Amtrak route whose costs exceed 
     2 times its revenues, as based on the National Railroad 
     Passenger Corporation Fiscal Years 2013-2017 Five Year Plan 
     from May 2013.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. SESSIONS. Madam Chairman, once again I stand up in a continuing 
theme of what I believe fiscally responsible Members who come to the 
floor should look at--the operation of Amtrak.

[[Page H5231]]

  Today, once again, I come to the floor to offer my ideas about how we 
can help, especially during troubling financial times for the American 
taxpayer with our Federal Government, that we can look at and find ways 
to where we work with Amtrak.
  Years ago I met with the chairman of the board, who openly 
acknowledged that there were challenges that Amtrak faced, not just 
safety issues, but many other issues that dealt with their financial 
integrity.
  I told him I would continue doing these kinds of amendments, and he 
considered this, in a sense, an opportunity for the people who provide 
money, meaning the taxpayers of the United States, to have a say about 
the operation of how their money would be used. That is the same spirit 
that I am here on the floor today.
  Madam Chairman, my amendment would eliminate funding for Amtrak 
routes that have total direct costs that are more than twice the 
revenue that they produce. That means, if the cost is twice as much as 
the revenue, I think that that should be a solid reason why someone 
should consider eliminating those routes.
  They are all over the place, and I believe that Amtrak continues to 
provide these, accept government money, and they don't give two flips 
about what we think about the use of the taxpayer money. And so I think 
it is worth our time to be here.
  Every single long-distance route that Amtrak provides over 400 miles 
in length operates at a loss every single month. If they have got a 
route that is more than 400 miles, I mean, we are helping them out 
here, Madam Chairman.
  We are helping out Amtrak, and we are saying to them, if you have got 
something more than 400 miles, you are operating at a loss.
  Now we are saying, however, if it is twice the cost of the revenue, 
that is what we would like to have you look at. And I think that it 
would be an argument for us, as a provider of money, to say, look, we 
think that you should help people. Maybe when they call in to you to 
take Amtrak, if it is one of those routes, why don't you suggest to 
them that they fly aircraft, that they take a bus, that they do 
something where the American taxpayer is not on the line.
  The bottom line is, if you combine seven routes that are taken in 
this parameter, the American taxpayer pays $332.8 million for this 
subsidy. $332 million is maybe not a lot of money to Amtrak, but that 
is a darn lot amount of money for the American people to be putting 
into Amtrak to have them waste.
  I believe it is a waste. I believe it could be not only better 
allocated, but utilized in a better way, like shifting people who are 
coming to you--let's take an alternative. Let's maybe take an airplane.
  It is clear that the government subsidizes rail service on Amtrak, 
and it does not make economic sense that they take advantage of that.
  So, Madam Chairman, it is real simple. This is an opportunity for the 
people who represent taxpayers to simply come forth and say, let's have 
a vote on this, that we believe that that is too much money. 332 
million bucks should not be used on these seven routes, and that is why 
I am here today.
  So, Madam Chairman, I urge all my colleagues to support what I think 
is a commonsense amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment. 
While I support the efforts and reforms to move Amtrak to operate in a 
more efficient and effective manner, I must oppose this amendment.
  I appreciate very much the gentleman from Texas, my good friend, and 
his raising this issue. The gentleman's amendment would eliminate seven 
Amtrak routes and eliminate rail service to dozens of cities and towns 
of all sizes across America.
  Just to list, those would be California Zephyr, which goes from 
Chicago to Emeryville, California, which happens to go through Iowa; 
Cardinal Hoosier line, which is Chicago to New York; Coast Star Light, 
from Seattle to Los Angeles; the Crescent, from New York City to New 
Orleans; Silver Star, from New York City to Miami; Southwest Chief, 
from Chicago to Los Angeles; and the Sunset Limited, from Los Angeles 
to New Orleans.

                              {time}  1745

  Again, I appreciate very much what the gentleman is trying to do. I 
just think we need to work on efficiency at Amtrak.
  We have been trying very, very hard, through all of our hearings and 
through our contact with Amtrak, to get efficiency and to modernize and 
to try to get them to a profitable state; but unfortunately, I must 
oppose this amendment, just because of the vast impact it would have on 
so many people.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I move to strike the last word.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PASTOR of Arizona. Madam Chair, I also agree with the chairman 
for the reasons he stated.
  I rise in opposition to this amendment. It would dismantle Amtrak, 
the only resemblance of a rail system that we have in this Nation.
  Obviously, we need to work with them, so that Amtrak becomes more 
efficient, but this amendment would dismantle it, and for that reason, 
I oppose the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Sessions).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SESSIONS. Madam Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas will 
be postponed.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Engel

  Mr. ENGEL. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the amendment.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title), insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to lease or purchase new light duty vehicles for any 
     executive fleet, or for an agency's fleet inventory, except 
     in accordance with Presidential Memorandum--Federal Fleet 
     Performance, dated May 24, 2011.

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ENGEL. Madam Chair, on May 24, 2011, President Obama issued a 
memorandum on Federal fleet performance that requires all new light-
duty vehicles in the Federal fleet to be alternative fuel vehicles, 
such as hybrid, electric, natural gas, or biofuel, by December 31, 
2015.
  My amendment echoes the Presidential memorandum by prohibiting funds 
in the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act 
from being used to lease or purchase new light-duty vehicles, except in 
accord with the President's memorandum.
  Mr. LATHAM. Will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. ENGEL. I yield to my friend, the gentleman from Iowa.
  Mr. LATHAM. I would be happy to accept your amendment.
  Mr. ENGEL. I thank the gentleman, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Engel).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments on which further proceedings were 
postponed, in the following order:
  An amendment by Mr. Denham of California.
  Amendment No. 1 by Mrs. Blackburn of Tennessee.
  An amendment by Mr. Schock of Illinois.
  An amendment by Mr. Gosar of Arizona.
  An amendment by Mr. Gosar of Arizona.
  An amendment by Mr. Schiff of California.
  An amendment by Mr. Sessions of Texas.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.

[[Page H5232]]

                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Denham

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Denham) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 227, 
noes 186, not voting 18, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 288]

                               AYES--227

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peters (CA)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--186

     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutieerrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--18

     Cantor
     Culberson
     Delaney
     Doyle
     Gerlach
     Hall
     Horsford
     Kaptur
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Owens
     Pocan
     Sires
     Wasserman Schultz
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)

                              {time}  1820

  Ms. FUDGE, Ms. CHU, and Mr. RUSH changed their vote from ``aye'' to 
``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  (By unanimous consent, Mr. BLUMENAUER was allowed to speak out of 
order.)


     Moment of Silence for Victims of Reynolds High School Shooting

  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, Reynolds High School in Troutdale, 
Oregon, is a terrific institution in my district. I was there recently, 
and the kids gave me a wooden bowtie with a bicycle on it.
  In a scene that is achingly familiar, this morning at Reynolds, a 
shooting occurred. A student was killed. The shooter died. A teacher 
was wounded.
  The school and law enforcement recently completed drills to deal with 
these sad circumstances. Luckily, it went off without a hitch, and 
there were no further injuries. It went as well as could be expected 
under the circumstances, with a massive regional response from law 
enforcement on the scene.
  I would ask, Mr. Chairman, that the House observe a moment of silence 
in support for the victims, their families, and the community.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Hastings of Washington). Members will rise and 
observe a moment of silence.


                  Amendment Offered by Mrs. Blackburn

  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, 2-minute voting will continue.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Tennessee (Mrs. Blackburn) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 159, 
noes 260, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 289]

                               AYES--159

     Amash
     Amodei
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Campbell
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cooper
     Cotton
     Crawford
     Daines
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Nunes

[[Page H5233]]


     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Williams
     Wittman
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--260

     Aderholt
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutieerrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (KY)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Doyle
     Hall
     Horsford
     Kaptur
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1828

  Mr. BARR changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Schock

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Illinois 
(Mr. Schock) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 210, 
noes 209, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 290]

                               AYES--210

     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--209

     Aderholt
     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutieerrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Peters (CA)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (KY)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney

[[Page H5234]]


     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Doyle
     Hall
     Horsford
     Kaptur
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1833

  Messrs. POE of Texas, GARCIA, and MAFFEI changed their vote from 
``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Gosar) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 190, 
noes 232, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 291]

                               AYES--190

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--232

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Gutieerrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Hall
     Horsford
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Wilson (SC)


                    announcement by the acting chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1838

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                     Amendment Offered by Mr. Gosar

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Gosar) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 181, 
noes 240, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 292]

                               AYES--181

     Amash
     Bachmann
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Maffei
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus

[[Page H5235]]


     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--240

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Roby
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Gutieerrez
     Hall
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Wilson (SC)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1841

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  (By unanimous consent, Mr. Boehner was allowed to speak out of 
order.)


 Recognizing Representative Latham on His Years of Service to the House

  Mr. BOEHNER. Mr. Chair, I will have the Members know that the 
gentleman from Iowa has announced that this will be his last term in 
Congress.
  On behalf of the House, I want to thank Mr. Latham for his 20 years 
of service to the House, thank him for all those years of service on 
the Appropriations Committee, and thank him for being one of my best 
friends. Congratulations.
  (By unanimous consent, Mr. Hoyer was allowed to speak out of order.)


 Recognizing Representative Latham and Representative Pastor on Their 
                     Years of Service to the House

  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Chair, first I want to say to Mr. Latham, with whom I 
had the opportunity of serving on the Appropriations Committee for some 
years, thank you for your service. We obviously didn't always agree, 
but I always found you to be a gentleman and conscientious and honest 
in your leadership and willing to work together where we could work 
together, and I want to thank you for that.

                              {time}  1845

  Mr. Chairman, not only is Mr. Latham retiring, but his partner, the 
ranking member, Mr. Pastor, who is standing at the back of the Chamber, 
is also retiring.
  Mr. Chairman, let me simply say about Ed Pastor, Ed Pastor is a quiet 
man, a little bit like John Wayne in ``The Quiet Man,'' but a very 
effective man who worked very hard not only for his constituents, but 
for the citizens of our country.
  I also had the opportunity to serve many years with Mr. Pastor on 
subcommittees together and on the full committee together. We owe a 
debt of gratitude to both of these gentlemen who worked together to 
produce products that America could be proud of and work forward on. 
Perhaps we didn't always get there, any of us, but they worked as a 
team trying to get the best job possible within the constraints on 
which they were operating, and we thank them both for that.
  Thank you, Mr. Pastor. We are proud of you.


                    Amendment Offered by Mr. Schiff

  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, 2-minute voting will continue.
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Schiff) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 208, 
noes 212, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 293]

                               AYES--208

     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Campbell
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duncan (SC)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Goodlatte
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Lankford
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rooney
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Upton
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

[[Page H5236]]



                               NOES--212

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Capito
     Carson (IN)
     Carter
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Coble
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garamendi
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Larsen (WA)
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Maffei
     Marchant
     Marino
     Matheson
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Rahall
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Cantor
     Cole
     Delaney
     Gutieerrez
     Hall
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Wilson (SC)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1849

  Ms. DUCKWORTH changed her vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                   Amendment Offered by Mr. Sessions

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Sessions) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 167, 
noes 250, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 294]

                               AYES--167

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Camp
     Campbell
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Culberson
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Guthrie
     Harper
     Harris
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Upton
     Walberg
     Weber (TX)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wittman
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--250

     Barber
     Barletta
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Richmond
     Roby
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wolf
     Womack
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Bilirakis
     Blackburn
     Cantor
     Delaney
     Gutieerrez
     Hall
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Wilson (SC)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1853

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR (Ms. Foxx). The Clerk will read the last three 
lines.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       This Act may be cited as the ``Transportation, Housing and 
     Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
     2015''.

  Mr. LATHAM. Madam Chairman, I move that the committee do now rise and 
report the bill back to the House with sundry amendments, with the 
recommendation that the amendments be

[[Page H5237]]

agreed to and that the bill, as amended, do pass.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Hastings of Washington) having assumed the chair, Ms. Foxx, Acting 
Chair of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, 
reported that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill 
(H.R. 4745) making appropriations for the Departments of 
Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and related agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, 
directed her to report the bill back to the House with sundry 
amendments adopted in the Committee of the Whole, with the 
recommendation that the amendments be agreed to and that the bill, as 
amended, do pass.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under House Resolution 604, the previous 
question is ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment reported from the 
Committee of the Whole?
  Mr. CONNOLLY. Mr. Speaker, I demand a separate vote on Gingrey 
amendment No. 29.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is a separate vote demanded on any other 
amendment reported from the Committee of the Whole? If not, the Chair 
will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will redesignate the amendment on 
which a separate vote has been demanded.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the amendment.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. CONNOLLY. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 167, 
noes 254, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 295]

                               AYES--167

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barr
     Barton
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Conaway
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson, Sam
     Jordan
     King (IA)
     Kingston
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Latta
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Massie
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Price (GA)
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)

                               NOES--254

     Amodei
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hanna
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jolly
     Jones
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Wilson (FL)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Gutieerrez
     Hall
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Wilson (SC)

                              {time}  1903

  Messrs. HURT and HASTINGS of Florida changed their vote from ``aye'' 
to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. ESTY. I am in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. Esty moves to recommit the bill H.R. 4745 to the 
     Committee on _____ with instructions to report the same back 
     to the House forthwith with the following amendment:
       Page 37, line 13, (related to National Highway Traffic 
     Safety Administration, Operations and Research), after the 
     dollar amount, insert ``(increased by $5,000,000)''.
       Page 48, line 5, (related to Federal Transit 
     Administration, Administrative Expenses), after the dollar 
     amount, insert ``(reduced by $5,000,000)''.

  Ms. ESTY (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Connecticut is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment to the bill, which 
will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. If adopted, the 
bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as amended.
  Mr. Speaker, we owe Americans a safe transportation system. Drivers

[[Page H5238]]

need to know that their cars are safe. Parents shouldn't have to worry 
about a faulty accelerator propelling them at speeds of 100 miles an 
hour as they drive to work or pick up their children from soccer 
practice. None of us should be concerned about a faulty switch turning 
off power steering, our brakes, or airbags.
  Tragically, as recent news reports and congressional investigations 
have shown, Americans are justifiably worried. The costs of inadequate 
safety oversight are real.
  My friend and senior Senator Richard Blumenthal shared the following 
story with me.
  A woman from Fairfield County was driving one of the recently 
recalled car models on a major highway. She wound up under a freight 
dump truck, and her airbags failed to deploy. Her head hit the steering 
wheel, and she was knocked unconscious. Nine months and two surgeries 
later, she still suffers from postconcussion syndrome.
  In her own words, she said:

       I had to move back home . . . giving up the dream I had 
     been pursuing.

  Mr. Speaker, the free market won't protect consumers by itself. We 
have learned over the decades that consumer safety depends not only on 
our automakers, but also on our Department of Transportation having the 
resources to conduct investigations and enforce our recall system.
  I am a mother of three children, all of them young drivers. I know 
how important product safety oversight can be to keeping our children 
safe.
  In fact, just before coming on the floor this afternoon, I learned 
that two school buses in my district were involved in a multivehicle 
accident, sending dozens of students to the hospital.
  I also know oversight won't save lives, unless we provide 
investigators the resources they need to keep our vehicles safe. We can 
do better. We must do better. Do you know why? We need to save lives.
  Unfortunately, the bill before us today provides millions less than 
the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has requested for 
operations and research. My motion to recommit adds $5 million for the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's vehicle safety 
enforcement program. This amendment would not add one penny to the 
deficit.
  Mr. Speaker, it shouldn't take a record settlement, after years of 
litigation, to bring some small measure of closure to victims and their 
families following a preventable defect, nor should it take 10 years to 
issue a recall once a major problem is discovered.
  Whatever your position is on the underlying bill, I ask you to 
support my amendment in the name of common sense. I ask you to support 
this proposal in the name of auto dealers in my State and in yours, who 
have reported difficulty getting replacement parts that are desperately 
needed for these recalls.
  I ask for your support on behalf of the thousands of Connecticut 
carowners and millions across this country affected by recent recalls.
  Safety is--and should be--a bipartisan issue. We can do better. We 
should do better. We must do better.
  I ask for your support as someone who believes that we can write 
better legislation without spending more money. Let's do the right 
thing. Let's do the reasonable thing. I ask all House Members to join 
me to vote for this motion, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Iowa is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LATHAM. Mr. Speaker, first of all, I want to say thank you to 
Speaker Boehner and Mr. Hoyer for the kind words earlier and to also 
express my appreciation to my counterpart here, Mr. Pastor, who has 
been such a great partner through this whole process. It has been a 
real pleasure.
  Mr. Speaker, the bill we considered is a good piece of legislation 
that adequately funds critical transportation and housing programs, 
programs that my colleagues on both sides of the aisle support, and it 
does so within the confines of a reduced budget.
  The motion specifically adds money to NHTSA's administration account. 
Unfortunately, simply throwing money at a problem will not solve the 
problem. We have an opportunity in the next surface reauthorization 
bill to look at NHTSA's authority and regulatory ability.
  It is kind of a surprise to have this motion now. We have gone 
through 2 days under a totally open rule. This could have been 
considered in regular order. Mr. Speaker, this is just an effort to 
grind the appropriations process bills to a halt.
  I urge my colleagues to reject this motion and pass H.R. 4745 today, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, this 5-
minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by a 5-minute 
vote on passage of the bill.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 195, 
noes 227, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 296]

                               AYES--195

     Barber
     Barrow (GA)
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutieerrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velaazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--227

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)

[[Page H5239]]


     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Hall
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Wilson (SC)

                              {time}  1917

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  Under clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 229, 
nays 192, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 297]

                               YEAS--229

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Camp
     Campbell
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kingston
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Southerland
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vela
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                               NAYS--192

     Amash
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Caardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gibson
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Grijalva
     Gutieerrez
     Hahn
     Hanabusa
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Labrador
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujaan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matheson
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Michaud
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Saanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velaazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Cantor
     Delaney
     Hall
     Lewis
     Miller, Gary
     Moran
     Negrete McLeod
     Nunnelee
     Speier
     Wilson (SC)

                              {time}  1924

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________