HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION FUNDING ACT OF 2014; Congressional Record Vol. 160, No. 110
(House of Representatives - July 15, 2014)

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             HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION FUNDING ACT OF 2014


                             General Leave

  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and 
include extraneous materials on H.R. 5021.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 669, I call up 
the bill (H.R. 5021) to provide an extension of Federal-aid highway, 
highway safety, motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs 
funded out of the Highway Trust Fund, and for other purposes, and ask 
for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 669, the 
amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the Committee on 
Ways and Means, modified

[[Page H6246]]

by the amendments printed in House Report 113-521, are adopted, and the 
bill, as amended, is considered read.
  The text of the bill, as amended, is as follows:

                               H.R. 5021

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Highway 
     and Transportation Funding Act of 2014''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
     is as follows:

       Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

           TITLE I--SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM EXTENSION

                    Subtitle A--Federal-Aid Highways

       Sec. 1001. Extension of Federal-aid highway programs.
       Sec. 1002. Administrative expenses.

            Subtitle B--Extension of Highway Safety Programs

       Sec. 1101. Extension of National Highway Traffic Safety 
           Administration highway safety programs.
       Sec. 1102. Extension of Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
           Administration programs.
       Sec. 1103. Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act.

               Subtitle C--Public Transportation Programs

       Sec. 1201. Formula grants for rural areas.
       Sec. 1202. Apportionment of appropriations for formula 
           grants.
       Sec. 1203. Authorizations for public transportation.
       Sec. 1204. Bus and bus facilities formula grants.

                    Subtitle D--Hazardous Materials

       Sec. 1301. Authorization of appropriations.

                      TITLE II--REVENUE PROVISIONS

       Sec. 2001. Extension of Highway Trust Fund expenditure 
           authority.
       Sec. 2002. Funding of Highway Trust Fund.
       Sec. 2003. Funding stabilization.
       Sec. 2004. Extension of Customs user fees.

     SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds that--
       (1) the existing Highway Trust Fund system is unsustainable 
     and unable to meet our Nation's 21st century transportation 
     needs;
       (2) MAP-21 included important reforms that must be built 
     upon in the next reauthorization bill to increase the 
     efficient and effective utilization of Federal funding;
       (3) these reforms should include the elimination of 
     duplicative Federal regulations and increase the authority 
     and responsibility of the States to safely and efficiently 
     build, operate, and fund transportation systems that best 
     serve the needs of their citizens, including the ability of 
     each State to implement innovative solutions, while also 
     maintaining the appropriate Federal role in transportation; 
     and
       (4) Congress should enact and the President should sign a 
     surface transportation reauthorization and reform bill prior 
     to the expiration of this Act.

           TITLE I--SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM EXTENSION

                    Subtitle A--Federal-Aid Highways

     SEC. 1001. EXTENSION OF FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAY PROGRAMS.

       (a) In General.--Except as provided in this subtitle, 
     requirements, authorities, conditions, eligibilities, 
     limitations, and other provisions authorized under divisions 
     A and E of MAP-21 (Public Law 112-141), the SAFETEA-LU 
     Technical Corrections Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-244), 
     titles I, V, and VI of SAFETEA-LU (Public Law 109-59), titles 
     I and V of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century 
     (Public Law 105-178), the National Highway System Designation 
     Act of 1995 (104-59), titles I and VI of the Intermodal 
     Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240), and 
     title 23, United States Code (excluding chapter 4 of that 
     title), which would otherwise expire on or cease to apply 
     after September 30, 2014, are incorporated by reference and 
     shall continue in effect until May 31, 2015.
       (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
       (1) Highway trust fund.--Except as provided in section 
     1002, there is authorized to be appropriated out of the 
     Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015, a sum equal to \243/365\ of the total amount 
     authorized to be appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund 
     for programs, projects, and activities for fiscal year 2014 
     under divisions A and E of MAP-21 (Public Law 112-141) and 
     title 23, United States Code (excluding chapter 4 of that 
     title).
       (2) General fund.--Section 1123(h)(1) of MAP-21 (23 U.S.C. 
     202 note) is amended by inserting ``and $19,972,603 out of 
     the general fund of the Treasury to carry out the program for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015'' before the period at the end.
       (c) Use of Funds.--
       (1) In general.--Except as otherwise expressly provided in 
     this subtitle, funds authorized to be appropriated under 
     subsection (b)(1) for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015, shall be distributed, 
     administered, limited, and made available for obligation in 
     the same manner and at the same levels as \243/365\ of the 
     amounts of funds authorized to be appropriated out of the 
     Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for 
     fiscal year 2014 to carry out programs, projects, activities, 
     eligibilities, and requirements under MAP-21 (Public Law 112-
     141), the SAFETEA-LU Technical Corrections Act of 2008 
     (Public Law 110-244), SAFETEA-LU (Public Law 109-59), titles 
     I and V of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century 
     (Public Law 105-178), the National Highway System Designation 
     Act of 1995 (104 -59), titles I and VI of the Intermodal 
     Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240), and 
     title 23, United States Code (excluding chapter 4 of that 
     title).
       (2) Contract authority.--Funds authorized to be 
     appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund (other than the 
     Mass Transit Account) under this section shall be--
       (A) available for obligation and shall be administered in 
     the same manner as if such funds were apportioned under 
     chapter 1 of title 23, United States Code; and
       (B) subject to section 1102 of MAP-21 (23 U.S.C. 104 note), 
     as amended by this subsection.
       (3) Obligation ceiling.--Section 1102 of MAP-21 (23 U.S.C. 
     104 note) is amended--
       (A) in subsection (a)--
       (i) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (1);
       (ii) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (2) and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (iii) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) $26,800,569,863 for the period beginning on October 
     1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.'';
       (B) in subsection (b)--
       (i) in paragraph (10) by striking ``2011'' and inserting 
     ``2012''; and
       (ii) in paragraph (12) by inserting ``, and for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015, 
     only in an amount equal to $639,000,000, less any reductions 
     that would have otherwise been required for that year by 
     section 251A of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901a), then multiplied by \243/
     365\ for that period'' after ``those fiscal years'';
       (C) in subsection (c)--
       (i) in the matter preceding paragraph (1) by inserting 
     ``and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending 
     on May 31, 2015'' after ``2014'';
       (ii) by striking paragraph (1)(A) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(A) amounts provided for administrative expenses and 
     programs; and'';
       (iii) in paragraph (2) in the matter preceding subparagraph 
     (A) by inserting ``or, for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending May 31, 2015, that is equal to \243/365\ of 
     such unobligated balance'' after ``unobligated balance of 
     amounts'';
       (iv) in paragraph (5) by striking ``section 204'' and 
     inserting ``sections 202 and 204''; and
       (v) by inserting ``or period'' after ``the fiscal year'' 
     each place it appears;
       (D) in subsection (d) in the matter preceding paragraph (1) 
     by striking ``2014'' and inserting ``2015'';
       (E) in subsection (f)--
       (i) in paragraph (1)--

       (I) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) by inserting 
     ``and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending 
     on May 31, 2015'' after ``2014''; and
       (II) by inserting ``or period'' after ``the fiscal year'' 
     each place it appears; and

       (ii) in paragraph (3) by striking ``section 133(c)'' and 
     inserting ``section 133(b)''.

     SEC. 1002. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

       (a) Authorization of Contract Authority.--Notwithstanding 
     any other provision of this Act or any other law, there is 
     authorized to be appropriated from the Highway Trust Fund 
     (other than the Mass Transit Account), from amounts provided 
     under section 1001, for administrative expenses of the 
     Federal-aid highway program $292,931,507 for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.
       (b) Contract Authority.--Funds authorized to be 
     appropriated by this section shall be--
       (1) available for obligation, and shall be administered, in 
     the same manner as if such funds were apportioned under 
     chapter 1 of title 23, United States Code, except that such 
     funds shall remain available until expended; and
       (2) subject to the limitation on obligations for Federal-
     aid highways and highway safety construction programs for the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015, specified in section 1102 of MAP-21 (23 U.S.C. 104 
     note), as amended by this subtitle.

            Subtitle B--Extension of Highway Safety Programs

     SEC. 1101. EXTENSION OF NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
                   ADMINISTRATION HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAMS.

       (a) Extension of Programs.--
       (1) Highway safety programs.--Section 31101(a)(1) of MAP-21 
     (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) $156,452,055 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (2) Highway safety research and development.--Section 
     31101(a)(2) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:

[[Page H6247]]

       ``(C) $75,563,014 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (3) National priority safety programs.--Section 31101(a)(3) 
     of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) $181,084,932 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (4) National driver register.--Section 31101(a)(4) of MAP-
     21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) $3,328,767 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (5) High visibility enforcement program.--
       (A) Authorization of appropriations.--Section 31101(a)(5) 
     of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
       (i) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (ii) in subparagraph (B) by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (iii) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) $19,306,849 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (B) Law enforcement campaigns.--Section 2009(a) of SAFETEA-
     LU (23 U.S.C. 402 note) is amended--
       (i) in the first sentence by inserting ``and in the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015'' 
     after ``fiscal years 2013 and 2014''; and
       (ii) in the second sentence by inserting ``and in the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015,'' after ``fiscal years 2013 and 2014'',
       (6) Administrative expenses.--Section 31101(a)(6) of MAP-21 
     (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) $16,976,712 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (b) Cooperative Research and Evaluation.--Section 403(f)(1) 
     of title 23, United States Code, is amended by inserting 
     ``ending before October 1, 2014, and $1,664,384 of the total 
     amount available for apportionment to the States for highway 
     safety programs under section 402(c) in the period beginning 
     on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' after 
     ``each fiscal year''.
       (c) Applicability of Title 23.--Section 31101(c) of MAP-21 
     (126 Stat. 733) is amended by inserting ``and for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' 
     after ``fiscal years 2013 and 2014''.

     SEC. 1102. EXTENSION OF FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY 
                   ADMINISTRATION PROGRAMS.

       (a) Motor Carrier Safety Grants.--Section 31104(a) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (8);
       (2) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (9) and 
     inserting ``; and'' ; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(10) $145,134,247 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (b) Administrative Expenses.--Section 31104(i)(1) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (H);
       (2) by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (I) 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(J) $172,430,137 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (c) Grant Programs.--
       (1) Commercial driver's license program improvement 
     grants.--Section 4101(c)(1) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is 
     amended by inserting before the period at the end the 
     following: ``and $19,972,603 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015''.
       (2) Border enforcement grants.--Section 4101(c)(2) of 
     SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by inserting before 
     the period at the end the following: ``and $21,304,110 for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015''.
       (3) Performance and registration information system 
     management grant program.--Section 4101(c)(3) of SAFETEA-LU 
     (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by inserting before the period at 
     the end the following: ``and $3,328,767 for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015''.
       (4) Commercial vehicle information systems and networks 
     deployment program.--Section 4101(c)(4) of SAFETEA-LU (119 
     Stat. 1715) is amended by inserting before the period at the 
     end the following: ``and $16,643,836 for the period beginning 
     on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015''.
       (5) Safety data improvement grants.--Section 4101(c)(5) of 
     SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by inserting before 
     the period at the end the following: ``and $1,997,260 for the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015''.
       (d) High-Priority Activities.--Section 31104(k)(2) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended by inserting ``and up to 
     $9,986,301 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015,'' after ``2014''.
       (e) New Entrant Audits.--Section 31144(g)(5)(B) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended by inserting ``and up to 
     $21,304,110 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015,'' after ``per fiscal year''.
       (f) Outreach and Education.--Section 4127(e) of SAFETEA-LU 
     (119 Stat. 1741) is amended by inserting ``and $2,663,014 to 
     the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration for the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015,'' after ``2014''.
       (g) Grant Program for Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators.--
     Section 4134(c) of SAFETEA-LU (49 U.S.C. 31301 note) is 
     amended by inserting ``and $665,753 for the period beginning 
     on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' after 
     ``2014''.

     SEC. 1103. DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACT.

       Section 4 of the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act 
     (16 U.S.C. 777c) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a) in the matter preceding paragraph (1) 
     by inserting ``and for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015'' after ``2014''; and
       (2) in subsection (b)(1)(A) by striking ``for each'' and 
     all that follows before ``the Secretary of the Interior'' and 
     inserting ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 
     2014, and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015,''.

               Subtitle C--Public Transportation Programs

     SEC. 1201. FORMULA GRANTS FOR RURAL AREAS.

       Section 5311(c)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A) by inserting ``for each fiscal year 
     ending before October 1, 2014, and $3,328,767 for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' 
     before ``shall be distributed''; and
       (2) in subparagraph (B) by inserting ``for each fiscal year 
     ending before October 1, 2014, and $16,643,836 for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' 
     before ``shall be apportioned''.

     SEC. 1202. APPORTIONMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR FORMULA 
                   GRANTS.

       Section 5336(h)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is 
     amended by inserting ``for each fiscal year ending before 
     October 1, 2014, and $19,972,603 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' before ``shall 
     be set aside''.

     SEC. 1203. AUTHORIZATIONS FOR PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION.

       (a) Formula Grants.--Section 5338(a) of title 49, United 
     States Code, is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1) by striking ``and $8,595,000,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $8,595,000,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014, and $5,722,150,685 for the period beginning 
     on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015'';
       (2) in paragraph (2)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and $128,800,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $128,800,000 for fiscal 
     year 2014, and $85,749,041 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'';
       (B) in subparagraph (B) by inserting ``and $6,657,534 for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015,'' after ``2014'';
       (C) in subparagraph (C) by striking ``and $4,458,650,000 
     for fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $4,458,650,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014, and $2,968,361,507 for the period beginning 
     on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'';
       (D) in subparagraph (D) by striking ``and $258,300,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $258,300,000 for fiscal 
     year 2014, and $171,964,110 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'';
       (E) in subparagraph (E)--
       (i) by striking ``and $607,800,000 for fiscal year 2014'' 
     and inserting ``, $607,800,000 for fiscal year 2014, and 
     $404,644,932 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015,'';
       (ii) by striking ``and $30,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' 
     and inserting ``, $30,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and 
     $19,972,603 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015,''; and
       (iii) by striking ``and $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' 
     and inserting ``, $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and 
     $13,315,068 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015,'';
       (F) in subparagraph (F) by inserting ``and $1,997,260 for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015,'' after ``2014'';
       (G) in subparagraph (G) by inserting ``and $3,328,767 for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015,'' after ``2014'';
       (H) in subparagraph (H) by inserting ``and $2,563,151 for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015,'' after ``2014'';
       (I) in subparagraph (I) by striking ``and $2,165,900,000 
     for fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $2,165,900,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014, and $1,441,955,342 for the period beginning 
     on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'';
       (J) in subparagraph (J) by striking ``and $427,800,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $427,800,000 for fiscal 
     year 2014, and $284,809,315 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,''; and
       (K) in subparagraph (K) by striking ``and $525,900,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $525,900,000 for fiscal 
     year 2014, and $350,119,726 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,''.
       (b) Research, Development Demonstration and Deployment 
     Projects.--Section

[[Page H6248]]

     5338(b) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by 
     striking ``and $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' and 
     inserting ``, $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and 
     $46,602,740 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and 
     ending on May 31, 2015''.
       (c) Transit Cooperative Research Program.--Section 5338(c) 
     of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and 
     $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, 
     $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and $4,660,274 for the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015''.
       (d) Technical Assistance and Standards Development.--
     Section 5338(d) of title 49, United States Code, is amended 
     by striking ``and $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' and 
     inserting ``, $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and $4,660,274 
     for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on 
     May 31, 2015''.
       (e) Human Resources and Training.--Section 5338(e) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and 
     $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, 
     $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and $3,328,767 for the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015''.
       (f) Capital Investment Grants.--Section 5338(g) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and 
     $1,907,000,000 for fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, 
     $1,907,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, and $1,269,591,781 for 
     the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 
     31, 2015''.
       (g) Administration.--Section 5338(h) of title 49, United 
     States Code, is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1) by striking ``and $104,000,000 for 
     fiscal year 2014'' and inserting ``, $104,000,000 for fiscal 
     year 2014, and $69,238,356 for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015'';
       (2) in paragraph (2) by inserting ``for each of fiscal 
     years 2013 and 2014 and not less than $3,328,767 for the 
     period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 
     2015,'' before ``shall be available''; and
       (3) in paragraph (3) by inserting ``for each of fiscal 
     years 2013 and 2014 and not less than $665,753 for the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015,'' 
     before ``shall be available''.

     SEC. 1204. BUS AND BUS FACILITIES FORMULA GRANTS.

       Section 5339(d)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) by inserting ``for each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 
     and $43,606,849 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, 
     and ending on May 31, 2015,'' after ``$65,500,000'';
       (2) by inserting ``for each such fiscal year and $832,192 
     for such period'' after ``$1,250,000''; and
       (3) by inserting ``for each such fiscal year and $332,877 
     for such period'' after ``$500,000''.

                    Subtitle D--Hazardous Materials

     SEC. 1301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       (a) In General.--Section 5128(a) of title 49, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in paragraph (2) by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) $28,468,948 for the period beginning on October 1, 
     2014, and ending on May 31, 2015.''.
       (b) Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Fund.--
     Section 5128(b) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by redesignating paragraphs (1) through (5) as 
     subparagraphs (A) through (E), respectively, and by adjusting 
     the margins accordingly;
       (2) by striking ``From the'' and inserting the following:
       ``(1) Fiscal years 2013 and 2014.--From the''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(2) Fiscal year 2015.--From the Hazardous Materials 
     Emergency Preparedness Fund established under section 
     5116(i), the Secretary may expend for the period beginning on 
     October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015--
       ``(A) $125,162 to carry out section 5115;
       ``(B) $14,513,425 to carry out subsections (a) and (b) of 
     section 5116, of which not less than $9,087,534 shall be 
     available to carry out section 5116(b);
       ``(C) $99,863 to carry out section 5116(f);
       ``(D) $416,096 to publish and distribute the Emergency 
     Response Guidebook under section 5116(i)(3); and
       ``(E) $665,753 to carry out section 5116(j).''.
       (c) Hazardous Materials Training Grants.--Section 5128(c) 
     of title 49, United States Code, is amended by inserting 
     ``and $2,663,014 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, 
     and ending on May 31, 2015,'' after ``2014''.

                      TITLE II--REVENUE PROVISIONS

     SEC. 2001. EXTENSION OF HIGHWAY TRUST FUND EXPENDITURE 
                   AUTHORITY.

       (a) Highway Trust Fund.--Section 9503 of the Internal 
     Revenue Code of 1986 is amended--
       (1) by striking ``October 1, 2014'' in subsections 
     (b)(6)(B), (c)(1), and (e)(3) and inserting ``June 1, 2015'', 
     and
       (2) by striking ``MAP-21'' in subsections (c)(1) and (e)(3) 
     and inserting ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 
     2014''.
       (b) Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund.--Section 
     9504 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended--
       (1) by striking ``MAP-21'' each place it appears in 
     subsection (b)(2) and inserting ``Highway and Transportation 
     Funding Act of 2014'', and
       (2) by striking ``October 1, 2014'' in subsection (d)(2) 
     and inserting ``June 1, 2015''.
       (c) Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund.--Paragraph 
     (2) of section 9508(e) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 
     is amended by striking ``October 1, 2014'' and inserting 
     ``June 1, 2015''.

     SEC. 2002. FUNDING OF HIGHWAY TRUST FUND.

       (a) In General.--Subsection (f) of section 9503 of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by redesignating 
     paragraph (5) as paragraph (7) and by inserting after 
     paragraph (4) the following new paragraphs:
       ``(5) Additional sums.--Out of money in the Treasury not 
     otherwise appropriated, there is hereby appropriated--
       ``(A) $7,765,000,000 to the Highway Account (as defined in 
     subsection (e)(5)(B)) in the Highway Trust Fund; and
       ``(B) $2,000,000,000 to the Mass Transit Account in the 
     Highway Trust Fund.
       ``(6) Additional increase in fund balance.--There is hereby 
     transferred to the Highway Account (as defined in subsection 
     (e)(5)(B)) in the Highway Trust Fund amounts appropriated 
     from the Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund under 
     section 9508(c)(3).''.
       (b) Appropriation From Leaking Underground Storage Tank 
     Trust Fund.--
       (1) In general.--Subsection (c) of section 9508 of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at the end 
     the following new paragraph:
       ``(3) Additional transfer to highway trust fund.--Out of 
     amounts in the Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 
     there is hereby appropriated $1,000,000,000 to be transferred 
     under section 9503(f)(6) to the Highway Account (as defined 
     in section 9503(e)(5)(B)) in the Highway Trust Fund.''.
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 9508(c)(1) of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking 
     ``paragraph (2)'' and inserting ``paragraphs (2) and (3)''.

     SEC. 2003. FUNDING STABILIZATION.

       (a) Funding Stabilization Under the Internal Revenue Code 
     of 1986.--The table in subclause (II) of section 
     430(h)(2)(C)(iv) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is 
     amended to read as follows:


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            The applicable minimum
      ``If the calendar year is:                percentage is:           The applicable maximum percentage is:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, or 2017.  90%..........................  110%
2018..................................  85%..........................  115%
2019..................................  80%..........................  120%
2020..................................  75%..........................  125%
After 2020............................  70%..........................  130%''.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       (b) Funding Stabilization Under Employee Retirement Income 
     Security Act of 1974.--
       (1) In general.--The table in subclause (II) of section 
     303(h)(2)(C)(iv) of the Employee Retirement Income Security 
     Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1083(h)(2)(C)(iv)) is amended to read 
     as follows:


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            The applicable minimum
      ``If the calendar year is:                percentage is:           The applicable maximum percentage is:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, or 2017.  90%..........................  110%
2018..................................  85%..........................  115%
2019..................................  80%..........................  120%
2020..................................  75%..........................  125%
After 2020............................  70%..........................  130%''.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       (2) Conforming amendments.--
       (A) In general.--Section 101(f)(2)(D) of such Act (29 
     U.S.C. 1021(f)(2)(D)) is amended--
       (i) in clause (i) by inserting ``and the Highway and 
     Transportation Funding Act of 2014'' after ``MAP-21'' both 
     places it appears, and
       (ii) in clause (ii) by striking ``2015'' and inserting 
     ``2020''.
       (B) Statements.--The Secretary of Labor shall modify the 
     statements required under subclauses (I) and (II) of section 
     101(f)(2)(D)(i) of such Act to conform to the amendments made 
     by this section.
       (c) Stabilization Not To Apply for Purposes of Certain 
     Accelerated Benefit Distribution Rules.--

[[Page H6249]]

       (1) Internal revenue code of 1986.--The second sentence of 
     paragraph (2) of section 436(d) of the Internal Revenue Code 
     of 1986 is amended by striking ``of such plan'' and inserting 
     ``of such plan (determined by not taking into account any 
     adjustment of segment rates under section 
     430(h)(2)(C)(iv))''.
       (2) Employee retirement income security act of 1974.--The 
     second sentence of subparagraph (B) of section 206(g)(3) of 
     the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (29 
     U.S.C. 1056(g)(3)(B)) is amended by striking ``of such plan'' 
     and inserting ``of such plan (determined by not taking into 
     account any adjustment of segment rates under section 
     303(h)(2)(C)(iv))''.
       (3) Effective date.--
       (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
     the amendments made by this subsection shall apply to plan 
     years beginning after December 31, 2014.
       (B) Collectively bargained plans.--In the case of a plan 
     maintained pursuant to 1 or more collective bargaining 
     agreements, the amendments made by this subsection shall 
     apply to plan years beginning after December 31, 2015.
       (4) Provisions relating to plan amendments.--
       (A) In general.--If this paragraph applies to any amendment 
     to any plan or annuity contract, such plan or contract shall 
     be treated as being operated in accordance with the terms of 
     the plan during the period described in subparagraph (B)(ii).
       (B) Amendments to which paragraph applies.--
       (i) In general.--This paragraph shall apply to any 
     amendment to any plan or annuity contract which is made--

       (I) pursuant to the amendments made by this subsection, or 
     pursuant to any regulation issued by the Secretary of the 
     Treasury or the Secretary of Labor under any provision as so 
     amended, and
       (II) on or before the last day of the first plan year 
     beginning on or after January 1, 2016, or such later date as 
     the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe.

       (ii) Conditions.--This subsection shall not apply to any 
     amendment unless, during the period--

       (I) beginning on the date that the amendments made by this 
     subsection or the regulation described in clause (i)(I) takes 
     effect (or in the case of a plan or contract amendment not 
     required by such amendments or such regulation, the effective 
     date specified by the plan), and
       (II) ending on the date described in clause (i)(II) (or, if 
     earlier, the date the plan or contract amendment is adopted),

     the plan or contract is operated as if such plan or contract 
     amendment were in effect, and such plan or contract amendment 
     applies retroactively for such period.
       (C) Anti-cutback relief.--A plan shall not be treated as 
     failing to meet the requirements of section 204(g) of the 
     Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 
     1054(g)) and section 411(d)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code 
     of 1986 solely by reason of a plan amendment to which this 
     paragraph applies.
       (d) Modification of Funding Target Determination Periods.--
       (1) Internal revenue code of 1986.--Clause (i) of section 
     430(h)(2)(B) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended 
     by striking ``the first day of the plan year'' and inserting 
     ``the valuation date for the plan year''.
       (2) Employee retirement income security act of 1974.--
     Clause (i) of section 303(h)(2)(B) of the Employee Retirement 
     Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1083(h)(2)(B)(i)) is 
     amended by striking ``the first day of the plan year'' and 
     inserting ``the valuation date for the plan year''.
       (e) Effective Date.--
       (1) In general.--The amendments made by subsections (a), 
     (b), and (d) shall apply with respect to plan years beginning 
     after December 31, 2012.
       (2) Elections.--A plan sponsor may elect not to have the 
     amendments made by subsections (a), (b), and (d) apply to any 
     plan year beginning before January 1, 2014, either (as 
     specified in the election)--
       (A) for all purposes for which such amendments apply, or
       (B) solely for purposes of determining the adjusted funding 
     target attainment percentage under sections 436 of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and 206(g) of the Employee 
     Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1054(g)) 
     for such plan year.

     A plan shall not be treated as failing to meet the 
     requirements of section 204(g) of such Act and section 
     411(d)(6) of such Code solely by reason of an election under 
     this paragraph.

     SEC. 2004. EXTENSION OF CUSTOMS USER FEES.

       Section 13031(j)(3) of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget 
     Reconciliation Act of 1985 (19 U.S.C. 58c(j)(3)) is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``September 30, 2023'' 
     and inserting ``September 30, 2024''; and
       (2) in subparagraph (B)(i), by striking ``September 30, 
     2023'' and inserting ``September 30, 2024''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The bill shall be debatable for 1 hour 
equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member 
of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee 
on Ways and Means.
  The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Shuster), the gentleman from 
West Virginia (Mr. Rahall), the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Camp), and 
the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Levin) each will control 15 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  H.R. 5021, the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014, 
extends Federal surface transportation programs and ensures the 
solvency of the highway trust fund through May 2015. H.R. 5021 is a 
clean extension of the surface transportation programs and continues 
the MAP-21 reforms.
  We have an immediate, critical need to address the solvency of the 
trust fund and extend the current surface transportation law. This bill 
does that in a responsible way, with policies that have all previously 
received strong bipartisan and bicameral support. If Congress fails to 
act, thousands of transportation projects and hundreds of thousands of 
jobs across the country will be at risk. This legislation provides 
much-needed certainty and stability for the States.
  This bill in no way precludes Congress from continuing to work on 
addressing a long-term funding solution and a long-term reauthorization 
bill, which remains a top priority for the Transportation and 
Infrastructure Committee. However, this legislation is the responsible 
solution at this time, ensures that we don't play politics with these 
programs, and enables us to continue making improvements to our surface 
transportation system.
  With that, Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

         Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of 
           Representatives,
                                    Washington, DC, July 14, 2014.
     Hon. Bill Shuster,
     Chairman, Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
         Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chairman: I am writing to confirm our mutual 
     understanding with respect to H.R. 5021, the Highway and 
     Transportation Funding Act of 2014. Thank you for consulting 
     with the Committee on Education and the Workforce with regard 
     to H.R. 5021 on those matters within the committee's 
     jurisdiction.
       In the interest of expediting the House's consideration of 
     H.R. 5021, the Committee on Education and the Workforce will 
     forgo further consideration of this bill. However, I do so 
     only with the understanding this procedural route will not be 
     construed to prejudice my committee's jurisdictional interest 
     and prerogatives on this bill, or any other similar 
     legislation, and will not be considered as precedent for 
     consideration of matters of jurisdictional interest to my 
     committee in the future.
       I respectfully request your support for the appointment of 
     outside conferees from the Committee on Education and the 
     Workforce should this bill or a similar bill be considered in 
     a conference with the Senate. I also request you include our 
     exchange of letters on this matter in the Congressional 
     Record during consideration of this bill on the House floor. 
     Thank you for your attention to these matters.
           Sincerely,
                                                       John Kline,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

         Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of 
           Representatives,
                                     Washington, DC, July 15, 2014
     Hon. John Kline,
     Chairman, Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
         Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chairman: Thank you for your letter regarding H.R. 
     5021, the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014. I 
     appreciate your willingness to support expediting the 
     consideration of this legislation on the House floor.
       I acknowledge that by forgoing action on this legislation, 
     the Committee on Education and the Workforce is not waiving 
     any of its jurisdiction and will not be prejudiced with 
     respect to the appointment of conferees or its jurisdictional 
     prerogatives on this or similar legislation.
       I appreciate your cooperation regarding this legislation 
     and I will include our letters on H.R. 5021 in the 
     Congressional Record during consideration of this measure on 
     the House floor.
           Sincerely,
                                                     Bill Shuster,
                                                         Chairman.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, passage of this bill today is absolutely necessary to 
keep our surface transportation programs up and running. In less than a 
month, the highway trust fund will go belly up and force-feed our 
States rationed payments for their transportation and infrastructure 
investments. This would starve our national economy, put States in a 
desperate situation, and

[[Page H6250]]

cost jobs. Congress must act now to avert this unnecessary crisis.
  The bill under consideration today will help States get through the 
remainder of the construction season. It will also provide time for 
Congress to come together and pass a longer-term surface transportation 
law so that we don't find ourselves in this crisis mode again.
  But this needs to happen sooner rather than later because this bill 
leaves our highway, transit, and safety programs on autopilot. While 
the driverless car may be the wave of the future, it is no way to run 
our transportation programs, and I know the chairman has driven those 
cars on autopilot.
  Passing extension after extension only brings us more of the same, 
and our States have already said that the status quo isn't meeting 
their needs.
  A long-term, robust surface transportation bill is the only way we 
are going to address our greatest infrastructure challenges. It is the 
only way we will be able to build on what works and reform what isn't. 
It is one of the few sure-fire ways to boost our economy, create jobs, 
and help us compete with our global rivals.
  ``Starving the beast'' simply doesn't work when it comes to 
transportation and infrastructure policy. We need greater investment in 
our roads and bridges. We need an increased focus on moving freight 
across our borders and overseas.
  We should grow regional collaborations to build significant projects, 
and we must bring every possible transportation job back to the U.S. to 
be done by American workers.
  It is worth noting that this debate is about far more than 
accounting, dollar signs, and trust funds. It is about the men and 
women who work in these industries and have to face needless 
uncertainty about their futures. It is about those that rely on public 
transit systems. And it is about the driving public who must endure 
aging infrastructure and the car repair bills and safety concerns that 
come with it.
  I am going to vote for this bill today not because it is the best 
solution, but because it does avert an immediate crisis and keeps the 
ball rolling forward.
  I thank the members of the Ways and Means Committee for their work on 
this bill, and I look forward to working with our chairman, Mr. 
Shuster, to bring forward a robust, long-term surface transportation 
bill to vote on in the near future.
  I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1515

  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Petri), chairman of the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
  Mr. PETRI. Mr. Speaker, the debate we are having today is not really 
about the future of the highway trust fund. Unfortunately, today is 
about doing what Congress does too often--kicking the can down the 
road, avoiding one crisis while setting up another.
  I recognize that more time is often needed to craft a more robust 
bipartisan solution, the result of which is often well worth the delay, 
but, Mr. Speaker, we must come to our senses. We must realize that 
another short-term patch is not really what our State governments are 
calling for; this is not really what the American Trucking Association 
or the Chamber of Commerce is calling for; and this is not what the 
American people sent us here to accomplish.
  For close to 50 years, the highway trust fund was self-sustaining. 
Those who used the roads paid for the roads. But we have been stalled 
in the 20th century. The fuel tax, which traditionally paid for highway 
improvements, hasn't been changed since 1993, while construction costs 
have grown more expensive, cars have become more fuel efficient or run 
on alternative fuels, and infrastructure needs have continued to rise.
  In the Highways and Transit Subcommittee, we have had hearing after 
hearing where State transportation officials, mayors, Governors, 
truckers, transit operators, economists, and experts in transportation 
policy have testified with unwavering support for a long-term, fully 
funded surface transportation bill. That should be our goal.
  But at the end of the day, we can't let the quest for the perfect 
stand in the way of the good or the acceptable. In this case, we have 
an obligation to keep our highway projects going, our transportation 
moving, and our economy growing. Since this is the only option we have 
today, this is what we will do.
  We need to stop the patches and budget gimmicks and come up with a 
viable, real solution on how we fund the trust fund. History shows that 
it is hard to do before an election. Perhaps it will be easy to do 
after that.
  So I ask my colleagues to consider this question: Which is the more 
responsible path, more budget gimmicks or raising revenue to actually 
pay for needed spending?
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
the District of Columbia (Ms. Norton), ranking member of the Highways 
and Transit Subcommittee.
  Ms. NORTON. I thank my good friend from West Virginia for yielding, 
and I thank both the chairman and the ranking member for their hard 
work on this bill. I know that they both wanted a long-term bill and 
that they have worked for a long-term bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that we have a bipartisan, bicameral bill, 
but I think that for all concerned, it expresses bipartisan 
disappointment. We had 2 years to do a bill since MAP-21, and all we 
have been able to produce is an 8-month stopgap fix.
  At the same time, the States and the localities we represent are 
probably grateful for small favors today. The administration had 
already announced rationing because of the insolvency of the trust fund 
as of August 1, with only what little money would come in to replenish 
the trust fund for each State.
  We were staring at both an insolvent trust fund and a loss of the 
construction season at the same time. That would have been an economic 
catastrophe, with the loss of hundreds of thousands of jobs. We must 
use this moment to face that we cannot rebuild our bridges, roads, and 
transit systems on pension-smoothing stopgap extensions.
  The State backlog of projects will be left untouched by this bill. 
Because we have produced a climate of uncertainty, States won't dare 
start up the real work that needs to be done on their roads, bridges, 
and transit because they are getting a patchwork bill. Patchwork bills 
yield patched-up roads and bridges and deteriorating transit.
  At the very least, we owe it to the country to revisit this bill as 
soon as possible and as early as October. The delay in MAP-21 got us 
today's stopgap measure. Congress needs a spur under its saddle to 
avoid another delay.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Arkansas (Mr. Crawford), from a State in which a referendum arose that 
increased the user fee to fund the highway system.
  Mr. CRAWFORD. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman for his work on H.R. 
5021, which I rise in support of this afternoon, which provides greater 
certainty and sufficient funding for infrastructure projects across the 
Nation. Without an immediate solution for the highway trust fund, our 
State highway departments are left wondering if there will be adequate 
funding to continue any infrastructure improvement.
  In March of this year, the Arkansas Highway and Transportation 
Department warned that, without congressional action to remedy the 
highway trust fund shortfall, continuing with highway and 
infrastructure contracts that were scheduled for April letting would 
have threatened the ability to pay contractors. As a result, 10 vital 
projects totaling over $60 million were either put on hold or forced to 
find alternative methods of temporary financing.
  My colleagues have described similar scenarios in their own States, 
meaning that across the Nation new infrastructure projects have already 
ground to a halt, threatening general contractors, their employees, 
suppliers, and putting at risk the jobs that are both directly and 
indirectly supported by these projects.
  I think most lawmakers can agree that ensuring that we have a 
reliable and modern infrastructure on land, water, rail, and air is 
critical. With the Senate announcing last week an agreement with 
Chairman Camp and House leaders to enact a short-term funding

[[Page H6251]]

solution, we can now turn our attention back to a multiyear 
transportation bill that will provide long-term assurance to States for 
financing infrastructure improvements.
  In moving forward with a long-term bill, we can spend time with 
stakeholders and constituents--the ultimate users of the 
infrastructure--and allow them to weigh in on what is being considered. 
As we return our focus to long-term legislation, we must also examine 
how to reform the highway trust fund so that taxpayers will know how 
their dollars are being spent. With costs increasing and funds at a 
premium, we owe our constituents a more transparent system that 
demonstrates effective use of their money on infrastructure 
improvement.
  I hope my colleagues will join me in supporting H.R. 5021, and I look 
forward to working on a long-term, comprehensive transportation bill to 
ensure our Nation's future growth. We can't continue to beat the drum 
to attract businesses, add jobs, and improve the economy if we are not 
willing to use our authority to invest in our Nation's infrastructure.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I am happy to yield 2 minutes to the 
distinguished gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson).
  Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, allow me to thank 
Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Rahall and Subcommittee Chair Petri 
and Ranking Member Eleanor Holmes Norton.
  I rise today in support of H.R. 5021, the Highway and Transportation 
Funding Act for 2014.
  In particular, the bill before the House this afternoon would do two 
things: first, it would provide a total of $35.3 billion for highway, 
public transit, and surface transportation programs; secondly, it would 
extend surface transportation programs authorized under MAP-21 through 
May 31, 2015.
  I support this bill because it takes almost 60,000 construction jobs 
in Texas out of harm's way, and it ensures that over 3,500 active 
highway and transit projects in Texas will not be slowed or stopped by 
the highway trust fund's shortfall.
  However, my support for this bill is reluctant, as I believe we have 
missed another opportunity to craft a long-term highway program yet 
again. While I am pleased that we have come together to address the 
impeding highway crisis, we are also kicking the can down the road 
again.
  Today, 65 percent of our Nation's roads are rated at less than good 
condition, and 25 percent of our bridges require significant repair. In 
Texas alone, we have over 300,000 miles of public roads, 8 percent of 
which are in poor condition.
  The measure before us today all but ensures that we will be having 
this exact same debate again sometime in the next Congress; rather, 
what we need to do is adopt a long-term plan that will provide 
certainty, increase transit investments, and keep workers in our 
construction industries on the job. When we return from the August 
recess, I urge my colleagues to work together and begin crafting a 
long-term surface transportation bill. We have seen again and again 
legislating by crisis is not effective.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield the gentlewoman an additional 30 
seconds.
  Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. I thank the gentleman.
  As our roads erode and our transit systems decay, we owe our 
constituents no less than acting in their best interest and enacting a 
long-term bill as soon as possible.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Barletta), one of the committee's 
true experts on infrastructure, a mayor of a small city, and a 
construction business owner.
  Mr. BARLETTA. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this legislation that 
will keep our highway trust fund solvent until we agree on a long-term 
solution.
  If we fail to act, the money to fund surface transportation projects 
will soon run dry. That could result in the stoppage of more than 7,000 
projects. We would lose countless jobs across the country, and in my 
home State of Pennsylvania as well.
  I have always supported a highway bill of a least 5 years or more, 
but in the absence of one, I support this proposal to give us time to 
work out a longer-term funding solution. We need a plan that will meet 
our transportation needs while also providing contractors and builders 
the guidance they need to invest in equipment and employees.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this important piece of 
legislation.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I am happy to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Hahn), a very valued member of our 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
  Ms. HAHN. Mr. Speaker, I thank Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member 
Rahall for bringing this before us today.
  This short-term highway trust fund fix is crucial for keeping our 
highway and transit systems solvent, and I intend to vote for it. 
Letting the highway trust fund become insolvent would be irresponsible 
and cut 700,000 jobs and increase congestion. But once our work is done 
here today, we do need a long-term, creative solution to fund our much-
needed transportation projects in this country.
  Over 64 percent of the roads in Los Angeles are in utter disrepair, 
costing each resident driver nearly $832 a year. My own dad, who was a 
county supervisor in Los Angeles for 40 years, used to offer people a 
dollar for every pothole they could find in his district. If he made 
that offer today, he would go broke.
  To fill this funding gap, I support looking at different ways of 
funding our roads in addition to the gas tax, such as vehicle miles 
traveled, which charges drivers by the miles that they travel.
  For our national economy, we need to focus on freight infrastructure. 
Freight bottlenecks cost us approximately $200 billion a year. 
Yesterday, I introduced the National Freight Network Trust Fund Act for 
a long-term fix that creates dedicated funding for our freight 
infrastructure.
  I urge all of my colleagues to support this short-term fix and join 
me in looking forward to solving this problem long term.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Bucshon), who is from one of the most 
innovative States in funding and moving projects forward at a very fast 
pace.
  Mr. BUCSHON. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of this 
legislation.
  Last year, I was honored to be conferee a for MAP-21, the highway 
bill, and I am proud of the bill that our conference committee produced 
and was subsequently signed into law. Our Nation's transportation 
projects are being completed faster, and States like my home State of 
Indiana receive more Federal funding than they had in the past.
  We do need a long-term solution to fund our infrastructure. Today, 
however, we need to support this extension. This funding is critical 
for projects such as Interstate 69, which runs through my district.
  With construction season underway, we need to ensure that every State 
can continue with the summer construction projects that are ongoing. 
This legislation is necessary to keep thousands of Americans working to 
rebuild our infrastructure--improving the flow of commerce and ensuring 
the safety of Americans as they travel.
  I would like to thank Chairman Camp and Chairman Shuster for their 
leadership, and I urge all of my colleagues to support this 
legislation.

                              {time}  1530

  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I am glad to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. DeFazio), a distinguished member of our 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, we can pretend that we care about the 
future of America and its transportation system. We used to be number 
one in the world, widely recognized. We are now rated 26th, and we are 
moving down quickly.
  The system is falling apart. There are 140,000 bridges that need 
repair or replacement, and 40 percent of the pavement on the National 
Highway System has failed to the point at which

[[Page H6252]]

you have to dig it up, not just resurface it. There is a $70 billion 
backlog in our transit systems just to bring everything up to a state 
of good repair. That is not even to begin to think about building a 
21st century transportation system to compete with the rest of the 
world. For the Chinese, 9 percent of their GDP goes to transportation. 
They want to be able to move people and goods more efficiently and to 
out-compete us. Even Brazil, 6 percent. India, 6 percent. The United 
States of America, 1 percent. We have got to get serious about this.
  Today, we are going to do a little shuffling around of some money, 
and say, oh, we can pretend, by pension smoothing and this and that, 
that we are creating money so we get around not creating more debt or 
deficit here. Come on. Really, it is pretty phony stuff. Let's get real 
about how we are going to fund our transportation future.
  We are fighting with people who believe in a theory called 
``devolution.'' That is, they want to devolve the duty of building a 
national transportation system to the 50 dispersed States and let them 
figure it out. We tried that. This is 1956. The brand new Kansas 
Turnpike ended in Emil Schweitzer's farm field for years because 
Oklahoma couldn't afford their part of that system until the Eisenhower 
bill passed, and we had a highway trust fund.
  We know this works--user-fee based, a national system, coordinating 
among the States, not having roads that disconnect at the border, not 
tolling the heck out of everything, which some people would have us do, 
not fragmenting the system. What are you going to say to the Port of 
Los Angeles, where 40 percent of the freight comes into the country? 
Oh, you figure out how to get the freight out of L.A. to serve the rest 
of the country, and you pay for it. No. This is a national obligation. 
It is international and national competitiveness. We have to get 
serious, and this bill here today is not serious or long term.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentlewoman from West Virginia (Mrs. Capito), a long-term member of 
the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, someone who fights 
every day for West Virginia.
  Mrs. CAPITO. I want to thank Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member 
Rahall for bringing this bill to the floor today.
  Mr. Speaker, more than 700,000 jobs and 6,000 road and bridge 
projects could be in jeopardy if payments from the Federal highway 
trust fund are delayed. I rise today in support of the Highway and 
Transportation Funding Act, which would prevent this catastrophic 
scenario.
  In my home State of West Virginia, more than 200 projects are 
currently receiving Federal funding. If we fail to act now, we risk 
layoffs at the height of the summer construction season. Inaction would 
cripple the efforts of our State highway department to maintain our 
roads and bridges after a particularly harsh winter and to build new 
projects like U.S. Route 35, Corridor H, and the King Coal Highway in 
West Virginia.
  American motorists, construction workers, and small businesses 
deserve certainty that the Federal Government will continue to invest 
in our Nation's infrastructure. Today's bill provides that certainty 
for the remainder of this construction season, but I wait, as most of 
us do, to complete the work on the longer term bill. I ask my 
colleagues to join me in passing the Highway and Transportation Funding 
Act.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I am very happy to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Hoyer), our distinguished minority whip 
and a strong supporter of our infrastructure in this country.
  Mr. HOYER. Those were the good old days, I tell my friend Mr. Rahall, 
when I got an unlimited 1 minute.
  Mr. Speaker, there is some good news. The good news is this committee 
is chaired by someone who wants to invest in America, grow jobs, and 
expand our economy. I speak of my friend Bill Shuster, and I thank him 
for that. The other good news is that our ranking Democrat, Nick Joe 
Rahall, has a history of making sure that America invests in its 
infrastructure.
  The bad news is that this bill does not give what Mrs. Capito 
suggested it gives, and that is certainty. It gives a temporary, 
inadequate response to what is a long-term problem. I won't ask him the 
question, but I believe that Mr. Shuster absolutely agrees with me. We 
ought to find a fiscally sustainable funding source for our 
infrastructure and highway system.
  Mr. Speaker, a well-maintained highway structure supports the growth 
of our economy and the creation of good jobs. That is why I have been 
advocating for a long-term, sustainable fix that makes investments in 
our roads and bridges and provides the certainty that needed repairs 
will be completed. I am for a big deal, not just for certainty in 
infrastructure but for certainty in the investment in our economy. I 
will continue to advocate that.
  This bill, unfortunately, does not do that. It is better than doing 
nothing, but it does not do what we need to do. In fact, by 
implementing a short-term fix only until May, this bill promotes 
uncertainty for construction firms and other businesses that rely on 
projects paid for by the highway trust fund, which support American 
jobs. It also puts Congress in the position of having to deal with this 
issue next May, as next year's summer construction season is about to 
begin, without any certainty of what we will do.
  Democrats would prefer to work with Republicans to pass a long-term 
fix now or, if we cannot do that, to reauthorize it for a few months so 
that we can return to this issue after the November elections and pass 
a long-term fix, but we cannot take the risk of allowing this fund to 
run dry this summer.
  The highway trust fund supports the infrastructure improvements that 
enable manufacturers to move their products to market faster and help 
attract businesses and jobs from overseas. It helps us to Make It In 
America--manufacture it, grow it, sell it here and around the world. If 
we allow it to go broke, according to the Department of Transportation, 
our economy could lose as many as 700,000 jobs.
  This bill, I think, will get some significant support from our side 
of the aisle but not because it is our choice, not because it is the 
right way to go. In my view, as I said, I don't want to hurt him with 
his party or with anybody outside of this Chamber, but I think Mr. 
Shuster agrees that we need a long-term solution. I urge my colleagues 
to work together in a bipartisan fashion to get a long-term, 
confidence-building resolution of this stop-and-jerk, or go-and-jerk, 
funding process that we are adopting.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I do agree with the distinguished minority 
whip that we need a long-term solution to the trust fund and a long-
term bill to provide certainty to this Nation when it comes to our 
transportation system.
  With that, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. 
Rodney Davis), one of the newest members of the committee but one of 
the hardest-working members of the committee.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
  Mr. Speaker, supporting H.R. 5021 means protecting hundreds of 
thousands of jobs throughout this great country. More specifically, in 
Illinois, it means saving nearly 30,000 jobs and 4,000 construction 
projects that are already underway. Supporting this bill means 
improving our crumbling roads and bridges--a constitutional 
responsibility of this body's. Supporting H.R. 5021 means governing 
responsibly instead of creating yet another manufactured crisis that 
would add even more uncertainty and instability to a still struggling 
economy.
  By extending this highway trust fund, which is not my first choice--
if we extend this bill and these programs through May, we can continue 
working on that long-term highway bill that both sides of the aisle 
stand here and say that we need, and we can create jobs and keep up 
with our 21st century transportation needs. The highway trust fund has 
fallen short for many years, and we need to come up with long-term 
solutions.
  I look forward to working with my colleagues from the other side of 
the aisle and with Chairman Shuster and his continued leadership.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, may I have the time remaining, please.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from West Virginia has 1

[[Page H6253]]

minute remaining, and the gentleman from Pennsylvania has 6 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, it is now my pleasure to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Mica), the distinguished former 
chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
  Mr. MICA. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and the distinguished ranking 
member. Thank you for your hard work in trying right now to put a Band-
Aid on our bleeding transportation funding. Thank you for trying to get 
the transportation cart out of the ditch.
  Mr. Speaker, we have reached the eleventh hour, and soon projects 
will be closing down across the country. It is unfortunate that we are 
at this juncture on the road to funding transportation responsibly. We 
had a chance for a 5-year bill, and we did not have the leadership, I 
believe, from the White House. In fact, President Obama was AWOL during 
that entire process. Now, today, we see the President has been at a 
bridge, and he is going to be at another site. He is out at a research 
thing, talking about transportation funding.
  Where was the President when Mr. Oberstar--the distinguished 
gentleman who recently passed away and who was chair of the committee--
offered a bill, and he came and cut his legs out from underneath the 
Democrat chairman? We would have had a longer term, fully funded bill. 
If it is to secure our borders, where has he been? He says he doesn't 
do photo ops, but he is doing them now, and he will do them on 
transportation. He doesn't need to be at the bridge. He needs to be 
here, working with these distinguished Members of Congress for a long-
term solution. He was absent at the border, and he is absent as we need 
to secure our Nation's infrastructure. This is not acceptable.
  I support this measure because it is an extension of what we did. It 
doesn't have deficit spending. It is responsible for paying for it, and 
it doesn't have earmarks. The last bill had 6,300 earmarks--not this 
bill. I support the measure.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. SHUSTER. We have no more speakers on our side.
  Mr. Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Ms. Frankel), a very distinguished member of our 
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
  Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. Thank you, Mr. Rahall.
  Mr. Speaker, transportation moves our economy, and modern 
infrastructure is a path to jobs and prosperity. I will vote for this 
stopgap measure, but I want to echo the words of my colleagues on both 
sides of the aisle who have called for a long-term, sustainable fix of 
our highway trust fund so that the United States of America can compete 
in the world's market.
  Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, in closing, much has been said today in 
dislike of this temporary fix, and I could not agree more. It is not my 
preference. We all want to address this in a long-term, robust manner. 
That is also the opinion of the Transportation Trades Department of the 
AFL-CIO, who say that further delay will only maintain the status quo 
in keeping workers off the job, undercutting long-term planning and 
hindering the country in advancing to a 21st century transportation 
system.
  There are very similar views, like views, expressed by the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce when they say in a letter to Members of Congress 
that, in the Chamber's view, the longer the pass, the easier it will be 
for Congress to kick the can down the road and avoid the tough question 
of how we will maintain Federal investment in highway public 
transportation and highway safety.
  I hope we come back before next May and address this issue.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, how much time is left?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Pennsylvania has 4 
minutes remaining.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  First, I want to start off by expressing my condolences to a former 
chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. I guess, 
back then, it was Public Works and Transportation. Chairman Bob Roe, 
who chaired the committee in the eighties, passed away this morning, at 
9:30, at the age of 90. I just want to say that my thoughts and prayers 
are with his family at this time.

                              {time}  1545

  I want to start in closing by thanking Chairman Camp and Ranking 
Member Levin and the entire Ways and Means Committee for passing out, 
on a voice vote, H.R. 5021.
  I would like to reiterate that H.R. 5021 is a clean extension of the 
surface transportation programs that continues the MAP-21 reforms. This 
extension is necessary to provide much-needed certainty and stability 
for States while we continue to work on addressing a long-term funding 
solution and a long-term reauthorization bill.
  I am committed to that. I know that the Transportation Committee is 
going to work diligently with the Ways and Means Committee on funding a 
long-term solution to the funding and also to passing a strong long-
term reauthorization bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I encourage all Members to support this bill, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  At the end of this month, States across the country will be forced to 
put road construction on hold if Congress cannot address the highway 
trust fund. At risk are hundreds of thousands of jobs in the 
construction industry.
  A strong infrastructure is central to commerce, and at a time when 
millions of Americans are packing their bags to take a vacation or just 
traveling to work, we must ensure that projects can be completed so 
that the roads, bridges, and highways they travel on are modernized and 
safe.
  The bill before us today, H.R. 5021, will provide enough funding to 
get us through May 21, 2015, giving States the ability to complete 
projects.
  This bill is the only package with all provisions having a proven 
history of getting big bipartisan votes in both the House and the 
Senate. The three provisions--pension smoothing, custom user fees, and 
leaking underground storage tanks--have all been used previously in 
bills that received strong bipartisan votes.
  Pension smoothing and LUST were included in the last bipartisan 
highway trust fund legislation. These are policies everyone is familiar 
with. They are policies that will provide the funding we need, and they 
are the only policies that will pass both the House and Senate in time 
to fund our highways after the end of this month.
  A long-term solution would be my preference, and an important feature 
of my tax reform discussion draft would provide enough revenue to 
maintain the solvency of the highway trust fund for 8 years.
  In the meantime, I hope all Members of Congress can work on a longer-
term solution by the end of May next year. This won't be an easy task, 
so it is important that Congress has time to have a deliberative, open 
debate about bipartisan solutions, rather than trying to hit Americans 
who are already paying more for gas with a gas tax hike.
  It is time to act now. State transportation departments have already 
started delaying or stopping certain highway projects to prepare for 
the fact that funding may fall short. Americans across the country 
deserve to see less gridlock on the roads and from their elected 
representatives.
  These policies are straightforward and have a history of bipartisan, 
bicameral support.
  I am encouraged that the White House issued their support for the 
House highway bill, so we have an opportunity to solve this problem 
today.
  Mr. Speaker, I will enter into the Record the administration's 
statement of support.

                   Statement of Administration Policy


       H.R. 5021--Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014

  (Rep. Camp, R-Michigan, and Rep. Shuster, R-Pennsylvania, July 14, 
                                 2014)

       With surface transportation funding running out and 
     hundreds of thousands of jobs

[[Page H6254]]

     at risk later this summer, the Administration supports House 
     passage of H.R. 5021. This legislation would provide for 
     continuity of funding for the Highway Trust Fund during the 
     height of the summer construction season and keep Americans 
     at work repairing the Nation's crumbling roads, bridges, and 
     transit systems.
       However, this legislation only provides a short-term fix to 
     the Highway Trust Fund. It does not address the continued 
     need to pass a long-term authorization bill that creates jobs 
     and provides certainty for cities, States, and businesses. 
     Congress should work to pass a long-term authorization bill 
     well before the expiration date set forth in H.R. 5021. The 
     President has been very clear that increasing investment in 
     the Nation's infrastructure is a top priority. That is why 
     the President laid out a vision for a 21st century surface 
     transportation infrastructure, the GROW AMERICA Act, which 
     would streamline project approval processes and implement 
     innovative transportation policies that will make better use 
     of taxpayer dollars while supporting millions of jobs and 
     positioning the Nation's economy for lasting growth. That 
     proposal is fully paid for through existing revenues and by 
     reforming business taxes to help create jobs and spur 
     investment while eliminating loopholes that reward companies 
     for moving profits overseas.
       The Administration is focused every day on what can be done 
     to expand opportunity for every American. In today's economy, 
     that means building a first-class infrastructure that 
     attracts first-class jobs and takes American businesses' 
     goods all across the world.

  Mr. CAMP. We also have strong industry support in a letter to 
Congress from 62 organizations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 
American Road and Transportation Builders Association, the American 
Trucking Association, and the National Association of Manufacturers, 
which stated, ``A long-term Federal commitment to prioritize and invest 
in our aging infrastructure and safety needs is essential to achieve 
this goal. Keeping the highway trust fund solvent is the first step.''
  Mr. Speaker, I will enter their statement of support into the Record 
as well.

                                                     July 14, 2014
       To Members of the U.S. Congress:
       The undersigned organizations representing every sector of 
     the economy urge the House of Representatives and Senate to 
     pass bipartisan legislation that will stabilize the Highway 
     Trust Fund and prevent a shutdown of federal highway and 
     public transportation investments across the country.
       Our transportation infrastructure network is the foundation 
     on which the nation's economy functions. American 
     manufacturers, industries and businesses depend on this 
     complex system to move people, products and services every 
     day of the year.
       As the World Economic Forum (WEF) noted in its 2013-2014 
     Global Competitiveness Report, infrastructure connects 
     regions, integrates markets and provides access to markets 
     and services. While this latest report places the U.S. 
     economy fifth in its ``Global Competitiveness Index,'' 
     America's infrastructure network now ranks 15th globally.
       Shortchanging the Highway Trust Fund is not the path to 
     future economic growth, jobs and increased competitiveness. 
     The possibility of a deficient Highway Trust Fund that 
     shutters 100,000 construction projects that support 700,000 
     jobs and puts all new highway, bridge and public 
     transportation investments on hold will further harm an 
     already fragile economy.
       The U.S. economy requires a surface transportation 
     infrastructure network that can keep pace with growing 
     demands. A long-term federal commitment to prioritize and 
     invest in our aging infrastructure and safety needs is 
     essential to achieve this goal. Keeping the Highway Trust 
     Fund solvent is the first step.
       We urge Congress to avoid the immediate transportation 
     cliff and improve the long-term fiscal condition of the 
     Highway Trust Fund during 2014.
           Sincerely,
       National Association of Manufacturers, U.S. Chamber of 
     Commerce, American Road & Transportation Builders 
     Association, Associated General Contractors of America, 
     National Retail Federation, American Trucking Association, 
     U.S. Travel Association, American Farm Bureau Federation, 
     Mothers Against Drunk Driving, NAACP, American Association of 
     State Highway and Transportation Officials, International 
     Union of Operating Engineers, American Society of Civil 
     Engineers, Laborers International Union of North America, 
     National Association of Development Organizations, NAIOP, the 
     Commercial Real Estate Development Association, American 
     Public Transportation Association, Airports Council 
     International--North America, Transportation for America, 
     Building America's Future.
       Smart Growth America, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance, 
     The American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, 
     Governors Highway Safety Association, American Highway Users 
     Alliance, American Public Works Association, American Council 
     of Engineering Companies, National Stone Sand and Gravel 
     Association, Transportation Intermediaries Association, The 
     American Society of Landscape Architects, American Iron and 
     Steel Institute, National Utility Contractors Association, 
     American Concrete Pipe Association, American Concrete 
     Pavement Association, National Ready Mixed Concrete 
     Association, National Asphalt Pavement Association, Truckload 
     Carriers Association, American Association of Airport 
     Executives, International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike 
     Association, Intelligent Transportation Society of America 
     (ITS America).
       Safe Routes to School National Partnership, League of 
     American Bicyclists, Alliance for Biking & Walking, 
     Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, National 
     Tank Truck Carriers, American Moving & Storage Association, 
     NATSO, representing America's Truckstops and Travel Plazas, 
     National Recreation and Park Association, Metropolitan 
     Planning Council (Chicago, IL), American Traffic Safety 
     Services Association, SMART--Transportation Division, Safe 
     Kids Worldwide, PeopleForBikes--Business Network, PolicyLink, 
     International Warehouse Logistics Association, The National 
     Industrial Transportation League, The Coalition for America's 
     Gateways and Trade Corridors, Association of Equipment 
     Manufacturers, Portland Cement Association, Associated 
     Equipment Distributors, National Electrical Contractors 
     Association National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
     (NEMA).

  Mr. CAMP. A ``yes'' vote will avoid a last-minute crisis. We also 
need to fund important highway projects and ensure that thousands of 
jobs are not at risk.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I will support this bill because we are at the eleventh hour. No, it 
is not the eleventh hour; it is a few minutes before midnight.
  Unless Congress acts by the end of this month, more than 100,000 
transportation projects could be delayed and as many as 700,000 jobs 
put at risk, but this legislation is a patch when what our Nation's 
infrastructure needs is major repair. Doing nothing is not an option, 
but we should be doing much better.
  The Republicans, I must say, in this House, talk a lot about the need 
for certainty, but they have riddled infrastructure funding with 
uncertainty. The fact that we are in this position illustrates just how 
little House Republicans have done, since they assumed the majority in 
2011, to address the long-term problems facing the trust fund and our 
infrastructure.
  Every Democrat on Ways and Means urged our chairman, Mr. Camp, to 
hold a series of hearings on long-term financing options for the trust 
fund, yet the committee has not held a single hearing on this topic in 
the 3 years and 6 months the Republicans have been in the majority.
  Since 2011, the committee has had nearly two dozen hearings on 
repealing or dismantling the ACA and, in the last 14 months, a half-
dozen hearings on the IRS. Those are not the priorities that are going 
to lead to a long-term solution of the trust fund. The Nation, in a 
word, deserves better than this short shrift. It needs a long-term 
solution.
  Democrats on Ways and Means proposed an extension until December 31 
in order to pressure a long-term solution this year. All of us on the 
Democratic side voted ``yes,'' and all of the Republicans voted ``no.''
  Let me end with a word on unemployment insurance. Senate Democrats 
and Republicans passed a bill to extend unemployment insurance that 
included an almost identical set of offsets as those included in 
today's legislation.
  The House Republicans refused to take up that measure, at the same 
time calling some of them--the offsets--pie in the sky and opposing the 
plan.
  Well, here we are today on the floor of the House, and 3 million 
Americans are still waiting for House Republicans to allow just one 
vote on a bipartisan plan to extend unemployment benefits. It is time 
that House Republicans get priorities straight.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the balance of my time now 
be given to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer), a distinguished 
member of our committee who has worked so hard with the rest of us on 
highway issues, to control.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Michigan?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.

[[Page H6255]]

  I am pleased that Congress is finally acting today, not with a 
looming crisis, but one that is already upon us. This is entirely 
predictable.
  I have been arguing for months that Congress needs to act because the 
stopgap measure we did last Congress was designed to create precisely 
this Congress at precisely this time.
  Sixty-two groups may have signed on a letter of support, but they 
prefer us to act meaningfully for long-term funding. They accept this 
because it is the only alternative to shutting down activities this 
summer.
  My Republican friends are unwilling--not unable--but unwilling to 
resolve the funding contradictions. Revenues have failed to keep pace 
with the demands of an aging growing Nation, making no change for 21 
years, as our infrastructure ages and falls apart, our Nation continues 
to grow and transportation patterns change. It is guaranteed that we 
should change as well.
  This Congress has refused to address its responsibilities. The House 
Ways and Means Committee has not had a single hearing on transportation 
finance. One of our most important responsibilities, uniquely ours, one 
that is unlike so many other items we deal with, it is possible to 
resolve. We haven't had a hearing in the 43 months that the Republicans 
have been in charge of Congress.
  Now, I understand there are conflicts within the Republican Caucus. 
There are some that appear satisfied with locking us into a slow, 
steady decline called for in the Republican budget--no new projects 
until October of 2015 and a 30 percent reduction over the next decade, 
at exactly the time the Federal partnership should be enhanced, not 
reduced.
  There are others in the Republicans whose answer is to just abandon 
ship, to give up on the Federal partnership, slash the Federal gas tax, 
and abandon any hope of a national transportation policy and 
partnership to help States with projects that are multistate in nature 
or that need to be done whether economic times are bad.
  That would be tragic and wrong to abandon the partnership that has 
meant so much, but it is part of what is driving some of our Republican 
Tea Party friends. Just because there may not be a majority in the 
Republican ranks for either approach does not mean that we should 
continue to dither.
  Because Republicans friends are unwilling or unable to resolve this, 
we have frozen the Transportation Committee in place. They don't have a 
bill. They are not going to have a bill unless we resolve what the 
budget number is: increase, continue the downward slide, or abandon it 
altogether.
  We will be no better off next May to resolve this question. In fact, 
we will be worse off because we will be in the middle of a Presidential 
campaign, with a new Congress, maybe new committee lineups.
  So as one of the stakeholders told me as we filed out of the hearing 
room last week, May 2015 is really May 2017 and, I might add, at the 
earliest.
  We should reject this approach to hand off our responsibilities. We 
should resolve the resource question, and we should commit that this 
Congress is not going to recess for August vacation, not going to 
recess to campaign in October, until we have worked to give the 
American people a transportation bill they need--deserve--to jump-start 
the economy, create hundreds of thousands of family-wage jobs, and 
strengthen communities and families across the Nation.
  American infrastructure used to be the best in the world and a point 
of pride bringing Americans together. It is now a source of 
embarrassment and deep concern as we fall further and further behind 
global leaders.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  In addition to the Statement of Administration Policy in support of 
the legislation which has been entered into the record, as well as a 
letter from 62 organizations in support of the legislation--including 
the American Trucking Association, American Farm Bureau, National 
Association of Manufacturers--I also have a letter from the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce, which is the world's largest business federation, 
which represents more than 3 million businesses of all sizes, sectors, 
and regions, is key voting this legislation and has written a separate 
letter in support of this bill.
  I would enter into the Record the Chamber of Commerce letter 
regarding H.R. 5021.

                                               Chamber of Commerce


                              of the United States of America,

                                    Washington, DC, July 15, 2014.
       To the Members of the U.S. House of Representatives: The 
     U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the world's largest business 
     federation representing the interests of more than three 
     million businesses of all sizes, sectors, and regions, as 
     well as state and local chambers and industry associations, 
     and dedicated to promoting, protecting and defending 
     America's free enterprise system, strongly urges you to vote 
     for H.R. 5021, the ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act 
     of 2014,'' which would extend federal surface transportation 
     programs and provide for a short-term solution for the 
     Highway Trust Fund (HTF) shortfall. By the end of July, 
     Congress must send to the President a measure that generates 
     the necessary cash flows to support continued outlays from 
     the HTF and affords much-needed continuity in the short-term 
     for economic development, international trade, and job 
     creation.
       Then, it is imperative to immediately turn to identifying 
     and advancing a bipartisan, sustainable, and long-term 
     solution to the HTF that can achieve bicameral success. The 
     Chamber urges leaders of both parties to put politics aside 
     and come together on a shared solution to the HTF's 
     structural deficiencies. The user-supported HTF has been a 
     bipartisan compromise from its beginning. It is the offspring 
     of a Democratic-controlled House and Senate in the 84th 
     Congress and the Republican Eisenhower Administration. For 58 
     years the HTF has served America's transportation 
     infrastructure well and helped to create the world's largest 
     economy; however, its long-term solvency has been compromised 
     by a lack of action in both the legislative and executive 
     branches.
       The Chamber recognizes action on a short-term HTF fix as an 
     important step and looks forward to working with you in the 
     months ahead on a long-lasting remedy for the Highway Trust 
     Fund. The Chamber urges the House to pass H.R. 5021, and may 
     include votes on, or in relation to, this bill in our annual 
     How They Voted Scorecard.
           Sincerely,
                                                  R. Bruce Josten.

  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from New Jersey (Mr. Pascrell), one of the champions on our committee 
for infrastructure in America.
  Mr. PASCRELL. I thank the ranking member, Mr. Speaker, and I want to 
thank our chairman, our ranking member who was just here a few moments 
ago.
  It is ironic, as I said earlier today, when we take up the 
transportation and infrastructure legislation that, just a few hours 
ago, the champion of transportation and infrastructure passed away. He 
was the chairman of the Transportation Committee. At that time, it was 
the Public Works Committee. He left the Congress in 1992, so it is 
ironic.
  Mr. Chairman, through the Speaker, you have to understand the 
frustration that exists on both sides of the aisle on this legislation. 
We know what is needed. We know what is going to happen by the end of 
August. Many projects throughout the United States of America will just 
shut down or begin to shut down. Bills will not be paid. That is not 
good. That is not acceptable.
  On the other hand, when the dust settles, the very committee that we 
represent, where everything goes through--the Ways and Means 
Committee--will have voted for close to $1 trillion when the dust 
settles, unpaid for, permanent tax cuts, many of which are never meant 
to be permanent. Check the Record.
  So we can do this and add $1 trillion to the deficit, and we can't 
come up with a bipartisan 5-year or 6-year transportation plan for our 
roads?
  Let's wait until the bridges fall down. Then we will do something 
about it.

                              {time}  1600

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I yield the gentleman an additional 15 seconds.
  Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Speaker, estimates as to how much we need to invest 
simply to maintain and repair our existing surface transportation 
system run as high as $177 billion per year. The actual capital 
spending in 2012 was only $103 billion.
  Mr. CAMP. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentlewoman

[[Page H6256]]

from Pennsylvania (Ms. Schwartz), who has been a valued member of our 
committee, and we are going to miss her.
  Ms. SCHWARTZ. Mr. Speaker, our manufacturers, small business owners, 
and everyday commuters require a modern transportation system. Simply 
put, our daily lives, our safety, and our economy all require a first-
rate transportation system. But our Nation's infrastructure is 
crumbling, endangering travelers, lengthening commutes, and holding 
back economic growth.
  In their latest report card, the American Society of Civil Engineers 
gave my own home State's roads and transit a D-minus. Sadly, 
Pennsylvania has the largest number of crumbling bridges in our Nation, 
at over 5,000. This is simply unacceptable.
  With the highway trust fund running out of funds, we must act to 
ensure that important projects continue, that workers stay on the job, 
and that we do not fall further behind. But the bill before us is a 
temporary fix. Instead, this Congress should act on a robust 
transportation bill--not for a few months, but for years--a plan that 
will not only create jobs now but will help ensure our economic 
competitiveness and economic growth locally and nationally for years to 
come. We should do our job and pass a fully funded 6-year Federal 
transportation and infrastructure bill this year.
  Putting this off does not make it easier. It does not build a 
stronger economy. While necessary, this bill is another missed 
opportunity by House Republicans who are short on vision, too willing 
to rely on fiscal gimmicks, and unable to find common ground to get the 
bill done--and done right.
  Mr. CAMP. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, may I inquire as to the remaining time?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Latham). The gentleman from Oregon has 
5\1/4\ minutes remaining, and the gentleman from Michigan has 11 
minutes remaining.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Danny K. Davis), a valued member of our Ways and 
Means Committee.
  Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. I thank the gentleman from Oregon for 
yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I had hoped that we would be here passing a long-term 
transportation plan. Unfortunately, that is not the case.
  However, I support H.R. 5021 as an initial step in strengthening the 
American infrastructure. This bill obviously provides immediate help to 
prevent default of the highway trust fund and prevents impending delays 
in transportation. Mr. Speaker, 30,000 people will continue to work in 
my State as a result of this bill and its passage.
  So I commend us for at least reaching this agreement, keeping things 
moving, and I urge its passage.
  Mr. CAMP. I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to submit for the Record a letter from the 
Associated General Contractors of America in support of H.R. 5021 and 
urging its passage.

                                            The Associated General


                                       Contractors of America,

                                     Arlington, VA, July 15, 2014.
     Re Support H.R. 5021, the Highway and Transportation Funding 
         Act of 2014

     Hon. John Boehner,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Boehner: On behalf of the Associated 
     General Contractors of America (AGC), I urge you to support 
     H.R. 5021, the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 
     2014.
       The Highway Trust Fund is running on fumes. The United 
     States Department of Transportation (DOT) recently announced 
     they will initiate cash management procedures for programs 
     funded out of the Highway Account of the trust fund on August 
     1, 2014. This will force DOT to delay reimbursements to state 
     departments of transportation for projects under construction 
     or, in some cases, already completed. Further, if no 
     additional revenue is found, the trust fund will not be able 
     to support any new projects in 2015.
       Bipartisan action is required to give states the funding 
     certainty they need to issue highway construction contracts 
     and to give the 10,000 construction firms engaged in highway, 
     road and bridge construction the confidence they need to make 
     hiring and capital investment decisions at the peak of the 
     summer highway construction season. Providing revenue for the 
     Highway Trust Fund will also guarantee the federal government 
     can meet its obligations to reimburse states for highway and 
     bridge construction projects already underway.
       The looming insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund and the 
     lack of long-term authorization stifles the economic impact 
     of road construction. It undermines states' ability to best 
     plan and manage their highway, bridge and transit 
     construction programs It also stretches state budgets and may 
     increase their borrowing costs.
       To that end, AGC urges the House to pass bipartisan 
     legislation that can provide the certainty states need to 
     make investment decisions and the industry needs to make 
     critical business decisions. Focus must then turn to finding 
     a bipartisan, bicameral solution this year to fund a multi-
     year reauthorization of MAP-21.
           Sincerely,

                                             Jeffrey D. Shoaf,

                                        Senior Executive Director,
                                               Government Affairs.

  Mr. CAMP. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Doggett), an eloquent spokesperson for rebuilding and 
renewing America.
  Mr. DOGGETT. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, today really demonstrates the House Republican fear of 
even trying. Their guiding strategic principle in this Congress is to 
do nothing and to be sure that no one else can do anything; and when 
they are eventually overwhelmed by a self-created crisis, as they have 
done with our transportation system, then to do next to nothing.
  Bridges can literally fall down, highways crumble, public 
transportation systems are hobbled, but the House Republicans continue 
to reject a normal reauthorization of the Transportation Act of the 
type that, for decades, had broad bipartisan support in this House.
  The only thing bipartisan about this last-gasp desperate effort to 
prevent a stoppage of transportation projects and the various groups 
that have endorsed it is that, after having had presented as a 
purported serious proposal by House Republicans that the way to stop 
the traffic slowdown was to have a mail or postal slowdown to finance 
it, they see this as a chance finally to at least prevent temporarily a 
total shutdown of our transportation project system. And so they are 
going along with it. I am not.
  I realize that to have a sound transportation system, you can't do it 
week to week or month to month. There has to be some long-term 
planning. These bridges cannot repair themselves. These potholes don't 
fill themselves. We often hear that freedom is not free. Well, neither 
are freeways.
  We have to have the revenue to have the kind of responsible national 
transportation system of the type that Dwight Eisenhower once provided 
the lead on when there was bipartisan support for reasonable public 
investment. Our competitors understand this. They are out there 
designing a 21st century transportation system that will be 
competitive, and we are being left in the potholes.
  It is essential that we have a long-term bill, not this type of 
stopgap measure.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I yield myself the remainder of the time.
  I appreciate my friend from Michigan putting into the Record what can 
only be regarded as reluctant letters of support. I wish that some of 
my colleagues would have had time to look at it. It is not a ringing 
endorsement of what is before us. It is a reluctant acknowledgement 
that that is all we have time for, that is all the Republicans will 
allow.
  I have worked with those groups, with the road builders, with the 
Chamber, with the AFL-CIO, with the contractors, with elements large 
and small, local governments, transit. They are unanimous in their 
effort, in their regard that we should deal with this in the big 
picture. A number of them had letters before the Ways and Means 
Committee that it should be done this year, not kicked forward. That is 
why I asked our Republican chairman to allow us to hear from these 
people.
  If we would have heard from Peter Ruane from the Road Builders in 
person; Tom Donohue from the Chamber; Rich Trumka from the AFL-CIO; 
Terence O'Sullivan, the eloquent leader of the Laborers'; from the AAA 
and the truckers, Bill Graves, they wouldn't endorse this approach. 
They would be

[[Page H6257]]

talking about our getting down to business. But the Republicans would 
not allow us a hearing, not for 43 months. So they are reduced to 
offering tepid letters of support so the whole system doesn't fall 
apart.
  Mr. Speaker, I would respectfully suggest that those are not a reason 
to move forward with this legislation and be happy. It is a sad 
commentary that this is the best that the Republicans think they can 
give us.
  Those road groups who depend on moving freight, maintaining roads, 
who care about the health and well-being of our communities deserve 
better. Our families deserve better. The economy deserves better.
  I hope that we will, in a moment, have a motion to recommit that will 
shorten the amount of time that we let this Congress off the hook and 
make sure that we don't adjourn this Congress without doing our job.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
distinguished gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).
  Mr. YOUNG of Alaska. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to go through history. The former chairman 
of the Infrastructure Committee on the last large highway bill, 
SAFETEA-LU, that was passed, I had a dear friend from Minnesota named 
Jim Oberstar who served beside me and worked with me to write that 
piece of legislation. Finally, he became the chairman. What is 
impressive about that, this gentleman had more knowledge about 
transportation probably than anyone in this House has ever had, 
including myself.
  I will tell you what was the biggest disappointment of his life is he 
wanted to write a transportation bill, a long-term transportation bill, 
and fund it. And guess who said no. Our President, Mr. Obama. His 
Secretary, a dear friend of mine, came down and said there is no way we 
are going to pass a long-term bill with full funding. He did not 
support Jim Oberstar.
  What I wanted to do was to fully fund it, and I was opposed then by 
the seated President, George W. Bush.
  In fact, if Mr. Oberstar had the opportunity, with the Senate being 
in the control of the President's party and the House being in the 
control of the President's party, we would not be here today. We would 
have infrastructure, bar none. We wouldn't be discussing what we are 
doing today.
  This measure today is a stopgap measure. But this Congress has to 
wake up, and the President should have woken up then when he had 
control to pass legislation for the infrastructure of this country.
  So, when we get accused on this side of not doing anything and making 
a stopgap measure, go back through history. This President has failed 
to recognize the importance. And for those interest groups, they should 
have been on him at that time in support of Mr. Oberstar.
  So, Mr. Speaker, I say respectfully, this is a two-way street. We 
have to understand this is a really important piece of legislation to 
keep us going, but then we have to solve it permanently. Let's be 
leaders on infrastructure, which we do not have down on Pennsylvania 
Avenue right now at this time.
  Mr. CAMP. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I would add to the gentleman from Alaska's remarks by saying the Ways 
and Means Committee proposed a tax reform discussion draft that 
actually funded the highway trust fund for 8 years. Now my friends on 
the other side would like to shorten this temporary measure, which goes 
through the end of May, to just go through the end of December, and 
that is wrong for a couple of reasons.
  First, the Senate bill that is being considered has the same length 
of time as the current House bill, so that would be out of step with 
the direction that the Senate is trying to go. We are obviously trying 
to form a bipartisan, bicameral piece of legislation here.
  The second is that, if we only were to pass this along for a few 
months, all of the problems that the Members on the other side talked 
about would only be made worse, that is, there would not be the ability 
to plan over the winter, for example, for spring construction projects. 
To just extend it for a few months, again, makes it so temporary and so 
short that you would immediately have companies, States, employers 
hedging their bets on whether funding is going to continue after that 
time.
  The construction season isn't just in the good months of the year, it 
also goes through the winter, and that is why it is so important that 
we get through the end of May to June 1 to give the Congress time to 
really come up with a long-term solution, which clearly everyone 
prefers on both sides.
  So with that, I urge support for the legislation and yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, the Department of Transportation 
reports that the Highway Trust Fund will be unable to fully fund 
critical, ongoing highway programs as soon as August. This crisis stems 
from a fundamental mismatch between trust fund revenues and highway 
program spending that predates enactment of the last surface 
transportation reauthorization that Congress enacted. Since 2008, 
Congress has bailed out the Highway Trust Fund with more than $54 
billion in transfers.
  H.R. 5021 provides the necessary funds to keep the federal highway 
and transit programs running while Congress develops legislation to set 
these programs on a sound financial footing for the long term. I look 
forward to working with my colleagues to address the systematic factors 
that have been driving the Highway Trust Fund's bankruptcy.
  Importantly, this bill follows a House budget rule that requires 
general fund transfers to the trust fund to be fully offset. It should 
not become a recurring practice for taxpayers to bail out the highway 
and transit programs because Congress and the President are unable to 
make the changes necessary to avoid future trust fund insolvency.
  My primary concern is with using pension smoothing as an offset. 
Based on CBO scoring, the bill produces ten-year savings through 
changing pension law, but these changes will likely be more than offset 
by greater federal obligations in the future. Ultimately, allowing 
additional smoothing now increases future liabilities for the taxpayer 
guarantee of private-sector pensions. In addition, we are increasingly 
using 10 years of savings to offset one year of costs as this bill 
does. It is progress to offset these costs, but we need to be reducing 
spending and deficits and when we increase spending, we should be 
offsetting the cost in as short a timeframe as possible.
  Again, I look forward to working with my colleagues on legislation 
that will set the Highway Trust Fund on a sustainable path going 
forward, so that we can avoid the kind of stop-gap legislation we are 
considering today.
  Ms. BROWN of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I'm glad that the House is 
restoring a little sanity to this body by bringing up a clean extension 
of our nation's Surface Transportation Programs. These programs are too 
critical to our economy to become a political issue. The short-term 
Highway Trust Fund extension that the House is voting on today will 
keep workers on the job this summer and fall fixing our bridges, 
operating our transit systems and making our highways safer. 
Unfortunately, we're already behind the 8 Ball in preparing for surface 
reauthorization and have some serious work to do in deciding how we are 
going to fund the future of transportation in this country.
  Developing a bill based on strong policy is always the best way to 
write legislation, but the most critical part of developing this next 
reauthorization bill is clearly finding a way to pay for it. Without 
that everything else is just talk.
  As we prepare for reauthorization of MAP-21 we need to get serious 
about funding our nation's transportation system. We can't continue to 
provide grossly inadequate funding for our nation's infrastructure. 
We're failing to keep pace with our international competitors who are 
investing heavily in infrastructure, particularly rail infrastructure 
to move people, goods, and services in their countries. I agree we need 
to squeeze out every bit of efficiency we can through improved 
technology and innovation, but we are kidding ourselves if we don't 
think it will take a significant investment in our nation's 
infrastructure to truly solve the congestion problems we are facing.
  The Transportation and Infrastructure Committee needs to take the 
bull by the horns and decide how we are going to fund all forms of 
transportation for the future. Our committee needs to have all possible 
options on the table to address our current shortfalls. The American 
Society of Civil Engineers has given our nation infrastructure a D 
grade. That is unacceptable for the greatest county in the world.
  Transportation and Infrastructure funding is absolutely critical to 
the nation, and, if properly funded, serves as a tremendous economic 
and job creator. In fact, Department of Transportation (DOT) statistics 
show that for every

[[Page H6258]]

$1 billion invested in transportation infrastructure, 44,000 jobs are 
created, as is $6.2 billion in economic activity.
  So, as the Transportation & Infrastructure committee prepares the 
next transportation reauthorization bill, I hope we can develop a long 
term bill with dedicated funding source for all modes of transportation 
so we can improve our nation's infrastructure, create jobs and improve 
the economy, and provide new and innovative transportation options for 
the traveling public.
  Mr. DINGELL. Mr. Speaker, I rise in reluctant support of H.R. 5021, 
the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014. Once again, 
Congress has failed to lead on a critical issue that impacts the lives 
of every American. We need to make bold investments in our 
transportation infrastructure, which is currently in a state of 
disrepair. It should be embarrassing to every member of Congress that 
the American Society of Civil Engineers recently gave our nation's 
infrastructure a grade of ``D+.''
  Instead of working towards a multi-year reauthorization of our 
surface transportation programs, which expire on September 30, 2014, 
Congress is once again kicking the can down the road. If Congress does 
not act to replenish the Highway Trust Fund, payments to states for 
transportation projects would be cut drastically. This would have 
detrimental impacts on our already modest efforts to improve our 
infrastructure and we must not allow this to occur. While I am 
disappointed in the lack of progress made on a permanent solution to 
this problem, I support this measure as a way to avoid catastrophe.
  While Congress plays an important role in funding transportation 
infrastructure projects, states have an obligation in this area as 
well. I'm extremely disappointed that the Michigan State Legislature 
adjourned for the summer without reaching agreement on funding ongoing 
road projects in Michigan. All of our leaders, from Congress down to 
states, cities, and municipalities, need to make infrastructure 
spending a top priority rather than continuing to play politics with 
this issue.
  While I urge adoption of this measure, I also hope my colleagues will 
join me in having a serious discussion about how to provide a long-term 
fix to our nation's infrastructure problems. Our constituents demand 
action on this critical issue.
  Mrs. NEGRETE McLEOD. Mr. Speaker, I support efforts by Congress to 
continue funding the Highway Trust Fund. This fund provides $3.2 
billion of necessary resources for building and maintaining 
California's transportation system and growing the state's economy. 
With the passage of H.R. 5021, San Bernardino County's Omnitrans will 
be able to move forward with the purchase of 15 new transit buses to 
link the cities of Fontana, Ontario, Montclair, and Pomona. Projects 
like this are crucial to the local economy and construction projects 
across California's 35th Congressional District will continue through 
spring of next year.
  This short term investment is an important first step, but it is time 
we make significant long term investments in the country's 
infrastructure and Congress must now take up The GROW AMERICA Act. This 
legislation is a four year reauthorization proposal that provides 
increased and stable funding for our nation's highways, bridges, mass 
transits, and rail systems. This will provide critical investments to 
fix our failing roads and crumbling bridges to ensure the safety of our 
transportation systems. Sixty five percent of America's infrastructure 
is rated in less than good condition and one in four bridges requires 
significant repair. Congress must act now by investing in our 
infrastructure to increase safety, build our nation's transportation 
workforce, and increase opportunity for the middle class.
  This legislation will provide $5 billion in funding over four years 
for the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery Act. The 
TIGER grant program will continue to be available for another four 
years, extending successful transportation projects that serve the 
diverse travel and goods movement to meet the needs or the residents 
and businesses of California.
  The GROW AMERICA Act will also empower regional and local communities 
to make transportation investments that support the growth of the 
economy and quality of life of the residents of California's 35th 
Congressional District. According to the Department of Transportation 
only 8 percent of federal highway dollars are now controlled by 
regional and local interests and additional authority over resources at 
the local level would increase the success of our transportation 
investments. This will ensure the public and interested parties can 
participate in the early development of transportation plans and review 
alternative development scenarios. Lastly, The GROW AMERICA Act will 
adopt local performance-based decision making to ensure regional 
priorities drive investment decisions and by implementing measures to 
reduce the amount of time to break ground on local projects.
  This input from local stakeholders is very important for the 
communities I represent in the 35th Congressional District of 
California. As a major freight corridor for Burlington Northern-Santa 
Fe and Union Pacific Railroads, San Bernardino County needs additional 
investment in grade separation projects to reduce traffic congestion. 
It often loses out on infrastructure grants to larger metropolitan 
areas. The GROW AMERICA Act will take our role as a freight corridor 
into account when determining funding for the Inland Empire.
  Again, I commend today's efforts to continue funding the Highway 
Trust Fund, but it is clear that the success of our economy relies on 
the strength of our infrastructure. I urge Congress take up the GROW 
AMERICA Act and make the critical transportation investments needed to 
create jobs and increase opportunity in California.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 669, the 
previous question is ordered on the bill, as amended.
  The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.

                              {time}  1615


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. I am, in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Blumenauer moves to recommit the bill H.R. 5021 to the 
     Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure with 
     instructions to report the same back to the House forthwith 
     with the following amendment:
       At the end of title I, add the following:

              Subtitle E--Modification of Extension Period

     SEC. 1401. EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2014.

       In this title, including the amendments made by this title 
     any reference to ``May 31, 2015'' shall be treated as a 
     reference to ``December 31, 2014''.
       Add at the end of the bill the following:

              TITLE III--SENSE OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

     SEC. 3001. SENSE OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REGARDING NEED 
                   TO PASS LONG-TERM TRANSPORTATION FUNDING BILL.

       (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
     following:
       (1) The Highway Trust Fund is projected to become insolvent 
     before the end of the fiscal year.
       (2) The user-fee principle upon which the Highway Trust 
     Fund was established is eroding.
       (3) Since 2008, Congress has transferred $54 billion from 
     the general fund to the Highway Trust Fund.
       (4) The primary funding mechanisms for the Highway Trust 
     Fund have not been fundamentally addressed since 1993.
       (5) Due to a decline in per capita miles driven, a decline 
     in the purchasing power of highway excise taxes, and 
     increased fuel efficiency, Highway Trust Fund revenues have 
     not kept pace with the needs of United States infrastructure.
       (6) United States infrastructure is falling behind the rest 
     of the world.
       (7) In 2013, the United States was ranked 25th globally in 
     overall infrastructure quality.
       (8) Short-term surface transportation extensions increase 
     costs of transportation projects, limit the ability of state 
     and local governments to plan infrastructure improvement, and 
     ultimately have resulted in the degradation of United States 
     infrastructure.
       (b) Sense of House.--It is the sense of the House of 
     Representatives that--
       (1) any long-term transportation reauthorization bill 
     should, at a minimum, fund infrastructure spending at least 
     to current levels plus inflation through fiscal year 2020, 
     and
       (2) by the end of calendar year 2014, the Committee on Ways 
     and Means and Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
     of the House of Representatives should each report 
     legislation reauthorizing the surface transportation programs 
     within their respective jurisdictions, and the House of 
     Representatives should pass a long-term surface 
     reauthorization bill to ensure the sustainability of the 
     Highway Trust Fund and improve United States infrastructure.
       In section 2001, strike ``June 1, 2015'' each place it 
     appears and insert ``January 1, 2015''.
       In the quoted matter proposed to be inserted by section 
     2002(a), strike the first dollar amount and insert 
     ``$5,550,000,000''.
       In the quoted matter proposed to be inserted by section 
     2002(a), strike the second dollar amount and insert 
     ``$1,450,000,000''.
       Strike section 2003 and insert the following (and 
     redesignate the succeeding section accordingly):

[[Page H6259]]

     SEC. 2003. CLARIFICATION OF 6-YEAR STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS IN 
                   CASE OF OVERSTATEMENT OF BASIS.

       (a) In General.--Subparagraph (B) of section 6501(e)(1) of 
     the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended--
       (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of clause (i), by 
     redesignating clause (ii) as clause (iii), and by inserting 
     after clause (i) the following new clause:
       ``(ii) An understatement of gross income by reason of an 
     overstatement of unrecovered cost or other basis is an 
     omission from gross income; and'', and
       (2) by inserting ``(other than in the case of an 
     overstatement of unrecovered cost or other basis)'' in clause 
     (iii) (as so redesignated) after ``In determining the amount 
     omitted from gross income''.
       (b) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section 
     shall apply to--
       (1) returns filed after the date of the enactment of this 
     Act, and
       (2) returns filed on or before such date if the period 
     specified in section 6501 of the Internal Revenue Code of 
     1986 (determined without regard to such amendments) for 
     assessment of the taxes with respect to which such return 
     relates has not expired as of such date.

     SEC. 2004. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON RETURNS RELATING TO 
                   MORTGAGE INTEREST.

       (a) In General.--Paragraph (2) of section 6050H(b) of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking ``and'' 
     at the end of subparagraph (C), by redesignating subparagraph 
     (D) as subparagraph (I), and by inserting after subparagraph 
     (C) the following new subparagraphs:
       ``(D) the unpaid balance with respect to such mortgage,
       ``(E) the address of the property securing such mortgage,
       ``(F) information with respect to whether the mortgage is a 
     refinancing that occurred in such calendar year,
       ``(G) the amount of real estate taxes paid from an escrow 
     account with respect to the property securing such mortgage, 
     and
       ``(H) the date of the origination of such mortgage, and''.
       (b) Payee Statements.--Subsection (d) of section 6050H of 
     the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking 
     ``and'' at the end of paragraph (1), by striking the period 
     at the end of paragraph (2) and inserting ``, and'', and by 
     inserting after paragraph (2) the following new paragraph:
       ``(3) the information required to be included on the return 
     under subparagraphs (D), (E), and (F) of subsection 
     (b)(2).''.
       (c) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section 
     shall apply to returns and statements the due date for which 
     (determined without regard to extensions) is after December 
     31, 2015.

     SEC. 2005. PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO MEET DUE DILIGENCE 
                   REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHILD TAX CREDIT.

       (a) In General.--Section 6695 of the Internal Revenue Code 
     of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new 
     subsection:
       ``(h) Failure to Be Diligent in Determining Eligibility for 
     Child Tax Credit.--Any person who is a tax return preparer 
     with respect to any return or claim for refund who fails to 
     comply with due diligence requirements imposed by the 
     Secretary by regulations with respect to determining 
     eligibility for, or the amount of, the credit allowable by 
     section 24 shall pay a penalty of $500 for each such 
     failure.''.
       (b) Effective Date.--The amendment made by this section 
     shall apply to taxable years beginning after December 31, 
     2014.
       At the end of title I, as amended, add the following:

     SEC. 1402. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

       (a) In General.--In this title, including the amendments 
     made by this title--
       (1) any reference to a dollar amount relating to the period 
     beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on May 31, 2015, 
     shall be treated as a reference to that dollar amount 
     multiplied by 0.3786008230453; and
       (2) any reference to ``\243/365\'' shall be treated as a 
     reference to ``\92/365\''.
       (b) Exception.--Subsection (a)(1) shall not apply to the 
     dollar amount referred to in the matter proposed to be 
     inserted by section 1001(c)(3)(B)(ii).

  Mr. BLUMENAUER (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
consent to suspend the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Oregon?
  Mr. SHUSTER. I object.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Objection is heard.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I reserve a point of order against the 
motion to recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. A point of order is reserved.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk continued to read.
  Mr. SHUSTER (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Oregon is recognized for 5 minutes in support of his motion.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, this may be the last chance Congress has 
to honor our commitments to provide answers about transportation 
funding and develop a framework that will guide the Federal partnership 
that has meant so much. The motion won't kill the bill, and it won't 
delay the bill. It simply reduces the funding to the amount necessary 
for Congress to do its job before we adjourn for the year. It is so 
that we cannot duck our responsibilities and hand this off not to the 
next Congress but to the Congress after that.
  Make no mistake, Mr. Speaker, in May of next year there will be no 
transportation bill, there will be no funding, and Congress will be 
even more nervous and confused with a transportation problem that will 
be more complex. It will be more expensive, and the politics, I am sad 
to say, will be harder, not easier.
  My good friend, the chair of the Ways and Means Committee, does have 
a proposal. He has never had a hearing on it. And it was dismissed when 
it was announced by his own Speaker, if I quote: ``Blah, blah, blah.''
  This is a sad moment for me. But it is not too late for us to do 
something about it. We need to move forward and have a tighter 
timetable. Let's finally have a hearing in Ways and Means. Let's have a 
proposal going forward. I am perfectly willing to work in August to do 
this. I would be happy for us to add days in September. We shouldn't 
recess in October to campaign and leave a big question mark. It is true 
that it takes time to put these things together, but we won't be 
putting it together next spring, mark my words.
  The Republicans need to enable us to find out where they stand. Will 
they finally have a hearing on my friend Mr. Camp's proposal? Will they 
slash the highway trust fund and abandon the responsibilities? Or will 
they just use the Ryan budget and reduce transportation 30 percent over 
the next 10 years and no new projects for 15 months?
  Those are all legitimate issues. They deserve to have a day in court, 
and if we get down to work, we could resolve it. I am confident we can 
do it, and it will be just as easy, if not easier, to do now than 
waiting until next year when the clock will be ticking, when half the 
United States Senate will be running for President, and we will have a 
new lineup, other than the Speaker, who may be happy to have avoided 
it. It is not going to be any easier.
  I respectfully suggest that we honor those 62 groups that want us to 
move. Look, they would much rather have us do it this year.
  We had infrastructure that was once the envy of the world. Now it is 
a source of embarrassment. We are 27th in the world and sinking. Our 
problems are getting more expensive, and they are getting harder. I 
know how hard the job that the chair of the T&I Committee has. I 
respect him, I respect the committee, but they need to know exactly how 
much money they have got so they can fashion a bill, and if they did 
that, they would be able to crank one out, I am confident, in a month 
or two. But right now, after an entire Congress, they don't have a 
bill. We don't have a bill.
  Those 62 groups and organizations don't have a path. What they have 
is a great big question mark next May when we start this all over 
again. This shouldn't be a partisan argument. I disagreed when 
President Bush shut it down. I disagreed that President Obama didn't 
move forward, but it is not Republicans versus Democrats. It is not 
House versus Senate. It is time for us to all come together and work as 
the stakeholders would have us do.
  In fact, we don't even have to have any courage. We can just follow 
what those experts who represent truckers, AAA, local government, and 
contractors have offered as guidance. Read the special commissions that 
have reported to President Bush. This is not rocket science. It is 
will, it is action, it is deciding exactly how much we are going to 
spend and when.
  Mr. Speaker, I would respectfully request that the House approve this 
motion to recommit, give us enough time and money to avoid the summer 
shutdown but not enough to let this Congress off the hook and hand it 
off to the 115th or the 120th Congress, but we do our job so America 
can do its.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

[[Page H6260]]

  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my point of order and seek the 
time in opposition to the motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The reservation is withdrawn.
  The gentleman from Pennsylvania is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I do rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit, and I just want to say I have high regard and great respect 
for the gentleman from Oregon and his passion for infrastructure. As 
long as I have been here, he has certainly been a strong advocate. 
Leaving the committee to go to Ways and Means, I know his passion is on 
the Transportation Committee, but now he is on the committee that 
certainly can help the process and move it forward.
  But I strongly oppose this motion to recommit. It shortens the length 
of the time of the extension, and I am afraid that putting all our eggs 
in a lameduck basket will cause us great problems, and I don't believe 
it will be successful. And then what do we do then? We are going to be 
doing another short-term and another short-term extension. So 
shortening the length is not appropriate, I believe.
  I think this is the best strategy. It cuts funding. I don't believe 
that that is in our interest. If we don't get this into next year, we 
are going to lose that funding because somebody will take it for 
something else, and if we are not successful in lameduck, then we are 
going to be going into the next construction season and then we will 
have trouble working out a solution to that when you cut the funding. 
It also increases taxes, and that is something right now that I just 
don't believe this country can accept.
  We have an immediate, critical need to address the solvency of the 
trust fund and extend the surface transportation law so that we can get 
through this construction season and we can continue with the planning 
season to move us into next year. I am confident that we are going to 
be able to do something next year because I believe we have to do 
something, not on just this issue, but on many issues that we have 
kicked the can down the road.
  As the distinguished former chairman of the Transportation Committee 
pointed out, my colleagues, not Mr. Blumenauer, but many of my 
colleagues on the other side, went and kicked the can down the road and 
passed a massive stimulus bill that put about 5 or 6 or 7 percent of 
that into highway funding when we all know that was where the need was.
  Former Chairman Oberstar wanted to do a bill, but again, his own 
party left him. His own party was irresponsible on that and, again, 
passing a stimulus bill which I believe hasn't worked, and if it would 
have been directed to transportation and to infrastructure, we would 
see a very, very different economy today.
  I also add that extending these programs through May in no way 
precludes Congress from continuing to work on addressing a long-term 
funding solution--which I believe we have to do. It in no way precludes 
us from moving on a long-term reauthorization bill, which we continue 
to work on in the committee, and which is a top priority for the 
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
  However, I believe this legislation is the responsible solution at 
the time and ensures we don't play politics with these programs, and it 
enables us to continue to make improvements to our surface 
transportation system.
  So, Mr. Speaker, I strongly oppose this motion. I urge my colleagues 
to vote ``no'', and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, the Chair 
will reduce to 5 minutes the minimum time for any electronic vote on 
the question of passage of the bill.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 193, 
nays 227, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 413]

                               YEAS--193

     Barber
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera (CA)
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brady (PA)
     Braley (IA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings (FL)
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holt
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McIntyre
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller, George
     Moore
     Moran
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters (CA)
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Pingree (ME)
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tierney
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Waxman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--227

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Broun (GA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Carter
     Cassidy
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Culberson
     Daines
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gardner
     Garrett
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hall
     Hanna
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Issa
     Jenkins
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Lankford
     Latham
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matheson
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Petri
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (GA)
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Royce
     Runyan
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schock
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Terry
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

[[Page H6261]]



                             NOT VOTING--12

     Byrne
     Campbell
     Carney
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Hanabusa
     Kingston
     Miller, Gary
     Nunnelee
     Rush
     Southerland
     Williams

                              {time}  1652

  Messrs. FORTENBERRY, REICHERT, FINCHER, and DUNCAN of South Carolina 
changed their vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Mrs. KIRKPATRICK, Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD, Messrs. YARMUTH and CLEAVER 
changed their vote from ``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 367, 
noes 55, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 414]

                               AYES--367

     Aderholt
     Amodei
     Bachmann
     Bachus
     Barber
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barrow (GA)
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bentivolio
     Bera (CA)
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (NY)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Bonamici
     Boustany
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Braley (IA)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Camp
     Cantor
     Capito
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Cassidy
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chaffetz
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Cotton
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Daines
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doyle
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers
     Engel
     Enyart
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia
     Gardner
     Gerlach
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gingrey (GA)
     Goodlatte
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffin (AR)
     Griffith (VA)
     Grijalva
     Grimm
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings (FL)
     Hastings (WA)
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Honda
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hunter
     Hurt
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Kuster
     LaMalfa
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latham
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maffei
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAllister
     McCarthy (CA)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McIntyre
     McKeon
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mica
     Michaud
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Moran
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Negrete McLeod
     Neugebauer
     Noem
     Nolan
     Nunes
     O'Rourke
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor (AZ)
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters (MI)
     Peterson
     Petri
     Pingree (ME)
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Polis
     Price (GA)
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rahall
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rogers (MI)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Runyan
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schock
     Schrader
     Schwartz
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Southerland
     Speier
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Terry
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tierney
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waxman
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Wolf
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IN)

                                NOES--55

     Amash
     Blumenauer
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Broun (GA)
     Carter
     Chabot
     Clawson (FL)
     Clay
     Collins (GA)
     DeSantis
     Doggett
     Duncan (SC)
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Garrett
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Hall
     Harris
     Holt
     Huelskamp
     Hultgren
     Jones
     Jordan
     Labrador
     Lamborn
     Lankford
     Lummis
     Matheson
     McClintock
     McDermott
     Meadows
     Messer
     Miller, George
     Mulvaney
     Nugent
     Olson
     Peters (CA)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Ribble
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Stockman
     Stutzman
     Waters
     Weber (TX)
     Welch
     Westmoreland
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Byrne
     Campbell
     Carney
     DesJarlais
     Gutierrez
     Hanabusa
     Kingston
     Miller, Gary
     Nunnelee
     Williams


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining.

                              {time}  1659

  Mr. RUSH changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________