JUANITA MILLENDER-McDONALD POST OFFICE
(House of Representatives - December 08, 2014)

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[Pages H8843-H8844]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                 JUANITA MILLENDER-McDONALD POST OFFICE

  Mr. MEADOWS. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill (H.R. 5687) to designate the facility of the United States Postal 
Service located at 101 East Market Street in Long Beach, California, as 
the ``Juanita Millender-McDonald Post Office.''
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 5687

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. JUANITA MILLENDER-MCDONALD POST OFFICE.

       (a) Designation.--The facility of the United States Postal 
     Service located at 101 East Market Street in Long Beach, 
     California, shall be known and designated as the ``Juanita 
     Millender-McDonald Post Office''.
       (b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, 
     document, paper, or other record of the United States to the 
     facility referred to in section 1 shall be deemed to be a 
     reference to the ``Juanita Millender-McDonald Post Office''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
North Carolina (Mr. Meadows) and the gentleman from Vermont (Mr. Welch) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from North Carolina.


                             General Leave

  Mr. MEADOWS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their 
remarks and include extraneous materials on the bill under 
consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from North Carolina?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. MEADOWS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I rise in support of H.R. 5687, introduced by Representative Janice 
Hahn of California, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 101 East Market Street in Long Beach, 
California, as the Juanita Millender-McDonald Post Office.
  Juanita Millender-McDonald represented California's 37th District in 
the House of Representatives for over a decade, serving from 1996 until 
her untimely death. During her time in Congress, she was known for her 
commitment to protecting international human rights, and she worked to 
aid victims of genocide and human trafficking. Representative 
Millender-McDonald was also the first African American woman to chair 
the House Administration Committee. Sadly, she passed away on April 22, 
2007, at age 68, due to colon cancer.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in memorializing Juanita 
Millender-McDonald's public service by supporting this bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WELCH. Mr. Speaker, I support this legislation.
  At this time, I yield such time as she may consume to the gentlewoman 
from

[[Page H8844]]

California, Representative Hahn, the sponsor of this legislation.
  Ms. HAHN. Thank you.
  Mr. Speaker, I am proud to speak today about a friend and predecessor 
who served some of the same communities that I now represent.
  Today, we are voting on a piece of legislation that will recognize 
the life and legacy of the late Congresswoman, Juanita Millender-
McDonald, by designating the United States Postal Service facility 
located at 101 East Market Street, in Long Beach, as the Juanita 
Millender-McDonald Post Office.
  Many of my colleagues in the House had the opportunity to serve 
alongside Congresswoman Millender-McDonald. They remember her forceful 
personality and her unyielding advocacy on behalf of her constituents. 
However, Juanita, who left us so suddenly and too early, was a 
remarkable woman who broke barriers and who had many impressive 
achievements even before entering Congress.

                              {time}  1545

  By age 26, Juanita Millender-McDonald was a mother of five. She was 
already in her forties when, after raising her children, Valerie, 
Angela, Sherryll, Michael, and R. Keith, she went back to school and 
earned both her bachelor's and master's degrees with the support of her 
loving husband, James.
  She became a teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District and 
later became the manuscript editor for Images, a textbook aimed at 
promoting the self-esteem of young women, and the director of gender 
equality programs for the school district.
  She broke down barriers for women and minorities and made history by 
becoming the first African American woman elected to the Carson City 
Council and, in 2007, became the first African American woman to chair 
a congressional committee, the Committee on House Administration.
  While serving for more than a decade in the House of Representatives, 
she also served on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and 
the Small Business Committee, the committees on which I now currently 
serve, and she was an active member of the Congressional Black Caucus.
  From her days in the California Assembly to serving here in the 
House, Juanita Millender-McDonald dedicated her career to advocating 
for the Los Angeles public school system, job training, women's 
equality, women's health, and combating the drug epidemic that was 
tearing apart her community. Her advocacy on behalf of the victims of 
genocide and human trafficking serves as a lasting testament to her 
dedication to creating a better world.
  Congresswoman Millender-McDonald worked tirelessly for her 
constituents, taking only a week of leave before she succumbed to 
cancer.
  By designating a United States Postal Service facility in my district 
as the Juanita Millender-McDonald Post Office, we honor an exemplary 
woman with an incredible public service record.
  It is my hope that honoring her now will allow her life and 
accomplishments to inspire further residents, not only of Long Beach 
but Americans across the land.
  Mr. Speaker, I am proud to speak today about a friend and predecessor 
who served some of the same communities that I now represent.
  Today we are voting on a piece of legislation that will recognize the 
life and legacy of the late Congresswoman Juanita Millender-McDonald, 
by designating the United States Postal Service facility located at 101 
E. Market Street in Long Beach, as the Juanita Millender-McDonald Post 
Office.
  Many of my colleagues in the House had the opportunity to serve 
alongside Congresswoman Millender-McDonald and remember her forceful 
personality and her unyielding advocacy on behalf of her constituents.
  However, Juanita, who left us so suddenly and too early, was a 
remarkable woman who broke barriers and had many impressive 
achievements even before entering Congress.
  By age 26, Juanita Millender-McDonald was a mother of five. She was 
already in her forties, when, after raising her children, she went back 
to school and subsequently earned bachelor's and master's degrees and 
did additional studies towards a PhD.
  She became a teacher in L.A. USD and later the manuscript editor for 
Images, a textbook aimed at promoting the self-esteem of young women, 
and the director of gender equity programs for the school district.
  She broke down barriers for women and minorities and made history by 
becoming the first African-American woman elected to the Carson City 
Council, and in 2007 became the first African-American woman to chair a 
Congressional Committee--the House Administration Committee.
  While serving for more than a decade in the House of Representatives, 
she also served on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee and 
the Small Business Committee--the committees on which I now serve--and 
was an active member of the Congressional Black Caucus.
  From her days in the California Assembly to serving here in the 
House, Juanita Millender-McDonald dedicated her career to advocating 
for the Los Angeles public school system, job training, women's 
equality and women's health, and combating the drug epidemic that was 
tearing apart her community. Her advocacy on behalf of the victims of 
genocide and human trafficking serves as a lasting testament to her 
dedication to creating a better world.
  Congresswoman Millender-McDonald worked tirelessly for her 
constituents, taking only a week of leave before she succumbed to 
cancer.
  By designating a United States Postal Service facility in my district 
as the Juanita Millender-McDonald Post Office, we honor an exemplary 
woman with an incredible public service record.
  I know her family, including her husband James McDonald, Jr.; 
children, Valerie, Angela, Sherryll, Michael and R. Keith; and 
grandchildren, Ayanna, Myles, Ramia, Blair and Diamond, are so proud of 
her great legacy.
  It is my hope that honoring her now will allow her life and 
accomplishments to inspire further residents not only of Long Beach but 
Americans across the land.
  Mr. MEADOWS. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WELCH. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Thompson), my good friend who is the 
ranking member of the Homeland Security Committee.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of 
legislation naming this facility after Ms. Juanita Millender-McDonald, 
a wonderful lady. She served this institution well up until her final 
moments. Most of us were not aware of the terminal illness she had. She 
served with grace, dignity, and honor, and our respect. She will be 
missed.
  Mr. WELCH. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. MEADOWS. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Weber of Texas). The question is on the 
motion offered by the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Meadows) that 
the House suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 5687.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________