PRECLEARANCE AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2014
(House of Representatives - July 08, 2014)

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                 PRECLEARANCE AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2014

  Mr. MEEHAN. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill (H.R. 3488) to establish the conditions under which the Secretary 
of Homeland Security may establish preclearance facilities, conduct 
preclearance operations, and provide customs services outside the 
United States, and for other purposes, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 3488

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Preclearance Authorization 
     Act of 2014''.

     SEC. 2. DEFINITION.

       In this Act, the term ``appropriate congressional 
     committees'' means the Committee on Homeland Security and the 
     Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives 
     and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs and the Committee on Finance of the Senate.

     SEC. 3. ESTABLISHMENT OF PRECLEARANCE OPERATIONS.

       Pursuant to section 1629 of title 19, United States Code, 
     and subject to section 5, the Secretary of Homeland Security 
     may establish U.S. Customs and Border Protection preclearance 
     operations in a foreign country to--
       (1) prevent terrorists, instruments of terrorism, and other 
     security threats from entering the United States;
       (2) prevent inadmissible persons from entering the United 
     States;
       (3) ensure merchandise destined for the United States 
     complies with applicable laws;
       (4) ensure the prompt processing of persons eligible to 
     travel to the United States; and
       (5) accomplish such other objectives as the Secretary 
     determines necessary to protect the United States.

     SEC. 4. NOTIFICATION AND CERTIFICATION TO CONGRESS.

       (a) Notification.--Not later than 180 days before entering 
     into an agreement with the government of a foreign country to 
     establish U.S. Customs and Border Protection preclearance 
     operations in such foreign country, the Secretary of Homeland 
     Security shall provide to the appropriate congressional 
     committees the following:
       (1) A copy of the proposed agreement to establish such 
     preclearance operations, including an identification of the 
     foreign country with which U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
     intends to enter into a preclearance agreement, and the 
     location at which such preclearance operations will be 
     conducted.
       (2) An estimate of the date on which U.S. Customs and 
     Border Protection intends to establish preclearance 
     operations under such agreement.
       (3) The anticipated funding sources for preclearance 
     operations under such agreement, and other funding sources 
     considered.
       (4) An assessment of the impact such preclearance 
     operations will have on legitimate trade and travel, 
     including potential impacts on passengers traveling to the 
     United States.
       (5) A homeland security threat assessment for the country 
     in which such preclearance operations are to be established.
       (6) An assessment of the impacts such preclearance 
     operations will have on U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
     domestic port of entry staffing.
       (7) Information on potential economic, competitive, and job 
     impacts on United States air carriers associated with 
     establishing such preclearance operations.
       (8) Information on the anticipated homeland security 
     benefits associated with establishing such preclearance 
     operations.
       (9) Information on potential security vulnerabilities 
     associated with commencing such preclearance operations, and 
     mitigation plans to address such potential security 
     vulnerabilities.
       (10) A U.S. Customs and Border Protection staffing model 
     for such preclearance operations, and plans for how such 
     positions would be filled.
       (11) Information on the anticipated costs over the next 
     five fiscal years associated with commencing such 
     preclearance operations.
       (12) A copy of the agreement referred to in subsection (a) 
     of section 5.
       (13) Other factors that the Secretary of Homeland Security 
     determines to be necessary for Congress to comprehensively 
     assess the appropriateness of commencing such preclearance 
     operations.
       (b) Certifications Relating to Preclearance Operations 
     Established at Airports.--In the case of an airport, in 
     addition to the notification requirements under subsection 
     (a), not later than 90 days before entering into an agreement 
     with the government of a foreign country to establish U.S. 
     Customs and Border Protection preclearance operations at an 
     airport in such foreign country, the Secretary of Homeland 
     Security shall provide to the appropriate congressional 
     committees the following:
       (1) A certification that preclearance operations under such 
     preclearance agreement would provide homeland security 
     benefits to the United States.
       (2) A certification that preclearance operations within 
     such foreign country will be established under such agreement 
     only if--
       (A) at least one United States passenger carrier operates 
     at such airport; and
       (B) the access of all United States passenger carriers to 
     such preclearance operations is the same as the access of any 
     non-United States passenger carrier.
       (3) A certification that the Secretary of Homeland Security 
     has considered alternative options to preclearance operations 
     and has determined that such options are not the most 
     effective means of achieving the objectives specified in 
     section 3.
       (4) A certification that the establishment of preclearance 
     operations in such foreign country will not significantly 
     increase customs processing times at United States airports.
       (5) An explanation of other objectives that will be served 
     by the establishment of preclearance operations in such 
     foreign country.
       (6) A certification that representatives from U.S. Customs 
     and Border Protection consulted publically with interested 
     parties, including providers of commercial air service in the 
     United States, employees of such providers, security experts, 
     and such other parties as the Secretary determines to be 
     appropriate, before entering into such an agreement with such 
     foreign government.
       (7) A report detailing the basis for the certifications 
     referred to in paragraphs (1) through (6).
       (c) Modification of Existing Agreements.--Not later than 30 
     days before substantially modifying a preclearance agreement 
     with the government of a foreign country in effect as of the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland 
     Security shall provide to the appropriate congressional 
     committees a copy of the proposed agreement, as modified, and 
     the justification for such modification.
       (d) Remediation Plan.--
       (1) In general.--The Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
     Border Protection shall monthly measure the average customs 
     processing time to enter the 25 United States airports that 
     support the highest volume of international travel (as 
     determined by available Federal passenger data) and provide 
     to the appropriate congressional committees such 
     measurements.
       (2) Assessment.--Based on the measurements described in 
     paragraph (1), the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
     Protection shall quarterly assess whether the average customs 
     processing time referred to in such paragraph significantly 
     exceeds the average customs processing time to enter the 
     United States through a prclearance operation.
       (3) Submission.--Based on the assessment conducted under 
     paragraph (2), if the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
     Protection determines that the average customs processing 
     time referred to in paragraph (1) significantly exceeds the 
     average customs processing time to enter the United States 
     through a preclearance operation described in paragraph (2), 
     the Commissioner shall, not later than 60 days after making 
     such determination, provide to the appropriate congressional 
     committees a remediation plan for reducing such average 
     customs processing time referred to in paragraph (1).
       (4) Implementation.--Not later than 30 days after 
     submitting the remediation plan referred to in paragraph (3), 
     the Commissioner of United States Customs and Border 
     Protection shall implement those portions of such plan that 
     can be carried out using existing resources, excluding the 
     transfer of personnel.
       (5) Suspension.--If the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
     Border Protection does not submit the remediation plan 
     referred to in paragraph (3) within 60 days in accordance 
     with such paragraph, the Commissioner may not, until such 
     time as such remediation plan is submitted, conduct any 
     negotiations relating to preclearance operations at an 
     airport in any country or commence any such preclearance 
     operations.
       (6) Stakeholder recommendations.--The remediation plan 
     described in paragraph (3) shall consider recommendations 
     solicited from relevant stakeholders.
       (e) Classified Report.--The assessment required pursuant to 
     subsection (a)(5) and the report required pursuant to 
     subsection (b)(7) may be submitted in classified form if the 
     Secretary of Homeland Security determines that such is 
     appropriate.

     SEC. 5. AVIATION SECURITY SCREENING AT PRECLEARANCE AIRPORTS.

       (a) Aviation Security Standards Agreement.--Prior to the 
     commencement of preclearance operations at an airport in a 
     foreign country under this Act, the Administrator of the 
     Transportation Security Administration shall enter into an 
     agreement with the government of such foreign country that 
     delineates and requires the adoption of aviation security 
     screening standards that are determined by the Administrator 
     to be comparable to those of the United States.
       (b) Aviation Security Rescreening.--If the Administrator of 
     the Transportation Security Administration determines that 
     the government of a foreign country has not maintained 
     security standards and protocols comparable to those of the 
     United States at airports at which preclearance operations 
     have been established in accordance with an agreement entered 
     into pursuant to subsection (a), the Administrator

[[Page H5843]]

     shall require the rescreening in the United States by the 
     Transportation Security Administration of passengers and 
     their property before such passengers may deplane into 
     sterile areas of airports in the United States.
       (c) Selectees.--Any passenger who is determined to be a 
     selectee based on a check against a terrorist watch list and 
     arrives on a flight originating from a foreign airport at 
     which preclearance operations have been established in 
     accordance with an agreement entered into pursuant to 
     subsection (a), shall be required to undergo security 
     rescreening by the Transportation Security Administration 
     before being permitted to board a domestic flight in the 
     United States.

     SEC. 6. LOST AND STOLEN PASSPORTS.

       The Secretary of Homeland Security may not enter into or 
     renew an agreement with the government of a foreign country 
     to establish or maintain U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
     preclearance operations at an airport in such foreign country 
     unless such government certifies--
       (1) that it routinely submits information about lost and 
     stolen passports of its citizens and nationals to INTERPOL's 
     Stolen and Lost Travel Document database; or
       (2) makes available to the United States Government such 
     information through another comparable means of reporting.

     SEC. 7. EFFECTIVE DATE.

       Except for subsection (c) of section 4, this Act shall 
     apply only to the establishment of preclearance operations in 
     a foreign country in which no preclearance operations have 
     been established as of the date of the enactment of this Act.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Meehan) and the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Payne) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania.


                             General Leave

  Mr. MEEHAN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks 
and include any extraneous material on the bill under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. MEEHAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of my bill, H.R. 3488. This 
legislation would require that the Secretary of Homeland Security meet 
certain conditions and requirements prior to establishing any new U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection preclearance operations in foreign 
countries.
  The Customs and Border Protection's preclearance operations overseas 
inspect and examine travelers and their merchandise in foreign 
locations prior to their arrival in the United States. Once cleared on 
foreign soil, passengers do not have to clear customs upon arrival in 
the United States.
  Now, Congress has a long history of supporting limited and specific 
preclearance operations. These serve to facilitate travel, and they 
improve homeland security. However, earlier this year, Customs and 
Border Patrol, or CBP, commenced preclearance operations in Abu Dhabi 
without prior notification to Congress, without concern to American 
jobs, and without a clear homeland security benefit.
  This legislation ensures that the DHS takes into account the impact 
on American jobs and our global competitiveness as we enhance our 
security through future preclearance facilities. My bill requires DHS 
to meet a series of benchmarks to establish a preclearance operation 
and requires transparency and prompt notification to Congress while the 
Department negotiates preclearance agreements with foreign governments. 
This legislation will go a long way towards preventing a repeat of 
CBP's mismanaged rollout of the preclearance facility in Abu Dhabi 
earlier this year.
  I have long had serious concerns about the agreement with Abu Dhabi, 
especially the way it was handled by the Department and, ultimately, 
the disregard DHS had for the domestic airline industry. To correct 
that error, this bill requires extensive consultation with key 
stakeholders so that that never happens again.
  Abu Dhabi was the first new preclearance location established since 
9/11. Prior to Abu Dhabi, the U.S. had preclearance locations in places 
like Ireland, the Bahamas, and Canada. We had an obligation to get this 
right, and CBP did not. Despite the security-focused rationale, this 
agreement was conducted without suitable congressional notification or 
a thorough explanation for the rationale of preclearance operations in 
Abu Dhabi.
  We know that a significant number of watch list hits and suspicious 
travel pattern information originates from the region, but that does 
not excuse the lack of notification or, more importantly, not taking 
into account how such agreements affect American workers and their 
employers.
  The establishment of a preclearance facility in Abu Dhabi, where no 
domestic carrier currently flies--let me repeat that, no domestic 
carrier currently flies--puts U.S. carriers at a competitive and 
significant disadvantage, as customs wait times are generally shorter 
at preclearance facilities compared to wait times in the United States.
  This facility provides a clear facilitation benefit to foreign 
airlines at the expense of U.S. carriers and U.S. jobs, and this is 
particularly egregious where the foreign-based airline is given 
subsidies designed to tilt the market unfairly in their direction. By 
requiring the Secretary to consider the economic impact in establishing 
preclearance facilities, we protect American jobs and American workers.
  I support giving our security professionals the tools needed in their 
effort to ``push out our borders,'' but we must do so in a way that 
makes us more secure, does not divert limited CBP staffing resources, 
or threaten U.S. jobs and a vital economic engine provided by U.S. 
carriers.
  I am pleased that over 150 of my colleagues from both sides of the 
aisle cosponsored this measure, and I urge all of my colleagues to 
support this important bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of H.R. 3488, the Preclearance 
Authorization Act of 2014.
  As a Member who represents a major international airport, I had deep 
reservations about the Department of Homeland Security's decision to 
open a preclearance facility in Abu Dhabi earlier this year. I was 
concerned about the prospect that limited Customs and Border Protection 
personal resources would be diverted from domestic airports like Newark 
Liberty International Airport to overseas posts, which could result in 
wait times for clearing customs exceeding anyone's definition of 
reasonable. I also had concerns about DHS' decision to conduct 
preclearance at an overseas airport where U.S. carriers do not have a 
presence, thus giving a competitive advantage to a foreign-owned 
airline.
  H.R. 3488 addresses both of my concerns. Regarding customs processing 
times, the bill requires DHS to certify to Congress that the 
establishment of preclearance operations in an additional country will 
not significantly increase processing times at airports in the United 
States. As for opening preclearance facilities at airports where U.S. 
carriers do not operate, this bill would prohibit DHS from doing so 
going forward.
  United States airlines and the jobs they create and support across 
the country are critical to our economy. Efforts to ``push out our 
borders'' for security reasons must not come at the expense of the 
competitiveness of U.S.-owned and -operated airlines. I commend the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Meehan) for recognizing this fact and 
for bringing forth this legislation before us today.
  If enacted, H.R. 3488 will result in stricter requirements as well as 
enhanced oversight and accountability regarding how DHS decides to 
expand preclearance operations.
  With that, Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. MEEHAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield as much time as she may consume to 
the gentlewoman from Michigan (Mrs. Miller).
  Mrs. MILLER of Michigan. Mr. Speaker, first of all, I certainly want 
to thank Mr. Meehan for his diligent work on this issue--for quite a 
long time, actually. He raised concerns with the Department of Homeland 
Security preclearance operations very early on, and his leadership has 
been so important to the success of this bill and where we are today.
  You know, really, I think there have been few issues that have kept 
CBP leadership busier over the last year 

[[Page H5844]]

than preclearance. The troubled rollout of the preclearance in Abu 
Dhabi caused an awful lot of consternation in the Congress.

  The preclearance facility in Abu Dhabi was the first such operation 
established since 9/11 based primarily on a security rationale. 
Therefore, the lack of appropriate congressional coordination and 
notification troubled many Members on both sides of the aisle.
  In fact, preclearance operations were the subject of a limitation 
amendment to last year's Department of Homeland Security Appropriations 
bill that I cosponsored with Mr. Meehan.
  The bill under consideration today is sort of a fusion of Mr. 
Meehan's original text and then the FY14 Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, as well as Ms. Jackson Lee's bill on this topic also, and it was 
very carefully crafted after numerous consultations with the Department 
of Homeland Security, the airline industry, and, again, Members from 
both sides of the aisle.
  It really sets the contours for future preclearance operations which 
incorporate a series of notifications and certifications, including a 
justification that outlines the homeland security benefit and impact to 
domestic staffing and wait times that any new preclearance operations 
would have. Moreover, Mr. Speaker, this bill requires Congress to be 
notified in the event that the Department of Homeland Security modifies 
or changes an existing agreement.
  I certainly want to be clear that the House Homeland Security 
Committee supports preclearance where it makes sense. Preclearance, of 
course, has been around as a security screening and trade facilitation 
tool since the early 1950s actually, and since 9/11, the security value 
of these operations has only been heightened. However, this bill makes 
it absolutely clear that the Department of Homeland Security cannot 
repeat the mistakes of the past.
  I would also like to just thank Chairman Camp of the Ways and Means 
Committee, who helped work with us with the Homeland Security Committee 
to get this bill to the floor today. Again, I certainly want to thank 
Mr. Meehan and other Members who have worked hard to make sure that the 
American airlines are not negatively impacted by future preclearance 
operations overseas.
  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Thompson), the ranking member of the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of 
H.R. 3488, the Preclearance Authorization Act of 2014.
  Earlier this year, the Department of Homeland Security decided to 
alter the focus of Customs and Border Protection's preclearance program 
from one aimed at passenger facilitation to one intended to enhance 
security--or, at least, that is what we were told when a bipartisan 
group of Members led by Representatives Meehan and DeFazio began asking 
hard questions about why a preclearance facility was being opened in 
Abu Dhabi, an airport at which no U.S. flag carriers operate.
  Since preclearance operations commenced in Abu Dhabi earlier this 
year, representatives from DHS, including Secretary Johnson, have 
repeatedly stated that they are looking to expand the program to other 
high-risk overseas airports. Enactment of H.R. 3488 would ensure that, 
before DHS entered into another preclearance agreement, thoughtful 
consideration is given to the potential homeland security benefits of 
such an expansion, as well as the potential impacts to CBP staff at 
domestic ports of entry. Importantly, the bill also requires DHS to 
report to Congress on the potential economic, competitive, and job-
related impacts opening such a facility would have on United States air 
carriers.
  During committee consideration of the bill, an amendment that I 
offered was accepted that would require any passenger arriving in the 
U.S. who is determined to be a selectee to undergo security rescreening 
by the Transportation Security Administration before being permitted to 
board a domestic flight in the United States. This provision would 
ensure that any traveler that is determined to be potentially dangerous 
undergoes security screening on U.S. soil before being allowed to board 
a domestic flight.
  Finally, the bill prohibits the opening of a new preclearance 
facility unless at least one United States passenger carrier operates 
at the airport where preclearance operations would be established. This 
provision will ensure that we do not see a repeat of the circumstances 
surrounding the opening of the preclearance facility in Abu Dhabi, 
where a foreign airline was provided a significant competitive 
advantage over U.S. carriers.
  With that, Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on H.R. 
3488, the Preclearance Authorization Act of 2014.

                              {time}  1630

  Mr. MEEHAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
distinguished gentleman from Texas (Mr. McCaul), the chairman of the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
  Mr. McCAUL. Mr. Speaker, I would first like to commend the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Meehan) for his hard work and leadership on this 
issue, this bill. He rallied more than 150 Members of Congress--no 
small feat in this institution--to express his concern over the way the 
DHS preclearance operations in Abu Dhabi were set up last year. The 
commonsense bill before us today should be supported by every Member of 
this body. Pushing out the border through operations like preclearance 
allows Customs and Border Protection to identify and intercept threats, 
including dangerous people and cargo, long before they ever reach our 
shores. So it is a noble concept.
  Preclearance facilities have served America's interests by 
facilitating secure trade and travel since the 1950s. Since 9/11, the 
security value of these facilities has only increased.
  However, I share the concerns of many of my colleagues regarding the 
rollout of a preclearance facility that was recently established in Abu 
Dhabi, which was the first such facility set up after 9/11. The process 
by which CBP announced and created this facility was not transparent, 
raising several questions about the suitability of that location.
  I recently had the opportunity to visit this preclearance facility in 
Abu Dhabi on a delegation that I led to the region, and I came away 
convinced that there is real security value in putting our CBP officers 
overseas. However, I think it is appropriate that Congress weigh in on 
how we go about establishing future preclearance operations, given the 
controversy and mismanaged rollout of Abu Dhabi.
  This bill strengthens the homeland security elements of preclearance 
operations by requiring that comparable aviation security screening 
standards are in place prior to beginning preclearance operations. It 
would also require rescreening of passengers and cargo if security 
standards are not maintained overseas.
  This bill takes steps to reduce the potential for missteps by 
requiring a series of notifications and certifications to the Congress 
long before new preclearance facilities are established. Under the 
requirements of this bill, DHS must now certify that future facilities 
serve the national interests, stakeholders must be properly consulted, 
and U.S. airlines must have equal access to locations under 
consideration. This legislation we are considering is a result of 
extensive consultation with industry, the Department itself, and 
Members from both parties.
  Again, I want to thank Chairman Meehan for his hard work and 
oversight on this important program. I want to thank the ranking member 
of the full committee, Bennie Thompson, and the ranking member of the 
subcommittee for, once again, on our committee, showing great 
bipartisanship to get the will of the people done in this House.
  Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, as you heard, H.R. 3488 enjoys the support of members of 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Indeed, this bill has a bipartisan 
collection of 154 cosponsors.
  With that, Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to support H.R. 3488, the 
Preclearance Authorization Act of 2014, and I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  Mr. MEEHAN. Mr. Speaker, I want to express my deep appreciation to my

[[Page H5845]]

colleagues from both sides of the aisle for responding so collectively 
to the importance of this issue.
  First and foremost, the principle that I think we stand for on both 
sides of the aisle is, when important issues like this are raised, that 
there be appropriate consultation with Congress and an appropriate 
understanding of the clear articulation by Homeland Security of the 
benefit that they expect to reach.
  As the chairman has identified, once he visited Abu Dhabi, he came 
away convinced that there was a benefit. But the idea that that would 
not have been shared with us prior to entering that agreement is one of 
the critical things that we want to see addressed by this legislation.
  But it is also the inability of the Department to appreciate or to 
take into consideration the impact that this will have, that it may 
have, and, in fact, it will have when there is no United States airline 
flying from Abu Dhabi. And the competitive disadvantage of that, which 
is generated by the fact that individuals who choose to fly the foreign 
airline currently get right into our country once they get into the 
preclearance facility, while those on American airlines coming into the 
same airport will wait in long lines. It creates a competitive 
disadvantage and the real possibility of a loss of American jobs.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to join me in supporting this bill, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, as a senior member of the Homeland 
Security Committee and the Ranking Member of the Border and Maritime 
Security Subcommittee, I rise in support of H.R. 3488, the 
``Preclearance Authorization Act of 2014.''
  The legislation before the House today is the product of regular 
order, having been considered and approved by the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security in May and the Full Committee on Homeland 
Security in June.
  H.R. 3488 stipulates the conditions under which the Secretary of 
Homeland Security may establish and conduct preclearance operations.
  It is imperative that as we seek to ``push out our Nation's borders'' 
through preclearance and other programs, we do so in a risk-based 
manner that is mindful of impacts to our economy and the traveling 
public.
  That guiding principle is what prompted me to introduce legislation 
last November, H.R. 3575, the ``Putting Security First in Preclearance 
Act.''
  I am pleased that several of the provisions and policy goals 
contained in my legislation have been incorporated into the bill before 
the House today.
  During subcommittee consideration of H.R. 3488, I offered two 
amendments that were adopted.
  The first amendment requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
report to Congress on the anticipated homeland security benefits 
associated with establishing preclearance operations at a foreign 
airport.
  As the Department of Homeland Security seeks to expand preclearance 
operations to potentially high-risk airports around the world, we 
should have a full understanding of the homeland security benefits 
associated with opening such facilities.
  My second amendment, also adopted during subcommittee consideration 
of the bill, requires that any country seeking to enter into a 
preclearance agreement with the United States submit lost and stolen 
passport information to INTERPOL or another source that is searchable 
by the United States.
  The tragic loss of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 in March brought 
into focus a number of vulnerabilities in the international aviation 
arena, not the least of which is gaps related to lost and stolen 
passports.
  On April 4th, the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security held a 
hearing on the vulnerabilities of passport fraud.
  One of the major takeaways from that hearing was the need for more 
countries to regularly submit information about lost and stolen 
passports to INTERPOL.
  The provision in H.R. 3488 requiring countries seeking to open 
Preclearance facilities to submit information on lost and stolen 
passports to INTERPOL will serve as an impetus for bringing would-be 
international partners into the fold and make the INTERPOL database 
more complete.
  Enactment of H.R. 3488 will ensure greater Congressional oversight of 
the process associated with commencing preclearance operations and 
ensure the economic interest of U.S. airlines are considered when new 
Preclearance facilities are contemplated.
  I urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting passage of H.R. 
3488.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Meehan) that the House suspend the 
rules and pass the bill, H.R. 3488, as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill, as amended, was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________