STUDENT SUCCESS ACT; Congressional Record Vol. 161, No. 105
(House of Representatives - July 08, 2015)

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[Pages H4908-H4935]
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                          STUDENT SUCCESS ACT


                             General Leave

  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and 
include extraneous material on H.R. 5.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Minnesota?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 125 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the further consideration of the bill, 
H.R. 5.
  Will the gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Yoder) kindly take the chair.

                              {time}  1624


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 5) to support State and local accountability for public 
education, protect State and local authority, inform parents of the 
performance of their children's schools, and for other purposes, with 
Mr. Yoder (Acting Chair) in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Friday, 
February 27, 2015, a request for a recorded vote on amendment No. 44 
printed in part B of House Report 114-29 offered by the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Scott) had been postponed.
  Pursuant to House Resolution 347, it shall be in order to consider 
the further amendments printed in part A of House Report 114-192 as if 
such amendments had been printed in part B of House Report 114-29. Each 
such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, 
by a Member designated in the report, shall be considered read, shall 
be debatable for the time specified in the report, equally divided and 
controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to 
amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the 
question.


                 Amendment No. 45 Offered by Mr. Rokita

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 45 
printed in part A of House Report 114-192.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 5, lines 4, 7, 16, 20, and 24, strike ``2021'' and 
     insert ``2019''.
       Page 6, lines 4, 10, 16, 21, and 25, strike ``2021'' and 
     insert ``2019''.
       Page 7, line 4, strike ``2021'' and insert ``2019''.
       Page 94, line 18, strike ``2021'' and insert ``2019''.
       Page 450, line 19 and 23, strike ``2021'' and insert 
     ``2019''.
       Page 461, line 17, strike ``2021'' and insert ``2019''.
       Page 484, line 11, strike ``2021'' and insert ``2019''.
       Page 619, line 7, strike ``2021'' and insert ``2019''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 347, the gentleman 
from Indiana (Mr. Rokita) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Indiana.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, my amendment is simple. It shortens 
authorization of the act from 6 years to 4 years. I am very thankful 
for the leadership of the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Grothman) for 
his work in leading this effort.
  Mr. Chairman, it is the role of Congress to conduct oversight of 
Federal programs and regularly revisit the results of taxpayer 
investments. We began a process to replace No Child Left Behind 4 years 
ago, and our goal

[[Page H4909]]

from the beginning has always been to roll back the Federal 
Government's authority over K-12 schools and return to State and local 
education leaders the responsibility and opportunity to deliver a 
quality education to their students.
  Now, the Student Success Act is a strong conservative proposal that 
reflects our shared principles for reducing the Federal role, restoring 
local control, and empowering individuals, not government bureaucrats. 
Reducing the authorization to 4 years will give Congress and the next 
administration a chance to ensure that these bold reforms are actually 
working as intended.
  Mr. Chairman, I encourage my colleagues to support this commonsense 
amendment to the underlying bill, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I had the opportunity to serve on our State 
Board of Education in Colorado from 2001 to 2007, so this was during 
the implementation phase of No Child Left Behind.
  Now, we knew at the time many of the flaws we are hoping to address 
through ESEA reauthorization today, but it took several years just to 
get up to the point where we had the tests, we had the standards, and 
we complied with it.
  Education is a major public enterprise. In fact, it is the largest 
public enterprise at the State and local level. One of the frustrations 
that I have heard a lot of in the last few years--and it has really 
amplified the frustration about testing--is the fact that the ball has 
been moving, the testing has been changed.
  My State of Colorado, which is fairly typical, moved from one test, 
the CSAP, to a temporary test, the TCAP, and then finally a third test, 
all in a period of 4 years.
  What we need to do--and this is something that we will hear from 
education stakeholders as varied as teachers, school boards, and 
principals--is stop moving the ball.
  We know it is not going to be perfect. Let's give it a little bit of 
time to work. Now, this bill is far from perfect, which is why I oppose 
the underlying bill; but whatever set of rules you set in place, I feel 
it is important to allow the rulemaking, the State laws, to catch up, 
which takes a period of time, a period of years.
  I think the longer reauthorization, through 2021, rather than 
reducing it to 4 years, is absolutely in the interests of ensuring that 
whatever law we come up with can be implemented more effectively at the 
State and local level.
  Not only is it frustrating for districts and teachers to chase a 
constantly moving ball, it detracts from their most important effort, 
which is to educate the next generation of Americans.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Minnesota, Chairman Kline, the chairman of the full Education and 
Workforce Committee. He has been a leader in the area of working on 
these issues for a lot more than 4 years.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I just wanted to take literally a few seconds to say I 
understand the gentleman's purpose here. I think this improves the 
bill.
  I support the amendment, and I urge my colleagues to vote for it.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Scott), the ranking member.

                              {time}  1630

  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the 
amendment.
  As the gentleman from Colorado has indicated, if you have a good 
bill, you should have as long an authorization as possible. It allows 
for better planning and the other things he mentioned.
  But this is a bad bill. The funding formula takes from the poor and 
gives to the rich. It eliminates the responsibility to actually do 
something about the achievement gaps. I just believe the quicker we can 
get back to it, the better. So if you want to shorten the authorization 
so that the pain inflicted on this bill is shorter, I am for it.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for supporting the 
amendment. The reasons he is supporting are completely wrong. We have 
increased Federal spending, as the gentleman knows, on education over 
300 percent since the Federal Government has been involved. And guess 
what, Mr. Chairman, the results have been flat-lined.
  This bill does anything but take from the poor and give to the rich. 
In fact, it ensures that civil rights are protected and that children, 
whatever socioeconomic background, aren't left behind, but they have 
the opportunity to succeed in the 21st century and win.
  Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Indiana has 3\1/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. ROKITA. I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Grothman), who is new to this Congress but is already 
making this mark. He has coauthored this amendment with me.
  Mr. GROTHMAN. Mr. Chairman, well, one of the many reasons that this 
is a good bill is that it recognizes that the Federal Government is 
taking too much control over education in this country.
  One of the reasons the Federal Government should not get involved in 
many, many things is they are not very nimble. When they make a 
mistake, rather than turning something around--you know, if a school 
board makes a mistake, they may come back in a meeting 2 weeks later 
and undo the mistake they made. When the Federal Government makes a 
mistake, it can take 15 or 20 years, if ever, to admit they made a 
mistake.
  Now, when the original No Child Left Behind bill passed, I used to 
meet with school superintendents a couple times a month. They knew 
within months that that bill was horribly flawed.
  Chairman Kline has worked very hard on this bill. It is a very good 
bill, but it is still a very big, complicated bill. And I am sure 
within months, years, a couple of years, local superintendents will 
report changes they want to have made.
  I think this is a very good amendment because, even though it doesn't 
assure us that we are going to revisit this in 4 years any more than 
the original No Child Left Behind we were sure we were going to revisit 
in 7 years, I think it reminds Congress that at least in a 4-year 
period you ought to be looking at it, see what your local 
superintendents think, see what your local schoolteachers think, and 
see if it can be improved. And, of course, it is going to be able to be 
improved in 4 years. So that is the reason for the amendment.
  I mean, if you told anybody back home we are passing a law and we 
don't anticipate even looking at it again for 4 years, I think they 
would think that is highly unusual. That defines one of the reasons why 
we shouldn't get the Federal Government involved in a wide variety of 
things.
  Mr. ROKITA. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, of course you can look at a bill during its 
period of initial authorization. There are routinely cleanup bills that 
move through this body.
  And I wish--I wish--the No Child Left Behind had a cleanup bill in 
2002 or in 2003 or in 2004, all during its initial period of 
authorization, but President Bush closed the doors on even the changes 
that I think that we could have had broad consensus that we needed to 
pass.
  But of course whatever comes out of this ESEA process, if we can 
agree on cleanup things and unintended consequences 2 years, 3 years 
out, let's do them.
  Look, the answer is not to move the ball. It leads to the spinning of 
the wheels for a period of years. And rather than working on educating 
kids, people are working on complying with an ever-changing matrix of 
Federal, State, and local law.
  There is a lot that happens after we pass a law in this body. It goes 
to Federal rulemaking, input from various constituencies, final rules. 
It goes to States who might change their policies, State Boards of 
Education, State commissioners. It goes down to districts, busy 
superintendents who are worried about bus schedules, who are

[[Page H4910]]

worried about opening new schools, have to worry about recommending to 
their boards the new policies that will comply with our new Federal 
law.
  It takes a lot of time. It might take 2 years, 3 years before it 
finally reaches those policy implementation levels on the ground at a 
local level. And guess what, if this amendment becomes law and the 
authorization period is only 4 years, they might finally--finally--
start complying with this law only to find that there is a future 
Congress, a future President that moves the ball once again and starts 
the whole cycle of spinning wheels all over again.
  We need to make sure that whatever we do in this body, that we give 
time for a thoughtful implementation of it at the State and local level 
that doesn't detract from the core mission that the men and women who 
teach in our classrooms, the men and women who volunteer on school 
boards, the professionals who serve as superintendents commit their 
lives to in terms of educating kids.
  So we need to move forward with a longer reauthorization. If there 
are cleanup matters that we can agree on during that authorization 
period, we should by no means preclude them from the discussion until 
the end of this authorization. That was one of the problems with No 
Child Left Behind, that this body never had a follow-up discussion.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no,'' and I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Rokita).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 46 Offered by Mr. Walker

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 46 
printed in part A of House Report 114-192.
  Mr. WALKER. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 580, line 24, strike the closing quotation mark and 
     second period.
       Page 580, after line 24, insert the following:

                          ``PART G--A PLUS ACT

     ``SECTION 6701. SHORT TITLE; PURPOSE; DEFINITIONS.

       ``(a) Short Title.--This part may be cited as the 
     ``Academic Partnerships Lead Us to Success Act'' or the `A 
     PLUS Act'.
       ``(b) Purpose.--The purposes of this part are as follows:
       ``(1) To give States and local communities added 
     flexibility to determine how to improve academic achievement 
     and implement education reforms.
       ``(2) To reduce the administrative costs and compliance 
     burden of Federal education programs in order to focus 
     Federal resources on improving academic achievement.
       ``(3) To ensure that States and communities are accountable 
     to the public for advancing the academic achievement of all 
     students, especially disadvantaged children.
       ``(c) Definitions.--In this part:
       ``(1) Accountability.--The term `accountability' means that 
     public schools are answerable to parents and other taxpayers 
     for the use of public funds and shall report student progress 
     to parents and taxpayers regularly.
       ``(2) Declaration of intent.--The term `declaration of 
     intent' means a decision by a State, as determined by State 
     Authorizing Officials or by referendum, to assume full 
     management responsibility for the expenditure of Federal 
     funds for certain eligible programs for the purpose of 
     advancing, on a more comprehensive and effective basis, the 
     educational policy of such State.
       ``(3) State.--The term `State' has the meaning given such 
     term in section 1122(e).
       ``(4) State authorizing officials.--The term `State 
     Authorizing Officials' means the State officials who shall 
     authorize the submission of a declaration of intent, and any 
     amendments thereto, on behalf of the State. Such officials 
     shall include not less than 2 of the following:
       ``(A) The governor of the State.
       ``(B) The highest elected education official of the State, 
     if any.
       ``(C) The legislature of the State.
       ``(5) State designated officer.--The term `State Designated 
     Officer' means the person designated by the State Authorizing 
     Officials to submit to the Secretary, on behalf of the State, 
     a declaration of intent, and any amendments thereto, and to 
     function as the point-of-contact for the State for the 
     Secretary and others relating to any responsibilities arising 
     under this part.

     ``SEC. 6702. DECLARATION OF INTENT.

       ``(a) In General.--Each State is authorized to submit to 
     the Secretary a declaration of intent permitting the State to 
     receive Federal funds on a consolidated basis to manage the 
     expenditure of such funds to advance the educational policy 
     of the State.
       ``(b) Programs Eligible for Consolidation and Permissible 
     Use of Funds.--
       ``(1) Scope.--A State may choose to include within the 
     scope of the State's declaration of intent any program for 
     which Congress makes funds available to the State if the 
     program is for a purpose described in this Act. A State may 
     not include any program funded pursuant to the Individuals 
     with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.).
       ``(2) Uses of funds.--Funds made available to a State 
     pursuant to a declaration of intent under this part shall be 
     used for any educational purpose permitted by State law of 
     the State submitting a declaration of intent.
       ``(3) Removal of fiscal and accounting barriers.--Each 
     State educational agency that operates under a declaration of 
     intent under this part shall modify or eliminate State fiscal 
     and accounting barriers that prevent local educational 
     agencies and schools from easily consolidating funds from 
     other Federal, State, and local sources in order to improve 
     educational opportunities and reduce unnecessary fiscal and 
     accounting requirements.
       ``(c) Contents of Declaration.--Each declaration of intent 
     shall contain--
       ``(1) a list of eligible programs that are subject to the 
     declaration of intent;
       ``(2) an assurance that the submission of the declaration 
     of intent has been authorized by the State Authorizing 
     Officials, specifying the identity of the State Designated 
     Officer;
       ``(3) the duration of the declaration of intent;
       ``(4) an assurance that the State will use fiscal control 
     and fund accounting procedures;
       ``(5) an assurance that the State will meet the 
     requirements of applicable Federal civil rights laws in 
     carrying out the declaration of intent and in consolidating 
     and using the funds under the declaration of intent;
       ``(6) an assurance that in implementing the declaration of 
     intent the State will seek to advance educational 
     opportunities for the disadvantaged;
       ``(7) a description of the plan for maintaining direct 
     accountability to parents and other citizens of the State; 
     and
       ``(8) an assurance that in implementing the declaration of 
     intent, the State will seek to use Federal funds to 
     supplement, rather than supplant, State education funding.
       ``(d) Duration.--The duration of the declaration of intent 
     shall not exceed 5 years.
       ``(e) Review and Recognition by the Secretary.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall review the 
     declaration of intent received from the State Designated 
     Officer not more than 60 days after the date of receipt of 
     such declaration, and shall recognize such declaration of 
     intent unless the declaration of intent fails to meet the 
     requirements under subsection (c).
       ``(2) Recognition by operation of law.--If the Secretary 
     fails to take action within the time specified in paragraph 
     (1), the declaration of intent, as submitted, shall be deemed 
     to be approved.
       ``(f) Amendment to Declaration of Intent.--
       ``(1) In general.--The State Authorizing Officials may 
     direct the State Designated Officer to submit amendments to a 
     declaration of intent that is in effect. Such amendments 
     shall be submitted to the Secretary and considered by the 
     Secretary in accordance with subsection (e).
       ``(2) Amendments authorized.--A declaration of intent that 
     is in effect may be amended to--
       ``(A) expand the scope of such declaration of intent to 
     encompass additional eligible programs;
       ``(B) reduce the scope of such declaration of intent by 
     excluding coverage of a Federal program included in the 
     original declaration of intent;
       ``(C) modify the duration of such declaration of intent; or
       ``(D) achieve such other modifications as the State 
     Authorizing Officials deem appropriate.
       ``(3) Effective date.--The amendment shall specify an 
     effective date. Such effective date shall provide adequate 
     time to assure full compliance with Federal program 
     requirements relating to an eligible program that has been 
     removed from the coverage of the declaration of intent by the 
     proposed amendment.
       ``(4) Treatment of program funds withdrawn from declaration 
     of intent.--Beginning on the effective date of an amendment 
     executed under paragraph (2)(B), each program requirement of 
     each program removed from the declaration of intent shall 
     apply to the State's use of funds made available under the 
     program.

     ``SEC. 6703. TRANSPARENCY FOR RESULTS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION.

       ``(a) In General.--Each State operating under a declaration 
     of intent under this part shall inform parents and the 
     general public regarding the student achievement assessment 
     system, demonstrating student progress relative to the 
     State's determination of student proficiency, as described in 
     paragraph (2), for the purpose of public accountability to 
     parents and taxpayers.
       ``(b) Accountability System.--The State shall determine and 
     establish an accountability system to ensure accountability 
     under this part.
       ``(c) Report on Student Progress.--Not later than 1 year 
     after the effective date of the declaration of intent, and 
     annually

[[Page H4911]]

     thereafter, a State shall disseminate widely to parents and 
     the general public a report that describes student progress. 
     The report shall include--
       ``(1) student performance data disaggregated in the same 
     manner as data are disaggregated under section 1111(b)(3)(A); 
     and
       ``(2) a description of how the State has used Federal funds 
     to improve academic achievement, reduce achievement 
     disparities between various student groups, and improve 
     educational opportunities for the disadvantaged.

     ``SEC. 6704. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

       ``(a) In General.--Except as provided in subsection (b), 
     the amount that a State with a declaration of intent may 
     expend for administrative expenses shall be limited to 1 
     percent of the aggregate amount of Federal funds made 
     available to the State through the eligible programs included 
     within the scope of such declaration of intent.
       ``(b) States Not Consolidating Funds Under Part a of Title 
     I.--If the declaration of intent does not include within its 
     scope part A of title I, the amount spent by the State on 
     administrative expenses shall be limited to 3 percent of the 
     aggregate amount of Federal funds made available to the State 
     pursuant to such declaration of intent.

     ``SEC. 6705. EQUITABLE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

       ``Each State consolidating and using funds pursuant to a 
     declaration of intent under this part shall provide for the 
     participation of private school children and teachers in the 
     activities assisted under the declaration of intent in the 
     same manner as participation is provided to private school 
     children and teachers under section 9501.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 347, the gentleman 
from North Carolina (Mr. Walker) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from North Carolina.
  Mr. WALKER. Mr. Chairman, I am introducing the Academic Partnerships 
Lead Us to Success, or the A-PLUS, Act.
  When most of us come to Washington, one of the promises or one of the 
things that we try and do best is to return as much power or, should I 
say, decisionmaking back to the States and back to the people.
  I believe the A-PLUS Act does that. It allows the States to opt out 
of as many as 80 different Federal programs, returning that 
opportunity. Some may say that No Child Left Behind, that it allows the 
opt out, and it does; but what it doesn't do, it doesn't allow the 
States to opt out of the mandates and still keep their Federal funding. 
That is why we believe this is a crucial amendment.
  I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. DeSantis), my distinguished friend.
  Mr. DeSANTIS. Mr. Chairman, I thank my friend from North Carolina.
  I am happy to cosponsor this amendment. I think of this amendment in 
terms of Common Core because we have had a lot of controversy over 
Common Core. A lot of parents are upset about it, and they say: Look, 
this was the Federal Government getting involved in education, and 
people support it.
  Congress said: Wait a minute. The Federal Government never mandated 
Common Core. That never happened.
  And, you know, that is true.
  But what did happen was the Federal Government had a huge amount of 
money under President Obama's race to the top, and they said: Hey, 
States--and this is during the recession and States needed the money--
here is some money, but you have got to do what we want you to do.
  And so they conditioned that funding and really coerced a lot of 
States into adopting something like Common Core.
  And so I think what the A-PLUS does is it says: Okay. The Federal 
Government has gotten involved in K-12 education. I don't think it has 
been very successful from the very beginning, but if you are going to 
be providing money, at least give the State the ability to take that 
money and use it as they see fit to try and innovate and to try to do 
things that will improve the academic performance of their kids. But 
don't condition the funding on following specific formulas that 
Washington knows best.
  I think this really empowers States. I think this is something that 
will empower local communities and, I think, ultimately will be better 
off as a matter of K-12 education. So I thank my friend from North 
Carolina for offering it.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition 
to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The amendment would literally let States just take the money and run 
with no assurance that the billions of Federal dollars actually benefit 
the populations of students that ESEA was intended to serve: low-
income, minority students who do not speak English, students with 
disabilities.
  The original purpose of ESEA was to address the special educational 
needs of children of low-income families and the impact that 
concentrations of low-income families have on the ability of local 
educational agencies to support adequate educational programs.
  Subsequently, we added a requirement that you identify and address 
achievement gaps. That is the purpose of the law. If you just opt out 
and take it as a block grant, you don't have to address the problems 
that the money is designed to cure.
  The underlying bill violates the original purpose of the original 
ESEA, and this amendment just makes it worse.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WALKER. Mr. Chairman, I request how much time is remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from North Carolina has 2\3/4\ 
minutes remaining.
  Mr. WALKER. Mr. Chairman, who better to address these problems than 
parents, States, and local school boards.
  Let's talk about specifically what the A-PLUS Act does.
  One, it restores education decisionmaking to State and local leaders 
who are better positioned to make informed decisions about the needs of 
their local school communities. It allows States to consolidate funding 
for any and all programs that are authorized under the ESEA, and it 
also reduces bureaucracy and increases transparency of student outcomes 
by redirecting accountability to parents and taxpayers, not Washington.
  Fundamentally, I believe that government is more accountable, almost 
always, the more local, and it becomes more effective.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Polis).
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, there is a great potential for cooperation 
between Democrats and Republicans, as has historically been, with 
regard to education; and that lies in, of course, enhancing flexibility 
in freeing teachers and principals and districts from some of the 
bureaucratic constraints that they have that distract from their 
ability to maximize education.
  But along with that increased flexibility needs to come 
accountability; otherwise, we wind up with the worst of both worlds. 
And just like No Child Left Behind erred too far in the direction of 
not enough flexibility with too much in the wrong kind of 
accountability, so, too, must we be careful not to err in the direction 
of too much flexibility without accountability.
  It is important to make sure that as we increase the ways and the 
manner that States and districts have to free up local innovation at 
the classroom level, at the school level, at the district level, we 
need to make sure and reiterate what our goals are here.
  How do we make sure that all students are learning? How do we make 
sure that schools are serving students with disabilities under IDEA? 
How do we make sure that districts and States are committed to closing 
the achievement gap between students of color and White students, even 
in local jurisdictions that might not have that political will 
intrinsically? That is the Federal promise. That is the promise and the 
reason behind ESEA and our efforts to improve education across these 
United States.
  To turn it over to the States effectively makes the referee a player 
on the field. We need to have an objective look. The same people who 
are concerned with deciding exactly how moneys are spent cannot 
objectively weigh whether it is working or whether it is not. That is 
just human nature.
  We need to make sure that if States have additional flexibility in 
grants--something I think that we can certainly work together on--if 
they have

[[Page H4912]]

that flexibility, we need to make sure there is an objective standard 
under which what they are doing with that flexibility is determined to 
work or not to work. And if it doesn't work, we need to encourage those 
States to move in a different direction. If it does work, we can 
increase our efforts to support them.
  So again, there is a general premise here that can be worked on, but 
the underlying amendment would be extremely detrimental to public 
education.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have 
remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 2 minutes remaining.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from North Carolina yielded back the 
balance of his time. Did the gentleman intend to reserve?
  Mr. WALKER. Yes.
  The Acting CHAIR. Does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent to 
reclaim his 2 minutes of time?
  Mr. WALKER. He yielded back 2 minutes to me. Is that correct?
  The Acting CHAIR. Does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent?
  Mr. WALKER. Yes.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from North 
Carolina may reclaim his 2 minutes of time.
  There was no objection.


                         Parliamentary Inquiry

  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, a point of parliamentary inquiry.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman will state his parliamentary inquiry.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, to be clear, the gentleman was not yielded 
time from the gentleman from Virginia.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is correct.
  Mr. POLIS. The gentleman was granted his own time, which erroneously 
he had yielded back to the Chair.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado is correct.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from North Carolina
  Mr. WALKER. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from North Carolina has 2 minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Virginia has 2 minutes remaining.
  Mr. WALKER. Mr. Chairman, a lot of this is talk. And with due respect 
to my friend from Colorado, I hear the point. But I would say a lot of 
that is we are hearing ``we, we this, we this, we the Federal, we 
this.'' It really should be ``we the people at the State,'' ``we the 
people at the local level.''
  It is important that we get some of the power that we like to monger 
up here among us in this House to return it back to the States, to 
return it back to the individual school boards.

                              {time}  1645

  Who best knows to make these decisions other than these parents and 
these school boards? We talk about accountability. As Dr. Phil would 
say, ``How has that been working for us the last 40 years?''
  We need to get the accountability back to where it goes, where it 
should have been from the very beginning, and that is to the State 
level and to the local people, to the parents and the school boards.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, the ESEA passed in 1965 because 
States and localities were not equitably funding the schools. The ESEA 
required the money to be spent primarily in the areas with a 
concentration of low-income families. If this amendment passes, we can 
reasonably assume that they will go back to the way they were doing it.
  This makes a bad bill even worse. So I would hope that we would 
defeat the amendment and keep the requirement that the States, in using 
the money, address the fiscal inequalities and achievement gaps.
  With this amendment, there are no requirements that they do anything, 
and we can reasonably assume that they would go back to doing the 
things they were doing to begin with before the ESEA passed. I would 
hope we would defeat this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Walker).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from North 
Carolina will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 47 Offered by Mr. Salmon

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 47 
printed in part A of House Report 114-192.
  Mr. SALMON. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 31, line 3, strike ``(3)(B)(ii)(II)'' and insert 
     ``(3)(B)(ii)(II), except that States shall allow the parent 
     of a student to opt such student out of the assessments 
     required under this paragraph for any reason and shall not 
     include such students in calculating the participation rate 
     under this clause''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 347, the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Salmon) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. SALMON. Mr. Chairman, I first want to thank Chairman Kline and 
Representative Rokita of the House Committee on Education and the 
Workforce for working with me on this important amendment, which is to 
ensure that parents have more authority and power over their children's 
educations.
  My amendment is very, very simple. It would allow any parent to opt 
his child out of high-stakes testing, and it would protect schools from 
being punished by the Federal Department of Education if parents opted 
to take their children out of these tests.
  Since the 2001 reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act, called No Child Left Behind, the Federal Government has 
placed increasing importance on academic assessments in K-12 education.
  Assessments are important and even necessary to understand and 
measure a child's academic progress. However, academic assessments have 
become an overutilized metric to evaluate everything from the quality 
of a teacher to the strength of a particular program.
  Because of this frenzied obsession with high-stakes testing, more and 
more time is being usurped from actual classroom learning. It was 
reported that the testing for a student in the 11th grade could take up 
to 27 days, a total of 15 percent of the entire school year, and a lot 
of the teachers complain about having to teach to the test. In fact, I 
think that is why the NEA has come out in support of this amendment.
  Parents are becoming increasingly fed up with such constant and 
onerous testing requirements, and so are the teachers. While some 
States currently allow parents to opt their students out of 
assessments, there exists a simultaneous obligation on schools of a 95 
percent participation rate in school assessments.
  If schools don't meet these requirements, they risk enforcement 
measures from the Department of Education, which, at worst, could 
include losing access to Federal funding. These factors create a 
strange environment of conflicting interests for students, parents, and 
schools.
  My amendment would ease a school's fear of penalties by directing 
that opted-out students not be counted among the 95 percent 
participation requirement while giving parents due power over their 
children's educations.
  I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this important 
amendment, which returns the power back to where it should be, with the 
parents.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, it is one thing to keep a light 
on problems like achievement gaps, as the underlying bill does, but it 
kind of sweeps everything under the rug.
  Before the participation threshold of 95 percent, only one State 
actually assessed 95 percent of students with disabilities, and it was 
not unusual for

[[Page H4913]]

low-achieving students to suddenly have field trips on testing day. If 
you are not measuring the achievement gap, you can't deal with the 
achievement gap.
  We need to make sure that enough students test, which is 95 percent, 
so that we can actually identify the achievement gaps and do something 
about it. Parents do have the right to opt out, but when the dust 
settles, at least 95 percent will have had to have taken the test.
  We have situations now in which, if you eliminate that requirement, 
school systems can encourage people not to show up on testing day. They 
can have field trips on testing day and can manipulate the data so 
that, if only half of the students are taking the test and if you make 
sure that it is the good students who are taking the test, your scores 
all of a sudden will go up.
  The requirement that 95 percent get tested means you have meaningful 
data so that you can find out what the problem is, and then you can 
deal with it.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SALMON. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Minnesota (Mr. Kline), the chairman of the full committee.
  Mr. KLINE. I thank the gentleman for offering this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, the gentleman is expressing a concern here of parents, 
not of schoolteachers and principals who want to put together field 
trips. There is a great deal of anxiety on the part of some parents, 
and this is giving them some power.
  I support the gentleman's amendment, and I encourage my colleagues to 
support it.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva).
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I thank the ranking member.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the underlying legislation and 
to the Salmon amendment.
  Once again, we are considering legislation that does nothing to 
improve equity in our public education system, assuring and ensuring 
that resources are focused on student populations that have been 
historically marginalized, primarily children of color, English 
language learners, children with disabilities, and poor kids. The 
lessons from No Child Left Behind are plentiful, some good that need 
improvement and some that need to be eliminated from a reauthorization.
  This amendment, along with the underlying legislation, continues to 
dismantle and remove the ESEA's significant mission, to deal with the 
issue of poverty in this country, marginalized communities, and kids 
who are not achieving.
  Mr. Chairman, I ask my colleagues to oppose H.R. 5 and this 
amendment. The current bill fails to provide all of our communities 
with equitable educations.
  Portability eliminates a maintenance of effort, block grants don't 
address charter school accountability, and it eliminates provisions to 
protect English learners in this country. With this amendment, we 
eliminate the Nation's responsibility to be accountable and to ensure 
that all children get an education.
  I am astounded by the historical amnesia that goes on when we have 
these discussions. The ESEA was formed for a purpose: to improve and to 
create equity and opportunity for children who didn't have it.
  We have not reached a stage in this country when we can say that 
States can take care of this. We can go back to those vestiges, as the 
ranking member said, in which there was no equality, there was no 
opportunity, and tell the States, ``You can do what you want with this 
Federal money. And, by discretion, if you don't educate all of your 
children, that is okay. And if, by discretion, we can't hold anybody 
accountable for his lack of education, that is okay.''
  That is the message we are going back to, and I urge a ``no'' vote.
  Mr. SALMON. Mr. Chairman, I take serious umbrage with the arrogance 
that purveys this city in that we are the font of all knowledge. In 
fact, I lovingly joke with my constituents when I go back and say, ``I 
am from Washington, D.C., and I am here to help you.'' It always draws 
a loud amount of laughter because everybody knows that that is not the 
way things really are.
  If we can't trust our parents, who have the biggest vested interest 
in whether or not their children succeed in education, if we can't 
trust the teachers, if we can't trust the local school boards, whose 
members also have to run for election, then we might as well just fold 
up and go home.

  I have a lot more confidence in parents, in teachers, in our local 
school boards, than I do in some nameless, faceless bureaucrat here in 
Washington, D.C. I say we put the power back where it should be: in the 
hands of parents and teachers and local school boards.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have 
remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman has 1\1/2\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Polis).
  Mr. POLIS. I thank the ranking member.
  Mr. Chairman, one parent recently wrote me that she prefers that 
students with special needs be required to take tests. In her words, 
``The tests gave us the data we needed to see where my son needed 
additional support.''
  I rise in opposition to Mr. Salmon's amendment.
  Before No Child Left Behind was passed, schools across the country 
would systemically excluded students from tests in an effort to inflate 
a school's overall performance and sweep deficiencies and 
discrimination under the rug.
  This amendment, which would allow students to opt out of tests and 
allow those students to be omitted from the testing threshold, would 
make it easier to, once again, exclude historically marginalized 
students from accountability systems.
  There would be almost no way of knowing which students truly opted 
out, which were pushed out, and which students stayed at home at their 
schools' suggestion or traveled on an optional field trip.
  In my home State of Colorado, a similar provision was brought up in 
the State legislature, and over 400 business and community leaders 
strongly publicly opposed the bill and succeeded in defeating it.
  In order to close achievement gaps, we need data on every student, 
regardless of race, background, or disability. This kind of policy 
allows the very data we need the most on the most needy kids to be 
swept under the rug.
  For that reason, I strongly urge a ``no'' vote on this amendment.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself the balance of my 
time.
  If this amendment passes, school systems will have an incentive to 
address achievement gaps not by the hard work that it takes to close 
the achievement gaps, but by just manipulating the data. That is wrong, 
and this amendment ought to be defeated.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Salmon).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. SALMON. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona will 
be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 48 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 48 
printed in part A of House Report 114-192.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike section 112 and insert the following:

     SEC. 112. STATE PLANS.

       Section 1111 (20 U.S.C. 6311) is amended to read as 
     follows:

     ``SEC. 1111. STATE PLANS.

       ``(a) Plans Required.--
       ``(1) In general.--For any State desiring to receive a 
     grant under this part, the State educational agency shall 
     submit to the Secretary a plan, developed by the State 
     educational agency, in consultation with representatives of 
     local educational agencies, teachers, school leaders, 
     specialized instructional support personnel, early childhood 
     education providers, parents, community organizations, 
     communities representing underserved populations, and Indian 
     tribes,

[[Page H4914]]

     that satisfies the requirements of this section, and that is 
     coordinated with other programs of this Act, the Individuals 
     with Disabilities Education Act, the Carl D. Perkins Career 
     and Technical Education Act of 2006, the Head Start Act, the 
     Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, and the McKinney-
     Vento Homeless Assistance Act.
       ``(2) Consolidated plan.--A State plan submitted under 
     paragraph (1) may be submitted as a part of a consolidated 
     plan under section 9302.
       ``(b) College and Career Ready Content Standards, 
     Assessments, and Achievement Standards.--
       ``(1) General requirements.--Each State plan shall include 
     evidence that the State's college and career ready content 
     standards, assessments, and achievement standards under this 
     subsection are--
       ``(A) vertically aligned from kindergarten through grade 
     12; and
       ``(B) developed and implemented to ensure that proficiency 
     in the content standards will signify that a student is on-
     track to graduate prepared for--
       ``(i) according to written affirmation from the State's 
     public institutions of higher education, placement in credit-
     bearing, nonremedial courses at the 2-and 4-year public 
     institutions of higher education in the State; and
       ``(ii) success on relevant State career and technical 
     education standards.
       ``(2) College and career ready content standards.--
       ``(A) In general.--Each State plan shall demonstrate that, 
     not later than the 2015-2016 school year the State 
     educational agency will adopt and implement high-quality, 
     college and career ready content standards that comply with 
     this paragraph.
       ``(B) Subjects.--The State educational agency shall have 
     such high-quality, academic content standards for students in 
     kindergarten through grade 12 for, at a minimum, English 
     language arts, math, and science.
       ``(C) Elements.--College and career ready content standards 
     under this paragraph shall--
       ``(i) be developed through participation in a State-led 
     process that engages--

       ``(I) kindergarten through-grade-12 education experts 
     (including teachers and educational leaders); and
       ``(II) representatives of institutions of higher education, 
     the business community, and the early learning community;

       ``(ii) be rigorous, internationally benchmarked, and 
     evidence-based, requiring students to demonstrate the ability 
     to think critically, solve problems, and communicate 
     effectively;
       ``(iii) be either--

       ``(I) validated, including through written affirmation from 
     the State's public institutions of higher education, to 
     ensure that proficiency in the content standards will signify 
     that a student is on-track to graduate prepared for--

       ``(aa) placement in credit-bearing, nonremedial courses at 
     the 2-and 4-year public institutions of higher education in 
     the State; and
       ``(bb) success on relevant State career and technical 
     education standards; or

       ``(II) State-developed and voluntarily adopted by a 
     significant number of States;

       ``(iv) for standards from kindergarten through grade 3, 
     reflect progression in how children develop and learn the 
     requisite skills and content from earlier grades (including 
     preschool) to later grades; and
       ``(v) apply to all schools and students in the State.
       ``(D) English language proficiency standards.--Each State 
     educational agency shall develop and implement statewide, 
     high-quality English language proficiency standards that--
       ``(i) are aligned with the State's academic content 
     standards;
       ``(ii) reflect the academic language that is required for 
     success on the State educational agency's academic content 
     assessments;
       ``(iii) predict success on the applicable grade level 
     English language arts content assessment;
       ``(iv) ensure proficiency in each of the domains of 
     speaking, listening, reading, and writing in the appropriate 
     amount of time; and
       ``(v) address the different proficiency levels of English 
     learners.
       ``(E) Early learning standards.--The State educational 
     agency shall, in collaboration with the State agencies 
     responsible for overseeing early care and education programs 
     and the State early care and education advisory council, 
     develop and implement early learning standards across all 
     major domains of development for preschoolers that--
       ``(i) demonstrate alignment with the State academic content 
     standards;
       ``(ii) are implemented through dissemination, training, and 
     other means to applicable early care and education programs;
       ``(iii) reflect research and evidence-based developmental 
     and learning expectations;
       ``(iv) inform teaching practices and professional 
     development and services; and
       ``(v) for preschool age children, appropriately assist in 
     the transition to kindergarten.
       ``(F) Assurance.--Each State plan shall include an 
     assurance that the State has implemented the same content 
     standards for all students in the same grade and does not 
     have a policy of using different content standards for any 
     student subgroup.
       ``(3) High-quality assessments.--
       ``(A) In general.--Each State plan shall demonstrate that 
     the State educational agency will adopt and implement high-
     quality assessments in English language arts, math, and 
     science not later than the 2016-2017 school year that comply 
     with this paragraph.
       ``(B) Elements.--Such assessments shall--
       ``(i) be valid, reliable, appropriate, and of adequate 
     technical quality for each purpose required under this Act, 
     and be consistent with relevant, nationally recognized 
     professional and technical standards;
       ``(ii) measure the knowledge and skills necessary to 
     demonstrate proficiency in the academic content standards 
     under paragraph (2) for the grade in which the student is 
     enrolled;
       ``(iii) be developed as part of a system of assessments 
     providing data (including individual student achievement data 
     and individual student growth data), that shall be used to 
     improve teaching, learning, and program outcomes;
       ``(iv) be used in determining the performance of each local 
     educational agency and school in the State in accordance with 
     the State's accountability system under subsection (c);
       ``(v) provide an accurate measure of--

       ``(I) student achievement at all levels of student 
     performance; and
       ``(II) student academic growth;

       ``(vi) allow for complex demonstrations or applications of 
     knowledge and skills including the ability to think 
     critically, solve problems, and communicate effectively;
       ``(vii) be accessible for all students, including students 
     with disabilities and English learners, by--

       ``(I) incorporating principles of universal design as 
     defined by section 3(a) of the Assistive Technology Act of 
     1998 (29 U.S.C. 3002(a)); and
       ``(II) being interoperable when using any digital 
     assessment, such as computer-based and online assessments;

       ``(viii) provide for accommodations, including for 
     computer-based and online assessments, for students with 
     disabilities and English learners to provide a valid and 
     reliable measure of such students' achievement;
       ``(ix) produce individual student interpretive, 
     descriptive, and diagnostic reports that allow parents, 
     teachers, and school leaders to understand and address the 
     specific academic needs of students, and include information 
     regarding achievement on academic assessments, and that are 
     provided to parents, teachers, and school leaders, as soon as 
     is practicable after the assessment is given, in an 
     understandable and uniform format, and to the extent 
     practicable, in a language that parents can understand; and
       ``(x) may be partially delivered in the form of portfolios, 
     projects, or extended performance tasks as long as such 
     assessments meet the requirements of this subsection.
       ``(C) Administration.--Such assessments shall--
       ``(i) be administered to all students, including all 
     subgroups described in subsection (c)(3)(A), in the same 
     grade level for each content area assessed, except as 
     provided under subparagraph (E), through--

       ``(I) a single summative assessment each school year; or
       ``(II) multiple statewide assessments over the course of 
     the school year that result in a single summative score that 
     provides valid, reliable, and transparent information on 
     student achievement for each tested content area in each 
     grade level;

       ``(ii) for English language arts and math--

       ``(I) be administered annually, at a minimum, for students 
     in grade 3 through grade 8; and
       ``(II) be administered at least once, but not earlier than 
     11th grade for students in grades 9 through grade 12; and

       ``(iii) for science, be administered at least once during 
     grades 3 through 5, grades 6 through 8, and grades 9 through 
     12.
       ``(D) Native language assessments.--Each State educational 
     agency with at least 10,000 English learners, at least 25 
     percent of which speak the same language that is not English, 
     shall adopt and implement native language assessments for 
     that language consistent with State law. Such assessments 
     shall be for students--
       ``(i) for whom the academic assessment in the student's 
     native language would likely yield more accurate and reliable 
     information about such student's content knowledge;
       ``(ii) who are literate in the native language and have 
     received formal education in such language; or
       ``(iii) who are enrolled in a bilingual or dual language 
     program and the native language assessment is consistent with 
     such program's language of instruction.
       ``(E) Alternate assessments for students with the most 
     significant cognitive disabilities.--In the case of a State 
     educational agency that adopts alternate achievement 
     standards for students with the most significant cognitive 
     disabilities described in paragraph (4)(D), the State shall 
     adopt and implement high-quality statewide alternate 
     assessments aligned to such alternate achievement standards 
     that meet the requirements of subparagraphs (B) and (C), so 
     long as the State ensures that in the State the total number 
     of students in each grade level assessed in each subject does 
     not exceed the cap established under subsection 
     (c)(3)(E)(iii)(II).
       ``(F) English language proficiency assessments.--Each State 
     educational agency

[[Page H4915]]

     shall adopt and implement statewide English language 
     proficiency assessments that--
       ``(i) are administered annually and aligned with the 
     State's English language proficiency standards and academic 
     content standards;
       ``(ii) are accessible, valid, and reliable;
       ``(iii) measure proficiency in reading, listening, 
     speaking, and writing in English both individually and 
     collectively;
       ``(iv) assess progress and growth on language and content 
     acquisition; and
       ``(v) allow for the local educational agency to retest a 
     student in the individual domain areas that the student did 
     not pass, unless the student is newly entering a school in 
     the State, or is in the third, fifth, or eighth grades.
       ``(G) Special rule with respect to bureau funded schools.--
     In determining the assessments to be used by each school 
     operated or funded by the Department of the Interior's Bureau 
     of Indian Education receiving funds under this part, the 
     following shall apply:
       ``(i) Each such school that is accredited by the State in 
     which it is operating shall use the assessments the State has 
     developed and implemented to meet the requirements of this 
     section, or such other appropriate assessment as approved by 
     the Secretary of the Interior.
       ``(ii) Each such school that is accredited by a regional 
     accrediting organization shall adopt an appropriate 
     assessment, in consultation with and with the approval of, 
     the Secretary of the Interior and consistent with assessments 
     adopted by other schools in the same State or region, that 
     meets the requirements of this section.
       ``(iii) Each such school that is accredited by a tribal 
     accrediting agency or tribal division of education shall use 
     an assessment developed by such agency or division, except 
     that the Secretary of the Interior shall ensure that such 
     assessment meets the requirements of this section.
       ``(H) Assurance.--Each State plan shall include an 
     assurance that the State educational agency will take steps 
     to ensure that the State assessment system, which includes 
     all statewide assessments and local assessments is 
     coordinated and streamlined to eliminate duplication of 
     assessment purposes, practices, and use.
       ``(I) Accommodations.--Each State plan shall--
       ``(i) describe the accommodations for English learners and 
     students with disabilities on the assessments used by the 
     State which may include accommodations such as text-to-speech 
     technology or read aloud, braille, large print, calculator, 
     speech-to-text technology or scribe, extended time, and 
     frequent breaks;
       ``(ii) include evidence of the effectiveness of such 
     accommodations in maintaining valid results for the 
     appropriate population; and
       ``(iii) include evidence that such accommodations do not 
     change the construct intended to be measured by the 
     assessment or the meaning of the resulting scores.
       ``(J) Adaptive assessments.--In the case of a State 
     educational agency that develops and administers computer 
     adaptive assessments, such assessments shall meet the 
     requirements of this paragraph, and must measure, at a 
     minimum, each student's academic proficiency against the 
     State's content standards as described in paragraph (2) for 
     the grade in which the student is enrolled.
       ``(4) College and career ready achievement and growth 
     standards.--
       ``(A) In general.--Each State plan shall demonstrate that 
     the State will adopt and implement college and career ready 
     achievement standards in English language arts, math, and 
     science by the 2015-2016 school year that comply with this 
     paragraph.
       ``(B) Elements.--Such academic achievement standards shall 
     establish at a minimum, 3 levels of student achievement that 
     describe how well a student is demonstrating proficiency in 
     the State's academic content standards that differentiate 
     levels of performance to--
       ``(i) describe 2 levels of high achievement (on-target and 
     advanced) that indicate, at a minimum, that a student is 
     proficient in the academic content standards under paragraph 
     (2) as measured by the performance on assessments under 
     paragraph (3); and
       ``(ii) describe a third level of achievement (catch-up) 
     that provides information about the progress of a student 
     toward becoming proficient in the academic content standards 
     under paragraph (2) as measured by the performance on 
     assessments under paragraph (3).
       ``(C) Vertical alignment.--Such achievement standards are 
     vertically aligned to ensure a student who achieves at the 
     on-target or advanced levels under subparagraph (B)(i) 
     signifies that student is on-track to graduate prepared for--
       ``(i) placement in credit-bearing, nonremedial courses at 
     the 2- and 4-year public institutions of higher education in 
     the State; and
       ``(ii) success on relevant State career and technical 
     education standards.
       ``(D) Alternate achievement standards.--If a State 
     educational agency adopts alternate achievement standards for 
     students with the most significant cognitive disabilities, 
     such academic achievement standards shall establish, at a 
     minimum, 3 levels of student achievement that describe how 
     well a student is demonstrating proficiency in the State's 
     academic content standards that--
       ``(i) are aligned to the State's college and career ready 
     content standards under paragraph (2);
       ``(ii) are vertically aligned to ensure that a student who 
     achieves at the on-target or advanced level under clause 
     (v)(I) signifies that the student is on-track to access a 
     postsecondary education or competitive integrated employment;
       ``(ii) reflect concepts and skills that students should 
     know and understand for each grade;
       ``(iv) are supported by evidence-based learning 
     progressions to age and grade-level performance; and
       ``(v) establish, at a minimum--

       ``(I) 2 levels of high achievement (on-target and advanced) 
     that indicate, at a minimum, that a student with the most 
     significant cognitive disabilities is proficient in the 
     academic content standards under paragraph (2) as measured by 
     the performance on assessments under paragraph (3)(E); and
       ``(II) a third level of achievement (catch-up) that 
     provides information about the progress of a student with the 
     most significant cognitive disabilities toward becoming 
     proficient in the academic content standards under paragraph 
     (2) as measured by the performance on assessments under 
     paragraph (3)(E).

       ``(E) Student growth standards.--Each State plan shall 
     demonstrate that the State will adopt and implement student 
     growth standards for students in the assessed grades that 
     comply with this subparagraph, as follows:
       ``(i) On-target and advanced levels.--For a student who is 
     achieving at the on-target or advanced level of achievement, 
     the student growth standard is not less than the rate of 
     academic growth necessary for the student to remain at that 
     level of student achievement for not less than 3 years.
       ``(ii) Catch-up level.--For a student who is achieving at 
     the catch-up level of achievement, the student growth 
     standard is not less than the rate of academic growth 
     necessary for the student to achieve an on-target level of 
     achievement within 3 or 4 years, as determined by the State.
       ``(F) Prohibition.--A State may not establish alternate or 
     modified achievement standards for any subgroup of students, 
     except as provided under subparagraph (D).
       ``(5) Rule of construction.--Nothing in paragraph (3) shall 
     be construed to prescribe the use of the academic assessments 
     established pursuant to such paragraph for student promotion 
     or graduation purposes.
       ``(c) Accountability and School Improvement System.--The 
     State plan shall demonstrate that not later than the 2016-
     2017 school year, the State educational agency, in 
     consultation with representatives of local educational 
     agencies, teachers, school leaders, parents, community 
     organizations, communities representing underserved 
     populations and Indian tribes, has developed a single 
     statewide accountability and school improvement system (in 
     this subsection known as the `accountability system') that 
     ensures all students have the knowledge and skills to 
     successfully enter the workforce or postsecondary education 
     without the need for remediation by complying with this 
     subsection as follows:
       ``(1) Elements.--Each State accountability system shall, at 
     a minimum--
       ``(A) annually measure academic achievement for all 
     students, including each subgroup described in paragraph 
     (3)(A), in each public school, including each charter school, 
     in the State, including--
       ``(i) student academic achievement in accordance with the 
     academic achievement standards described in subsection 
     (b)(4);
       ``(ii) student growth in accordance with the student growth 
     standards described in subsection (b)(4)(E); and
       ``(iii) graduation rates in diploma granting schools;
       ``(B) set clear performance and growth targets in 
     accordance with paragraph (2) to improve the academic 
     achievement of all students as measured under subparagraph 
     (A) of this paragraph and to close achievement gaps so that 
     all students graduate ready for postsecondary education and 
     the workforce;
       ``(C) establish equity indicators to diagnose school 
     challenges and measure school progress within the improvement 
     system described in section 1116, including factors to 
     measure, for all students and each subgroup described in 
     paragraph (3)(A)--
       ``(i) academic learning, such as--

       ``(I) percentage of students successfully completing 
     rigorous coursework that aligns with college and career ready 
     standards described under subsection (b)(2) such as dual 
     enrollment, Advanced Placement (AP) or International 
     Baccalaureate (IB) courses;
       ``(II) percentage of students enrolled in arts courses;
       ``(III) student success on State or local educational 
     agency end-of course examinations; and
       ``(IV) student success on performance-based assessments 
     that are valid, reliable and comparable across a local 
     educational agency and meet the requirements of paragraph 
     (3)(B);

       ``(ii) student engagement, such as--

       ``(I) student attendance rates;
       ``(II) student discipline data, including suspension and 
     expulsion rates;
       ``(III) incidents of bullying and harassment; and
       ``(IV) surveys of student engagement and satisfaction;

       ``(iii) student advancement, such as--

       ``(I) student on-time promotion rates;

[[Page H4916]]

       ``(II) on-time credit accumulation rates;
       ``(III) course failure rates; and
       ``(IV) post-secondary and workforce entry rates;

       ``(iv) student health and wellness;
       ``(v) student access to instructional quality, such as--

       ``(I) number of qualified teachers and paraprofessionals;
       ``(II) number of specialized instructional support 
     personnel;
       ``(III) instructional personnel attendance, vacancies, and 
     turnover; and
       ``(IV) rates of effective teachers and principals, as 
     determined by the State or local educational agency;

       ``(vi) school climate and conditions for student success, 
     such as--

       ``(I) the availability of up-to-date instructional 
     materials, technology, and supplies;
       ``(II) measures of school safety; and
       ``(III) the condition of school facilities; including 
     accounting for well-equipped instructional spaces; and

       ``(vii) family and community engagement in education;
       ``(D) annually differentiate performance and condition of 
     schools based on--
       ``(i) the achievement measured under subparagraph (A);
       ``(ii) whether the school meets the performance and growth 
     targets set under paragraph (2); and
       ``(iii) to a lesser extent, data on the State-established 
     equity indicators, as described in subparagraph (C); and
       ``(E) identify using the differentiation described in 
     subparagraph (D), for the purposes under section 1116--
       ``(i) high priority schools that--

       ``(I) according to the State-established parameters 
     described in 1116(a)(2), have the lowest performance in the 
     local educational agency and the State using current and 
     prior year academic achievement, growth, and graduation rate 
     data as described in subparagraph (A) and data on the state-
     established equity indicators described in subparagraph (C); 
     or
       ``(II) as of the date of enactment of the Student Success 
     Act, have been identified under 1003(g); and

       ``(ii) schools in need of support that have not met one or 
     more of the performance targets set under paragraph (2) for 
     any subgroup described in paragraph (3)(A) in the same grade 
     level and subject, for two consecutive years; and
       ``(iii) reward schools that have--

       ``(I) the highest performance in the State for all students 
     and student subgroups described in paragraph (3)(A); or
       ``(II) made the most progress over at least the most recent 
     2-year period in the State in increasing student academic 
     achievement and graduation rates for all students and student 
     subgroups described in paragraph (3)(A); and
       ``(III) made significant progress in overcoming school 
     challenges identified using the State-established equity 
     indicators, as described in subparagraph (C).

       ``(2) Goals and targets.--
       ``(A) In general.--Each State educational agency shall 
     establish goals and targets for the State accountability and 
     school improvement system that comply with this paragraph. 
     Such targets shall be established separately for all 
     elementary school and secondary school students, economically 
     disadvantaged students, students from major racial and ethnic 
     groups, students with disabilities, and English learners and 
     expect accelerated academic gains from subgroups who are the 
     farthest away from college and career-readiness as determined 
     by annual academic achievement measures described in 
     paragraph (1)(A).
       ``(B) Achievement goals.--Each State educational agency 
     shall set multi-year goals that are consistent with the 
     academic and growth achievement standards under subsection 
     (b)(4) to ensure that all students graduate prepared to enter 
     the workforce or postsecondary education without the need for 
     remediation.
       ``(C) Performance targets.--Each State educational agency 
     shall set ambitious, but achievable annual performance 
     targets separately for each subgroup of students described in 
     paragraph (3)(A), for local educational agencies and schools, 
     for each grade level and in English language arts and math 
     that reflect the progress required for all students and each 
     subgroup of students described in paragraph (3)(A) to meet 
     the State-determined goals as required under subparagraph 
     (B), as approved by the Secretary.
       ``(D) Growth targets.--Each State educational agency shall 
     set ambitious but achievable growth targets that--
       ``(i) assist the State in achieving the academic 
     achievement goals described in subparagraph (B); and
       ``(ii) include targets that ensure all students, including 
     subgroups of students described in paragraph (3)(A), meet the 
     growth standards described in subsection (b)(4)(E).
       ``(E) Graduation rate goals and targets.--
       ``(i) Graduation rate goals.--Each State educational agency 
     shall set a graduation rate goal of not less than 90 percent.
       ``(ii) Graduation rate targets.--Each State educational 
     agency shall establish graduation rate targets which shall 
     not be less rigorous than the targets approved under section 
     200.19 of title 34, Code of Federal Regulations (or a 
     successor regulation).
       ``(iii) Extended-year graduation rate targets.--In the case 
     of a State that chooses to use an extended year graduation 
     rate in the accountability and school improvement system 
     described under this subsection, the State shall set extended 
     year graduation rate targets that are more rigorous than the 
     targets set under clause (ii) and, if applicable, are not 
     less rigorous than the targets approved under section 200.19 
     of title 34, Code of Federal Regulations (or a successor 
     regulation).
       ``(3) Fair accountability.--Each State educational agency 
     shall establish fair and appropriate policies and practices, 
     as a component of the accountability system established under 
     this subsection, to measure school, local educational agency, 
     and State performance under the accountability system that, 
     at a minimum, comply with this paragraph as follows:
       ``(A) Disaggregate.--Each State educational agency shall 
     disaggregate student achievement data in a manner that 
     complies with the State's group size requirements under 
     subparagraph (B) for the school's, local educational 
     agency's, and the State's performance on its goals and 
     performance targets established under paragraph (2), by each 
     content area and each grade level for which such goals and 
     targets are established, and, if applicable, by improvement 
     indicators described in paragraph (1)(D) for each of the 
     following groups:
       ``(i) All public elementary and secondary school students.
       ``(ii) Economically disadvantaged students.
       ``(iii) Students from major racial and ethnic groups.
       ``(iv) Students with disabilities.
       ``(v) English learners.
       ``(B) Subgroup size.--Each State educational agency shall 
     establish group size requirements for performance measurement 
     and reporting under the accountability system that--
       ``(i) is the same for all subgroups described in 
     subparagraph (A);
       ``(ii) does not exceed 15 students;
       ``(iii) yields statistically reliable information; and
       ``(iv) does not reveal personally identifiable information 
     about an individual student.
       ``(C) Participation.--Each State educational agency shall 
     ensure that--
       ``(i) not less than 95 percent of the students in each 
     subgroup described subparagraph (A) take the State's 
     assessments under subsection (b)(2); and
       ``(ii) any school or local educational agency that does not 
     comply with the requirement described in clause (i) of this 
     subparagraph may not be considered to have met its goals or 
     performance targets under paragraph (2).
       ``(D) Averaging.--Each State educational agency may average 
     achievement data with the year immediately preceding that 
     school year for the purpose of determining whether schools, 
     local educational agencies, and the State have met their 
     performance targets under paragraph (2).
       ``(E) Students with the most significant cognitive 
     disabilities.--
       ``(i) In general.--In calculating the percentage of 
     students scoring at the on-target levels of achievement and 
     the graduation rate for the purpose of determining whether 
     schools, local educational agencies, and the State have met 
     their performance targets under paragraph (2), a State shall 
     include all students with disabilities, even those students 
     with the most significant cognitive disabilities, and--

       ``(I) may include the on-target and advanced scores of 
     students with the most significant cognitive disabilities 
     taking alternate assessments under subsection (b)(3)(E) 
     provided that the number and percentage of such students who 
     score at the on-target or advanced level on such alternate 
     assessments at the local educational agency and the State 
     levels, respectively, does not exceed the cap established by 
     the Secretary under clause (iii) in the grades assessed and 
     subjects used under the accountability system established 
     under this subsection; and
       ``(II) may include students with the most significant 
     cognitive disabilities, who are assessed using alternate 
     assessments described in subsection (b)(3)(E) and who receive 
     a State-defined standards-based alternate diploma aligned 
     with alternate achievement standards described in 
     subparagraph (4)(D) and with completion of the student's 
     right to a free and appropriate public education under the 
     Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as graduating 
     with a regular secondary school diploma, provided that the 
     number and percentage of those students who receive a State-
     defined standards-based alternate diploma at the local 
     educational agency and the State levels, respectively, does 
     not exceed the cap established by the Secretary under clause 
     (iii).

       ``(ii) State requirements.--If the number and percentage of 
     students taking alternate assessments or receiving a State-
     defined standards-based alternate diploma exceeds the cap 
     under clause (iii) at the local educational agency or State 
     level, the State educational agency, in determining whether 
     the local educational agency or State, respectively, has met 
     its performance targets under paragraph (2), shall--

       ``(I) include all students with the most significant 
     cognitive disabilities;
       ``(II) count at the catch-up level of achievement or as not 
     graduating such students who exceed the cap;
       ``(III) include such students at the catch-up level of 
     achievement or as not graduating in

[[Page H4917]]

     each applicable subgroup at the school, local educational 
     agency, and State level; and
       ``(IV) ensure that parents are informed of the actual 
     academic achievement levels and graduation status of their 
     children with the most significant cognitive disabilities.

       ``(iii) Secretarial duties.--The Secretary shall establish 
     a cap for the purposes of this subparagraph which--

       ``(I) shall be based on the most recently available data 
     on--

       ``(aa) the incidence of students with the most significant 
     cognitive disabilities;
       ``(bb) the participation rates, including by disability 
     category, on alternate assessments using alternate 
     achievement standards pursuant to subsection (b)(3)(E);
       ``(cc) the percentage of students, including by disability 
     category, scoring at each achievement level on such alternate 
     assessments; and
       ``(dd) other factors the Secretary deems necessary; and

       ``(II) may not exceed 1 percent of all students in the 
     combined grades assessed.

       ``(4) Transition provisions.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Secretary shall take such steps as 
     necessary to provide for the orderly transition to the new 
     accountability and school improvement systems required under 
     this subsection from prior accountability and school 
     improvement systems in existence on the day before the date 
     of enactment of the Student Success Act.
       ``(B) Transition.--To enable the successful transition 
     described in this paragraph, each State educational agency 
     receiving funds under this part shall--
       ``(i) administer assessments that were in existence on the 
     day before the date of enactment of the Student Success Act 
     and beginning not later than the 2014-2015 school year, 
     administer high-quality assessments described in subsection 
     (b)(3);
       ``(ii) report student performance on the assessments 
     described in subparagraph (I), consistent with the 
     requirements under this title;
       ``(iii) set a new baseline for performance targets, as 
     described in paragraph (2)(C) and (2)(D), once new high-
     quality assessments described in subsection (b)(3) are 
     implemented;
       ``(iv) implement the accountability and school improvement 
     requirements of sections 1111 and 1116, except--

       ``(I) the State shall not be required to identify new 
     persistently low achieving schools or schools in need of 
     improvement under section 1116 for 1 year after high-quality 
     assessments described in subsection (b)(3) have been 
     implemented; and
       ``(II) shall continue to implement school improvement 
     requirements of section 1116 in persistently low achieving 
     schools and schools in need of improvement that were 
     identified as such in the year prior to implementation of new 
     high-quality assessments; and

       ``(v) assist local educational agencies in providing 
     training and professional development on the implementation 
     of new college and career ready standards and high-quality 
     assessments.
       ``(C) End of transition.--The transition described in this 
     paragraph shall be completed by no later than 2 years from 
     the date of enactment of the Student Success Act.
       ``(d) Other Provisions to Support Teaching and Learning.--
     Each State plan shall contain the following:
       ``(1) Descriptions.--A description of--
       ``(A) how the State educational agency will carry out the 
     responsibilities of the State under section 1116;
       ``(B) a plan to identify and reduce inequities in the 
     allocation of State and local resources, including personnel 
     and nonpersonnel resources, between schools that are 
     receiving funds under this title and schools that are not 
     receiving such funds under this title, consistent with the 
     requirements in section 1120A, including--
       ``(i) a description of how the State will support local 
     educational agencies in meeting the requirements of section 
     1120A; and
       ``(ii) a description of how the State will support local 
     educational agencies to align plans under subparagraph (A), 
     efforts to improve educator supports and working conditions 
     described in section 2112(b)(3), and efforts to improve the 
     equitable distribution of teachers and principals described 
     in section 2112(b)(5), with efforts to improve the equitable 
     allocation of resources as described in this subsection;
       ``(C) how the State educational agency will ensure that the 
     results of the State assessments described in subsection 
     (b)(3) and the school identifications described in subsection 
     (c)(1), respectively, will be provided to local educational 
     agencies, schools, teachers, and parents promptly, but not 
     later than before the beginning of the school year following 
     the school year in which such assessments, other indicators, 
     or evaluations are taken or completed, and in a manner that 
     is clear and easy to understand;
       ``(D) how the State educational agency will meet the 
     diverse learning needs of students by--
       ``(i) identifying and addressing State-level barriers to 
     implementation of universal design for learning, as described 
     in section 5429(b)(21), and multi-tier system of supports; 
     and
       ``(ii) developing and making available to local educational 
     agencies technical assistance for implementing universal 
     design for learning, as described in section 5429(b)(21), and 
     multi-tier system of supports;
       ``(E) for a State educational agency that adopts alternate 
     achievement standards for students with the most significant 
     cognitive disabilities under subsection (b)(4)(D)--
       ``(i) the clear and appropriate guidelines for 
     individualized education program teams to apply in 
     determining when a student's significant cognitive disability 
     justifies alternate assessment based on alternate achievement 
     standards, which shall include guidelines to ensure--

       ``(I) students with the most significant cognitive 
     disabilities have access to the general education curriculum 
     for the grade in which the student is enrolled;
       ``(II) participation in an alternate assessment does not 
     influence a student's placement in the least restrictive 
     environment;
       ``(III) determinations are made separately for each subject 
     and are re-determined each year during the annual 
     individualized education program team meeting;
       ``(IV) the student's mode of communication has been 
     identified and accommodated to the extent possible; and
       ``(V) parents of such students give informed consent that--

       ``(aa) their child's achievement be based on alternate 
     achievement standards; and
       ``(bb) if applicable, that participation in such 
     assessments precludes the student from completing the 
     requirements for a regular secondary school diploma; and
       ``(ii) the procedures the State educational agency will use 
     to ensure and monitor that individualized education program 
     teams implement the requirements of clause (i); and
       ``(iii) the plan to disseminate information on and promote 
     use of appropriate accommodations to increase the number of 
     students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who 
     are assessed using achievement standards described in 
     subparagraphs (B) and (C) of subsection (b)(4);
       ``(F) how the State educational agency will meet the needs 
     of English learners, including--
       ``(i) the method for identifying an English learner that 
     shall be used by all local educational agencies in the State;
       ``(ii) the entrance and exit requirements for students 
     enrolled in limited English proficient classes, which shall--

       ``(I) be based on rigorous English language standards; and
       ``(II) prepare such students to successfully complete the 
     State's assessments; and

       ``(iii) timelines and targets for moving students from the 
     lowest levels of English language proficiency to the State-
     defined English proficient level, including an assurance 
     that--

       ``(I) such targets will be based on student's initial 
     language proficiency level when first identified as limited 
     English proficient and grade; and
       ``(II) such timelines will ensure students achieve English 
     proficiency by 18 years of age, unless the State has obtained 
     prior approval by the Secretary;

       ``(G) how the State educational agency will assist local 
     educational agencies in improving instruction in all core 
     academic subjects;
       ``(H) how the State educational agency will develop and 
     improve the capacity of local educational agencies to use 
     technology to improve instruction; and
       ``(I) how any State educational agency with a charter 
     school law will support high-quality public charter schools 
     that receive funds under this title by--
       ``(i) ensuring the quality of the authorized public 
     chartering agencies in the State by establishing--

       ``(I) a system of periodic evaluation and certification of 
     public chartering agencies using nationally-recognized 
     professional standards; or
       ``(II) a statewide, independent chartering agency that 
     meets nationally-recognized professional standards;

       ``(ii) including in the procedure established pursuant to 
     clause (i) requirements for--

       ``(I) the annual filing and public reporting of 
     independently audited financial statements including 
     disclosure of amount and duration of any nonpublic financial 
     and in-kind contributions of support, by each public 
     chartering agency, for each school authorized by such agency, 
     and by each local educational agency and the State;
       ``(II) the adoption and enforcement of school employee 
     compensation and conflict of interest guidelines for all 
     schools authorized, which shall include disclosure of 
     executive pay and affiliated parties with financial interest 
     in the management operations, or contractual obligations of 
     the school;
       ``(III) a legally binding charter or performance contract 
     between each charter school and the school's authorized 
     public chartering agency that--

       ``(aa) describes the rights, duties, and remedies of the 
     school and the public chartering agency; and
       ``(bb) bases charter renewal and revocation decisions on an 
     agreed-to school accountability plan which includes financial 
     and organizational indicators, with significant weight given 
     to the student achievement on the achievement goals, 
     performance targets, and growth targets established pursuant 
     to subparagraphs (B), (C), and (D) of subsection (c)(2), 
     respectively, for each student subgroup described in 
     subsection (c)(3)(A), as well as
       ``(iii) developing and implementing, in consultation and 
     coordination with local educational agencies, a system of 
     intervention, revocation, or closure for charter schools and 
     public chartering agencies failing to

[[Page H4918]]

     meet the requirements and standards described in clauses (i) 
     and (ii), which, at a minimum provides for--

       ``(I) initial and regular review, no less than once every 3 
     years, of each public chartering agency; and
       ``(II) intervention, revocation, or closure of any charter 
     school identified for school improvement under section 1116.

       ``(2) Assurances.--Assurances that--
       ``(A) the State educational agency will participate in 
     biennial State academic assessments of 4th, 8th, and 12th 
     grade reading, mathematics, and science under the National 
     Assessment of Educational Progress carried out under section 
     303(b)(2) of the National Assessment of Educational Progress 
     Authorization Act, if the Secretary pays the costs of 
     administering such assessments;
       ``(B) the State educational agency will--
       ``(i) notify local educational agencies and the public of 
     the content and student academic achievement standards and 
     academic assessments developed under this section, and of the 
     authority to operate schoolwide programs; and
       ``(ii) fulfill the State educational agency's 
     responsibilities regarding local educational agency and 
     school improvement under section 1116;
       ``(C) the State educational agency will encourage local 
     educational agencies to consolidate funds from other Federal, 
     State, and local sources for school improvement activities 
     under 1116 and for schoolwide programs under section 1114;
       ``(D) the State educational agency has modified or 
     eliminated State fiscal and accounting barriers so that 
     schools can easily consolidate funds from other Federal, 
     State, and local sources for schoolwide programs under 
     section 1114;
       ``(E) that State educational agency will coordinate data 
     collection efforts to fulfill the requirements of this Act 
     and reduce the duplication of data collection to the extent 
     practicable;
       ``(F) the State educational agency will provide the least 
     restrictive and burdensome regulations for local educational 
     agencies and individual schools participating in a program 
     assisted under this part;
       ``(G) the State educational agency will inform local 
     educational agencies in the State of the local educational 
     agency's authority--
       ``(i) to transfer funds under title VI;
       ``(ii) to obtain waivers under part D of title IX; and
       ``(iii) if the State is an Ed-Flex Partnership State, to 
     obtain waivers under the Education Flexibility Partnership 
     Act of 1999;
       ``(H) the State educational agency will work with other 
     agencies, including educational service agencies or other 
     local consortia and comprehensive centers established under 
     the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002, and 
     institutions to provide professional development and 
     technical assistance to local educational agencies and 
     schools;
       ``(I) the State educational agency will ensure that local 
     educational agencies in the State comply with the 
     requirements of subtitle B of title VII of the McKinney-Vento 
     Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. lll17); and
       ``(J) the State educational agency has engaged in timely 
     and meaningful consultation with representatives of Indian 
     tribes located in the State in the development of the State 
     plan to serve local educational agencies under its 
     jurisdiction in order to--
       ``(i) improve the coordination of activities under this 
     Act;
       ``(ii) meet the purpose of this title; and
       ``(iii) meet the unique cultural, language, and educational 
     needs of Indian students.
       ``(e) Family Engagement.--Each State plan shall include a 
     plan for strengthening family engagement in education. Each 
     such plan shall, at a minimum, include--
       ``(1) a description of the State's criteria and schedule 
     for review and approval of local educational agency 
     engagement policies and practices pursuant to section 
     1112(e)(3);
       ``(2) a description of the State's system and process for 
     assessing local educational agency implementation of section 
     1118 responsibilities;
       ``(3) a description of the State's criteria for identifying 
     local educational agencies that would benefit from training 
     and support related to family engagement in education;
       ``(4) a description of the State's statewide system of 
     capacity-building and technical assistance for local 
     educational agencies and schools on effectively implementing 
     family engagement in education practices and policies to 
     increase student achievement;
       ``(5) an assurance that the State will refer to Statewide 
     Family Engagement Centers, as described in section 5702, 
     those local educational agencies that would benefit from 
     training and support related to family engagement in 
     education; and
       ``(6) a description of the relationship between the State 
     educational agency and Statewide Family Engagement Centers, 
     parent training and information centers, and community parent 
     resource centers in the State established under sections 671 
     and 672 of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
       ``(f) Peer Review and Secretarial Approval.--
       ``(1) Secretarial duties.--The Secretary shall--
       ``(A) establish a peer-review process to assist in the 
     review of State plans;
       ``(B) appoint individuals to the peer-review process who 
     are representative of parents, teachers, State educational 
     agencies, local educational agencies, and experts and who are 
     familiar with educational standards, assessments, 
     accountability, the needs of low-performing schools, and 
     other educational needs of students;
       ``(C) approve a State plan within 120 days of its 
     submission unless the Secretary determines that the plan does 
     not meet the requirements of this section;
       ``(D) if the Secretary determines that the State plan does 
     not meet the requirements of this section immediately notify 
     the State of such determination and the reasons for such 
     determination;
       ``(E) not decline to approve a State's plan before--
       ``(i) offering the State an opportunity to revise its plan;
       ``(ii) providing technical assistance in order to assist 
     the State to meet the requirements of this section; and
       ``(iii) providing a hearing; and
       ``(F) have the authority to disapprove a State plan for not 
     meeting the requirements of this part, but shall not have the 
     authority to require a State, as a condition of approval of 
     the State plan, to include in, or delete from, such plan one 
     or more specific elements of the State's academic content 
     standards or to use specific academic assessment instruments 
     or items.
       ``(2) State revisions.--A State plan shall be revised by 
     the State educational agency if the revision is necessary to 
     satisfy the requirements of this section.
       ``(3) Public review.--Notifications under this subsection 
     shall be made available to the public through the website of 
     the Department, including--
       ``(A) State plans submitted or resubmitted by a State;
       ``(B) peer review comments;
       ``(C) State plan determinations by the Secretary, including 
     approvals or disapprovals;
       ``(D) amendments or changes to State plans; and
       ``(E) hearings.
       ``(g) Duration of the Plan.--
       ``(1) In general.--Each State plan shall--
       ``(A) remain in effect for the duration of the State's 
     participation under this part or 4 years, whichever is 
     shorter; and
       ``(B) be periodically reviewed and revised as necessary by 
     the State educational agency to reflect changes in the 
     State's strategies and programs under this part, including 
     information on the progress the State has made in fulfilling 
     the requirements of this section.
       ``(2) Renewal.--A State educational agency that desires to 
     continue participation under this part shall submit a renewed 
     plan every 4 years, including information on progress the 
     State has made in--
       ``(A) implementing college- and career-ready content and 
     achievement standards and high-quality assessments described 
     in paragraph (b);
       ``(B) meeting its goals and performance targets described 
     in subsection (c)(2); and
       ``(C) improving the capacity and skills of teachers and 
     principals as described in section 2112.
       ``(2) Additional information.--If significant changes are 
     made to a State's plan, such as the adoption of new State 
     academic content standards and State student achievement 
     standards, new academic assessments, or new performance goals 
     or target, growth goals or targets, or graduation rate goals 
     or targets, such information shall be submitted to the 
     Secretary for approval.
       ``(h) Failure To Meet Requirements.--If a State fails to 
     meet any of the requirements of this section, the Secretary 
     may withhold funds for State administration under this part 
     until the Secretary determines that the State has fulfilled 
     those requirements.
       ``(i) Reports.--
       ``(1) Annual state report card.--
       ``(A) In general.--A State that receives assistance under 
     this part shall prepare and disseminate an annual State 
     report card. Such dissemination shall include, at a minimum, 
     publicly posting the report card on the home page of the 
     State educational agency's website.
       ``(B) Implementation.--The State report card shall be--
       ``(i) concise; and
       ``(ii) presented in an understandable and uniform format 
     and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language that 
     the parents can understand.
       ``(C) Required information.--The State shall include in its 
     annual State report card--
       ``(i) information, in the aggregate, and disaggregated and 
     cross-tabulated by the same major groups as the decennial 
     census of the population, ethnicity, gender, disability 
     status, migrant status, English proficiency, and status as 
     economically disadvantaged, except that such disaggregation 
     and cross-tabulation shall not be required in a case in which 
     the number of students in a category is insufficient to yield 
     statistically reliable information or the results would 
     reveal personally identifiable information about an 
     individual student on--

       ``(I) student achievement at each achievement level on the 
     State academic assessments described in subsection (b)(3), 
     including the most recent 2-year trend;
       ``(II) student growth on the State academic assessments 
     described in subsection (b)(3), including the most-recent 2-
     year trend;
       ``(III) the four-year adjusted cohort rate, the extended-
     year graduation rate (where applicable), and the graduation 
     rate by type of diploma, including the most recent 2-year 
     trend;

[[Page H4919]]

       ``(IV) the State established equity indicators under 
     subsection (c)(1)(C);
       ``(V) the percentage of students who did not take the State 
     assessments; and
       ``(VI) the most recent 2-year trend in student achievement 
     and student growth in each subject area and for each grade 
     level, for which assessments under this section are required;

       ``(ii) information that provides a comparison between the 
     actual achievement levels and growth of each group of 
     students described in subsection (c)(3)(A) and the 
     performance targets and growth targets in subsection (c)(2) 
     for each such group of students on each of the academic 
     assessments and for graduation rates required under this 
     part;
       ``(iii) if a State adopts alternate achievement standards 
     for students with the most significant cognitive 
     disabilities, the number and percentage of students taking 
     the alternate assessments and information on student 
     achievement at each achievement level and student growth, by 
     grade and subject;
       ``(iv) the number of students who are English learners, and 
     the performance of such students, on the State's English 
     language proficiency assessments, including the students' 
     attainment of, and progress toward, higher levels of English 
     language proficiency;
       ``(v) information on the performance of local educational 
     agencies in the State regarding school improvement, including 
     the number and names of each school identified for school 
     improvement under section 1116 and information on the 
     outcomes of the equity indicators outlined in section 
     1111(c)(1)(C);
       ``(vi) the professional qualifications of teachers in the 
     State, the percentage of such teachers teaching with 
     emergency or provisional credentials, and the percentage of 
     classes in the State not taught by qualified teachers, in the 
     aggregate and disaggregated by high-poverty compared to low-
     poverty schools which, for the purpose of this clause, means 
     schools in the top quartile of poverty and the bottom 
     quartile of poverty in the State;
       ``(vii) information on teacher effectiveness, as determined 
     by the State, in the aggregate and disaggregated by high-
     poverty compared to low-poverty schools which, for the 
     purpose of this clause, means schools in the top quartile of 
     poverty and the bottom quartile of poverty in the State;
       ``(viii) a clear and concise description of the State's 
     accountability system, including a description of the 
     criteria by which the State educational agency evaluates 
     school performance, and the criteria that the State 
     educational agency has established, consistent with 
     subsection (c), to determine the status of schools with 
     respect to school improvement; and
       ``(ix) outcomes related to quality charter authorizing 
     standards as described in subsection (d)(1)(I), including, at 
     a minimum, annual filing as described in subsection 
     (d)(1)(I)(ii)(I).
       ``(2) Annual local educational agency report cards.--
       ``(A) Report cards.--A local educational agency that 
     receives assistance under this part shall prepare and 
     disseminate an annual local educational agency report card.
       ``(B) Minimum requirements.--The State educational agency 
     shall ensure that each local educational agency collects 
     appropriate data and includes in the local educational 
     agency's annual report the information described in paragraph 
     (1)(C) as applied to the local educational agency and each 
     school served by the local educational agency, and--
       ``(i) in the case of a local educational agency--

       ``(I) the number and percentage of schools identified for 
     school improvement under section 1116 and how long the 
     schools have been so identified; and
       ``(II) information that shows how students served by the 
     local educational agency achieved on the statewide academic 
     assessment compared to students in the State as a whole;
       ``(III) per-pupil expenditures from Federal, State, and 
     local sources, including personnel and nonpersonnel 
     resources, for each school in the local educational agency, 
     consistent with the requirements under section 1120A;
       ``(IV) the number and percentage of secondary school 
     students who have been removed from the 4-year adjusted 
     cohort by leaver code, and the number and percentage of 
     students from each adjusted cohort that have been enrolled in 
     high school for more than 4 years but have not graduated with 
     a regular diploma; and
       ``(V) information on the number of military-connected 
     students (students who are a dependent of a member of the 
     Armed Forces, including reserve components thereof) served by 
     the local educational agency and how such military-dependent 
     students achieved on the statewide academic assessment 
     compared to all students served by the local educational 
     agency; and

       ``(ii) in the case of a school--

       ``(I) whether the school has been identified for school 
     improvement; and
       ``(II) information that shows how the school's students 
     achievement on the statewide academic assessments and other 
     improvement indicators compared to students in the local 
     educational agency and the State as a whole.

       ``(C) Other information.--A local educational agency may 
     include in its annual local educational agency report card 
     any other appropriate information, whether or not such 
     information is included in the annual State report card.
       ``(D) Data.--A local educational agency or school shall 
     only include in its annual local educational agency report 
     card data that are sufficient to yield statistically reliable 
     information, as determined by the State, and that do not 
     reveal personally identifiable information about an 
     individual student.
       ``(E) Public dissemination.--The local educational agency 
     shall publicly disseminate the report cards described in this 
     paragraph to all schools in the school district served by the 
     local educational agency and to all parents of students 
     attending those schools in an accessible, understandable, and 
     uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a 
     language that the parents can understand, and make the 
     information widely available through public means, such as 
     posting on the Internet, distribution to the media, and 
     distribution through public agencies.
       ``(3) Preexisting report cards.--A State educational agency 
     or local educational agency that was providing public report 
     cards on the performance of students, schools, local 
     educational agencies, or the State prior to the date of 
     enactment of the Student Success Act may use those report 
     cards for the purpose of this subsection, so long as any such 
     report card is modified, as may be needed, to contain the 
     information required by this subsection.
       ``(4) Cost reduction.--Each State educational agency and 
     local educational agency receiving assistance under this part 
     shall, wherever possible, take steps to reduce data 
     collection costs and duplication of effort by obtaining the 
     information required under this subsection through existing 
     data collection efforts.
       ``(5) Annual state report to the secretary.--Each State 
     educational agency receiving assistance under this part shall 
     report annually to the Secretary, and make widely available 
     within the State--
       ``(A) information on the State's progress in developing and 
     implementing
       ``(i) the college and career ready standards described in 
     subsection (b)(2);
       ``(ii) the academic assessments described in subsection 
     (b)(3); and
       ``(iii) the accountability and school improvement system 
     described in subsection (c); and
       ``(B) the annual State report card under paragraph (1).
       ``(6) Report to congress.--The Secretary shall transmit 
     annually to the Committee on Education and the Workforce of 
     the House of Representatives and the Committee on Health, 
     Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate a report that 
     provides national and State-level data on the information 
     collected under paragraph (5).
       ``(7) Parents right-to-know.--
       ``(A) Achievement information.--At the beginning of each 
     school year, a school that receives funds under this subpart 
     shall provide to each individual parent--
       ``(i) information on the level of achievement and growth of 
     the parent's child on each of the State academic assessments 
     and, as appropriate, other improvement indicators adopted in 
     accordance with this subpart; and
       ``(ii) timely notice that the parent's child has been 
     assigned, or has been taught for four or more consecutive 
     weeks by, a teacher who is not qualified or has been found to 
     be ineffective, as determined by the State or local 
     educational agency.
       ``(B) Qualifications.--At the beginning of each school 
     year, a local educational agency that receives funds under 
     this part shall notify the parents of each student attending 
     any school receiving funds under this part, information 
     regarding the professional qualifications of the student's 
     classroom teachers, including, at a minimum, the following:
       ``(i) Whether the teacher has met State qualification and 
     licensing criteria for the grade levels and subject areas in 
     which the teacher provides instruction.
       ``(ii) Whether the teacher is teaching under emergency or 
     other provisional status through which State qualification or 
     licensing criteria have been waived.
       ``(iii) Whether the teacher is currently enrolled in an 
     alternative certification program.
       ``(iv) Whether the child is provided services by 
     paraprofessionals or specialized instructional support 
     personnel and, if so, their qualifications.
       ``(C) Format.--The notice and information provided to 
     parents under this paragraph shall be in an understandable 
     and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided 
     in a language that the parents can understand.
       ``(j) Privacy.--Information collected under this section 
     shall be collected and disseminated in a manner that protects 
     the privacy of individuals.
       ``(k) Technical Assistance.--The Secretary shall provide a 
     State educational agency, at the State educational agency's 
     request, technical assistance in meeting the requirements of 
     this section, including the provision of advice by experts in 
     the development of college and career ready standards, high-
     quality academic assessments, and goals and targets that are 
     valid and reliable, and other relevant areas.
       ``(l) Voluntary Partnerships.--A State may enter into a 
     voluntary partnership with another State to develop and 
     implement the academic assessments and standards required 
     under this section.
       ``(m) Definitions.--In this section:

[[Page H4920]]

       ``(1) Adjusted cohort; extended-year; entering cohort; 
     transferred into; transferred out.--
       ``(A) Adjusted cohort.--Subject to subparagraph (D)(ii) 
     through (G), the term `adjusted cohort' means the difference 
     of--
       ``(i) the sum of--

       ``(I) the entering cohort; plus
       ``(II) any students that transferred into the cohort in any 
     of grades 9 through 12; minus

       ``(ii) any students that are removed from the cohort as 
     described in subparagraph (E).
       ``(B) Extended year.--The term `extended year' when used 
     with respect to a graduation rate, means the fifth or sixth 
     year after the school year in which the entering cohort, as 
     described in subparagraph (C), is established for the purpose 
     of calculating the adjusted cohort.
       ``(C) Entering cohort.--The term `entering cohort' means 
     the number of first-time 9th graders enrolled in a secondary 
     school 1 month after the start of the secondary school's 
     academic year.
       ``(D) Transferred into.--The term `transferred into' when 
     used with respect to a secondary school student, means a 
     student who--
       ``(i) was a first-time 9th grader during the same school 
     year as the entering cohort; and
       ``(ii) enrolls after the entering cohort is calculated as 
     described in subparagraph (B).
       ``(E) Transferred out.--
       ``(i) In general.--The term `transferred out' when used 
     with respect to a secondary school student, means a student 
     who the secondary school or local educational agency has 
     confirmed has transferred to another--

       ``(I) school from which the student is expected to receive 
     a regular secondary school diploma; or
       ``(II) educational program from which the student is 
     expected to receive a regular secondary school diploma.

       ``(ii) Confirmation requirements.--

       ``(I) Documentation required.--The confirmation of a 
     student's transfer to another school or educational program 
     described in clause (i) requires documentation from the 
     receiving school or program that the student enrolled in the 
     receiving school or program.
       ``(II) Lack of confirmation.--A student who was enrolled, 
     but for whom there is no confirmation of the student having 
     transferred out, shall remain in the cohort as a non-graduate 
     for reporting and accountability purposes under this section.

       ``(iii) Programs not providing credit.--A student enrolled 
     in a GED or other alternative educational program that does 
     not issue or provide credit toward the issuance of a regular 
     secondary school diploma shall not be considered transferred 
     out.
       ``(F) Cohort removal.--To remove a student from a cohort, a 
     school or local educational agency shall require 
     documentation to confirm that the student has transferred 
     out, emigrated to another country, or is deceased.
       ``(G) Treatment of other leavers and withdrawals.--A 
     student who was retained in a grade, enrolled in a GED 
     program, aged-out of a secondary school or secondary school 
     program, or left secondary school for any other reason, 
     including expulsion, shall not be considered transferred out, 
     and shall remain in the adjusted cohort.
       ``(H) Special rule.--For those secondary schools that start 
     after grade 9, the entering cohort shall be calculated 1 
     month after the start of the secondary school's academic year 
     in the earliest secondary school grade at the secondary 
     school.
       ``(2) 4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate.--The term `4-
     year adjusted cohort graduation rate' means the percent 
     obtained by calculating the product of--
       ``(A) the result of--
       ``(i) the number of students who--

       ``(I) formed the adjusted cohort 4 years earlier; and
       ``(II) graduate in 4 years or less with a regular secondary 
     school diploma; divided by

       ``(ii) the number of students who formed the adjusted 
     cohort for that year's graduating class 4 years earlier; 
     multiplied by
       ``(B) 100.
       ``(3) Extended-year graduation rate.--The term `extended-
     year graduation rate' for a school year is defined as the 
     percent obtained by calculating the product of the result 
     of--
       ``(A) the sum of--
       ``(i) the number of students who--

       ``(I) form the adjusted cohort for that year's graduating 
     class; and
       ``(II) graduate in an extended year with a regular 
     secondary school diploma; or
       ``(III) graduate before exceeding the age for eligibility 
     for a free appropriate public education (as defined in 
     section 602 of the Individuals with Disabilities Education 
     Act) under State law; divided by

       ``(ii) the result of--

       ``(I) the number of students who form the adjusted cohort 
     for that year's graduating class; plus
       ``(II) the number of students who transferred in during the 
     extended year defined in paragraph (1)(B), minus
       ``(III) students who transferred out, emigrated, or died 
     during the extended year defined in paragraph (1)(B); 
     multiplied by

       ``(B) 100.
       ``(4) Leaver code.--The term `leaver code' means a number 
     or series of numbers and letters assigned to a categorical 
     reason for why a student left the high school from which she 
     or he is enrolled without having earned a regular high school 
     diploma, except that--
       ``(A) an individual student with either a duplicative code 
     or whom has not been assigned a leaver code shall not be 
     removed from the cohort assigned for the purpose of 
     calculating the adjusted cohort graduation rate; and
       ``(B) the number of students with either a duplicative 
     leaver code or who have not been assigned a leaver code shall 
     be included in reporting requirements for the leaver code.
       ``(5) Multi-tier system of supports.--The term `multi-tier 
     system of supports' means a comprehensive system of 
     differentiated supports that includes evidence-based 
     instruction, universal screening, progress monitoring, 
     formative assessment, and research-based interventions 
     matched to student needs, and educational decision-making 
     using student outcome data.
       ``(6) Graduation rate.--The term `graduation rate' means a 
     4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate and the extended-year 
     graduation rate.
       ``(7) Regular secondary school diploma.--
       ``(A) The term `regular secondary school diploma' means 
     standard secondary school diploma awarded to the 
     preponderance of students in the State that is fully aligned 
     with the State's college and career ready achievement 
     standards as described under subsection (b)(4), or a higher 
     diploma. Such term shall not include GED's, certificates of 
     attendance, or any lesser diploma awards.
       ``(B) If a State adopts different paths to the regular 
     secondary school diploma, such different paths shall--
       ``(i) be available to all students in the State;
       ``(ii) be equally rigorous in their requirements; and
       ``(iii) signify that a student is prepared for college or a 
     career without the need for remediation.''.

       Strike section 117 and insert the following:

     SEC. 117. ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT AND LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY 
                   AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT; SCHOOL SUPPORT AND 
                   RECOGNITION.

       Section 1116 (20 U.S.C. 6316) is amended to read as 
     follows:

     ``SEC. 1116. SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT.

       ``(a) Local Review.--
       ``(1) In general.--Each local educational agency receiving 
     funds under this part shall--
       ``(A) use the State academic assessments, including 
     measures of student growth and graduation rates, and data on 
     the state-established equity indicators described in section 
     1111(c)(1)(C) to review, annually, the progress of each 
     school served under this part, and consistent with the 
     parameters described in paragraph (2), to determine whether 
     the school is--
       ``(i) meeting performance targets, growth targets, and 
     graduation rate targets established under section 1111(c)(2); 
     and
       ``(ii) making progress to address school challenges 
     identified using the state- established equity indicators 
     described in section 1111(c)(1)(C);
       ``(B) based on the review conducted under subparagraph (A), 
     determine whether a school served under this part is--
       ``(i) in need of support as described under section 
     1111(c)(1)(E)(ii); or
       ``(ii) a high priority school that meets the State-
     established paraments under paragraph (2);
       ``(C) publicize and disseminate the results of the local 
     annual review described in subparagraph (A) to parents, 
     teachers, principals, schools, and the community so that the 
     teachers, principals, other staff, and schools can 
     continually refine, in an instructionally useful manner, the 
     program of instruction to help all children served under this 
     part meet the college and career ready achievement standards 
     established under section 1111(b); and
       ``(D) use the equity indicators established under section 
     1111(c)(1)(C) to diagnose school challenges and measure 
     school progress in carrying out the school improvement 
     activities under this section.
       ``(2) High priority schools.--The State educational agency 
     shall establish parameters, consistent with section 
     1111(c)(1)(E)(i), to assist local educational agencies in 
     identifying high priority schools within the local 
     educational agency that--
       ``(A) for elementary schools--
       ``(i) shall use student achievement on the assessments 
     required under section 1111(b)(3), including prior year data;
       ``(ii) shall use student growth data on the assessments 
     under section 1111(b)(3), including prior year data; and
       ``(iii) shall use, to a lesser extent than each of the 
     parameters established in clauses (i) and (ii), data on the 
     equity indicators established under section 1111(c)(1)(C); 
     and
       ``(B) for secondary schools--
       ``(i) shall use student achievement on the assessments 
     required under section 1111(b)(3), including prior year data;
       ``(ii) shall use student growth data on the assessments 
     under section 1111(b)(3), including prior year data;
       ``(iii) shall use graduation rate data, including prior 
     year data; and
       ``(iv) shall use, to a lesser extent than each of the 
     parameters established in clauses (i) through clause (iii), 
     data on the equity indicators established under section 
     1111(c)(1)(C); or
       ``(v) shall include schools with 4-year adjusted cohort 
     graduation rates below 67 percent as high priority schools.
       ``(b) School Improvement.--
       ``(1) In general.--Each school served under this part 
     determined to be a school in need of

[[Page H4921]]

     support pursuant to section 1111(c)(1)(C)(ii) or a high-
     priority school pursuant to 1111(c)(1)(C)(i), shall form a 
     school improvement team described in paragraph (2) to develop 
     and implement a school improvement plan described in 
     paragraph (3) to improve educational outcomes for all 
     students and address existing resource inequities.
       ``(2) School improvement team.--
       ``(A) In general.--Each school described in paragraph (1) 
     shall form a school improvement team, which shall include 
     school leaders, teachers, parents, community members, and 
     specialized instructional support personnel.
       ``(B) Schools in need of support.--Each school improvement 
     team for a school in need of support may include an external 
     partner and representatives of the local educational agency 
     and the State educational agency.
       ``(C) High-priority schools.--Each school improvement team 
     for a high-priority school shall include an external partner 
     and representatives of the local educational agency and the 
     State educational agency.
       ``(3) School improvement plan.--
       ``(A) In general.--A school improvement team shall develop, 
     implement, and make publicly available a school improvement 
     plan that uses information available under the accountability 
     and school improvement system established under section 
     1111(c), data available under the early warning indicator 
     system established under subsection (c)(5), data on the 
     improvement indicators established under section 
     1111(c)(1)(D), and other relevant data to identify--
       ``(i) each area in which the school needs support for 
     improvement;
       ``(ii) the type of support required;
       ``(iii) how the school plans to use comprehensive, 
     evidence-based strategies to address such needs;
       ``(iv) how the school will measure progress in addressing 
     such needs using the goals and targets and improvement 
     indicators established under paragraphs (2) and (1)(D) of 
     section 1111(c), respectively, and identify which of the 
     goals and targets are not currently being met by the school; 
     and
       ``(v) how the school will review its progress and make 
     adjustments and corrections to ensure continuous improvement.
       ``(B) Planning period.--The school improvement team may use 
     a planning period, which shall not be longer than one school 
     year to develop and prepare to implement the school 
     improvement plan.
       ``(C) Plan requirements.--Each school improvement plan 
     shall describe the following:
       ``(i) Planning and preparation.--The activities during the 
     planning period, including--

       ``(I) the preparation activities conducted to effectively 
     implement the budgeting, staffing, curriculum, and 
     instruction changes described in the plan; and
       ``(II) how the school improvement team engaged parents and 
     community organizations.

       ``(ii) Targets.--The performance, growth, and graduation 
     rate targets that contributed to the school's status as a 
     school in need of support or high-priority school, and the 
     school challenges identified by the school improvement 
     indicators under section 1111(c)(1)(D).
       ``(iii) Evidence-based, school improvement strategies.--
     Evidence-based, school improvement strategies to address the 
     factors and challenges described in clause (ii), to improve 
     instruction, including in all core academic subjects, to 
     improve the achievement of all students and address the needs 
     of students identified at the catch-up level of achievement.
       ``(iv) Needs and capacity analysis.--A description and 
     analysis of the school's ability and the resources necessary 
     to implement the evidence-based, school improvement 
     strategies identified under clause (iii), including an 
     analysis of--

       ``(I) staffing resources, such as the number, experience, 
     training level, effectiveness as determined by the State or 
     local educational agency, responsibilities, and stability of 
     existing administrative, instructional, and non-instructional 
     staff;
       ``(II) budget resources, including how Federal, State, and 
     local funds are being spent for instruction and operations to 
     determine how existing resources can be aligned and used to 
     support improvement;
       ``(III) the school curriculum;
       ``(IV) the use of time, such as the school's schedule and 
     use of additional learning time; and
       ``(V) any additional resources and staff necessary to 
     effectively implement the school improvement activities 
     identified in the school improvement plan.

       ``(v) Identifying roles.--The roles and responsibilities of 
     the State educational agency, the local educational agency, 
     the school and, if applicable, the external partner in the 
     school improvement activities, including providing 
     interventions, support, and resources necessary to implement 
     improvements.
       ``(vi) Plan for evaluation.--The plan for continuous 
     evaluation of the evidence-based, school improvement 
     strategies, including implementation of and fidelity to the 
     school improvement plan, that includes at least quarterly 
     reviews of the effectiveness of such activities.
       ``(D) Additional requirements for high-priority schools.--
     For a persistently-low achieving school, the school 
     improvement plan shall, in addition to the requirements 
     described in subparagraph (B), describe how the school will--
       ``(i) address school-wide factors to improve student 
     achievement, including--

       ``(I) establishing high expectations for all students, 
     which at a minimum, align with the achievement standards and 
     growth standards under section 1111(b)(4);
       ``(II) improving school climate, including student 
     attendance and school discipline, through the use of school-
     wide positive behavioral supports and interventions and other 
     evidence based approaches to improving school climate;
       ``(III) ensuring that the staff charged with implementing 
     the school improvement plan are engaged in the plan and the 
     school turnaround effort;
       ``(IV) establishing clear--

       ``(aa) benchmarks for implementation of the plan; and
       ``(bb) targets for improvement on the equity indicators 
     under section 1111(c)(1)(C);
       ``(ii) organize the school to improve teaching and 
     learning, including through--

       ``(I) strategic use of time, such as--

       ``(aa) establishing common planning time for teachers and 
     interdisciplinary teams who share common groups of students;
       ``(bb) redesigning the school calendar year or day, such as 
     through block scheduling, summer learning programs, or 
     increasing the number of hours or days, in order to create 
     additional learning time; or
       ``(cc) creating a flexible school period to address 
     specific student academic needs and interests such as credit 
     recovery, electives, enrichment activities, or service 
     learning; and

       ``(II) alignment of resources to improvement goals, such as 
     through ensuring that students in transition grades are 
     taught by teachers prepared to meet their specific learning 
     needs;

       ``(iii) increase teacher and school leader effectiveness, 
     as determined by the State or local educational agency, 
     including through--

       ``(I) demonstrating the principal has the skills, capacity, 
     and record of success to significantly improve student 
     achievement and lead a school turnaround, which may include 
     replacing the principal;
       ``(II) screening all existing staff at the school, with the 
     leadership team, through a process that ensures a rigorous 
     and fair review of their applications;
       ``(III) improving the recruitment and retention of 
     qualified and effective teachers and principals, as 
     determined by the State or local educational agency, to work 
     in the school;
       ``(IV) professional development activities that respond to 
     student and school-wide needs aligned with the school 
     improvement plan, such as--

       ``(aa) training teachers, leaders, and administrators 
     together with staff from schools making achievement goals and 
     performance targets under the accountability system under 
     section 1111(c) that serve similar populations and in such 
     schools;
       ``(bb) establishing peer learning and coaching among 
     teachers; or
       ``(cc) facilitating collaboration, including through 
     professional communities across subject area and 
     interdisciplinary groups and similar schools;

       ``(V) appropriately identifying teachers for each grade and 
     course; and
       ``(VI) the development of effective leadership structures, 
     supports, and clear decision making processes, such as 
     through developing distributive leadership and leadership 
     teams;

       ``(iv) improve curriculum and instruction, including 
     through--

       ``(I) demonstrating the relevance of the curriculum and 
     learning for all students, including instruction in all core 
     academic subjects, and may include the use of online course-
     work as long as such course-work meets standards of quality 
     and best practices for online education;
       ``(II) increasing access to rigorous and advanced course-
     work, including adoption and implementation of a college- and 
     career-ready curriculum, and evidence-based, engaging 
     instructional materials aligned with such a curriculum, for 
     all students;
       ``(III) increasing access to contextualized learning 
     opportunities aligned with readiness for postsecondary 
     education and the workforce, such as providing--

       ``(aa) work-based, project-based, and service-learning 
     opportunities; or
       ``(bb) a high-quality, college preparatory curriculum in 
     the context of a rigorous career and technical education 
     core;

       ``(IV) regularly collecting and using data to inform 
     instruction, such as--

       ``(aa) through use of formative assessments;
       ``(bb) creating and using common grading rubrics; or
       ``(cc) identifying effective instructional approaches to 
     meet student needs; and

       ``(V) emphasizing core skills instruction, such as 
     literacy, across content areas;

       ``(v) provide students with academic and social support to 
     address individual student learning needs, including 
     through--

       ``(I) ensuring access to services and expertise of 
     specialized instructional support personnel;
       ``(II) supporting students at the catch-up level of 
     achievement who need intensive intervention;
       ``(III) increasing personalization of the school experience 
     through learning structures that facilitate the development 
     of student and staff relationships;

[[Page H4922]]

       ``(IV) offering extended-learning, credit recovery, 
     mentoring, or tutoring options of sufficient scale to meet 
     student needs;
       ``(V) providing evidence-based, accelerated learning for 
     students with academic skill levels below grade level;
       ``(VI) coordinating and increasing access to integrated 
     services, such as providing specialized instructional support 
     personnel;
       ``(VII) providing transitional support between grade-spans, 
     including postsecondary planning.
       ``(VIII) meeting the diverse learning needs of all students 
     through strategies such as a multi-tier system of supports 
     and universal design for learning, as described in section 
     5429(b)(21); and
       ``(IX) engaging families and community partners, including 
     community-based organizations, organizations representing 
     underserved populations, Indian tribes (as appropriate), 
     organizations assisting parent involvement, institutions of 
     higher education, and businesses, in school improvement 
     activities through evidence-based strategies.

       ``(E) Submission and approval.--The school improvement team 
     shall submit the school improvement plan to the local 
     educational agency or the State educational agency, as 
     determined by the State educational agency based on the local 
     educational agency's ability to effectively monitor and 
     support the school improvement activities. Upon receiving the 
     plan, the local educational agency or the State educational 
     agency, as appropriate, shall--
       ``(i) establish a peer review process to assist with review 
     of the school improvement plan; and
       ``(ii) promptly review the plan, work with the school 
     improvement team as necessary, and approve the plan if the 
     plan meets the requirements of this paragraph.
       ``(F) Revision of plan.--A school improvement team may 
     revise the school improvement plan as additional information 
     and data is available.
       ``(G) Implementation.--A school with the support and 
     assistance of the local educational agency shall implement 
     the school improvement plan expeditiously, but not later than 
     the beginning of the next full school year after 
     identification for improvement.
       ``(4) Evaluation of school improvement.--
       ``(A) In general.--
       ``(i) Review.--The State educational agency or local 
     educational agency, as determined by the State in accordance 
     with paragraph (3)(D) shall, annually, review data with 
     respect to each school in need of support and each high-
     priority school to set clear benchmarks for progress, to 
     guide adjustments and corrections, to evaluate whether the 
     supports and interventions identified within the school 
     improvement plan are effective and the school is meeting the 
     targets for improvement established under its such plan, and 
     to specify what actions ensue for schools not making 
     progress.
       ``(ii) Data.--In carrying out the annual review under 
     clause (i), the school, the local educational agency, or 
     State educational agency shall measure progress on--

       ``(I) student achievement, student growth, and graduation 
     rates against the goals and targets established under section 
     1111(c)(2); and
       ``(II) improvement indicators as established under section 
     1111(c)(1)(D).

       ``(B) Schools in need of support.--If, after 3 years of 
     implementing its school improvement plan, a school in need of 
     support does not meet the goals and targets under section 
     1111(c)(2) that were identified under the school improvement 
     plan as not being met by the school and the improvement 
     indicators established under section 1111(c)(1)(D), then--
       ``(i) the local educational agency shall evaluate school 
     performance and other data, and provide intensive assistance 
     to that school in order to improve the effectiveness of the 
     interventions; and
       ``(ii) the State educational agency or the local 
     educational agency, as determined by the State, shall 
     determine whether the school shall partner with an external 
     partner--

       ``(I) to revise the school improvement plan; and
       ``(II) to improve, and as appropriate, revise, school 
     improvement strategies that meet the requirements of 
     paragraph (3)(B)(iii).

       ``(C) High-priority schools.--If, after 3 years of 
     implementing its school improvement plan, a high-priority 
     school does not demonstrate progress on the goals and targets 
     under section 1111(c)(2) that were identified under the 
     school improvement plan as not being met by the school or the 
     equity indicators established under section 1111(c)(1)(C), 
     then--
       ``(i) the local educational agency, in collaboration with 
     the State educational agency, shall determine actionable next 
     steps which may include school closure, replacement, or State 
     take-over of such school, shall provide all students enrolled 
     with new high-quality educational options;
       ``(ii) the local educational agency, and as appropriate the 
     State educational agency, shall develop and implement a plan 
     to assist with any resulting transition of the school under 
     clause (i) that--

       ``(I) is developed in consultation with parents and the 
     community;
       ``(II) addresses the needs of the students at the school by 
     considering strategies such as--

       ``(aa) opening a new school;
       ``(bb) graduating out current students and closing the 
     school in stages; and
       ``(cc) enrolling the students who attended the school in 
     other schools in the local educational agency that are higher 
     achieving, provided the other schools are within reasonable 
     proximity to the closed school and ensures receiving schools 
     have the capacity to enroll incoming students; and

       ``(III) provides information about high-quality educational 
     options and transition and support services to students who 
     attended that school and their parents.

       ``(D) Persistently low achieving school.--If, after 5 years 
     of implementing its school improvement plan, a persistently 
     low achieving school does not demonstrate progress on the 
     goals and targets under section 1111(c)(2) that were 
     identified under the school improvement plan, then the local 
     educational agency, in collaboration with the State 
     educational agency, shall determine actionable next steps, 
     which may include school closure, replacement, or State take-
     over of such school, and shall provide all students with 
     enrolled new high-quality educational options, as described 
     in subparagraph (C).
       ``(c) Local Educational Agency Responsibilities.--A local 
     educational agency served by this part, in supporting the 
     schools identified as a school in need of support or a high-
     priority school served by the agency, shall--
       ``(1) address resource inequities to improve student 
     achievement by--
       ``(A) targeting resources and support to those schools 
     identified as high priority or as in need of support, 
     including additional resources and staff necessary to 
     implement the school improvement plan, as described in 
     subsection (b)(3)(C)(iv)(V), and
       ``(B) ensuring the local educational agency budget calendar 
     is aligned with school staff and budgeting needs;
       ``(2) address local educational agency-wide factors to 
     improve student achievement by--
       ``(A) supporting the use of data to improve teaching and 
     learning through--
       ``(i) improving longitudinal data systems;
       ``(ii) regularly analyzing and disseminating usable data to 
     educators, parents, and students;
       ``(iii) building the data and assessment literacy of 
     teachers and principals; and
       ``(iv) evaluating at kindergarten entry the kindergarten 
     readiness of children and addressing the educational and 
     development needs determined by such evaluation;
       ``(B) addressing school transition needs of the local 
     educational agency by--
       ``(i) using kindergarten readiness data to consider 
     improving access to high-quality early education 
     opportunities; and
       ``(ii) providing targeted research-based interventions to 
     middle schools that feed into high schools identified for 
     school improvement under this section;
       ``(C) supporting human capital systems that ensure there is 
     a sufficient pool of qualified and effective teachers and 
     school leaders, as determined by the State or local 
     educational agency, to work in schools served by the local 
     educational agency;
       ``(D) developing support for school improvement plans among 
     key stakeholders such as parents and families, community 
     groups representing underserved populations, Indian tribes 
     (as appropriate), educators, and teachers;
       ``(E) carrying out administrative duties under this 
     section, including evaluation for school improvement and 
     technical assistance for schools; and
       ``(F) coordinating activities under this section with other 
     relevant State and local agencies, as appropriate;
       ``(3) supporting professional development activities for 
     teachers, school leaders, and specialized instructional 
     support personnel aligned to school improvement activities;
       ``(4) address curriculum and instruction factors to improve 
     student achievement by--
       ``(A) ensuring curriculum alignment with the State's early 
     learning standards and postsecondary education programs;
       ``(B) providing academically rigorous education options 
     such as--
       ``(i) effective dropout prevention, credit and dropout 
     recovery and recuperative education programs for disconnected 
     youth and students who are not making sufficient progress to 
     graduate high school in the standard number of years or who 
     have dropped out of high school;
       ``(ii) providing students with postsecondary learning 
     opportunities, such as through access to a relevant 
     curriculum or course of study that enables a student to earn 
     a secondary school diploma and--

       ``(I) an associate's degree; or
       ``(II) not more than 2 years of transferable credit toward 
     a postsecondary degree or credential;

       ``(iii) integrating rigorous academic education with career 
     training, including training that leads to postsecondary 
     credentials for students;
       ``(iv) increasing access to Advanced Placement or 
     International Baccalaureate courses and examinations; or
       ``(v) developing and utilizing innovative, high quality 
     distance learning strategies to improve student academic 
     achievement; and
       ``(C) considering how technology can be used to support 
     school improvement activities;
       ``(5) address student support factors to improve student 
     achievement by--

[[Page H4923]]

       ``(A) establishing an early warning indicator system to 
     identify students who are at risk of dropping out of high 
     school and to guide preventive and recuperative school 
     improvement strategies, including--
       ``(i) identifying and analyzing the academic risk factors 
     that most reliably predict dropouts by using longitudinal 
     data of past cohorts of students;
       ``(ii) identifying specific indicators of student progress 
     and performance, such as attendance, academic performance in 
     core courses, and credit accumulation, to guide decision 
     making;
       ``(iii) identifying or developing a mechanism for regularly 
     collecting and analyzing data about the impact of 
     interventions on the indicators of student progress and 
     performance; and
       ``(iv) analyzing academic indicators to determine whether 
     students are on track to graduate secondary school in the 
     standard numbers of years; and
       ``(B) identifying and implementing strategies for pairing 
     academic support with integrated student services and case-
     managed interventions for students requiring intensive 
     supports which may include partnerships with other external 
     partners;
       ``(6) promote family outreach and engagement in school 
     improvement activities, including those required by section 
     1118, to improve student achievement;
       ``(7) for each school identified for school improvement, 
     ensure the provision of technical assistance as the school 
     develops and implements the school improvement plan 
     throughout the plan's duration; and
       ``(8) identify school improvement strategies that are 
     consistently improving student outcomes and disseminate those 
     strategies so that all schools can implement them.
       ``(d) State Educational Agency Responsibilities.--A State 
     educational agency served by this part, in supporting schools 
     identified as a school in need of support or a high-priority 
     school and the local educational agencies serving such 
     schools, shall--
       ``(1) assess and address local capacity constraints to 
     ensure that its local educational agencies can meet the 
     requirements of this section;
       ``(2) target resources and support to those schools in the 
     State that are identified as a school in need of support or a 
     high-priority school and to local educational agencies 
     serving such schools, including additional resources 
     necessary to implement the school improvement plan as 
     described in subsection (b)(3)(C)(iv)(V);
       ``(3) provide support and technical assistance, including 
     assistance to school leaders, teachers, and other staff, to 
     assist local educational agencies and schools in using data 
     to support school equity and in addressing the equity 
     indicators described in section 1111(c)(1)(C);
       ``(4) identify school improvement strategies that are 
     consistently improving student outcomes and disseminate those 
     strategies so that all schools can implement them;
       ``(5) leverage resources from other funding sources, such 
     as school improvement funds, technology funds, and 
     professional development funds to support school improvement 
     activities;
       ``(6) provide a statewide system of support, including 
     regional support services, to improve teaching, learning, and 
     student outcomes;
       ``(7) assist local educational agencies in developing early 
     warning indicator systems;
       ``(8) with respect to schools that will work with external 
     partners to improve student achievement--
       ``(A) develop and apply objective criteria to potential 
     external partners that are based on a demonstrated record of 
     effectiveness in school improvement;
       ``(B) maintain an updated list of approved external 
     partners across the State;
       ``(C) develop, implement, and publicly report on standards 
     and techniques for monitoring the quality and effectiveness 
     of the services offered by approved external partners, and 
     for withdrawing approval from external partners that fail to 
     improve high-priority schools; and
       ``(D) may identify external partners as approved, 
     consistent with the requirements under paragraph (7), who 
     agree to provide services on the basis of receiving payments 
     only when student achievement has increased at an appropriate 
     level as determined by the State educational agency and 
     school improvement team under subsection (b)(2); and
       ``(9) carry out administrative duties under this section, 
     including providing monitoring and technical assistance to 
     local educational agencies and schools.
       ``(e) Rules of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed--
       ``(1) to alter or otherwise affect the rights, remedies, 
     and procedures afforded school or local educational agency 
     employees under Federal, State, or local laws (including 
     applicable regulations or court orders) or under the terms of 
     collective bargaining agreements, memoranda of understanding, 
     or other agreements between such employees and their 
     employers;
       ``(2) to require a child to participate in an early 
     learning program; or
       ``(3) to deny entry to kindergarten for any individual if 
     the individual is legally eligible, as defined by State or 
     local law.
       ``(f) Definition.--In this section, the term `external 
     partner' means an entity--
       ``(1) that is an organization such as a nonprofit 
     organization, community-based organization, local education 
     fund, service organization, educational service agency, or 
     institution of higher education; and
       ``(2) that has demonstrated expertise, effectiveness, and a 
     record of success in providing evidence-based strategies and 
     targeted support such as data analysis, professional 
     development, or provision of nonacademic support and 
     integrated student services to local educational agencies, 
     schools, or students that leads to improved teaching, 
     learning, and outcomes for students.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 347, the gentleman 
from Colorado (Mr. Polis) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Colorado.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, No Child Left Behind's metrics are outdated 
and rigid. On that we agree. But H.R. 5 in its current form abandons 
provisions that are crucial to ensuring equal educational opportunities 
for all of our Nation's students.
  My amendment advances a more comprehensive and effective vision of 
accountability at the school district and State levels.
  This new language expects States to set college- and career-ready 
standards rather than to allow them to dumb down their standards in 
order to inflate their results.
  It also requires States to set performance growth and graduation rate 
targets that ensure that schools improve every year for all subgroups, 
including for students with disabilities.
  One of the major deficiencies in H.R. 5 and one of the reasons that 
all of the advocacy groups for students with learning disabilities 
oppose the bill is it effectively removes the accountability we have 
for students with disabilities to ensure that they continue to learn.
  There is currently a 1 percent cap on the students with the most 
severe disabilities who are not tested. H.R. 5 would eliminate the 1 
percent cap on alternative assessments based on alternative achievement 
standards and would remove it altogether, allowing, ultimately, schools 
and States to decide not to have any accountability for those students 
who need programs that meet their learning needs the most.

                              {time}  1700

  The Democratic substitute amendment upholds our Nation's civil rights 
and equity responsibilities to ensure that all students receive a high-
quality education.
  It reinstates the 1 percent cap on alternative assessments for 
students with disabilities. It makes sure that accountability is a 
meaningful word and takes meaningful steps toward getting 
accountability right, rather than allowing discrimination and bad 
choices to continue to result in an increasing achievement gap across 
our country.
  This amendment is also reflected in the Democratic substitute and 
would make sure that we have an accountability system that prepares our 
students for the jobs and the workforce of the 21st century and to move 
on to higher education.
  Absent including this language or the Democratic substitute in the 
final passage of the bill, the bill in its current form would be a step 
backward, a step to lower standards, a step to reduce accountability, 
and a step to allow deficiencies to be swept under the rug, as they 
once were.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Chairman, I claim time in opposition to the 
gentleman's amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Zeldin).
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  My daughters just completed third grade, and I strongly support 
higher standards for them and their generation, but we need to set up 
our children to succeed, not fail. We need to stop federally mandated 
overtesting in our schools.
  This amendment would be a giant leap backwards for education reform. 
Rather than reforming the failed policies of No Child Left Behind, this 
amendment embraces the most problematic portions, continuing to obsess 
over federally mandated performance standards and using that to measure 
teacher performance.

[[Page H4924]]

  What is most insulting is that this proposal is so flawed that the 
sponsor needs to leverage Federal money to lure cash-strapped States to 
buy in because the proposal doesn't stand on its own merits.
  Our schools need greater flexibility and local control. This 
amendment would do the exact opposite, which is why I strongly oppose 
its passage and encourage all my colleagues to do the same.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Scott), the ranking member on the committee.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chairman, the present law only requires 
that States identify achievement gaps and prescribes exactly what has 
to be done to address the achievement gaps.
  Unfortunately, the one-size-fits-all prescription has often failed to 
effectively address the achievement gaps. The underlying bill goes 
overboard by eliminating any requirement that something gets done. The 
gentleman's amendment reinstates the requirement that something be 
done, but directs the States to develop their own locally tailored 
response to achievement gaps. This approach is much more likely to be 
effective and will be part of the Democratic substitute that will be 
voted on shortly.
  Mr. Chairman, before we leave the bill, I would like to thank many 
members of our staff that have worked on this bill since January. They 
have spent days and nights and weekends working on the bill, and I 
would like to acknowledge them and their work today.
  Denise Forte, Jacque Chevalier, Christian Haines, Ashlyn Holeyfield, 
Arika Trim, Tina Hone, Tylease Alli, Kiara Pesante, and Brian Kennedy 
all worked very hard on this bill and deserve significant recognition.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Utah (Mrs. Love).
  Mrs. LOVE. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment. As a 
mayor and mainly as a mother--I have three children in public schools--
I have found that the best solutions are found at the most local level.
  This amendment puts a larger footprint in the hands of the Federal 
Government and gives more power to the Federal Government, instead of 
our local agencies. I believe that the best people to teach our 
students are the people at the local level. I trust teachers and 
parents to make decisions for students.
  I made a promise that I was going to do everything I can to put the 
decisionmaking back into the hands of people, not into the hands of the 
Federal Government. I believe that this amendment actually puts it into 
the hands of the Federal Government and gives us a big step backwards.
  I believe that we, as people, when we are given more options, we can 
make better decisions; and when we make better decisions, we can do 
that at a local level and not at a Federal level. I ask that we vote 
against this amendment. I stand in opposition of this amendment.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chair, I would like to inquire as to how much time 
remains.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado has 1\3/4\ minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Minnesota has 2\3/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Chairman, the gentlewoman from Utah talked about 
decisions and implementation at the local level. On that, we agree. 
What this amendment is about is accountability metrics under whether we 
look at those decisions that are made locally and driven locally and by 
the State work or don't work.
  We want to allow the flexibility to get things right and close the 
achievement gap but not the flexibility to continue to ignore 
persistent gaps in our education system that continue to poorly serve 
too many low-income students and minority students.
  Given that my amendment is included in its entirety in the Democratic 
substitute upon which we will be voting, I ask unanimous consent to 
withdraw my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Colorado?
  There was no objection.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
114-29 and part A of House Report 114-192 on which further proceedings 
were postponed, in the following order:

Amendments printed in part B of House Report 114-29:
  Amendment No. 30 by Mr. Zeldin of New York.
  Amendment No. 31 by Mr. Hurd of Texas.
  Amendment No. 32 by Mr. Grayson of Florida.
  Amendment No. 33 by Ms. Wilson of Florida.
  Amendment No. 35 by Mr. Carson of Indiana.
  Amendment No. 39 by Ms. Brownley of California.
  Amendment No. 40 by Mr. Loebsack of Iowa.
  Amendment No. 41 by Mr. Polis of Colorado.
  Amendment No. 43 by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi.

Amendments printed in part A of House Report 114-192:
  Amendment No. 46 by Mr. Walker of North Carolina.
  Amendment No. 47 by Mr. Salmon of Arizona.

And amendment No. 44 printed in part B of House Report 114-29 by Mr. 
Scott of Virginia.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                 Amendment No. 30 Offered by Mr. Zeldin

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Zeldin) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 373, 
noes 57, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 410]

                               AYES--373

     Abraham
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boustany
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Cicilline
     Clarke (NY)
     Clawson (FL)
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graham
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Higgins
     Hill
     Holding
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy
     McCaul

[[Page H4925]]


     McClintock
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Norcross
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Quigley
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruppersberger
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Trott
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                                NOES--57

     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Brady (PA)
     Capps
     Carson (IN)
     Chu, Judy
     Clark (MA)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Conyers
     Cummings
     DeSaulnier
     Dingell
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Gallego
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Johnson (GA)
     Kildee
     Kuster
     Lowenthal
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     McCollum
     McDermott
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     O'Rourke
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Price (NC)
     Rangel
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sarbanes
     Schrader
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Takai
     Takano
     Torres
     Van Hollen
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Deutch
     Lofgren

                              {time}  1743

  Messrs. GRIJALVA, McDERMOTT, CUMMINGS, NEAL, TAKAI, and COHEN changed 
their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Ms. FUDGE, Messrs. GOHMERT, KEATING, HIGGINS, LABRADOR, AGUILAR, 
SWALWELL of California, Mlles. ESHOO, BASS, Messrs. CICILLINE, 
LANGEVIN, LEVIN, LEWIS, BERA, Mlles. MAXINE WATERS of California, 
VELAZQUEZ, Mr. SERRANO, Mrs. BEATTY, Messrs. CROWLEY, NORCROSS, VARGAS, 
SCHAKOWSKY, CUELLAR, McGOVERN, BECERRA, TONKO, Mlles. SLAUGHTER, 
DUCKWORTH, and Mr. CONNOLLY changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 31 Offered by Mr. Hurd

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Hurd) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 424, 
noes 2, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 411]

                               AYES--424

     Abraham
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Ashford
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boustany
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clawson (FL)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DeSaulnier
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farenthold
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graham
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Higgins
     Hill
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Holding
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Israel
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Knight
     Kuster
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Lynch
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nolan
     Norcross
     Nugent
     Nunes
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Polis
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price (NC)
     Price, Tom
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Russell
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Trott
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                                NOES--2

     Conyers
     Wilson (FL)

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Buck
     Culberson
     Davis, Rodney
     Deutch
     Lieu, Ted
     Lofgren
     Stutzman


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1743

  So the amendment was agreed to.

[[Page H4926]]

  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 411, I was 
unavoidably detained. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yes.''
  Ms. WILSON of Florida. Mr. Chair, during rollcall vote No. 411 on 
H.R. 5, I mistakenly recorded my vote as ``no'' when I should have 
voted ``yes.''


                Amendment No. 32 Offered by Mr. Grayson

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Grayson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 199, 
noes 228, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 412]

                               AYES--199

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSaulnier
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Ellmers (NC)
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garrett
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rogers (AL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                               NOES--228

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Lynch
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Roskam
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--6

     Culberson
     Deutch
     Griffith
     Lofgren
     Rogers (KY)
     Stivers


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1746

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


           Amendment No. 33 Offered by Ms. Wilson of Florida

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Florida 
(Ms. Wilson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 192, 
noes 237, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 413]

                               AYES--192

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Simpson

[[Page H4927]]


     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--237

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Buck
     Culberson
     Deutch
     Lofgren


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1750

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


           Amendment No. 35 Offered by Mr. Carson of Indiana

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Indiana 
(Mr. Carson) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 186, 
noes 245, not voting 2, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 414]

                               AYES--186

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--245

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Culberson
     Lofgren


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

[[Page H4928]]

                              {time}  1754

  Mr. COSTELLO of Pennsylvania changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


         Amendment No. 39 Offered by Ms. Brownley of California

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Brownley) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 191, 
noes 239, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 415]

                               AYES--191

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--239

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Lofgren
     Westmoreland


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1757

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 40 Offered by Mr. Loebsack

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Iowa (Mr. 
Loebsack) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the 
noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 218, 
noes 213, not voting 2, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 416]

                               AYES--218

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blum
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Graham
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Marino
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKinley
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reichert
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman

[[Page H4929]]


     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stefanik
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Zinke

                               NOES--213

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Culberson
     Lofgren


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1801

  Mr. YOUNG of Iowa changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 41 Offered by Mr. Polis

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado 
(Mr. Polis) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 205, 
noes 224, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 417]

                               AYES--205

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Dent
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKinley
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Zeldin

                               NOES--224

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Denham
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Huelskamp
     Hurt (VA)
     Lofgren


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1804

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.

[[Page H4930]]

        Amendment No. 43 Offered by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from 
Mississippi (Mr. Thompson) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 189, 
noes 241, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 418]

                               AYES--189

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--241

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Lofgren
     Stivers


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1808

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 46 Offered by Mr. Walker

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from North 
Carolina (Mr. Walker) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 195, 
noes 235, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 419]

                               AYES--195

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hensarling
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney (FL)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Williams
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--235

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Benishek
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici

[[Page H4931]]


     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Dold
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Graham
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Hastings
     Heck (NV)
     Heck (WA)
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Knight
     Kuster
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meehan
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller (MI)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Poliquin
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Reed
     Reichert
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rogers (KY)
     Rokita
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Russell
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stefanik
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Whitfield
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Yarmuth
     Young (AK)

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Lofgren


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1811

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. POLIQUIN. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 419, I mistakenly voted 
``no'' on the Walker Amendment. I should have and would have voted 
``yes.''
  Mr. CUELLAR. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 419, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``yes.''


                 Amendment No. 47 Offered by Mr. Salmon

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Arizona 
(Mr. Salmon) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 251, 
noes 178, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 420]

                               AYES--251

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Capuano
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeLauro
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellison
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Graham
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kirkpatrick
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lummis
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (FL)
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Peterson
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (OH)
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Waters, Maxine
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--178

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Barletta
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellmers (NC)
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hanna
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lynch
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Matsui
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     Nugent
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Richmond
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Israel
     Lofgren
     Smith (NE)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1814

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:

[[Page H4932]]

  Mr. WENSTRUP. Mr. Chair, on rollcall No. 420, I mistakenly voted 
``no'' on the Salmon Amendment. I meant to vote ``yes.''


           Amendment No. 44 Offered by Mr. Scott of Virginia

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Scott) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 187, 
noes 244, not voting 2, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 421]

                               AYES--187

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sherman
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--244

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Culberson
     Lofgren


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1819

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR. There being no further amendments under the rule, 
the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Womack) having assumed the chair, Mr. Yoder, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 5) to 
support State and local accountability for public education, protect 
State and local authority, inform parents of the performance of their 
children's schools, and for other purposes, and, pursuant to House 
Resolution 125, he reported the bill, as amended by that resolution, 
back to the House with sundry further amendments adopted in the 
Committee of the Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any further amendment reported from 
the Committee of the Whole? If not, the Chair will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. ESTY. I am in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. Esty moves to recommit the bill H.R. 5 to the Committee 
     on Education and the Workforce with instructions to report 
     the same back to the House forthwith with the following 
     amendment:
       Page 25, after line 14, insert the following:
       ``(F) Guaranteeing educational opportunities for children 
     with disabilities, including students with autism, down 
     syndrome, and other disabilities.--Each State plan shall 
     demonstrate that the development and adoption of the academic 
     content standards and academic achievement standards under 
     this paragraph does not--
       ``(i) result in lower academic standards for children with 
     disabilities than the standards adopted for students without 
     disabilities;
       ``(ii) deny students with disabilities, including students 
     with the most significant cognitive disabilities, access to a 
     regular secondary school diploma;
       ``(iii) deny any parent the right to give informed consent 
     before determining whether to apply alternate achievement 
     standards to the assessment of his or her child or any 
     relevant information needed to make such determination;
       ``(iv) otherwise lower expectations or academic achievement 
     for students with disabilities, including students with the 
     most significant cognitive disabilities; or
       ``(v) deny educational opportunities for students or any 
     subgroup of students described in section 
     1111(b)(3)(B)(ii)(II), including racial and ethnic minority 
     students who are identified for special education services at 
     a rate disproportionately higher than their peers.''.

[[Page H4933]]

       Add at the end the following:

     SEC. 802. PROTECTING CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES FROM ABUSIVE 
                   SECLUSION AND RESTRAINT PRACTICES.

       (a) Purpose.-- The purpose of this section is to ensure a 
     safe learning environment and to protect each elementary and 
     secondary school student from physical or mental abuse, 
     aversive behavioral interventions that compromise student 
     health and safety, or any physical restraint or seclusion 
     when there is no imminent threat of physical injury or in a 
     manner otherwise inconsistent with the purposes of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (21 U.S.C. 
     6301 et seq.).
       (b) Regulation.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Education shall 
     promulgate regulations providing, at minimum, that school 
     personnel shall be prohibited from imposing on any elementary 
     or secondary school student the following:
       (1) Mechanical restraints.
       (2) Chemical restraints.
       (3) Physical restraint or physical escort that restricts 
     breathing.
       (4) Aversive behavioral interventions that compromise 
     health and safety such as excessive pain, use of heat or 
     cold, spraying bleach infused water in faces, and depriving 
     students of food and bathroom access for hours on end.

  Ms. ESTY (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Speaker, I reserve a point of order.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. A point of order is reserved.
  The gentlewoman from Connecticut is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, this is the final amendment to the bill which 
will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. If adopted, the 
bill will immediately proceed to final passage as amended.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today with serious concerns.
  Today, we are voting on a bill that guts education funding; fails to 
provide adequate support for our hard-working teachers; and turns our 
back on our schools, our communities, and our children.
  Mr. Speaker, today, we are not fixing No Child Left Behind, which has 
long needed to be fixed, but instead, we are moving in the wrong 
direction. As a room parent, as a PTA mom, I strongly believe that 
every child deserves the opportunity for a quality education, and every 
child deserves to be treated with dignity and respect.
  The amendment I am offering today provides us the opportunity to live 
up to those goals. My amendment would guarantee continued funding for 
the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, known as IDEA.
  Just today, I met with school superintendents from Connecticut who 
emphasize the critical role of Federal funding for IDEA, which provides 
important support for students with autism and cognitive disabilities, 
and my amendment would protect children with disabilities from abusive 
seclusion and restraint practices.
  Last year, I met with a group of students from the FOCUS Center for 
Autism in Canton, Connecticut, in my district. They were incredible 
students, who bravely advocated for themselves and bluntly talked about 
the challenges they face in the classroom.
  According to the Centers for Disease Control, 1 in 68 American 
children is now on the autism spectrum, a tenfold increase in the last 
40 years. In Connecticut, too many students, particularly students who 
are on the autism spectrum, face unnecessary and dangerous seclusion 
and restraint.
  According to the Connecticut State Department of Education and the 
Office of the Child Advocate, there were 35,000 incidents of children 
being restrained or placed in seclusion last school year. Over 80 
percent of these children were boys; the majority of them children of 
color, many of them were in elementary school--even as young as 
preschool--and many of them were on the autism spectrum.
  Earlier this year, the Office of the Child Advocate in Connecticut 
released a report showing that, in the last 3 years, more than 1,300 
Connecticut schoolchildren were injured during such restraint or 
seclusion. Nationwide, the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office 
found hundreds of cases of alleged child abuse, including at least 20, 
that is 20 deaths of children related to the use of these harmful 
methods during the last two decades.
  These stories are truly horrific: a 7-year-old dying after being held 
face down for hours by school staff, 5-year-olds with broken arms and 
bloody noses after being tied to chairs with bungee cords and duct tape 
by their teacher, and a 13-year-old who hung himself in the seclusion 
room after prolonged confinement.
  This is absolutely unacceptable. While Congress surely should not 
micromanage discipline in local schools, we should--we should--step up 
to set standards to ensure that all our children are safe, and we 
should fully fund IDEA to ensure support for all children with 
disabilities.
  Now, let me be clear. Many teachers do an outstanding job in what can 
often be a challenging classroom environment. Having children with 
disabilities in the classroom can be a rewarding experience for the 
child and for their classmates.
  Children with learning disabilities will learn and excel with the 
right support. It is just not acceptable to say that we don't have 
enough time or enough money to provide that support.
  Today, let's fully fund IDEA, support special education and services 
for all children with disabilities, and restrict the dangerous 
practices of seclusion and restraint. We can do better; we must do 
better for our children.
  I ask all House Members to join me to vote for this amendment, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of a point of 
order.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The reservation of the point of order is 
withdrawn.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Minnesota is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Speaker, we know this is a procedural attempt, a usual 
procedural attempt, at the eleventh hour to derail this legislation. It 
is unfortunate because the American people have waited long enough for 
Congress to fix the problems plaguing our elementary and secondary 
education system.
  My colleagues, because it has been months since we have debated the 
underlying bill and the challenge we face, I want to remind my 
colleagues of what is at stake here.
  It has been more than 7 years since No Child Left Behind expired--7 
years. That means, for 7 years, this Congress has failed to meet its 
basic responsibility to replace the law. Each year we fail to act is 
another year States are tied to flawed policies and students are 
trapped in failing schools. No Child Left Behind continues as the law.
  Education is a deeply personal issue for many Americans. It is a 
topic discussed around kitchen tables, whether it is a child's report 
card, a change taking place in a local school district, or perhaps even 
policy changes being debated by Federal officials.
  We were reminded of this reality just a few months ago.

                              {time}  1830

  In February, we were making progress in advancing the Student Success 
Act, and we witnessed just how frustrated the American people are with 
the Federal role in K-12 education and how that frustration has grown 
worse under this administration.
  Rather than work with Congress to replace the law, the Obama 
administration has spent years imposing its agenda on schools through 
pet projects and conditional waivers.
  Just listen to the national debate raging over Common Core and you 
will quickly learn about the backlash against the Federal Government 
that has taken place under this administration.
  Because of this administration's unprecedented overreach, public 
anxiety and opposition to Federal intrusion is greater than it has ever 
been. The simple fact that Congress was considering changes to the law 
led countless individuals to speak out and raise concerns.
  Unfortunately, some of those concerns were based on misinformation, 
but they ultimately stem from a strong skepticism about the Federal 
role in education, a skepticism that I and many others share.
  Teachers, principals, parents, and education leaders desperately want

[[Page H4934]]

Congress to replace No Child Left Behind, but they are not just 
concerned with getting rid of a bad law, they also deeply care about 
what replaces it. The public response we witnessed earlier this year 
made that clear. We are here today because we are listening to the 
American people.
  The Student Success Act is a strong proposal to replace No Child Left 
Behind. It would eliminate dozens of ineffective and duplicative 
programs, repeal Federal mandates dictating State spending, teacher 
quality, accountability, and school improvement, and provide parents 
vital support to hold schools accountable and rescue children from 
underperforming schools.
  Throughout this legislative process, we have adopted bipartisan 
improvements to the bill, thanks to the work of both Republican and 
Democrat Members. Now it is time to move forward.
  We have an urgent responsibility to replace a flawed law with bold 
solutions that will help provide every child in every school an 
excellent education. That responsibility grows more urgent each day.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on the motion to recommit and to 
vote ``yes'' on the Student Success Act.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. ESTY. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 
XX, this 5-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 5-
minute votes on the passage of the bill, if ordered, and agreeing to 
the Speaker's approval of the Journal, if ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 185, 
noes 244, not voting 4, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 422]

                               AYES--185

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Graham
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--244

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Clawson (FL)
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     DeSantis
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fleming
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice, Jody B.
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huelskamp
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     LoBiondo
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     Massie
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (FL)
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Stutzman
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                             NOT VOTING--4

     Culberson
     Gutierrez
     Lofgren
     Sherman

                              {time}  1838

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 422, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``yes.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 218, 
noes 213, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 423]

                               AYES--218

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Babin
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barton
     Benishek
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Black
     Blackburn
     Blum
     Boehner
     Bost
     Boustany
     Brady (TX)
     Brat
     Bridenstine
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Chaffetz
     Coffman
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costello (PA)
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curbelo (FL)
     Davis, Rodney
     Denham
     Dent
     Diaz-Balart
     Dold
     Donovan
     Duffy
     Duncan (SC)
     Duncan (TN)
     Ellmers (NC)
     Emmer (MN)
     Farenthold
     Fincher
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Forbes
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franks (AZ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Garrett
     Gibbs
     Goodlatte
     Gosar
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guinta
     Guthrie
     Hanna
     Hardy
     Harper
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Heck (NV)
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Hill
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga (MI)
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Hurt (VA)
     Issa
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jolly
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)

[[Page H4935]]


     Kinzinger (IL)
     Kline
     Knight
     Labrador
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Latta
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lummis
     MacArthur
     Marchant
     Marino
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McSally
     Meehan
     Messer
     Mica
     Miller (MI)
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Mulvaney
     Murphy (PA)
     Neugebauer
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nugent
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Paulsen
     Pearce
     Perry
     Pittenger
     Pitts
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Pompeo
     Posey
     Price, Tom
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Ribble
     Rice (SC)
     Rigell
     Roby
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rokita
     Rooney (FL)
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rouzer
     Royce
     Russell
     Ryan (WI)
     Salmon
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Shimkus
     Shuster
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tiberi
     Tipton
     Trott
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Westmoreland
     Whitfield
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yoder
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Young (IN)
     Zeldin
     Zinke

                               NOES--213

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Amash
     Ashford
     Bass
     Beatty
     Becerra
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brooks (AL)
     Brown (FL)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buck
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardenas
     Carney
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clawson (FL)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Conyers
     Cooper
     Costa
     Courtney
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSantis
     DeSaulnier
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duckworth
     Edwards
     Ellison
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Esty
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fleming
     Foster
     Frankel (FL)
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gibson
     Gohmert
     Graham
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grayson
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Gutierrez
     Hahn
     Hastings
     Heck (WA)
     Hice, Jody B.
     Higgins
     Himes
     Hinojosa
     Honda
     Hoyer
     Huelskamp
     Huffman
     Israel
     Jackson Lee
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Joyce
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Kuster
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan Grisham (NM)
     Lujan, Ben Ray (NM)
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McDermott
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller (FL)
     Moore
     Moulton
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Nolan
     Norcross
     O'Rourke
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Rangel
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rohrabacher
     Rothfus
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez, Linda T.
     Sanchez, Loretta
     Sanford
     Sarbanes
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schrader
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Sinema
     Sires
     Slaughter
     Smith (WA)
     Speier
     Stutzman
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takai
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Tsongas
     Van Hollen
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Culberson
     Lofgren
     Sherman

                              {time}  1848

  Mr. ROGERS of Alabama changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  Stated against:
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 423, had I been present, I 
would have voted ``no.''

                          ____________________