150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PENNSYLVANIA FISH AND BOAT COMMISSION
(House of Representatives - April 12, 2016)

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[Page H1622]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]





     150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PENNSYLVANIA FISH AND BOAT COMMISSION

  (Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania asked and was given permission to 
address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to 
congratulate the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, or the PFBC, on 
their 150th anniversary.
  The PFBC was founded on March 30, 1866, following a convention in 
Harrisburg that was held to investigate water pollution caused by the 
effect logging in the Commonwealth was having on mountain lakes and 
streams. The discussion at that meeting prompted the current Governor, 
Andrew Curtin, to sign a law naming James Worrall as the State's first 
Commissioner of Fisheries, creating what would become the Nation's 
second oldest fish or wildlife agency.
  Since its founding 150 years ago, the PFBC has grown to employ more 
than 400 people and operates on an annual budget of nearly $60 million 
funded by anglers and boaters through license and registration fees, 
among other methods. The PFBC is responsible for policing 86,000 miles 
of Pennsylvania streams, nearly 4,000 lakes, more than 60 miles of Lake 
Erie's shoreline, and around 400,000 acres of wetlands.
  As an avid fisherman, I am proud of the work done by the Pennsylvania 
Fish and Boat Commission in keeping our lakes and streams healthy.

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