SENATE RESOLUTION 546--HONORING THE CENTENNIAL OF THE UNITED STATES GRAIN STANDARDS ACT
(Senate - July 14, 2016)

Text available as:

Formatting necessary for an accurate reading of this text may be shown by tags (e.g., <DELETED> or <BOLD>) or may be missing from this TXT display. For complete and accurate display of this text, see the PDF.

        
[Congressional Record Volume 162, Number 114 (Thursday, July 14, 2016)]
[Page S5176]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




  SENATE RESOLUTION 546--HONORING THE CENTENNIAL OF THE UNITED STATES 
                          GRAIN STANDARDS ACT

  Mr. ROBERTS (for himself and Ms. Stabenow) submitted the following 
resolution; which was considered and agreed to:

                              S. Res. 546

       Whereas before the enactment in 1916 of the United States 
     Grain Standards Act (7 U.S.C. 71 et seq.) (referred to in 
     this preamble as the ``Act'') and the United States Warehouse 
     Act (7 U.S.C. 241 et seq.)--
       (1) the grading, weighing, and warehousing of grain was 
     regulated exclusively by States;
       (2) there existed no uniform, nationwide system to inspect, 
     weigh, and store grain; and
       (3) each State enacted laws, standards, and regulations 
     relating to the inspection, weighing, and storage of grain;

       Whereas, on August 11, 1916, the 64th Congress passed the 
     Act, which established national uniformity in grain 
     standards;
       Whereas, before 1916, foreign and domestic purchasers of 
     grain were subject to practices that could result in a poor 
     quality of grain, despite inspection certificates indicating 
     higher grades, and farmers and others involved in the United 
     States grain trade suffered as a result;
       Whereas, in 1916, Congress established an official 
     inspection and certification system that--
       (1) made available official inspection and certification;
       (2) prohibited conflicts of interest by personnel of the 
     official inspection and certification system;
       (3) authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to use 
     administrative sanctions to prevent corrupt practices; and
       (4) established prohibitions on certain acts and penalties 
     for violations;

       Whereas, in 1976, Congress amended the Act to require 
     official inspection and certification for grain exports and 
     provide that any interested party may request official 
     inspection and certification for any United States grain;
       Whereas agricultural producers and purchasers benefitted 
     from a system that generated certainty and confidence in the 
     uniformity of inspection methods, weighing, and grading under 
     rules and regulations protected by law;
       Whereas, on October 21, 1976, Congress amended the Act to 
     establish the Federal Grain Inspection Service to preserve 
     the credibility and integrity of the United States grain 
     market;
       Whereas 2016 is the 40th anniversary of the establishment 
     of the Federal Grain Inspection Service to facilitate the 
     marketing of United States grain commodities;
       Whereas for 100 years the Act has supported a system of 
     marketing for United States grain; and
       Whereas, in 2016, the Act still provides certainty and 
     transparency for United States agriculture and consumers 
     involved in the international grain trade: Now, therefore, be 
     it
       Resolved, That the Senate--
       (1) reaffirms the significance of the United States Grain 
     Standards Act (7 U.S.C. 71 et seq.); and
       (2) finds that the United States Grain Standards Act (7 
     U.S.C. 71 et seq.) remains necessary to facilitate the 
     movement of United States grain into the marketplace by 
     providing agricultural producers, handlers, processors, 
     exporters, and international buyers an internationally 
     recognized standard in sampling, inspection, process 
     verification, weighing, and stowage examination services that 
     accurately and consistently describe the quality and quantity 
     of grain commodities traded domestically and internationally.

                          ____________________