APOLLO 11 50TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT; Congressional Record Vol. 162, No. 174
(House of Representatives - December 05, 2016)

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           APOLLO 11 50TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT

  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill 
(H.R. 2726) to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint 
commemorative coins in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the first 
manned landing on the Moon, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 2726

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Apollo 11 50th Anniversary 
     Commemorative Coin Act''.

     SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

       The Congress finds the following:
       (1) On July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 spacecraft launched 
     from Launch Complex 39A at the John F. Kennedy Space Center 
     carrying Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins, 
     who would become the first of mankind to complete a crewed 
     lunar landing.
       (2) The United States is the only country ever to have 
     attempted and succeeded in landing humans on a celestial body 
     off the Earth and safely returning them home, completing an 
     unprecedented engineering, scientific and political 
     achievement.
       (3) The Apollo 11 mission, culminating in man's first steps 
     on the Moon on July 20, 1969, honored the fallen astronauts 
     of the Apollo 1 crew, whose innovative work and bravery will 
     be remembered forever.
       (4) Apollo 11 accomplished the national goal set forth in 
     1961 by President John F. Kennedy, who stated at Rice 
     University the following year, ``We choose to go to the Moon. 
     We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other 
     things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, 
     because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best 
     of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one 
     that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to 
     postpone, and one which we intend to win''.
       (5) At the height of the Cold War, the Apollo space program 
     provided the United States and the free world with a powerful 
     symbolic win, demonstrating the strength, ambition, and 
     determination of the United States in technological and 
     economic advancement, and securing our Nation's leadership in 
     space for generations to come.
       (6) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's 
     (referred to in this Act as ``NASA'') Marshall Space Flight 
     Center in Huntsville, Alabama, designed, assembled, and 
     tested the most powerful launch vehicle in history, the 
     Saturn V rocket, which was used for the Apollo missions in 
     the 1960s and 1970s.
       (7) The Saturn V weighed 6,200,000 pounds and generated 
     7,600,000 pounds of thrust, which NASA has equated to 
     generating more power than 86 Hoover Dams.
       (8) During the time period from 1969 through 1972, NASA 
     completed eight Apollo missions and landed 12 men on the 
     Moon. The six missions that landed on the Moon returned with 
     a wealth of groundbreaking scientific data and over 800 
     pounds of lunar samples.
       (9) An estimated 400,000 Americans contributed to the 
     successful program that led to the lunar landing on July 20, 
     1969, including NASA scientists, engineers, astronauts, 
     industry contractors and their engineering and manufacturing 
     workforce, as well as the political leadership of Republicans 
     and Democrats in Congress and the White House.
       (10) The Apollo program, along with its predecessor Mercury 
     and Gemini programs, inspired generations of American 
     students to pursue careers in science, technology, 
     engineering, and mathematics (STEM), which has fueled 
     innovation and economic growth throughout a range of 
     industries over the last four decades.
       (11) July 20, 2019, will mark the 50th anniversary of the 
     Apollo 11 landing of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the 
     lunar surface.

     SEC. 3. COIN SPECIFICATIONS.

       (a) Denominations.--In recognition and celebration of the 
     50th anniversary of the first manned Moon landing, the 
     Secretary of the Treasury (hereafter in this Act referred to 
     as the ``Secretary'') shall mint and issue the following 
     coins:
       (1) $5 gold coins.--Not more than 50,000 $5 coins, which 
     shall--
       (A) weigh 8.359 grams;
       (B) be struck on a planchet having a diameter of 0.850 
     inches; and
       (C) contain not less than 90 percent gold.
       (2) $1 silver coins.--Not more than 400,000 $1 coins, which 
     shall--
       (A) weigh 26.73 grams;
       (B) be struck on a planchet having a diameter of 1.500 
     inches; and
       (C) contain not less than 90 percent silver.
       (3) Half-dollar clad coins.--Not more than 750,000 half-
     dollar coins which shall--
       (A) weigh 11.34 grams;
       (B) be struck on a planchet having a diameter of 1.205 
     inches; and
       (C) be minted to the specifications for half-dollar coins 
     contained in section 5112(b) of title 31, United States Code.
       (4) Proof silver $1 coins.--Not more than 100,000 proof $1 
     silver coins which shall--
       (A) weigh 5 ounces;
       (B) be struck on a planchet having a diameter of 3 inches; 
     and
       (C) contain .999 fine silver.
       (b) Legal Tender.--The coins minted under this Act shall be 
     legal tender, as provided in section 5103 of title 31, United 
     States Code.
       (c) Numismatic Items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 
     5136 of title 31, United States Code, all coins minted under 
     this Act shall be considered to be numismatic items.
       (d) Convex Shape.--
       (1) In general.--The coins minted under this Act shall be 
     produced in a fashion similar to the 2014 National Baseball 
     Hall of Fame 75th Anniversary Commemorative Coin, so that the 
     reverse of the coin is convex to more closely resemble the 
     visor of the astronaut's helmet of the time and the obverse 
     concave, providing a more dramatic display of the obverse 
     design chosen pursuant to section 4(c).
       (2) Sense of congress.--It is the sense of Congress that, 
     to the extent possible without significantly adding to the 
     purchase price of the coins, the coins minted under this Act 
     should be produced with the design of the reverse of the 
     coins continuing over what would otherwise be the edge of the 
     coins, such that the reverse design extends all the way to 
     the obverse design.

     SEC. 4. DESIGN OF COINS.

       (a) In General.--The design for the coins minted under this 
     Act shall be--
       (1) selected by the Secretary after consultation with--
       (A) the Commission of Fine Arts; and
       (B) with respect to the design of the reverse of the coins, 
     the Administrator of NASA; and
       (2) reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.
       (b) Designations and Inscriptions.--On each coin minted 
     under this Act there shall be--
       (1) a designation of the denomination of the coin;
       (2) an inscription of the year ``2019''; and
       (3) inscriptions of the words ``Liberty'', ``In God We 
     Trust'', ``United States of America'', and ``E Pluribus 
     Unum''.
       (c) Selection and Approval Process for Obverse Design.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall hold a juried, 
     compensated competition to determine the design of the common 
     obverse of the coins minted under this Act, with such design 
     being emblematic of the United States space program leading 
     up to the first manned Moon landing.
       (2) Selection process.--Proposals for the obverse design of 
     coins minted under this Act may be submitted in accordance 
     with the design selection and approval process developed by 
     the Secretary in the sole discretion of the Secretary.
       (3) Proposals.--As part of the competition described in 
     this subsection, the Secretary may accept proposals from 
     artists, engravers of the United States Mint, and members of 
     the general public, and any designs submitted for the design 
     review process described herein shall be anonymized until a 
     final selection is made.
       (4) Compensation.--The Secretary shall determine 
     compensation for the winning design under this subsection, 
     which shall be not less than $5,000.
       (d) Reverse Design.--The design on the common reverse of 
     the coins minted under this Act shall be a representation of 
     a close-up of the famous ``Buzz Aldrin on the Moon'' 
     photograph taken July 20, 1969, that shows just the visor and 
     part of the helmet of astronaut Buzz Aldrin, in which the 
     visor has a mirrored finish and reflects the image of the 
     United States flag and the lunar lander and the remainder of 
     the helmet has a frosted finish.

     SEC. 5. ISSUANCE OF COINS.

       (a) Quality of Coins.--Except with respect to coins 
     described under section 3(a)(4), coins minted under this Act 
     shall be issued in uncirculated and proof qualities.
       (b) Period for Issuance.--The Secretary may issue coins 
     minted under this Act only during the 1-year period beginning 
     on January 1, 2019.

     SEC. 6. SALE OF COINS.

       (a) Sale Price.--The coins issued under this Act shall be 
     sold by the Secretary at a price equal to the sum of--
       (1) the face value of the coins;
       (2) the surcharge provided in section 7(a) with respect to 
     such coins; and
       (3) the cost of designing and issuing the coins (including 
     labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, winning design 
     compensation, overhead expenses, marketing, and shipping).
       (b) Bulk Sales.--The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the 
     coins issued under this Act at a reasonable discount.
       (c) Prepaid Orders.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall accept prepaid orders 
     for the coins minted under this Act before the issuance of 
     such coins.
       (2) Discount.--Sale prices with respect to prepaid orders 
     under paragraph (1) shall be at a reasonable discount.

     SEC. 7. SURCHARGES.

       (a) In General.--All sales of coins minted under this Act 
     shall include a surcharge as follows:
       (1) A surcharge of $35 per coin for the $5 coin.
       (2) A surcharge of $10 per coin for the $1 coin described 
     under section 3(a)(2).

[[Page H7150]]

       (3) A surcharge of $5 per coin for the half-dollar coin.
       (4) A surcharge of $50 per coin for the $1 coin described 
     under section 3(a)(4).
       (b) Distribution.--Subject to section 5134(f) of title 31, 
     United States Code, all surcharges received by the Secretary 
     from the sale of coins issued under this Act shall be 
     promptly paid by the Secretary as follows:
       (1) one half to the Smithsonian Institution's National Air 
     and Space Museum's ``Destination Moon'' exhibit, for design, 
     education, and installation costs related to establishing and 
     maintaining the exhibit, and for costs related to creating a 
     traveling version of the exhibition;
       (2) one quarter to the Astronauts Memorial Foundation, for 
     costs related to the preservation, maintenance, and 
     enhancement of the Astronauts Memorial and for promotion of 
     space exploration through educational initiatives; and
       (3) one quarter to the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, to 
     aid its missions of promoting the importance of science and 
     technology to the general public and of aiding the United 
     States in retaining its world leadership in science and 
     technology by providing college scholarships for the very 
     best and brightest students pursuing degrees in science, 
     technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM).
       (c) Audits.--The recipients described under subsection (b) 
     shall be subject to the audit requirements of section 
     5134(f)(2) of title 31, United States Code, with regard to 
     the amounts received under subsection (b).
       (d) Limitation.--Notwithstanding subsection (a), no 
     surcharge may be included with respect to the issuance under 
     this Act of any coin during a calendar year if, as of the 
     time of such issuance, the issuance of such coin would result 
     in the number of commemorative coin programs issued during 
     such year to exceed the annual commemorative coin program 
     issuance limitation under section 5112(m)(1) of title 31, 
     United States Code (as in effect on the date of the enactment 
     of this Act). The Secretary of the Treasury may issue 
     guidance to carry out this subsection.

     SEC. 8. FINANCIAL ASSURANCES.

       The Secretary shall take such actions as may be necessary 
     to ensure that--
       (1) minting and issuing coins under this Act will not 
     result in any net cost to the United States Government; and
       (2) no funds, including applicable surcharges, are 
     disbursed to any recipient designated in section 7 until the 
     total cost of designing and issuing all of the coins 
     authorized by this Act (including labor, materials, dies, use 
     of machinery, winning design compensation, overhead expenses, 
     marketing, and shipping) is recovered by the United States 
     Treasury, consistent with sections 5112(m) and 5134(f) of 
     title 31, United States Code.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Posey) and the gentlewoman from New York (Ms. Velazquez) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.


                             General Leave

  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and 
include extraneous material on this bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Florida?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I rise in support of H.R. 2726, the Apollo 11 50th Anniversary 
Commemorative Coin Act, which I introduced, along with my colleague 
from Florida, Congresswoman Frederica Wilson. This has been a truly 
bipartisan endeavor, with 298 total cosponsors.
  In 1961, President John F. Kennedy challenged the Nation with the 
following words:
  ``We choose to go to the Moon. We choose to go to the Moon in this 
decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because 
they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the 
best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we 
are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which 
we intend to win. . . . `'
  That famous speech launched the Apollo program but, more importantly, 
it galvanized our Nation and united us into accomplishing perhaps the 
greatest technological achievement in human history, and it was truly a 
national undertaking. An estimated 400,000 men and women from across 
the United States contributed to the effort. Components of the Saturn V 
rocket, command and service module, lunar landing module, and other 
critical parts were literally manufactured from every State in the 
Union--from Huntsville, Alabama, to Seal Beach, California; New 
Orleans, Louisiana, to Cedar Rapids, Iowa; and everywhere in between.
  On July 16, 1969, a mere 8 years after the first American, Alan 
Shepard, traveled into space, a Saturn V rocket blasted off from 
Merritt Island, Florida, and raced to the Moon. Four days later, 
astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the lunar surface 
as Michael Collins stood watch.
  This legislation commemorates our Nation's commitment to space 
exploration, our pioneering spirit, and our unmatched ingenuity. The 
United States' leadership in space exploration has benefited our 
country's national security and economy, strengthened our international 
relationships, advanced scientific discovery and technology, and vastly 
improved life here on Earth for practically everyone.
  American space exploration continues to inspire our next generation 
of pioneers and innovators. As such, we were deliberate in our efforts 
to ensure that the sale of these coins would support efforts to grow 
the next generation of space explorers while also honoring the courage 
and sacrifice of NASA astronauts lost in the line of duty.
  This legislation would authorize the minting and sale in 2019 of a 
limited number of gold, silver, and clad coins in commemoration of the 
Apollo 11 mission. The coins would be domed, with the reverse featuring 
a representation of a spacesuit visor similar to the famous Buzz Aldrin 
on the Moon photograph.
  After all taxpayer costs are satisfied, surcharges on the sales price 
of the coins will fund college scholarships for our future scientists, 
engineers, and astronauts, support educational initiatives that promote 
space exploration, honor astronauts who have fallen in the line of 
duty, and memorialize this historical event through a stimulating new 
museum exhibit.
  Mr. Speaker, July 20, 2019, will mark the 50th anniversary of the 
landing of the Eagle lunar module on the Moon's surface. We remain the 
only country that has ever landed humans on the Moon and returned them 
safely to Earth.

                              {time}  1645

  This commemorative coin will celebrate what I feel is the most awe-
inspiring engineering and technological deed of the 20th century. I 
urge its immediate support.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

                                      Committee on Ways and Means,


                                     House of Representatives,

                                 Washington, DC, December 5, 2016.
     Hon. Jeb Hensarling,
     Chairman, Committee on Financial Services,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Hensarling: I am writing with respect to H.R. 
     2726, the ``Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin 
     Act.'' This bill contains provisions within the Rule X 
     jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means.
       The Committee on Ways and Means will not seek a sequential 
     referral on H.R. 2726 so that it may proceed expeditiously to 
     the House floor for consideration. This is done with the 
     understanding that the jurisdictional interests of the 
     Committee on Ways and Means over this and similar legislation 
     are in no way diminished or altered. In addition, the 
     Committee reserves the right to seek conferees on H.R. 2726 
     and requests your support when such a request is made.
       I would appreciate your response confirming this 
     understanding with respect to H.R. 2726 and ask that a copy 
     of our exchange of letters on this matter be included in the 
     Congressional Record during consideration of the bill on the 
     House floor.
           Sincerely,
                                                      Kevin Brady,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                              Committee on Financial Services,

                                 Washington, DC, December 5, 2016.
     Hon. Kevin Brady,
     Chairman, Committee on Ways and Means,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Brady: Thank you for your December 5th letter 
     regarding H.R. 2726, the ``Apollo 11 50th Anniversary 
     Commemorative Coin Act.''
       I am most appreciative of your decision to forego action on 
     H.R. 2726 so that it may move expeditiously to the House 
     floor. I acknowledge that although you are waiving action on 
     the bill, the Committee on Ways and Means is in no way 
     waiving its jurisdictional interest in this or similar 
     legislation. In addition, if a conference is necessary on 
     this legislation, I will support any request that your 
     committee be represented therein.
       Finally, I shall be pleased to include your letter and this 
     letter on H.R. 2726 in the Congressional Record during floor 
     consideration of the same.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jeb Hensarling,
                                                         Chairman.

[[Page H7151]]

     
                                  ____
                                         House of Representatives,


                                      Committee on the Budget,

                                Washington, DC, November 29, 2016.
     Hon. Jeb Hensarling,
     Chairman, Committee on Financial Services,
     House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Hensarling: I am writing concerning H.R. 
     2726, the Apollo 11: 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin Act, 
     which the House is expected to consider the week of December 
     5th.
       Section 9 of the bill includes budgetary compliance 
     language, which falls under the jurisdiction of the Committee 
     on the Budget. It is my understanding that this language will 
     be removed from the bill prior to House consideration. In 
     order to expedite House consideration of H.R. 2726, the 
     Committee will forgo action on the bill. This is being done 
     with the understanding that it does not in any way prejudice 
     the Committee with respect its jurisdictional prerogatives on 
     this or similar legislation.
       I would appreciate your response to this letter, confirming 
     this understanding with respect to H.R. 2726 and would ask 
     that a copy of our exchange of letters on this matter be 
     included in the Congressional Record during floor 
     consideration.
           Sincerely,
                                                  Tom Price, M.D.,
     Chairman, Committee on the Budget.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                 Committee Financial Services,

                                Washington, DC, November 30, 2016.
     Hon. Tom Price,
     Chairman, Committee on the Budget,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Price: Thank you for your November 30th 
     letter regarding H.R. 2726, the ``Apollo 11 50th Anniversary 
     Commemorative Coin Act,''
       I am most appreciative of your decision to forego action on 
     H.R. 2726 so that it may move expeditiously to the House 
     floor. I acknowledge that although you are waiving action on 
     the bill, the Committee on the Budget is in no way waiving 
     its jurisdictional interest in this or similar legislation. 
     In addition, if a conference is necessary on this 
     legislation, I will support any request that your committee 
     be represented therein.
       Finally, I shall he pleased to include your letter and this 
     letter on H.R. 2726 in the Congressional Record during floor 
     consideration of the same.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jeb Hensarling,
                                                         Chairman.

  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise to speak in favor of H.R. 2726, legislation that 
will authorize the issuance of gold, silver, and clad coins in 
commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the first time in history that 
mankind successfully completed a crewed lunar landing.
  The Apollo 11 mission was a momentous occasion in its own right, but 
it was also a bittersweet achievement, as it also served as a reminder 
of the first Apollo mission, whose courage we will never forget.
  I am pleased that, in addition to honoring the Apollo 11 crew, the 
legislation before us today also recognizes the estimated 400,000 
Americans who contributed to make possible the Apollo 11 mission. By 
calling on the Treasury Department to mint and issue coins in honor of 
Apollo 11, I hope that we will continue to remind all Americans of the 
boundlessness of what can be achieved when we set our sights high and, 
quite literally, aim for the Moon.
  I also hope the coin minted as part of this legislation will show our 
young people just how exciting the fields of science, mathematics, and 
engineering can be and how critical they are to building a brighter 
future for all.
  By ensuring that a quarter of the proceeds raised will be made 
available to the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation to make college 
scholarships available for students pursuing degrees in science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics, the legislation before us 
will make one step towards opening up these fields to our best and 
brightest.
  The remaining surcharges associated with the sale of the coins will 
go towards the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space 
Museum's Destination Moon exhibit and be provided to the Astronauts 
Memorial Foundation for maintenance of the memorial and to further 
educational initiatives.
  For these reasons, I hope all Members will support the legislation 
before us.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. 
Wilson), who has been a champion for this important legislation.
  Ms. WILSON of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to express my full 
support for the passage of H.R. 2726, the Apollo 11 50th Anniversary 
Commemorative Coin Act.
  I want to thank my longtime friend and Florida colleague, 
Representative Posey, for his outstanding leadership as the sponsor of 
this bill. I am proud to have worked very closely with him to build 
bipartisan support for this legislation. I also want to thank Speaker 
Ryan, Chairman Hensarling, Ranking Member Waters, and the Financial 
Services Committee for their work to bring this bill to the floor.
  Mr. Speaker, the bill before us today authorizes the minting and 
distribution of commemorative coins to celebrate the 50th anniversary 
of the first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11. These coins will 
honor Apollo 11 crew members, Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, and Neil 
Armstrong; NASA scientists, engineers, and astronauts; and the other 
400,000 Americans who made the mission possible.
  Surcharges from the sale of these coins will further our commitment 
to promote STEM education, space exploration, and science discovery. It 
will honor astronauts who lost their lives in service of our country 
and support the Destination Moon exhibit, which will feature exciting 
Apollo 11 artifacts.
  As a former elementary school principal and leading advocate for STEM 
education, I am very happy that this bill supports college scholarships 
for future scientists, engineers, and astronauts.
  Mr. Speaker, the Apollo 11 mission is a testament to our values as 
Americans. The mission's success reminded the world of our commitment 
to hard work, determination, and patriotism.
  When many questioned whether we could rise to the challenge of 
putting a man on the Moon within a decade, we came together, worked our 
hardest, and achieved this daunting task in just 8 years. We left the 
world in awe and wonder.
  When our astronauts were 4 miles past the designated landing spot and 
mission control told them that they had just 60 seconds of fuel left 
before the landing would have to be aborted, they did not panic. With 
unrelenting resolve, they managed to land on the Moon with only 17 
seconds to spare. When Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong planted our flag 
on the Moon, millions of Americans felt a sense of pride that was 
exhilarating and inspiring.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Speaker, I yield the gentlewoman an additional 30 
seconds.
  Ms. WILSON of Florida. As Members of Congress, we should look to 
Apollo 11 as inspiration as we work to tackle challenges that seem 
unsurmountable. I urge all of my colleagues to join me in voting for 
this bipartisan legislation, which has 298 cosponsors and the support 
of Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, Apollo 11's two surviving 
astronauts.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, basically, I will say that it is an honor for me to 
support this bill and this legislation. I ask all my colleagues to 
support it.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, we owe a debt of gratitude to the brave astronauts of 
the Apollo program, some of whom made the ultimate sacrifice in the 
line of duty. We are beholden to the hundreds of thousands of men and 
women who, when challenged to go to the Moon in this decade, accepted 
the challenge with a passion and a resolve that accomplished that which 
was thought unachievable.
  I want to thank the chairman and the ranking member for their 
leadership and support of this legislation. Of course, finally, I want 
to express my sincere gratitude to my longtime friend and colleague 
from Florida, (Ms. Wilson), for her staunch support and tireless 
efforts to ensure that this remarkable achievement is commemorated.
  Mr. Speaker, we have one opportunity to celebrate this historical 
event with a commemorative coin. I urge my colleagues to join me in 
supporting this bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr.

[[Page H7152]]

Posey) that the House suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 2726, 
as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill, as amended, was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________