STRENGTHENING CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY ACT; Congressional Record Vol. 162, No. 138
(House of Representatives - September 13, 2016)

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[Pages H5365-H5380]
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 STRENGTHENING CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY ACT

  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the 
rules and pass the bill (H.R. 5587) to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins 
Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 5587

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Strengthening Career and 
     Technical Education for the 21st Century Act''.

     SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. References.
Sec. 4. Effective date.
Sec. 5. Table of contents of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
              Education Act of 2006.
Sec. 6. Purpose.
Sec. 7. Definitions.
Sec. 8. Transition provisions.
Sec. 9. Prohibitions.
Sec. 10. Authorization of appropriations.

    TITLE I--CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO THE STATES

                    Part A--Allotment and Allocation

Sec. 110. Reservations and State allotment.
Sec. 111. Within State allocation.
Sec. 112. Accountability.
Sec. 113. National activities.
Sec. 114. Assistance for the outlying areas.
Sec. 115. Tribally controlled postsecondary career and technical 
              institutions.
Sec. 116. Occupational and employment information.

                        Part B--State Provisions

Sec. 121. State plan.
Sec. 122. Improvement plans.
Sec. 123. State leadership activities.

                        Part C--Local Provisions

Sec. 131. Local application for career and technical education 
              programs.
Sec. 132. Local uses of funds.

[[Page H5366]]

                      TITLE II--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 201. Federal and State administrative provisions.

             TITLE III--AMENDMENTS TO THE WAGNER-PEYSER ACT

Sec. 301. State responsibilities.

     SEC. 3. REFERENCES.

       Except as otherwise expressly provided, whenever in this 
     Act an amendment or repeal is expressed in terms of an 
     amendment to, or repeal of, a section or other provision, the 
     reference shall be considered to be made to a section or 
     other provision of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
     Education Act of 2006 (20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq.).

     SEC. 4. EFFECTIVE DATE.

       This Act and the amendments made by this Act shall take 
     effect beginning on July 1, 2017.

     SEC. 5. TABLE OF CONTENTS OF THE CARL D. PERKINS CAREER AND 
                   TECHNICAL EDUCATION ACT OF 2006.

       Section 1(b) is amended to read as follows:
       ``(b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
     Act is as follows:

``Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
``Sec. 2. Purpose.
``Sec. 3. Definitions.
``Sec. 4. Transition provisions.
``Sec. 5. Privacy.
``Sec. 6. Limitation.
``Sec. 7. Special rule.
``Sec. 8. Prohibitions.
``Sec. 9. Authorization of appropriations.

   ``TITLE I--CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO THE STATES

                   ``Part A--Allotment and Allocation

``Sec. 111. Reservations and State allotment.
``Sec. 112. Within State allocation.
``Sec. 113. Accountability.
``Sec. 114. National activities.
``Sec. 115. Assistance for the outlying areas.
``Sec. 116. Native American programs.
``Sec. 117. Tribally controlled postsecondary career and technical 
              institutions.

                       ``Part B--State Provisions

``Sec. 121. State administration.
``Sec. 122. State plan.
``Sec. 123. Improvement plans.
``Sec. 124. State leadership activities.

                       ``Part C--Local Provisions

``Sec. 131. Distribution of funds to secondary education programs.
``Sec. 132. Distribution of funds for postsecondary education programs.
``Sec. 133. Special rules for career and technical education.
``Sec. 134. Local application for career and technical education 
              programs.
``Sec. 135. Local uses of funds.

                     ``TITLE II--GENERAL PROVISIONS

              ``Part A--Federal Administrative Provisions

``Sec. 211. Fiscal requirements.
``Sec. 212. Authority to make payments.
``Sec. 213. Construction.
``Sec. 214. Voluntary selection and participation.
``Sec. 215. Limitation for certain students.
``Sec. 216. Federal laws guaranteeing civil rights.
``Sec. 217. Participation of private school personnel and children.
``Sec. 218. Limitation on Federal regulations.
``Sec. 219. Study on programs of study aligned to high-skill, high-wage 
              occupations.

               ``Part B--State Administrative Provisions

``Sec. 221. Joint funding.
``Sec. 222. Prohibition on use of funds to induce out-of-State 
              relocation of businesses.
``Sec. 223. State administrative costs.
``Sec. 224. Student assistance and other Federal programs.''.

     SEC. 6. PURPOSE.

       Section 2 (20 U.S.C. 2301) is amended--
       (1) in the matter preceding paragraph (1)--
       (A) by striking ``academic and career and technical 
     skills'' and inserting ``academic knowledge and technical and 
     employability skills''; and
       (B) by inserting ``and programs of study'' after 
     ``technical education programs'';
       (2) in paragraph (3), by striking ``, including tech prep 
     education''; and
       (3) in paragraph (4), by inserting ``and programs of 
     study'' after ``technical education programs''.

     SEC. 7. DEFINITIONS.

       Section 3 (20 U.S.C. 2302) is amended--
       (1) by striking paragraphs (16), (23), (24), (25), (26), 
     and (32);
       (2) by redesignating paragraphs (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), 
     (13), (14), (15), (17), (18), (19), (20), (21), (22), (27), 
     (28), (29), (30), (31), (33), and (34) as paragraphs (9), 
     (10), (13), (16), (17), (19), (20), (23), (25), (27), (28), 
     (30), (32), (35), (39), (40), (41), (44), (45), (46), and 
     (47), respectively;
       (3) in paragraph (3)--
       (A) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``5 different 
     occupational fields to individuals'' and inserting ``3 
     different fields, especially in in-demand industry sectors or 
     occupations, that are available to all students''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``not fewer than 5 
     different occupational fields'' and inserting ``not fewer 
     than 3 different occupational fields'';
       (4) in paragraph (5)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A)--
       (i) in clause (i)--

       (I) by striking ``coherent and rigorous content aligned 
     with challenging academic standards'' and inserting ``content 
     at the secondary level aligned with the challenging State 
     academic standards adopted by a State under section 
     1111(b)(1) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)), and at the postsecondary level 
     with the rigorous academic content,''
       (II) by striking ``and skills'' and inserting ``and 
     skills,''; and
       (III) by inserting ``, including in in-demand industry 
     sectors or occupations'' before the semicolon at the end;

       (ii) in clause (ii), by striking ``, an industry-recognized 
     credential, a certificate, or an associate degree'' and 
     inserting ``or a recognized postsecondary credential, which 
     may include an industry-recognized credential''; and
       (iii) in clause (iii), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B)--
       (i) by inserting ``, work-based, or other'' after 
     ``competency-based'';
       (ii) by striking ``contributes to the'' and inserting 
     ``supports the development of'';
       (iii) by striking the period at the end and inserting a 
     semicolon; and
       (iv) by striking ``general''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) to the extent practicable, coordinate between 
     secondary and postsecondary education programs, which may 
     include early college programs with articulation agreements, 
     dual or concurrent enrollment program opportunities, or 
     programs of study; and
       ``(D) may include career exploration at the high school 
     level or as early as the middle grades (as such term is 
     defined in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801)).'';
       (5) in paragraph (7)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``(and parents, as 
     appropriate)'' and inserting ``(and, as appropriate, parents 
     and out-of-school youth)''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``financial aid,'' and 
     all that follows through the period at the end and inserting 
     ``financial aid, job training, secondary and postsecondary 
     options (including baccalaureate degree programs), dual or 
     concurrent enrollment programs, work-based learning 
     opportunities, and support services.'';
       (6) by inserting after paragraph (7) the following:
       ``(8) Career pathways.--The term `career pathways' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 3 of the Workforce 
     Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3102).'';
       (7) by inserting after paragraph (10) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(11) CTE concentrator.--The term `CTE concentrator' 
     means--
       ``(A) at the secondary school level, a student served by an 
     eligible recipient who has--
       ``(i) completed 3 or more career and technical education 
     courses; or
       ``(ii) completed at least 2 courses in a single career and 
     technical education program or program of study; or
       ``(B) at the postsecondary level, a student enrolled in an 
     eligible recipient who has--
       ``(i) earned at least 12 cumulative credits within a career 
     and technical education program or program of study; or
       ``(ii) completed such a program if the program encompasses 
     fewer than 12 credits or the equivalent in total.
       ``(12) CTE participant.--The term `CTE participant' means 
     an individual who completes not less than 1 course or earns 
     not less than 1 credit in a career and technical education 
     program or program of study of an eligible recipient.'';
       (8) by inserting after paragraph (13) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(14) Dual or concurrent enrollment.--The term `dual or 
     concurrent enrollment' has the meaning given the term in 
     section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).
       ``(15) Early college high school.--The term `early college 
     high school' has the meaning given the term in section 8101 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
     U.S.C. 7801).'';
       (9) by inserting after paragraph (17) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(18) Eligible entity.--The term `eligible entity' means a 
     consortium that--
       ``(A) shall include at least two of the following:
       ``(i) a local educational agency;
       ``(ii) an educational service agency;
       ``(iii) an eligible institution;
       ``(iv) an area career and technical education school;
       ``(v) a State educational agency; or
       ``(vi) the Bureau of Indian Education;
       ``(B) may include a regional, State, or local public or 
     private organization, including a community-based 
     organization, one or more employers, or a qualified 
     intermediary; and
       ``(C) is led by an entity or partnership of entities 
     described in subparagraph (A).'';
       (10) by amending paragraph (19) (as so redesignated by 
     paragraph (2)) to read as follows:
       ``(19) Eligible institution.--The term `eligible 
     institution' means--
       ``(A) a consortium of 2 or more of the entities described 
     in subparagraphs (B) through (F);
       ``(B) a public or nonprofit private institution of higher 
     education that offers and will use funds provided under this 
     title in support of career and technical education courses 
     that lead to technical skill proficiency, an industry-
     recognized credential, a certificate, or an associate degree;
       ``(C) a local educational agency providing education at the 
     postsecondary level;

[[Page H5367]]

       ``(D) an area career and technical education school 
     providing education at the postsecondary level;
       ``(E) a postsecondary educational institution controlled by 
     the Bureau of Indian Affairs or operated by or on behalf of 
     any Indian tribe that is eligible to contract with the 
     Secretary of the Interior for the administration of programs 
     under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance 
     Act (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.) or the Act of April 16, 1934 (25 
     U.S.C. 452 et seq.); or
       ``(F) an educational service agency.'';
       (11) by amending paragraph (20) (as so redesignated by 
     paragraph (2)) to read as follows:
       ``(20) Eligible recipient.--The term `eligible recipient' 
     means--
       ``(A) an eligible institution or consortium of eligible 
     institutions eligible to receive assistance under section 
     132; or
       ``(B) a local educational agency (including a public 
     charter school that operates as a local educational agency), 
     an area career and technical education school, an educational 
     service agency, or a consortium of such entities, eligible to 
     receive assistance under section 131.'';
       (12) by adding after paragraph (20) (as so redesignated by 
     paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(21) English learner.--The term `English learner' means--
       ``(A) a secondary school student who is an English learner, 
     as defined in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801); or
       ``(B) an adult or an out-of-school youth who has limited 
     ability in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the 
     English language and--
       ``(i) whose native language is a language other than 
     English; or
       ``(ii) who lives in a family environment in which a 
     language other than English is the dominant language.
       ``(22) Evidence-based.--The term `evidence-based' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 8101(21)(A) of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     7801(21)(A)).'';
       (13) by inserting after paragraph (23) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(24) In-demand industry sector or occupation.--The term 
     `in-demand industry sector or occupation' has the meaning 
     given the term in section 3 of the Workforce Innovation and 
     Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3102).'';
       (14) by inserting after paragraph (25) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(26) Industry or sector partnership.--The term `industry 
     or sector partnership' has the meaning given the term in 
     section 3 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 
     U.S.C. 3102).'';
       (15) by inserting after paragraph (28) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(29) Local workforce development board.--The term `local 
     workforce development board' means a local workforce 
     development board established under section 107 of the 
     Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.'';
       (16) by inserting after paragraph (30) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(31) Out-of-school youth.--The term `out-of-school youth' 
     has the meaning given the term in section 3 of the Workforce 
     Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3102).'';
       (17) by inserting after paragraph (32) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(33) Paraprofessional.--The term `paraprofessional' has 
     the meaning given the term in section 8101 of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).
       ``(34) Pay for success initiative.--The term `pay for 
     success initiative' has the meaning given the term in section 
     8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
     (20 U.S.C. 7801), except that such term does not include an 
     initiative that--
       ``(A) reduces the special education or related services 
     that a student would otherwise receive under the Individuals 
     with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.); or
       ``(B) otherwise reduces the rights of a student or the 
     obligations of an entity under the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.), the 
     Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 701 et seq.), the 
     Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et 
     seq.), or any other law.'';
       (18) by inserting after paragraph (35) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(36) Program of study.--The term `program of study' means 
     a coordinated, nonduplicative sequence of secondary and 
     postsecondary academic and technical content that--
       ``(A) incorporates challenging State academic standards, 
     including those adopted by a State under section 1111(b)(1) 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
     U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)), that--
       ``(i) address both academic and technical knowledge and 
     skills, including employability skills; and
       ``(ii) are aligned with the needs of industries in the 
     economy of the State, region, or local area;
       ``(B) progresses in specificity (beginning with all aspects 
     of an industry or career cluster and leading to more 
     occupational specific instruction);
       ``(C) has multiple entry and exit points that incorporate 
     credentialing; and
       ``(D) culminates in the attainment of a recognized 
     postsecondary credential.
       ``(37) Qualified intermediary.--The term `qualified 
     intermediary' means a non-profit entity that demonstrates 
     expertise to build, connect, sustain, and measure 
     partnerships with entities such as employers, schools, 
     community-based organizations, postsecondary institutions, 
     social service organizations, economic development 
     organizations, and workforce systems to broker services, 
     resources, and supports to youth and the organizations and 
     systems that are designed to serve youth, including--
       ``(A) connecting employers to classrooms;
       ``(B) assisting in the design and implementation of career 
     and technical education programs and programs of study;
       ``(C) delivering professional development;
       ``(D) connecting students to internships and other work-
     based learning opportunities; and
       ``(E) developing personalized student supports.
       ``(38) Recognized postsecondary credential.--The term 
     `recognized postsecondary credential' has the meaning given 
     the term in section 3 of the Workforce Innovation and 
     Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3102).'';
       (19) in paragraph (41) (as so redesignated by paragraph 
     (2))--
       (A) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``foster children'' 
     and inserting ``youth who are in or have aged out of the 
     foster care system'';
       (B) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (C) in subparagraph (F), by striking ``individuals with 
     limited English proficiency.'' and inserting ``English 
     learners;''; and
       (D) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(G) homeless individuals described in section 725 of the 
     McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a); 
     and
       ``(H) youth with a parent who--
       ``(i) is a member of the armed forces (as such term is 
     defined in section 101(a)(4) of title 10, United States 
     Code); and
       ``(ii) is on active duty (as such term is defined in 
     section 101(d)(1) of such title).'';
       (20) by inserting after paragraph (41) (as so redesignated 
     by paragraph (2)) the following:
       ``(42) Specialized instructional support personnel.--The 
     term `specialized instructional support personnel' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 8101 of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).
       ``(43) Specialized instructional support services.--The 
     term `specialized instructional support services' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 8101 of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).'';
       (21) in paragraph (45) (as so redesignated by paragraph 
     (2)) by inserting ``(including paraprofessionals and 
     specialized instructional support personnel)'' after 
     ``supportive personnel''; and
       (22) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(48) Universal design for learning.--The term `universal 
     design for learning' has the meaning given the term in 
     section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).
       ``(49) Work-based learning.--The term `work-based learning' 
     means sustained interactions with industry or community 
     professionals in real workplace settings, to the extent 
     practicable, or simulated environments at an educational 
     institution that foster in-depth, first-hand engagement with 
     the tasks required of a given career field, that are aligned 
     to curriculum and instruction.''.

     SEC. 8. TRANSITION PROVISIONS.

       Section 4 (20 U.S.C. 2303) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``the Secretary determines to be 
     appropriate'' and inserting ``are necessary'';
       (2) by striking ``Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
     Education Improvement Act of 2006'' each place it appears and 
     inserting ``Strengthening Career and Technical Education for 
     the 21st Century Act''; and
       (3) by striking ``1998'' and inserting ``2006''.

     SEC. 9. PROHIBITIONS.

       Section 8 (20 U.S.C. 2306a) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``Federal Government to 
     mandate,'' and all that follows through the end and inserting 
     ``Federal Government--
       ``(1) to condition or incentivize the receipt of any grant, 
     contract, or cooperative agreement, or the receipt of any 
     priority or preference under such grant, contract, or 
     cooperative agreement, upon a State, local educational 
     agency, eligible agency, eligible recipient, eligible entity, 
     or school's adoption or implementation of specific 
     instructional content, academic standards and assessments, 
     curricula, or program of instruction (including any 
     condition, priority, or preference to adopt the Common Core 
     State Standards developed under the Common Core State 
     Standards Initiative, any other academic standards common to 
     a significant number of States, or any assessment, 
     instructional content, or curriculum aligned to such 
     standards);
       ``(2) through grants, contracts, or other cooperative 
     agreements, to mandate, direct, or control a State, local 
     educational agency, eligible agency, eligible recipient, 
     eligible entity, or school's specific instructional content, 
     academic standards and assessments, curricula, or program of 
     instruction (including any requirement, direction, or mandate 
     to adopt the Common Core State Standards developed under the 
     Common Core State Standards Initiative, any other academic 
     standards common to a significant number of States, or any 
     assessment, instructional content, or curriculum aligned to 
     such standards); and
       ``(3) except as required under sections 112(b), 211(b), and 
     223--

[[Page H5368]]

       ``(A) to mandate, direct, or control the allocation of 
     State or local resources; or
       ``(B) to mandate that a State or a political subdivision of 
     a State spend any funds or incur any costs not paid for under 
     this Act.''; and
       (2) by striking subsection (d) and redesignating subsection 
     (e) as subsection (d).

     SEC. 10. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       Section 9 (20 U.S.C. 2307) is amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 9. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       ``There are to be authorized to be appropriated to carry 
     out this Act (other than sections 114 and 117)--
       ``(1) $1,133,002,074 for fiscal year 2017;
       ``(2) $1,148,618,465 for fiscal year 2018;
       ``(3) $1,164,450,099 for fiscal year 2019;
       ``(4) $1,180,499,945 for fiscal year 2020;
       ``(5) $1,196,771,008 for fiscal year 2021; and
       ``(6) $1,213,266,339 for fiscal year 2022.''.

    TITLE I--CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO THE STATES

                    PART A--ALLOTMENT AND ALLOCATION

     SEC. 110. RESERVATIONS AND STATE ALLOTMENT.

       Paragraph (5) of section 111(a) (20 U.S.C. 2321(a)) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``No State'' and 
     inserting ``For each of fiscal years 2017, 2018, and 2019, no 
     State'';
       (2) by redesignating subparagraph (B) as subparagraph (C);
       (3) by inserting after subparagraph (A), as amended by 
     paragraph (1), the following:
       ``(B) Fiscal year 2020 and each succeeding fiscal year.--
     For fiscal year 2020 and each of the succeeding fiscal years, 
     no State shall receive an allotment under this section for a 
     fiscal year that is less than 90 percent of the allotment the 
     State received under this section for the preceding fiscal 
     year.''; and
       (4) in subparagraph (C), as redesignated by paragraph (2), 
     by striking ``subparagraph (A)'' and inserting ``subparagraph 
     (A) or (B)''.

     SEC. 111. WITHIN STATE ALLOCATION.

       Section 112 (20 U.S.C. 2322) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``10 percent'' and 
     inserting ``15 percent'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A)--

       (I) by striking ``1 percent'' and inserting ``2 percent''; 
     and
       (II) by striking ``State correctional institutions and 
     institutions'' and inserting ``State correctional 
     institutions, juvenile justice facilities, and educational 
     institutions''; and

       (ii) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``available for 
     services'' and inserting ``available to assist eligible 
     recipients in providing services''; and
       (C) in paragraph (3)(B), by striking ``a local plan;'' and 
     inserting ``local applications;''; and
       (2) in subsection (c), by striking ``section 135'' and all 
     that follows through the end and inserting ``section 135--
       ``(1) in--
       ``(A) rural areas;
       ``(B) areas with high percentages of CTE concentrators or 
     CTE participants; and
       ``(C) areas with high numbers of CTE concentrators or CTE 
     participants; and
       ``(2) in order to--
       ``(A) foster innovation through the identification and 
     promotion of promising and proven career and technical 
     education programs, practices, and strategies, which may 
     include practices and strategies that prepare individuals for 
     nontraditional fields; or
       ``(B) promote the development, implementation, and adoption 
     of programs of study or career pathways aligned with State-
     identified in-demand occupations or industries.''.

     SEC. 112. ACCOUNTABILITY.

       Section 113 (20 U.S.C. 2323) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``comprised of the 
     activities'' and inserting ``comprising the activities'';
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking subparagraph (B) and 
     redesignating subparagraph (C) as subparagraph (B);
       (B) in paragraph (1)(B), as so redesignated, by striking 
     ``, and State levels of performance described in paragraph 
     (3)(B) for each additional indicator of performance''; and
       (C) by striking paragraph (2) and inserting the following:
       ``(2) Indicators of performance.--
       ``(A) Core indicators of performance for cte concentrators 
     at the secondary level.--Each eligible agency shall identify 
     in the State plan core indicators of performance for CTE 
     concentrators at the secondary level that are valid and 
     reliable, and that include, at a minimum, measures of each of 
     the following:
       ``(i) The percentage of CTE concentrators who graduate high 
     school, as measured by--

       ``(I) the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate 
     (defined in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801)); and
       ``(II) at the State's discretion, the extended-year 
     adjusted cohort graduation rate defined in such section 8101 
     (20 U.S.C. 7801).

       ``(ii) CTE concentrator attainment of challenging State 
     academic standards adopted by the State under section 
     1111(b)(1) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)), and measured by the academic 
     assessments described in section 1111(b)(2) of such Act (20 
     U.S.C. 6311(b)(2)).
       ``(iii) The percentage of CTE concentrators who, in the 
     second quarter following the program year after exiting from 
     secondary education, are in postsecondary education or 
     advanced training, military service, or unsubsidized 
     employment.
       ``(iv) Not less than one indicator of career and technical 
     education program quality that--

       ``(I) shall include, not less than one of the following--

       ``(aa) the percentage of CTE concentrators graduating from 
     high school having attained recognized postsecondary 
     credentials;
       ``(bb) the percentage of CTE concentrators graduating from 
     high school having attained postsecondary credits in the 
     relevant career and technical educational program or program 
     of study earned through dual and concurrent enrollment or 
     another credit transfer agreement; or
       ``(cc) the percentage of CTE concentrators graduating from 
     high school having participated in work-based learning; and

       ``(II) may include any other measure of student success in 
     career and technical education that is statewide, valid, and 
     reliable.

       ``(v) The percentage of CTE concentrators in career and 
     technical education programs and programs of study that lead 
     to nontraditional fields.
       ``(B) Core indicators of performance for cte concentrators 
     at the postsecondary level.--Each eligible agency shall 
     identify in the State plan core indicators of performance for 
     CTE concentrators at the postsecondary level that are valid 
     and reliable, and that include, at a minimum, measures of 
     each of the following:
       ``(i) The percentage of CTE concentrators, who, during the 
     second quarter after program completion, are in education or 
     training activities, advanced training, or unsubsidized 
     employment.
       ``(ii) The median earnings of CTE concentrators in 
     unsubsidized employment two quarters after program 
     completion.
       ``(iii) The percentage of CTE concentrators who receive a 
     recognized postsecondary credential during participation in 
     or within 1 year of program completion.
       ``(iv) The percentage of CTE concentrators in career and 
     technical education programs and programs of study that lead 
     to nontraditional fields.
       ``(C) Alignment of performance indicators.--In developing 
     core indicators of performance under subparagraphs (A) and 
     (B), an eligible agency shall, to the greatest extent 
     possible, align the indicators so that substantially similar 
     information gathered for other State and Federal programs, or 
     for any other purpose, may be used to meet the requirements 
     of this section.'';
       (D) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) by amending subparagraph (A) to read as follows:
       ``(A) State adjusted levels of performance for core 
     indicators of performance.--
       ``(i) In general.--Each eligible agency, with input from 
     eligible recipients, shall establish and identify in the 
     State plan submitted under section 122, for the first 2 
     program years covered by the State plan, levels of 
     performance for each of the core indicators of performance 
     described in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (2) for 
     career and technical education activities authorized under 
     this title. The levels of performance established under this 
     subparagraph shall, at a minimum--

       ``(I) be expressed in a percentage or numerical form, so as 
     to be objective, quantifiable, and measurable; and
       ``(II) be sufficiently ambitious to allow for meaningful 
     evaluation of program quality.

       ``(ii) State adjusted levels of performance for subsequent 
     years.--Prior to the third program year covered by the State 
     plan, each eligible agency shall revise the State levels of 
     performance for each of the core indicators of performance 
     for the subsequent program years covered by the State plan, 
     taking into account the extent to which such levels of 
     performance promote meaningful program improvement on such 
     indicators. The State adjusted levels of performance 
     identified under this clause shall be considered to be the 
     State adjusted levels of performance for the State for such 
     years and shall be incorporated into the State plan.
       ``(iii) Reporting.--The eligible agency shall, for each 
     year described in clauses (i) and (iii), publicly report and 
     widely disseminate the State levels of performance described 
     in this subparagraph.
       ``(iv) Revisions.--If unanticipated circumstances arise in 
     a State, the eligible agency may revise the State adjusted 
     levels of performance required under this subparagraph, and 
     submit such revised levels of performance with evidence 
     supporting the revision and demonstrating public 
     consultation, in a manner consistent with the process 
     described in subsections (d) and (f) of section 122.''; and
       (ii) by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(B) Actual levels of performance.--At the end of each 
     program year, the eligible agency shall determine actual 
     levels of performance on each of the core indicators of 
     performance and publicly report and widely disseminate the 
     actual levels of performance described in this 
     subparagraph.''; and
       (E) in paragraph (4)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A)--

       (I) in clause (i)(I), by striking ``consistent with the 
     State levels of performance established under paragraph (3), 
     so as'' and inserting ``consistent with the form expressed in 
     the State levels, so as'';

[[Page H5369]]

       (II) by striking clause (i)(II) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(II) be sufficiently ambitious to allow for meaningful 
     evaluation of program quality.'';
       (III) in clause (iv)--

       (aa) by striking ``third and fifth program years'' and 
     inserting ``third program year''; and
       (bb) by striking ``corresponding'' before ``subsequent 
     program years'';

       (IV) in clause (v)--

       (aa) by striking ``and'' at the end of subclause (I);
       (bb) by redesignating subclause (II) as subclause (III);
       (cc) by inserting after subclause (I) the following:

       ``(II) local economic conditions;'';

       (dd) in subclause (III), as so redesignated, by striking 
     ``promote continuous improvement on the core indicators of 
     performance by the eligible recipient.'' and inserting 
     ``advance the eligible recipient's accomplishments of the 
     goals set forth in the local application; and''; and
       (ee) by adding at the end the following:

       ``(IV) the eligible recipient's ability and capacity to 
     collect and access valid, reliable, and cost effective 
     data.'';
       (V) in clause (vi), by inserting ``or changes occur related 
     to improvements in data or measurement approaches,'' after 
     ``factors described in clause (v),''; and
       (VI) by adding at the end the following:

       ``(vii) Reporting.--The eligible recipient shall, for each 
     year described in clauses (iii) and (iv), publicly report the 
     local levels of performance described in this 
     subparagraph.'';
       (ii) by striking subparagraph (B) and redesignating 
     subparagraph (C) as subparagraph (B); and
       (iii) in clause (ii)(I) of subparagraph (B), as so 
     redesignated--

       (I) by striking ``section 1111(h)(1)(C)(i)'' and inserting 
     ``section 1111(h)(1)(C)(ii)''; and
       (II) by striking ``section 3(29)'' and inserting ``section 
     3(40)''; and

       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in the heading, by inserting ``State'' before 
     ``Report'';
       (B) in paragraph (1)(B), by striking ``information on the 
     levels of performance achieved by the State with respect to 
     the additional indicators of performance, including the'' and 
     inserting ``the''; and
       (C) in paragraph (2)(A)--
       (i) by striking ``categories'' and inserting ``subgroups'';
       (ii) by striking ``section 1111(h)(1)(C)(i)'' and inserting 
     ``section 1111(h)(1)(C)(ii)''; and
       (iii) by striking ``section 3(29)'' and inserting ``section 
     3(40)''.

     SEC. 113. NATIONAL ACTIVITIES.

       Section 114 (20 U.S.C. 2324) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``The Secretary shall'' the first place it 
     appears and inserting ``The Secretary shall, in consultation 
     with the Director of the Institute for Education Sciences,''; 
     and
       (ii) by inserting ``from eligible agencies under section 
     113(c)'' after ``pursuant to this title''; and
       (B) by striking paragraph (3);
       (2) by amending subsection (b) to read as follows:
       ``(b) Reasonable Cost.--The Secretary shall take such 
     action as may be necessary to secure at reasonable cost the 
     information required by this title. To ensure reasonable 
     cost, the Secretary, in consultation with the National Center 
     for Education Statistics and the Office of Career, Technical, 
     and Adult Education shall determine the methodology to be 
     used and the frequency with which such information is to be 
     collected.'';
       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``may'' and inserting ``shall'';
       (ii) by striking ``, directly or through grants, contracts, 
     or cooperative agreements,'' and inserting ``directly or 
     through grants''; and
       (iii) by striking ``and assessment''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) in subparagraph (B), by inserting ``, acting through 
     the Director of the Institute for Education Sciences,'' after 
     ``describe how the Secretary''; and
       (ii) in subparagraph (C), by inserting ``, in consultation 
     with the Director of the Institute for Education Sciences,'' 
     after ``the Secretary'';
       (4) in subsection (d)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A)--

       (I) by inserting ``, acting through the Director of the 
     Institute for Education Sciences,'' after ``The Secretary'';
       (II) by inserting ``and the plan developed under subsection 
     (c)'' after ``described in paragraph (2)''; and
       (III) by striking ``assessment'' each place such term 
     appears and inserting ``evaluation''; and

       (ii) in subparagraph (B)--

       (I) in clause (v), by striking ``; and'' and inserting a 
     semicolon;
       (II) in clause (vi), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``, which may include individuals with expertise in 
     addressing inequities in access to, and in opportunities for 
     academic and technical skill attainment; and''; and
       (III) by adding at the end the following:

       ``(vii) representatives of special populations.'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) in the heading, by striking ``and assessment'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (A)--

       (I) by inserting ``, acting through the Director of the 
     Institute for Education Sciences,'' after ``the Secretary'';
       (II) by striking ``an independent evaluation and 
     assessment'' and inserting ``a series of research and 
     evaluation initiatives for each year for which funds are 
     appropriated to carry out this Act, which are aligned with 
     the plan in subsection (c)(2),'';
       (III) by striking ``Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
     Education Improvement Act of 2006'' and ``Strengthening 
     Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act'';
       (IV) by striking ``, contracts, and cooperative agreements 
     that are'' and inserting ``to institutions of higher 
     education or a consortia of one or more institutions of 
     higher education and one or more private nonprofit 
     organizations or agencies''; and
       (V) by adding at the end the following: ``Such evaluation 
     shall, whenever possible, use the most recent data 
     available.''; and

       (iii) by amending subparagraph (B) to read as follows:
       ``(B) Contents.--The evaluation required under subparagraph 
     (A) shall include descriptions and evaluations of--
       ``(i) the extent and success of the integration of 
     challenging State academic standards adopted under 1111(b)(1) 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
     U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)) and career and technical education for 
     students participating in career and technical education 
     programs, including a review of the effect of such 
     integration on the academic and technical proficiency 
     achievement of such students (including the number of such 
     students that receive a regular high school diploma, as such 
     term is defined under section 8101 of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 or a State-defined 
     alternative diploma described in section 
     8101(25)(A)(ii)(I)(bb) of such Act (20 U.S.C. 
     7801(25)(A)(ii)(I)(bb)));
       ``(ii) the extent to which career and technical education 
     programs and programs of study prepare students, including 
     special populations, for subsequent employment in high-skill, 
     high-wage occupations (including those in which mathematics 
     and science, which may include computer science, skills are 
     critical), or for participation in postsecondary education;
       ``(iii) employer involvement in, benefit from, and 
     satisfaction with, career and technical education programs 
     and programs of study and career and technical education 
     students' preparation for employment;
       ``(iv) efforts to expand access to career and technical 
     education programs of study for all students;
       ``(v) innovative approaches to work-based learning programs 
     that increase participation and alignment with employment in 
     high-growth industries, including in rural and low-income 
     areas;
       ``(vi) the impact of the amendments to this Act made under 
     the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st 
     Century Act, including comparisons, where appropriate, of--

       ``(I) the use of the comprehensive needs assessment under 
     section 134(b);
       ``(II) the implementation of programs of study; and
       ``(III) coordination of planning and program delivery with 
     other relevant laws, including the Workforce Innovation and 
     Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3101 et seq.) and the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq.);

       ``(vii) changes in career and technical education program 
     accountability as described in section 113 and any effects of 
     such changes on program delivery and program quality; and
       ``(viii) changes in student enrollment patterns.''; and
       (iv) in subparagraph (C)--

       (I) in clause (i)--

       (aa) by inserting ``, in consultation with the Director of 
     the Institute for Education Sciences,'' after ``The 
     Secretary'';
       (bb) in subclause (I)--
       (AA) by striking ``assessment'' and inserting ``evaluation 
     and summary of research activities carried out under this 
     section''; and
       (BB) by striking ``2010'' and inserting ``2021''; and
       (cc) in subclause (II)--
       (AA) by striking ``assessment'' and inserting ``evaluation 
     and summary of research activities carried out under this 
     section''; and
       (BB) by striking ``2011'' and inserting ``2023''; and

       (II) by adding after clause (ii) the following:

       ``(iii) Dissemination.--In addition to submitting the 
     reports required under clause (i), the Secretary shall 
     disseminate the results of the evaluation widely and on a 
     timely basis in order to increase the understanding among 
     State and local officials and educators of the effectiveness 
     of programs and activities supported under the Act and of the 
     career and technical education programs that are most likely 
     to produce positive educational and employment outcomes.''; 
     and
       (C) by striking paragraphs (3), (4), and (5) and inserting 
     the following:
       ``(3) Innovation.--
       ``(A) Grant program.--To identify and support innovative 
     strategies and activities to improve career and technical 
     education and align workforce skills with labor market needs 
     as part of the plan developed under subsection (c) and the 
     requirements of this subsection, the Secretary may award 
     grants to eligible entities to--

[[Page H5370]]

       ``(i) create, develop, implement, or take to scale 
     evidence-based, field initiated innovations, including 
     through a pay for success initiative to improve student 
     outcomes in career and technical education; and
       ``(ii) rigorously evaluate such innovations.
       ``(B) Matching funds.--
       ``(i) Matching funds required.--Except as provided under 
     clause (ii), to receive a grant under this paragraph, an 
     eligible entity shall, through cash or in-kind contributions, 
     provide matching funds from public or private sources in an 
     amount equal to at least 50 percent of the funds provided 
     under such grant.
       ``(ii) Exception.--The Secretary may waive the matching 
     fund requirement under clause (i) if the eligible entity 
     demonstrates exceptional circumstances.
       ``(C) Application.--To receive a grant under this 
     paragraph, an eligible entity shall submit to the Secretary 
     at such a time as the Secretary may require, an application 
     that--
       ``(i) identifies and designates the agency, institution, or 
     school responsible for the administration and supervision of 
     the program assisted under this paragraph;
       ``(ii) identifies the source and amount of the matching 
     funds required under subparagraph (B)(i);
       ``(iii) describes how the eligible entity will use the 
     grant funds, including how such funds will directly benefit 
     students, including special populations, served by the 
     eligible entity;
       ``(iv) describes how the program assisted under this 
     paragraph will be coordinated with the activities carried out 
     under section 124 or 135;
       ``(v) describes how the program assisted under this 
     paragraph aligns with the single plan described in subsection 
     (c); and
       ``(vi) describes how the program assisted under this 
     paragraph will be evaluated and how that evaluation may 
     inform the report described in subsection (d)(2)(C).
       ``(D) Priority.--In awarding grants under this paragraph, 
     the Secretary shall give priority to applications from 
     eligible entities that will predominantly serve students from 
     low-income families.
       ``(E) Geographic diversity.--
       ``(i) In general.--In awarding grants under this paragraph, 
     the Secretary shall award no less than 25 percent of the 
     total available funds for any fiscal year to eligible 
     entities proposing to fund career and technical education 
     activities that serve--

       ``(I) a local educational agency with an urban-centric 
     district locale code of 32, 33, 41, 42, or 43, as determined 
     by the Secretary;
       ``(II) an institution of higher education primarily serving 
     the one or more areas served by such a local educational 
     agency;
       ``(III) a consortium of such local educational agencies or 
     such institutions of higher education;
       ``(IV) a partnership between--

       ``(aa) an educational service agency or a nonprofit 
     organization; and
       ``(bb) such a local educational agency or such an 
     institution of higher education; or

       ``(V) a partnership between--

       ``(aa) a grant recipient described in subclause (I) or 
     (II); and
       ``(bb) a State educational agency.
       ``(ii) Exception.--Notwithstanding clause (i), the 
     Secretary shall reduce the amount of funds made available 
     under such clause if the Secretary does not receive a 
     sufficient number of applications of sufficient quality.
       ``(F) Uses of funds.--An eligible entity that is awarded a 
     grant under this paragraph shall use the grant funds, in a 
     manner consistent with subparagraph (A)(i), to--
       ``(i) improve career and technical education outcomes of 
     students served by eligible entities under this title;
       ``(ii) improve career and technical education teacher 
     effectiveness;
       ``(iii) improve the transition of students from secondary 
     education to postsecondary education or employment;
       ``(iv) improve the incorporation of comprehensive work-
     based learning into career and technical education;
       ``(v) increase the effective use of technology within 
     career and technical education programs;
       ``(vi) support new models for integrating academic content 
     and career and technical education content in such programs;
       ``(vii) support the development and enhancement of 
     innovative delivery models for career and technical 
     education;
       ``(viii) work with industry to design and implement courses 
     or programs of study aligned to labor market needs in new or 
     emerging fields;
       ``(ix) integrate science, technology, engineering, and 
     mathematics fields, including computer science education, 
     with career and technical education;
       ``(x) support innovative approaches to career and technical 
     education by redesigning the high school experience for 
     students, which may include evidence-based transitional 
     support strategies for students who have not met 
     postsecondary education eligibility requirements;
       ``(xi) improve CTE concentrator employment outcomes in 
     nontraditional fields; or
       ``(xii) support the use of career and technical education 
     programs and programs of study in a coordinated strategy to 
     address identified employer needs and workforce shortages, 
     such as shortages in the early childhood, elementary school, 
     and secondary school education workforce.
       ``(G) Evaluation.--Each eligible entity receiving a grant 
     under this paragraph shall provide for an independent 
     evaluation of the activities carried out using such grant and 
     submit to the Secretary an annual report that includes--
       ``(i) a description of how funds received under this 
     paragraph were used;
       ``(ii) the performance of the eligible entity with respect 
     to, at a minimum, the performance indicators described under 
     section 113, as applicable, and disaggregated by--

       ``(I) subgroups of students described in section 
     1111(c)(2)(B) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
     of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(c)(2)(B));
       ``(II) special populations; and
       ``(III) as appropriate, each career and technical education 
     program and program of study; and

       ``(iii) a quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the 
     project carried out under this paragraph.''; and
       (5) by striking subsection (e) and inserting the following:
       ``(e) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are 
     authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section--
       ``(1) $7,523,285 for fiscal year 2017;
       ``(2) $7,626,980 for fiscal year 2018;
       ``(3) $7,732,104 for fiscal year 2019;
       ``(4) $7,838,677 for fiscal year 2020;
       ``(5) $7,946,719 for fiscal year 2021; and
       ``(6) $8,056,251 for fiscal year 2022.''.

     SEC. 114. ASSISTANCE FOR THE OUTLYING AREAS.

       Section 115 (20 U.S.C. 2325) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)(3), by striking ``subject to 
     subsection (d)'' and inserting ``subject to subsection (b)'';
       (2) by striking subsections (b) and (c); and
       (3) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (b).

     SEC. 115. TRIBALLY CONTROLLED POSTSECONDARY CAREER AND 
                   TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS.

       Section 117(i) (20 U.S.C. 2327(i)) is amended to read as 
     follows:
       ``(i) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are 
     authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section--
       ``(1) $8,400,208 for fiscal year 2017;
       ``(2) $8,515,989 for fiscal year 2018;
       ``(3) $8,633,367 for fiscal year 2019;
       ``(4) $8,752,362 for fiscal year 2020;
       ``(5) $8,872,998 for fiscal year 2021; and
       ``(6) $8,995,296 for fiscal year 2022.''.

     SEC. 116. OCCUPATIONAL AND EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION.

       Section 118 (20 U.S.C. 2328) is repealed.

                        PART B--STATE PROVISIONS

     SEC. 121. STATE PLAN.

       Section 122 (20 U.S.C. 2342) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``6-year period'' and inserting ``4-year 
     period''; and
       (ii) by striking ``Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
     Education Improvement Act of 2006'' and inserting 
     ``Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st 
     Century Act'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)(B), by striking ``6-year period'' and 
     inserting ``4-year period''; and
       (C) in paragraph (3), by striking ``(including charter 
     school'' and all that follows through ``and community 
     organizations)'' and inserting ``(including teachers, 
     specialized instructional support personnel, 
     paraprofessionals, school leaders, authorized public 
     chartering agencies, and charter school leaders, consistent 
     with State law, employers, labor organizations, parents, 
     students, and community organizations)''; and
       (2) by amending subsections (b), (c), (d), and (e) to read 
     as follows:
       ``(b) Options for Submission of State Plan.--
       ``(1) Combined plan.--The eligible agency may submit a 
     combined plan that meets the requirements of this section and 
     the requirements of section 103 of the Workforce Innovation 
     and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3113), unless the eligible 
     agency opts to submit a single plan under paragraph (2) and 
     informs the Secretary of such decision.
       ``(2) Single plan.--If the eligible agency elects not to 
     submit a combined plan as described in paragraph (1), such 
     eligible agency shall submit a single State plan.
       ``(c) Plan Development.--
       ``(1) In general.--The eligible agency shall--
       ``(A) develop the State plan in consultation with--
       ``(i) representatives of secondary and postsecondary career 
     and technical education programs, including eligible 
     recipients and representatives of two-year Minority-Serving 
     Institutions and Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
     in States where such institutions are in existence, and 
     charter school representatives in States where such schools 
     are in existence, which shall include teachers, school 
     leaders, specialized instructional support personnel 
     (including guidance counselors), and paraprofessionals;
       ``(ii) interested community representatives, including 
     parents and students;
       ``(iii) the State workforce development board described in 
     section 101 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act 
     (29 U.S.C. 3111);
       ``(iv) representatives of special populations;
       ``(v) representatives of business and industry (including 
     representatives of small business), which shall include 
     representatives of industry and sector partnerships in the 
     State, as appropriate, and representatives of labor 
     organizations in the State;

[[Page H5371]]

       ``(vi) representatives of agencies serving out-of-school 
     youth, homeless children and youth, and at-risk youth; and
       ``(vii) representatives of Indian tribes located in the 
     State; and
       ``(B) consult the Governor of the State, and the heads of 
     other State agencies with authority for career and technical 
     education programs that are not the eligible agency, with 
     respect to the development of the State plan.
       ``(2) Activities and procedures.--The eligible agency shall 
     develop effective activities and procedures, including access 
     to information needed to use such procedures, to allow the 
     individuals and entities described in paragraph (1) to 
     participate in State and local decisions that relate to 
     development of the State plan.
       ``(d) Plan Contents.--The State plan shall include--
       ``(1) a summary of State-supported workforce development 
     activities (including education and training) in the State, 
     including the degree to which the State's career and 
     technical education programs and programs of study are 
     aligned with such activities;
       ``(2) the State's strategic vision and set of goals for 
     preparing an educated and skilled workforce (including 
     special populations) and for meeting the skilled workforce 
     needs of employers, including in-demand industry sectors and 
     occupations as identified by the State, and how the State's 
     career and technical education programs will help to meet 
     these goals;
       ``(3) a summary of the strategic planning elements of the 
     unified State plan required under section 102(b)(1) of the 
     Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 
     3112(b)(1)), including the elements related to system 
     alignment under section 102(b)(2)(B) of such Act (29 U.S.C. 
     3112(b)(2)(B));
       ``(4) a description of the career and technical education 
     programs or programs of study that will be supported, 
     developed, or improved, including descriptions of--
       ``(A) the programs of study to be developed at the State 
     level and made available for adoption by eligible recipients;
       ``(B) the process and criteria to be used for approving 
     locally developed programs of study or career pathways, 
     including how such programs address State workforce 
     development and education needs; and
       ``(C) how the eligible agency will--
       ``(i) make information on approved programs of study and 
     career pathways, including career exploration, work-based 
     learning opportunities, guidance and advisement resources, 
     available to students and parents;
       ``(ii) ensure nonduplication of eligible recipients' 
     development of programs of study and career pathways;
       ``(iii) determine alignment of eligible recipients' 
     programs of study to the State, regional or local economy, 
     including in-demand fields and occupations identified by the 
     State workforce development board as appropriate;
       ``(iv) provide equal access to activities assisted under 
     this Act for special populations;
       ``(v) coordinate with the State workforce board to support 
     the local development of career pathways and articulate 
     processes by which career pathways will be developed by local 
     workforce development boards;
       ``(vi) use State, regional, or local labor market data to 
     align career and technical education with State labor market 
     needs;
       ``(vii) support effective and meaningful collaboration 
     between secondary schools, postsecondary institutions, and 
     employers; and
       ``(viii) improve outcomes for CTE concentrators, including 
     those who are members of special populations;
       ``(5) a description of the criteria and process for how the 
     eligible agency will approve eligible recipients for funds 
     under this Act, including how--
       ``(A) each eligible recipient will promote academic 
     achievement;
       ``(B) each eligible recipient will promote skill 
     attainment, including skill attainment that leads to a 
     recognized postsecondary credential; and
       ``(C) each eligible recipient will ensure the local needs 
     assessment under section 134 takes into consideration local 
     economic and education needs, including where appropriate, 
     in-demand industry sectors and occupations;
       ``(6) a description of how the eligible agency will support 
     the recruitment and preparation of teachers, including 
     special education teachers, faculty, administrators, 
     specialized instructional support personnel, and 
     paraprofessionals to provide career and technical education 
     instruction, leadership, and support;
       ``(7) a description of how the eligible agency will use 
     State leadership funding to meet the requirements of section 
     124(b);
       ``(8) a description of how funds received by the eligible 
     agency through the allotment made under section 111 will be 
     distributed--
       ``(A) among career and technical education at the secondary 
     level, or career and technical education at the postsecondary 
     and adult level, or both, including how such distribution 
     will most effectively provide students with the skills needed 
     to succeed in the workplace; and
       ``(B) among any consortia that may be formed among 
     secondary schools and eligible institutions, and how funds 
     will be distributed among the members of the consortia, 
     including the rationale for such distribution and how it will 
     most effectively provide students with the skills needed to 
     succeed in the workplace;
       ``(9) a description of the procedure the eligible agency 
     will adopt for determining State adjusted levels of 
     performance described in section 113, which at a minimum 
     shall include--
       ``(A) consultation with stakeholders identified in 
     paragraph (1);
       ``(B) opportunities for the public to comment in person and 
     in writing on the State adjusted levels of performance 
     included in the State plan; and
       ``(C) submission of public comment on State adjusted levels 
     of performance as part of the State plan; and
       ``(10) assurances that--
       ``(A) the eligible agency will comply with the requirements 
     of this Act and the provisions of the State plan, including 
     the provision of a financial audit of funds received under 
     this Act, which may be included as part of an audit of other 
     Federal or State programs;
       ``(B) none of the funds expended under this Act will be 
     used to acquire equipment (including computer software) in 
     any instance in which such acquisition results in a direct 
     financial benefit to any organization representing the 
     interests of the acquiring entity or the employees of the 
     acquiring entity, or any affiliate of such an organization;
       ``(C) the eligible agency will use the funds to promote 
     preparation for high-skill, high-wage, or in-demand 
     occupations and nontraditional fields, as identified by the 
     State;
       ``(D) the eligible agency will use the funds provided under 
     this Act to implement career and technical education programs 
     and programs of study for individuals in State correctional 
     institutions, including juvenile justice facilities; and
       ``(E) the eligible agency will provide local educational 
     agencies, area career and technical education schools, and 
     eligible institutions in the State with technical assistance, 
     including technical assistance on how to close gaps in 
     student participation and performance in career and technical 
     education programs.
       ``(e) Consultation.--
       ``(1) In general.--The eligible agency shall develop the 
     portion of each State plan relating to the amount and uses of 
     any funds proposed to be reserved for adult career and 
     technical education, postsecondary career and technical 
     education, and secondary career and technical education after 
     consultation with the--
       ``(A) State agency responsible for supervision of community 
     colleges, technical institutes, or other 2-year postsecondary 
     institutions primarily engaged in providing postsecondary 
     career and technical education;
       ``(B) the State agency responsible for secondary education; 
     and
       ``(C) the State agency responsible for adult education.
       ``(2) Objections of state agencies.--If a State agency 
     other than the eligible agency finds that a portion of the 
     final State plan is objectionable, that objection shall be 
     filed together with the State plan. The eligible agency shall 
     respond to any objections of such State agency in the State 
     plan submitted to the Secretary.
       ``(f) Plan Approval.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall approve a State 
     plan, or a revision to an approved State plan, unless the 
     Secretary determines that the State plan, or revision, 
     respectively, does not meet the requirements of this Act.
       ``(2) Disapproval.--The Secretary shall--
       ``(A) have the authority to disapprove a State plan only if 
     the Secretary--
       ``(i) determines how the State plan fails to meet the 
     requirements of this Act; and
       ``(ii) immediately provides to the State, in writing, 
     notice of such determination and the supporting information 
     and rationale to substantiate such determination; and
       ``(B) not finally disapprove a State plan, except after 
     making the determination and providing the information 
     described in subparagraph (A) and giving the eligible agency 
     notice and an opportunity for a hearing.
       ``(3) Timeframe.--A State plan shall be deemed approved by 
     the Secretary if the Secretary has not responded to the 
     eligible agency regarding the State plan within 90 days of 
     the date the Secretary receives the State plan.''.

     SEC. 122. IMPROVEMENT PLANS.

       Section 123 (20 U.S.C. 2343) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``percent of an agreed upon'' and inserting 
     ``percent of the''; and
       (ii) by striking ``appropriate agencies,'' and inserting 
     ``appropriate State agencies,'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) by inserting ``including after implementation of the 
     improvement plan described in paragraph (1),'' after 
     ``purposes of this Act,''; and
       (ii) by striking ``Act'' and inserting ``subsection'';
       (C) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) by amending subparagraph (A) to read as follows:
       ``(A) In general.--If the eligible agency fails to make any 
     improvement in meeting any of the State adjusted levels of 
     performance for any of the core indicators of performance 
     identified under paragraph (1) during the first 2 years of 
     implementation of the improvement plan required under 
     paragraph (1), the eligible agency--
       ``(i) shall revise such improvement plan to address the 
     reasons for such failure; and
       ``(ii) shall continue to implement such improvement plan 
     until the eligible agency meets at least 90 percent of the 
     State adjusted level of performance for the same core

[[Page H5372]]

     indicators of performance for which the plan is revised.''; 
     and
       (ii) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``sanction in'' and 
     inserting ``requirements of''; and
       (D) by striking paragraph (4);
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (2), by striking ``the eligible agency, 
     appropriate agencies, individuals, and organizations'' and 
     inserting ``local stakeholders included in section 
     134(d)(1)'';
       (B) in paragraph (3), by striking ``shall work with the 
     eligible recipient to implement improvement activities 
     consistent with the requirements of this Act.'' and inserting 
     ``shall provide technical assistance to assist the eligible 
     recipient in meeting its responsibilities under section 
     134.'';
       (C) in paragraph (4)--
       (i) by amending subparagraph (A) to read as follows:
       ``(A) In general.--If the eligible recipient fails to make 
     any improvement in meeting any of the local adjusted levels 
     of performance for any of the core indicators of performance 
     identified under paragraph (2) during a number of years 
     determined by the eligible agency, the eligible recipient--
       ``(i) shall revise the improvement plan described in 
     paragraph (2) to address the reasons for such failure; and
       ``(ii) shall continue to implement such improvement plan 
     until such recipient meets at least 90 percent of an agreed 
     upon local adjusted level of performance for the same core 
     indicators of performance for which the plan is revised.''; 
     and
       (ii) in subparagraph (B)--

       (I) in the matter preceding clause (i)--

       (aa) by striking ``In determining whether to impose 
     sanctions under subparagraph (A), the'' and inserting 
     ``The''; and
       (bb) by striking ``waive imposing sanctions'' and inserting 
     ``waive the requirements of subparagraph (A)'';

       (II) in clause (i), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (III) in clause (ii), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; or''; and
       (IV) by adding at the end the following:

       ``(iii) in response to a public request from an eligible 
     recipient consistent with clauses (i) and (ii).''; and
       (D) by striking paragraph (5); and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(c) Plan Development.--Except for consultation described 
     in subsection (b)(2), the State and local improvement plans, 
     and the elements of such plans, required under this section 
     shall be developed solely by the eligible agency or the 
     eligible recipient, respectively.''.

     SEC. 123. STATE LEADERSHIP ACTIVITIES.

       Section 124 (20 U.S.C. 2344) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``shall conduct State 
     leadership activities.'' and inserting ``shall--
       ``(1) conduct State leadership activities directly; and
       ``(2) report on the effectiveness of such use of funds in 
     achieving the goals described in section 122(d)(2) and the 
     State adjusted levels of performance described in section 
     113(b)(3)(A).'';
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) by striking paragraphs (1) through (4) and inserting 
     the following:
       ``(1) developing statewide programs of study, which may 
     include standards, curriculum, and course development, and 
     career exploration, guidance, and advisement activities and 
     resources;
       ``(2) approving locally developed programs of study that 
     meet the requirements established in section 122(d)(4)(B);
       ``(3) establishing statewide articulation agreements 
     aligned to approved programs of study;
       ``(4) establishing statewide partnerships among local 
     educational agencies, institutions of higher education, and 
     employers, including small businesses, to develop and 
     implement programs of study aligned to State and local 
     economic and education needs, including as appropriate, in-
     demand industry sectors and occupations;''; and
       (B) by striking paragraphs (6) through (9) and inserting 
     the following:
       ``(6) support services for individuals in State 
     institutions, such as State correctional institutions, 
     including juvenile justice facilities, and educational 
     institutions that serve individuals with disabilities;
       ``(7) for faculty and teachers providing career and 
     technical education instruction, support services, and 
     specialized instructional support services, high-quality 
     comprehensive professional development that is, to the extent 
     practicable, grounded in evidence-based research (to the 
     extent a State determines that such evidence is reasonably 
     available) that identifies the most effective educator 
     professional development process and is coordinated and 
     aligned with other professional development activities 
     carried out by the State (including under title II of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     6601 et seq.) and title II of the Higher Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 1021 et seq.)), including programming that--
       ``(A) promotes the integration of the challenging State 
     academic standards adopted by the State under section 
     1111(b)(1) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)) and relevant technical knowledge 
     and skills;
       ``(B) prepares career and technical education teachers, 
     specialized instructional support personnel, and 
     paraprofessionals to provide appropriate accommodations for 
     students who are members of special populations, including 
     through the use of principles of universal design for 
     learning; and
       ``(C) increases understanding of industry standards, as 
     appropriate, for faculty providing career and technical 
     education instruction; and
       ``(8) technical assistance for eligible recipients.''; and
       (3) in subsection (c), by striking paragraphs (1) through 
     (17) and inserting the following:
       ``(1) awarding incentive grants to eligible recipients--
       ``(A) for exemplary performance in carrying out programs 
     under this Act, which awards shall be based on--
       ``(i) eligible recipients exceeding the local adjusted 
     level of performance established under section 113(b)(4)(A) 
     in a manner that reflects sustained or significant 
     improvement;
       ``(ii) eligible recipients effectively developing 
     connections between secondary education and postsecondary 
     education and training;
       ``(iii) the integration of academic and technical 
     standards;
       ``(iv) eligible recipients' progress in closing achievement 
     gaps among subpopulations who participate in programs of 
     study; or
       ``(v) other factors relating to the performance of eligible 
     recipients under this Act as the eligible agency determines 
     are appropriate; or
       ``(B) if an eligible recipient elects to use funds as 
     permitted under section 135(c);
       ``(2) providing support for the adoption and integration of 
     recognized postsecondary credentials or for consultation and 
     coordination with other State agencies for the 
     identification, consolidation, or elimination of licenses or 
     certifications which pose an unnecessary barrier to entry for 
     aspiring workers and provide limited consumer protection;
       ``(3) the creation, implementation, and support of pay-for-
     success initiatives leading to recognized postsecondary 
     credentials;
       ``(4) support for career and technical education programs 
     for adults and out-of-school youth concurrent with their 
     completion of their secondary school education in a school or 
     other educational setting;
       ``(5) the creation, evaluation, and support of competency-
     based curricula;
       ``(6) support for the development, implementation, and 
     expansion of programs of study or career pathways in areas 
     declared to be in a state of emergency under section 501 of 
     the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5191);
       ``(7) providing support for dual or concurrent enrollment 
     programs, such as early college high schools;
       ``(8) improvement of career guidance and academic 
     counseling programs that assist students in making informed 
     academic and career and technical education decisions, 
     including academic and financial aid counseling;
       ``(9) support for the integration of employability skills 
     into career and technical education programs and programs of 
     study;
       ``(10) support for programs and activities that increase 
     access, student engagement, and success in science, 
     technology, engineering, and mathematics fields (including 
     computer science), particularly for students who are members 
     of groups underrepresented in such subject fields, such as 
     female students, minority students, and students who are 
     members of special populations;
       ``(11) support for career and technical student 
     organizations, especially with respect to efforts to increase 
     the participation of students who are members of special 
     populations;
       ``(12) support for establishing and expanding work-based 
     learning opportunities;
       ``(13) support for preparing, retaining, and training of 
     career and technical education teachers, faculty, specialized 
     instructional support personnel, and paraprofessionals, such 
     as preservice, professional development, and leadership 
     development programs;
       ``(14) integrating and aligning programs of study and 
     career pathways;
       ``(15) supporting the use of career and technical education 
     programs and programs of study aligned with State, regional, 
     or local in-demand industry sectors or occupations identified 
     by State or local workforce development boards;
       ``(16) making all forms of instructional content widely 
     available, which may include use of open educational 
     resources;
       ``(17) support for the integration of arts and design 
     skills, when appropriate, into career and technical education 
     programs and programs of study; and
       ``(18) support for accelerated learning programs (described 
     in section 4104(b)(3)(A)(i)(IV) of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     7114(b)(3)(A)(i)(IV)) when any such program is part of a 
     program of study.''.

                        PART C--LOCAL PROVISIONS

     SEC. 131. LOCAL APPLICATION FOR CAREER AND TECHNICAL 
                   EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

       Section 134 (20 U.S.C. 2354) is amended--
       (1) in the section heading by striking ``local plan'' and 
     inserting ``local application'';
       (2) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in the heading, by striking ``Local Plan'' and 
     inserting ``Local Application'';
       (B) by striking ``submit a local plan'' and inserting 
     ``submit a local application''; and
       (C) by striking ``Such local plan'' and inserting ``Such 
     local application''; and
       (3) by striking subsection (b) and inserting the following:

[[Page H5373]]

       ``(b) Contents.--The eligible agency shall determine the 
     requirements for local applications, except that each local 
     application shall contain--
       ``(1) a description of the results of the comprehensive 
     needs assessment conducted under subsection (c);
       ``(2) information on the programs of study approved by a 
     State under section 124(b)(2) supported by the eligible 
     recipient with funds under this part, including--
       ``(A) how the results of the comprehensive needs assessment 
     described in subsection (c) informed the selection of the 
     specific career and technical education programs and 
     activities selected to be funded; and
       ``(B) a description of any new programs of study the 
     eligible recipient will develop and submit to the State for 
     approval;
       ``(3) a description of how the eligible recipient will 
     provide--
       ``(A) career exploration and career development coursework, 
     activities, or services;
       ``(B) career information; and
       ``(C) an organized system of career guidance and academic 
     counseling to students before enrolling and while 
     participating in a career and technical education program; 
     and
       ``(4) a description of how the eligible recipient will--
       ``(A) provide activities to prepare special populations for 
     high-skill, high-wage, or in-demand occupations that will 
     lead to self-sufficiency; and
       ``(B) prepare CTE participants for nontraditional fields.
       ``(c) Comprehensive Needs Assessment.--
       ``(1) In general.--To be eligible to receive financial 
     assistance under this part, an eligible recipient shall--
       ``(A) conduct a comprehensive local needs assessment 
     related to career and technical education; and
       ``(B) not less than once every two years, update such 
     comprehensive local needs assessment.
       ``(2) Requirements.--The comprehensive local needs 
     assessment described under paragraph (1) shall include--
       ``(A) an evaluation of the performance of the students 
     served by the eligible recipient with respect to State and 
     local adjusted levels of performance established pursuant to 
     section 113, including an evaluation of performance for 
     special populations;
       ``(B) a description of how career and technical education 
     programs offered by the eligible recipient are--
       ``(i) sufficient in size, scope, and quality to meet the 
     needs of all students served by the eligible recipient; and
       ``(ii)(I) aligned to State, regional, or local in-demand 
     industry sectors or occupations identified by the State or 
     local workforce development board, including career pathways, 
     where appropriate; or
       ``(II) designed to meet local education or economic needs 
     not identified by State or local workforce development 
     boards;
       ``(C) an evaluation of progress toward the implementation 
     of career and technical education programs and programs of 
     study;
       ``(D) an evaluation of strategies needed to overcome 
     barriers that result in lowering rates of access to, or 
     lowering success in, career and technical education programs 
     for special populations, which may include strategies to 
     establish or utilize existing flexible learning and 
     manufacturing facilities, such as makerspaces;
       ``(E) a description of how the eligible recipient will 
     improve recruitment, retention, and training of career and 
     technical education teachers, faculty, specialized 
     instructional support personnel, paraprofessionals, and 
     career, academic, and guidance counselors, including 
     individuals in groups underrepresented in such professions; 
     and
       ``(F) a description of how the eligible recipient will 
     support the transition to teaching from business and 
     industry.
       ``(d) Consultation.--In conducting the comprehensive needs 
     assessment under subsection (c), an eligible recipient shall 
     involve a diverse body of stakeholders, including, at a 
     minimum--
       ``(1) representatives of career and technical education 
     programs in a local educational agency or educational service 
     agency, including teachers and administrators;
       ``(2) representatives of career and technical education 
     programs at postsecondary educational institutions, including 
     faculty and administrators;
       ``(3) representatives of State or local workforce 
     development boards and a range of local or regional 
     businesses or industries;
       ``(4) parents and students;
       ``(5) representatives of special populations; and
       ``(6) representatives of local agencies serving out-of-
     school youth, homeless children and youth, and at-risk youth 
     (as defined in section 1432 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6472)).
       ``(e) Continued Consultation.--An eligible recipient 
     receiving financial assistance under this part shall consult 
     with the entities described in subsection (d) on an ongoing 
     basis to--
       ``(1) provide input on annual updates to the comprehensive 
     needs assessment required under subsection (c);
       ``(2) ensure programs of study are--
       ``(A) responsive to community employment needs;
       ``(B) aligned with employment priorities in the State, 
     regional, or local economy identified by employers and the 
     entities described in subsection (d), which may include in-
     demand industry sectors or occupations identified by the 
     local workforce development board;
       ``(C) informed by labor market information, including 
     information provided under section 15(e)(2)(C) of the Wagner-
     Peyser Act (29 U.S.C. 491-2(e)(2)(C));
       ``(D) designed to meet current, intermediate, or long-term 
     labor market projections; and
       ``(E) allow employer input, including input from industry 
     or sector partnerships in the local area, where applicable, 
     into the development and implementation of programs of study 
     to ensure programs align with skills required by local 
     employment opportunities, including activities such as the 
     identification of relevant standards, curriculum, industry-
     recognized credentials, and current technology and equipment;
       ``(3) identify and encourage opportunities for work-based 
     learning; and
       ``(4) ensure funding under this part is used in a 
     coordinated manner with other local resources.''.

     SEC. 132. LOCAL USES OF FUNDS.

       Section 135 (20 U.S.C. 2355) is amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 135. LOCAL USES OF FUNDS.

       ``(a) General Authority.--Each eligible recipient that 
     receives funds under this part shall use such funds to 
     develop, coordinate, implement, or improve career and 
     technical education programs to meet the needs identified in 
     the comprehensive needs assessment described in section 
     134(c).
       ``(b) Requirements for Uses of Funds.--Funds made available 
     to eligible recipients under this part shall be used to 
     support career and technical education programs that are of 
     sufficient size, scope, and quality to be effective and--
       ``(1) provide career exploration and career development 
     activities through an organized, systematic framework 
     designed to aid students, before enrolling and while 
     participating in a career and technical education program, in 
     making informed plans and decisions about future education 
     and career opportunities and programs of study, which may 
     include--
       ``(A) introductory courses or activities focused on career 
     exploration and career awareness;
       ``(B) readily available career and labor market 
     information, including information on--
       ``(i) occupational supply and demand;
       ``(ii) educational requirements;
       ``(iii) other information on careers aligned to State or 
     local economic priorities; and
       ``(iv) employment sectors;
       ``(C) programs and activities related to the development of 
     student graduation and career plans;
       ``(D) career guidance and academic counselors that provide 
     information on postsecondary education and career options; or
       ``(E) any other activity that advances knowledge of career 
     opportunities and assists students in making informed 
     decisions about future education and employment goals;
       ``(2) provide professional development for teachers, 
     principals, school leaders, administrators, faculty, and 
     career and guidance counselors with respect to content and 
     pedagogy that--
       ``(A) supports individualized academic and career and 
     technical education instructional approaches, including the 
     integration of academic and career and technical education 
     standards and curriculum;
       ``(B) ensures labor market information is used to inform 
     the programs, guidance, and advisement offered to students;
       ``(C) provides educators with opportunities to advance 
     knowledge, skills, and understanding of all aspects of an 
     industry, including the latest workplace equipment, 
     technologies, standards, and credentials;
       ``(D) supports administrators in managing career and 
     technical education programs in the schools, institutions, or 
     local educational agencies of such administrators;
       ``(E) supports the implementation of strategies to improve 
     student achievement and close gaps in student participation 
     and performance in career and technical education programs; 
     and
       ``(F) provides educators with opportunities to advance 
     knowledge, skills, and understanding in pedagogical 
     practices, including, to the extent the eligible recipient 
     determines that such evidence is reasonably available, 
     evidence-based pedagogical practices;
       ``(3) provide career and technical education students, 
     including special populations, with the skills necessary to 
     pursue high-skill, high-wage occupations;
       ``(4) support integration of academic skills into career 
     and technical education programs and programs of study to 
     support CTE participants at the secondary school level in 
     meeting the challenging State academic standards adopted 
     under section 1111(b)(1) of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)) by the State in 
     which the eligible recipient is located;
       ``(5) plan and carry out elements that support the 
     implementation of career and technical education programs and 
     programs of study and student achievement of the local 
     adjusted levels of performance established under section 113, 
     which may include--
       ``(A) curriculum aligned with the requirements for a 
     program of study;
       ``(B) sustainable relationships among education, business 
     and industry, and other community stakeholders, including 
     industry or sector partnerships in the local area,

[[Page H5374]]

     where applicable, that are designed to facilitate the process 
     of continuously updating and aligning programs of study with 
     skills in demand in the State, regional, or local economy;
       ``(C) dual or concurrent enrollment programs, including 
     early college high schools, and the development or 
     implementation of articulation agreements;
       ``(D) appropriate equipment, technology, and instructional 
     materials (including support for library resources) aligned 
     with business and industry needs, including machinery, 
     testing equipment, tools, implements, hardware and software, 
     and other new and emerging instructional materials;
       ``(E) a continuum of work-based learning opportunities;
       ``(F) industry-recognized certification exams or other 
     assessments leading toward industry-recognized postsecondary 
     credentials;
       ``(G) efforts to recruit and retain career and technical 
     education program administrators and educators;
       ``(H) where applicable, coordination with other education 
     and workforce development programs and initiatives, including 
     career pathways and sector partnerships developed under the 
     Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3101 et 
     seq.) and other Federal laws and initiatives that provide 
     students with transition-related services, including the 
     Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C.1400 et 
     seq.);
       ``(I) expanding opportunities for students to participate 
     in distance career and technical education and blended-
     learning programs;
       ``(J) expanding opportunities for students to participate 
     in competency-based education programs;
       ``(K) improving career guidance and academic counseling 
     programs that assist students in making informed academic and 
     career and technical education decisions, including academic 
     and financial aid counseling;
       ``(L) supporting the integration of employability skills 
     into career and technical education programs and programs of 
     study;
       ``(M) supporting programs and activities that increase 
     access, student engagement, and success in science, 
     technology, engineering, and mathematics fields (including 
     computer science) for students who are members of groups 
     underrepresented in such subject fields;
       ``(N) providing career and technical education, in a school 
     or other educational setting, for adults or a school-aged 
     individual who has dropped out of a secondary school to 
     complete secondary school education or upgrade technical 
     skills;
       ``(O) career and technical student organizations, including 
     student preparation for and participation in technical skills 
     competitions aligned with career and technical education 
     program standards and curriculum;
       ``(P) making all forms of instructional content widely 
     available, which may include use of open educational 
     resources;
       ``(Q) supporting the integration of arts and design skills, 
     when appropriate, into career and technical education 
     programs and programs of study;
       ``(R) where appropriate, expanding opportunities for CTE 
     concentrators to participate in accelerated learning programs 
     (described in section 4104(b)(3)(A)(i)(IV) of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     7114(b)(3)(A)(i)(IV)) as part of a program of study; and
       ``(S) other activities to improve career and technical 
     education programs; and
       ``(6) develop and implement evaluations of the activities 
     carried out with funds under this part, including evaluations 
     necessary to complete the comprehensive needs assessment 
     required under section 134(c) and the local report required 
     under section 113(b)(4)(C).
       ``(c) Pooling Funds.--An eligible recipient may pool a 
     portion of funds received under this Act with a portion of 
     funds received under this Act available to not less than 1 
     other eligible recipient to support implementation of 
     programs of study through the activities described in 
     subsection (b)(2).
       ``(d) Administrative Costs.--Each eligible recipient 
     receiving funds under this part shall not use more than 5 
     percent of such funds for costs associated with the 
     administration of activities under this section.''.

                      TITLE II--GENERAL PROVISIONS

     SEC. 201. FEDERAL AND STATE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS.

       The Act (20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq.) is amended--
       (1) in section 311(b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) by amending subparagraph (A) to read as follows:
       ``(A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraphs (B), 
     (C), or (D), in order for a State to receive its full 
     allotment of funds under this Act for any fiscal year, the 
     Secretary must find that the State's fiscal effort per 
     student, or the aggregate expenditures of such State, with 
     respect to career and technical education for the preceding 
     fiscal year was not less than the fiscal effort per student, 
     or the aggregate expenditures of such State, for the second 
     preceding fiscal year.'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``shall exclude 
     capital expenditures, special 1-time project costs, and the 
     cost of pilot programs.'' and inserting ``shall, at the 
     request of the State, exclude competitive or incentive-based 
     programs established by the State, capital expenditures, 
     special one-time project costs, and the cost of pilot 
     programs.''; and
       (iii) by adding after subparagraph (C), the following new 
     subparagraph:
       ``(D) Establishing the state baseline.--
       ``(i) In general.--For purposes of subparagraph (A), the 
     State may--

       ``(I) continue to use the State's fiscal effort per 
     student, or aggregate expenditures of such State, with 
     respect to career and technical education, as was in effect 
     on the day before the date of enactment of the Strengthening 
     Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act; or
       ``(II) establish a new level of fiscal effort per student, 
     or aggregate expenditures of such State, with respect to 
     career and technical education.

       ``(ii) Amount.--The amount of the new level described in 
     clause (i)(II) shall be the State's fiscal effort per 
     student, or aggregate expenditures of such State, with 
     respect to career and technical education, for the first full 
     fiscal year following the enactment of such Act.''; and
       (B) by striking paragraph (2) and inserting the following:
       ``(2) Failure to meet.--The Secretary shall reduce the 
     amount of a State's allotment of funds under this Act for any 
     fiscal year in the exact proportion by which the State fails 
     to meet the requirement of paragraph (1) by falling below the 
     State's fiscal effort per student or the State's aggregate 
     expenditures (using the measure most favorable to the State), 
     if the State failed to meet such requirement (as determined 
     using the measure most favorable to the State) for 1 or more 
     of the 5 immediately preceding fiscal years.
       ``(3) Waiver.--The Secretary may waive paragraph (2) due to 
     exceptional or uncontrollable circumstances affecting the 
     ability of the State to meet the requirement of paragraph 
     (1).'';
       (2) in section 317(b)(1)--
       (A) by striking ``may, upon written request, use funds made 
     available under this Act to'' and inserting ``may use funds 
     made available under this Act to''; and
       (B) by striking ``who reside in the geographical area 
     served by'' and inserting ``located in or near the 
     geographical area served by'';
       (3) by striking title II and redesignating title III as 
     title II;
       (4) by redesignating sections 311 through 318 as sections 
     211 through 218, respectively;
       (5) by redesignating sections 321 through 324 as sections 
     221 through 224, respectively; and
       (6) by inserting after section 218 (as so redesignated) the 
     following:

     ``SEC. 219. STUDY ON PROGRAMS OF STUDY ALIGNED TO HIGH-SKILL, 
                   HIGH-WAGE OCCUPATIONS.

       ``(a) Scope of Study.--The Comptroller General of the 
     United States shall conduct a study to evaluate--
       ``(1) the strategies, components, policies, and practices 
     used by eligible agencies or eligible recipients receiving 
     funding under this Act to successfully assist--
       ``(A) all students in pursuing and completing programs of 
     study aligned to high-skill, high-wage occupations; and
       ``(B) any specific subgroup of students identified in 
     section 1111(h)(1)(C)(ii) of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(h)(1)(C)(ii)) in 
     pursuing and completing programs of study aligned to high-
     skill, high-wage occupations in fields in which such subgroup 
     is underrepresented; and
       ``(2) any challenges associated with replication of such 
     strategies, components, policies, and practices.
       ``(b) Consultation.--In carrying out the study conducted 
     under subsection (a), the Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall consult with a geographically diverse (including 
     urban, suburban, and rural) representation of--
       ``(1) students and parents;
       ``(2) eligible agencies and eligible recipients;
       ``(3) teachers, faculty, specialized instructional support 
     personnel, and paraprofessionals, including those with 
     expertise in preparing CTE students for nontraditional 
     fields;
       ``(4) special populations; and
       ``(5) representatives of business and industry.
       ``(c) Submission.--Upon completion, the Comptroller General 
     of the United States shall submit the study conducted under 
     subsection (a) to the Committee on Education and the 
     Workforce of the House of Representatives and the Committee 
     on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.''.

             TITLE III--AMENDMENTS TO THE WAGNER-PEYSER ACT

     SEC. 301. STATE RESPONSIBILITIES.

       Section 15(e)(2) of the Wagner-Peyser Act (29 U.S.C. 49l-
     2(e)(2)) is amended--
       (1) by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(B) consult with eligible agencies (defined in section 3 
     of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 
     2006 (20 U.S.C. 2302)), State educational agencies, and local 
     educational agencies concerning the provision of workforce 
     and labor market information in order to--
       ``(i) meet the needs of secondary school and postsecondary 
     school students who seek such information; and
       ``(ii) annually inform the development and implementation 
     of programs of study defined in section 3 of the Carl D. 
     Perkins Career and

[[Page H5375]]

     Technical Education Act of 2006 (20 U.S.C. 2302), and career 
     pathways;'';
       (2) in subparagraph (G), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (3) in subparagraph (H), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (4) by inserting after subparagraph (H) the following new 
     subparagraph:
       ``(I) provide, on an annual and timely basis to each 
     eligible agency (defined in section 3 of the Carl D. Perkins 
     Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (20 U.S.C. 2302)), 
     the data and information described in subparagraphs (A) and 
     (B) of subsection (a)(1).''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Thompson) and the gentlewoman from Massachusetts (Ms. 
Clark) each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania.


                             General Leave

  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
that all Members may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and 
extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on H.R. 5587.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time 
as I may consume.
  I rise in support of H.R. 5587.
  Mr. Speaker, a weak economy and advances in technology have 
dramatically changed today's job market, creating both challenges and 
opportunities for men and women entering the workforce. This is why 
equipping today's students with the tools they need to remain 
competitive is essential. One way we can achieve that goal is by 
strengthening career and technical education programs for those eager 
to pursue pathways to success.
  As cochair of the Career and Technical Education Caucus, I have 
worked hard to increase awareness about the opportunities available 
through CTE. For some students, a four-year college is the best path 
forward. For others, a CTE program might be the best way to shape a 
fulfilling and successful future, Mr. Speaker.
  These State and local programs help individuals obtain the knowledge 
and skills they need to be successful in a number of different 
occupations and fields--fields like health care, technology, 
agriculture, and engineering.

                              {time}  1445

  However, the law that provides Federal support for these programs has 
not been updated in more than a decade. Simply put, it does not address 
the new challenges today's students, workers, and employers face.
  That is why I, along with my colleague from Massachusetts, 
Representative Katherine Clark, introduced H.R. 5587, a bill that works 
to modernize and improve current law to better reflect those challenges 
and provide more opportunities for students to pursue successful, 
rewarding careers.
  Recognizing the importance of engagement with community leaders and 
local businesses, this bill empowers State and local leaders by 
providing them with the flexibility they need to best prepare their 
students for the workforce and to respond to the changing needs of 
their communities. H.R. 5587 also promotes work-based learning and 
encourages stronger partnerships with employers to help students obtain 
jobs now and throughout their lifetimes.
  I am also proud to say H.R. 5587 takes steps to reduce the Federal 
role in career and technical education, while ensuring transparency and 
accountability amongst CTE programs. By streamlining performance 
measures, the bill provides State and local leaders--rather than the 
Federal Government--with the tools they need to hold these programs 
accountable.
  These are just some of the important reforms this bill makes to 
provide Americans with clear pathways to success.
  Mr. Speaker, I would be remiss not to thank a few people who have 
made this bill possible: Chairman Kline and his staff, in particular, 
James Redstone; Ranking Member Scott and his staff; Sam Morgante with 
Mr. Langevin's office; and Katie Brown of my staff.
  Both Sam and Katie have taken the lead staffing the Career and 
Technical Education Caucus, each providing tireless advocacy for the 
policies included in this bill. They have my deep appreciation for 
their hard work.
  I urge my colleagues to support H.R. 5587 and help us take a positive 
step towards reforming and strengthening career and technical education 
training in America.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of H.R. 5587, the 
Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, 
legislation that I am proud to introduce with the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Thompson), as well as Representatives Langevin, 
Nolan, Curbelo, and Byrne, and with the support of the House Education 
and the Workforce Committee ranking member, Mr. Scott, and our 
chairman, Mr. Kline.
  The bill before us is proof that Democrats and Republicans can come 
together and do the right thing for America's students, workers, and 
employers.
  The Perkins Career and Technical Education program reaches over 11 
million American students across the country each year; and for the 
first time in 10 years, this legislation will comprehensively update 
the program, overhauling how government invests in our workforce and 
strengthens American competitiveness through job skills training. This 
bill will help families by preparing them with the skills they need to 
thrive in high-demand fields as diverse as child care, advanced 
manufacturing, carpentry, computer science, automotive technology, 
culinary arts, and more.
  This legislation is supported by over 200 leading national 
organizations, including educators, trade groups, and major employers 
across the country.
  It was reported by the House Education and the Workforce Committee 
without a single dissenting vote, which I think reflects the 
bipartisan, good faith process by which we came together to draft and 
introduce this bill.
  Specifically, I am pleased this legislation takes steps to help 
policymakers measure what does and does not work in career and 
technical education, allowing us to build on our past successes. It 
ensures our career and technical education programs are aligned with 
the needs of high-demand growth industries in order to make sure that 
America is competitive globally. It also supports our work-based 
learning and apprenticeships. It directly supports our early education 
and childcare workforce and brings the Perkins program into the modern 
21st century global economy.
  I am very pleased to have this bill on the floor today. I urge its 
passage.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 2 
minutes to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Walberg), the chairman of 
the Workforce Protections Subcommittee.
  Mr. WALBERG. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 5587, which will 
help people in Michigan and across the country find meaningful careers 
in the 21st century workforce by updating our career and technical 
education programs.
  As I met with students, teachers, and employers in my district, I 
have heard consistent support for improving CTE. I know how important 
it is to modernize this program for today's jobs, from touring places 
like Southern Michigan Center for Science and Industry in Hudson, 
Michigan; the Jackson Area Career Center in Jackson, Michigan; Monroe 
County Community College; and many more.
  We know that not everyone's path to success in the workplace is the 
same and, while many students pursue degrees at colleges and 
universities, many others know their sweet spot lies somewhere else. 
Career and technical education provides those individuals that 
opportunity and ensures our aspiring workforce is getting the hands-on 
training they need and they want.
  I am particularly pleased that this bill includes my provisions to 
address outdated and burdensome occupational licensure requirements 
which can come at the expense of lower income workers, young people, 
and entrepreneurs who lack the resources to overcome regulatory 
obstacles.
  According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, nearly 1 in 3 
jobs now require a State-approved license or certification; in 1950, it 
was 1 in 20.

[[Page H5376]]

This bill will help create pathways to careers by encouraging States to 
review their regulatory climate and ensure it does not create 
unnecessary barriers for job growth.
  I commend the authors of this bill, and I am proud that it emerged 
from our committee on a unanimous 37-0 vote.
  I hope my colleagues will vote in support of this bipartisan 
legislation and work together to help every American pursue their 
personal paths to the American Dream.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Scott), the distinguished ranking member 
of our committee.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 5587, 
the Strengthening CTE for the 21st Century Act, which would reauthorize 
the Perkins Career and Technical Education program.
  The research is clear: the United States workforce is suffering from 
a skills gap. According to one study, 65 percent of all jobs in the 
United States in the near future will require at least some education 
or training past the high school level--not necessarily a 4-year 
degree, but some education and training past the high school level. In 
Virginia alone, we have thousands of jobs in the tech sector that go 
unfilled because of the lack of qualified applicants. Some of those 
jobs have salaries of $88,000.
  Today's CTE program is not the vocational education of the past, 
where students pursued a career rather than academic studies. Now the 
current programs integrate the academic curriculum which will assist in 
preparing participants for postsecondary education and credentials.
  Mr. Speaker, people in the future will have to learn a new job; but 
if they don't have the academic background, we will be doing them a 
great disservice. This bill will allow students to pursue a career 
track; and if they change their mind later on, they are still getting 
the academics. They can go to a college-ready program.
  We need to make sure that we have greater accountability for program 
quality. We want to ensure that we have more inclusive collaboration 
between educational institutions, industries, employers, and community 
partners. And we need to make sure that those programs are aligned with 
our recent K through 12 education and workforce systems.
  I would like to thank all of the people who have been involved in 
this, particularly the gentlewoman from Massachusetts (Ms. Clark) and 
the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Thompson), along with Mr. Langevin 
from Rhode Island, who is the chair of the CTE Caucus, and all of the 
others who have worked across the aisle to bring us together today.
  This bill, as has been pointed out, has been reported unanimously 
from the Education and the Workforce Committee, has strong support 
across the aisle, and I trust that we will pass it. I hope the Senate 
will take it up as soon as possible.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 
minute to the gentleman from Alabama (Mr. Byrne).
  Mr. BYRNE. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, earlier this summer, I had the opportunity to visit the 
new career and technical education classrooms at Saraland High School. 
From welding to engineering to IT, these programs are going to make a 
real difference, and I was so impressed to see CTE getting the 
attention it deserves.
  You see, for too long, we have devalued the importance of career and 
technical education here in America. The programs were seen as some 
sort of second-rate option for students who couldn't make it otherwise. 
That simply isn't the case.
  Instead, CTE programs offer real opportunities to students of all 
ages and from all backgrounds. With this bill, we are making it clear 
that career and technical education is a critical educational option 
that leads to good-paying jobs.
  This bill makes important reforms to our CTE programs, with a special 
emphasis on ensuring the programs focus on in-demand skill areas in 
order to close the skills gap and boost economic growth.
  This is a truly bipartisan, reform-oriented bill that deserves our 
strongest support, and I urge all my colleagues to join me in voting in 
favor of this legislation.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin), without whose leadership 
and expertise this legislation wouldn't be in the wonderful form that 
it is today, and we are very grateful for his role.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman from Massachusetts 
for yielding and for her outstanding leadership on reauthorizing the 
Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. I am certainly 
pleased to join with five other bipartisan colleagues as original 
cosponsors of this bill.
  I would also, in particular, like to thank my friend and colleague, 
Representative G.T. Thompson of Pennsylvania, for his unwavering 
commitment to expanding CTE. As co-chairs of the Career and Technical 
Education Caucus, Representative Thompson and I have made Perkins 
reauthorization our top priority; and today it is the culmination of 
over 4 years of our work on the caucus together. I want to thank him 
and both his staff and my staff for their extraordinary efforts.
  We should also, of course, recognize everything that Chairman Kline, 
Ranking Member Scott, and their staffs did to get this bill to the 
floor today.
  Perkins has historically been a bipartisan bill, and we are all very 
happy to continue this tradition. H.R. 5587 was passed unanimously by 
the Education and the Workforce Committee and is the product of an 
inclusive and thoughtful process. Again, it passed unanimously. When 
does that happen, ever, it seems, these days in this Congress? This is 
extraordinary.
  The bill makes many necessary updates to Perkins, with an emphasis on 
training students for the skills they will need in high-growth sectors 
in the 21st century economy. I am particularly pleased that it 
emphasizes the role of school counselors in helping students choose 
their career path, incorporating ideas from my Counseling for Career 
Choice Act. By equipping counselors with local labor market 
information, they can better help students choose the field that best 
fits their skills and interests and will ultimately lead to a good-
paying job.
  The bill also expands student access to work-based learning 
opportunities. This will help students to bridge the gap between 
classroom theory and workplace practice and align skills and training 
with employer needs.
  Providing workers with the skills necessary to thrive in the modern 
economy is essential to our economic prosperity. I urge all of my 
colleagues to support this bill and the Senate to quickly take up this 
bipartisan legislation.
  Again, I thank all of my colleagues who were involved in this effort 
and the staff for bringing this bill to the floor today.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to take 
a point of personal privilege just as a chance to recognize Chairman 
Kline of the Education and the Workforce Committee and to thank him for 
his leadership in education, for truly making a difference in the lives 
of our youth and, quite frankly, people of all ages, like with this 
piece of legislation. I very much appreciate his leadership.
  So it is my honor to yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Minnesota 
(Mr. Kline), the chairman of the Education and the Workforce Committee.

                              {time}  1500

  Mr. KLINE. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Pennsylvania for 
his leadership on this issue and for yielding the time.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the Strengthening 
Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act.
  A quality education is vital to succeeding in today's workforce. 
However, it is important to know that a quality education doesn't have 
to mean a 4-year college degree. Career and technical education can be 
just as valuable, and, for many individuals, it is the path that is 
best for them.
  Earlier this year, members on the Education and the Workforce 
Committee heard from Paul Tse. Paul

[[Page H5377]]

struggled as a student, but his life changed when he enrolled in a CTE 
program at the Thomas Edison High School of Technology in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. Today, he has a fulfilling career and not a dime--Mr. 
Speaker, not a dime--of student loan debt. There are countless other 
success stories just like Paul's.
  The CTE classes Rob Griffin took as a high school student in 
Whitfield County, Georgia, prepared him for a successful career at one 
of the Nation's leading steel fabricators.
  The hands-on experience Alex Wolff received at the Santa Barbara 
County Regional Occupational Program led to a rewarding career in 
electrical engineering. And Jasmine Morgan from the Atlanta area found 
her passion through CTE coursework and landed a job as a sports 
marketing specialist.
  The goal of this legislation is to help more individuals write their 
own success stories. This bipartisan legislation will empower State and 
local leaders to tailor CTE programs to serve the best interests of the 
students in their communities. It will improve transparency and 
accountability, as well as ensure Federal resources are aligned with 
the needs of the local workforce and help students obtain high-skilled, 
high-demand jobs.
  These positive reforms are an important part of our broader agenda, A 
Better Way, which is aimed at helping more men and women achieve a 
lifetime of success.
  I want to thank Representatives Glenn Thompson and Katherine Clark 
for their leadership.
  I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Nolan). I thank him for his leadership on 
CTE and all his work for the students and employers of his district and 
our country.
  Mr. NOLAN. Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by recognizing my 
distinguished colleague from Minnesota (Mr. Kline) for the great 
leadership that he has provided as the chairman of the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce. Make no mistake about it, our educational 
opportunities and future are brighter for you having chaired that 
committee and served in this Chamber. We all owe you a great debt of 
gratitude and wish you well in your future going forward. The greatest 
tribute I think that anyone can receive is that we served well and we 
made a difference. You have done that, and we thank you for that.
  I would be remiss if I didn't also thank Ranking Member Scott for his 
great work in this area. I also thank Mr. Thompson of Pennsylvania, Ms. 
Clark of Massachusetts, and the other original cosponsors for their 
hard work.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this critically important 
bipartisan reauthorization of the Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Act.
  Time and again, when I visit with owners and managers of 
manufacturing facilities throughout my northern Minnesota district, I 
am told two things. The first is that the employees they have hired who 
have participated in career and technical education programs are the 
very best that they have in their employment. Employers can't say 
enough good things about them and their skills and the work that they 
do.
  The second point is that they need more CTE-trained people. All down 
the line, from health care, to construction, to information technology, 
to transportation, to aviation--and the list goes on--good-paying jobs 
with living wages are waiting for these people.
  So this bill adds important new provisions to expand and update CTE 
so jobs can be filled. States get more flexibility to focus on the jobs 
and careers in high demand within their regions. Employers and 
communities get the tools they need to develop stronger partnerships to 
engage students and grow our local economies. And students get the 
tools that they need to compete and succeed in the 21st century. That 
is what this bill is all about.
  It's all about more good jobs.
  More great opportunities to learn and gain valuable skills and 
knowledge.
  And--More dynamic growth for an economy in need of the best, most 
skilled workers America can provide.
  I urge our colleagues in the Senate to join the House in supporting 
this critical and important program and act swiftly to take up and pass 
this legislation.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, it is my honor to 
recognize the chairman of the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, 
Elementary, and Secondary Education that has jurisdiction on this bill. 
I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Rokita).
  Mr. ROKITA. Well, I thank the gentleman from Pennsylvania for his 
kind words. He is a dear friend. I have looked forward to our work 
together so far and into the future.
  Mr. Speaker, I have been to probably a hundred schools in my time in 
public service. I have seen the best of schools, and I have seen the 
worst of schools. The one thing that I am seeing more and more, not 
only in our K-12 schools but in others after that, is the need for 
career and technical education and the need for reform in that area.
  Now, Mr. Speaker, I am not talking about the shop class of old or 
anything like that. In fact, what we are seeing now is a completely 
different model.
  As Indiana's Governor Pence cited in a congressional hearing last 
year, today's CTE, today's career and technical education, is not 
about, if not plan A, then plan B. It is about having two plan As. And 
that is exactly what today's CTE courses are bringing to the forefront.
  Technological advances are constantly changing the kinds of jobs that 
are available, as well as the skills needed to succeed in those 
careers. That is why career and technical education is so important. It 
provides opportunities for students to gain those specific skills and 
prepare them to navigate the changing workforce.
  Now, through a number of commonsense measures, Mr. Speaker, this bill 
is delivering the reforms that will provide the flexibility to State 
and local leaders to meet those unique local needs, build stronger 
engagement with employers, and ensure that CTE programs are delivering 
results. So I thank Representatives Thompson and Clark for working 
together to move this bill forward.
  I urge my colleagues to support this bipartisan bill and help more 
people gain the skills and hands-on experience that are critical to 
succeeding in today's workforce.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Courtney).
  Mr. COURTNEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of H.R. 5587, 
which addresses the most urgent workforce challenge in our Nation by 
updating and strengthening career and technical education programs at 
the secondary education level.
  First, the good news. All across the country, there is an exciting 
and growing need for trade and technical skills to fill jobs that young 
people can build a career and life around. Advanced manufacturing 
opportunities in aerospace, maritime, and even health care are 
happening from coast to coast. And the question of the day for many 
employers is whether our education and job training systems are ready 
to fill the need.
  Recent updates to K-12 and job training programs signed into law by 
President Obama in 2014 and 2015 built a positive platform to address 
this challenge, and passage of this bill for technical programs will 
add to that capability.
  In southeastern Connecticut where I hail from, the U.S. Navy's demand 
signal for new Virginia class and Columbia class submarines is 
projected to require up to 14,000 new hires in metal trades, design, 
and engineering over the next 10 years. For my region, passage of this 
bill is not just feel-good legislation but a critical, existential 
requirement.
  I strongly urge passage of this bill and swift concurrence by the 
Senate.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Roe), a classmate of mine and also 
another leader in the Education and the Workforce Committee and the 
chairman of the Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and 
Pensions.
  Mr. ROE of Tennessee. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to encourage my 
colleagues to support H.R. 5587, the Strengthening Career and Technical 
Education for the 21st Century Act. CTE programs are designed to 
prepare high school students and community college students

[[Page H5378]]

for the workforce. However, the laws supporting these efforts have not 
been updated in over a decade.
  In my district, I often hear from businessowners, employers, 
administrators, and students who all tell me about the need for quality 
education and training necessary in today's workplace. Just as the one-
size-fits-all approach doesn't work for health care, it will not work 
for education and workforce training. Each State, school district, and 
student is different. Local administrators, teachers, and employers--
not the Federal Government--should have these decisionmaking powers.
  Congress has worked to improve K-12 education and modernize the 
Nation's workforce development system, and this bill continues to build 
on that progress. The recession may have ended in 2009, Mr. Speaker, 
but too many people are still struggling to make ends meet. We can do 
better.
  I encourage my colleagues to support H.R. 5587.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to 
the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Polis).
  Mr. POLIS. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 5587, the 
Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act.
  A few weeks ago, I got to visit the new Pathways in Technology Early 
College, P-TECH, program at Skyline High School in Colorado in the St. 
Vrain Valley School District. P-TECH is a partnership between the St. 
Vrain Valley School District, Front Range Community College, IBM, and 
other employers. It allows students to earn a high school diploma and 
associate's degree in 4 or 5 years.
  I spoke with a number of students participating in the very first P-
TECH class, and they shared with me how this program will equip them 
with the skills they need to get good, reliable jobs after graduation. 
That is the kind of innovation Congress should be supporting, and this 
bill allows for that.
  The bill also allows funds to be used for open access education 
resources. Open access education resources and open access textbooks 
are openly licensed, free to use, and often come with more flexibility 
than traditional or commercial textbooks. Throughout this country, open 
education resources are gaining popularity, save resources, and 
maintain high quality standards.
  Last year, Congress recognized the cost-saving potential and 
flexibility of open education resources at the K-12 level in the Every 
Student Succeeds Act. I am very excited that support for open education 
resources continues in this bill.
  I urge this bill's final passage today, and I call on my colleagues 
in the Senate to take up this bipartisan legislation as soon as 
possible.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Carter).
  Mr. CARTER of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 
5587, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st 
Century Act, and the benefit and opportunities it will provide for 
those looking to enter the job market.
  We have an opportunity to get rid of the stigma of this vocation path 
and bring to light the benefits of career and technical education. This 
bill overhauls the system to bring the decisionmaking down to the State 
and local leaders. It more closely accounts for changes in the job 
market. It increases the input from groups such as students and 
business leaders.

  This legislation empowers leaders from our States and communities by 
reducing the paperwork for local education providers and streamlines 
the requirements process. It supports closer partnerships with 
employers, who know the needs of the workplace, and puts in place 
accountability benchmarks to ensure that these programs on the 
secondary level are delivering the training and results they are 
supposed to be providing to students.
  This bill also allows States and local authorities to develop a 
curriculum they know that works for their students and for their 
communities.
  I applaud the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Thompson) and the 
Education and the Workforce Committee for their hard work and diligence 
in addressing this matter.
  I urge my colleagues to support this bill.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from Oregon (Ms. Bonamici).
  Ms. BONAMICI. Mr. Speaker, I enthusiastically support the 
Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act.
  When I visit communities in Oregon, I hear from business leaders, 
educators, and students about how hands-on career and technical 
education programs engage them and prepare them for success after high 
school, regardless of what path they take.
  This CTE legislation authorizes needed increases in funding for CTE 
programs and takes important steps to help more students excel in 
school and in the workforce.
  The bill will improve participation among historically underserved 
students, bring needed input from key stakeholders, including parents 
and industry groups, and help students learn employability skills as 
well as technical skills.
  I thank my friend and colleague from New York, the co-chair of the 
STEAM Caucus, Congresswoman Stefanik, for working with me to include an 
amendment that promotes arts and design education, which is 
increasingly in high demand in numerous industry sectors that value 
innovation. I thank Chairman Kline, Ranking Member Scott, and 
Representatives Clark and Thompson for their leadership and commitment 
to improving CTE programs.
  I ask my colleagues to join me in approving this legislation and call 
on the Senate to quickly take action.

                              {time}  1515

  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I am now pleased to yield 
1 minute to the gentlewoman from North Carolina (Ms. Foxx), also a 
leader on the Committee on Education and the Workforce. She serves as 
our chair of the Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce 
Training.
  Ms. FOXX. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Pennsylvania for 
yielding to me and for the work that he has done on this important 
bill.
  Mr. Speaker, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act 
has provided Federal support to State and local career and technical 
education programs for more than 30 years. But for far too long there 
has been a discrepancy in what students are learning in the classroom 
and what employers say they need in the workplace.
  H.R. 5587 updates the law to reflect today's economic needs and the 
challenges that students and workers currently face. This bipartisan 
bill goes a long way toward ensuring that individuals who pursue a 
technical education have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed.
  Educational success is about more than just a degree. It is about 
preparing students for a satisfying life and teaching them the 
quantifiable skills that employers need in their employees. The 
Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act 
will help students reach those goals. I encourage my colleagues to 
support this important legislation.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1\1/2\ 
minutes to the gentlewoman from California (Mrs. Davis).
  Mrs. DAVIS of California. Mr. Speaker, career technical education 
answers the call that we hear from industry and from students alike to 
train students in fields where high-quality jobs are available. We know 
that means both equity and quality. Equity, of course, we know because 
every individual, every man, every woman, people of color, the 
disabled, all of the groups need to have equal access to a promising 
education and successful career.
  The reality is that we can't fix a problem that we can't see. So we 
have to have the data. We have to have the ability to know what we are 
looking at. But it is equally important to make sure that CTE programs 
deliver in terms of quality.
  So how do we do that?
  I am excited that this bill places an emphasis on teachers getting 
opportunities to advance their knowledge and skills. Teachers need 
support and training from industry leaders so that they can take their 
knowledge back to students.
  The flow of relevant information between industry, between teachers 
and students has to be highlighted and strengthened. When teachers have 
direct field experience, they are better able to enthusiastically 
relate accurate and timely industry practices to their

[[Page H5379]]

students, and that makes for stronger professional development for 
teachers, and that will trickle down to our students.
  Successful CTE programs will close the skills gap that undermines our 
productivity today. I urge my colleagues in the Senate to take up and 
pass this overwhelmingly bipartisan legislation.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Wilson).
  Mr. WILSON of South Carolina. Mr. Speaker, I thank Chairman Glenn 
Thompson for yielding.
  I am grateful to support the Strengthening Career and Technical 
Education for the 21st Century Act. Whether I am visiting one of the 
remarkable schools in South Carolina's technical education system of 
Aiken, Midlands, Orangeburg-Calhoun, or a local manufacturing facility, 
the message is the same: the job market is changing rapidly. Quality 
education is vital to competing, which is why apprenticeship programs 
are so important in leading to the success of BMW, MTU, AGY, SRS, 
Michelin, Bridgestone, Boeing, and soon Volvo in South Carolina.
  While existing technical education, which was established by Fritz 
Hollings and Floyd Spence, has played a role in creating jobs, existing 
legislation has not been updated for the last 10 years.
  This bill serves as a first step to reforming technical education 
programs by helping all Americans enter the workforce for high-skilled, 
in-demand jobs. Some reforms include empowering State and local 
community leaders, limiting Federal mandates, encouraging employment 
engagement, and increasing accountability.
  I am grateful to cosponsor the Strengthening Career and Technical 
Education for the 21st Century Act. I appreciate the leadership of 
Chairman Glenn Thompson for sponsoring this leadership, and I urge my 
colleagues to support it.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 
minute to the gentlewoman from North Carolina (Ms. Adams).
  Ms. ADAMS. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  As a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, I 
am proud to stand here today in support of the Strengthening Career and 
Technical Education for the 21st Century Act. This is commonsense, 
bipartisan legislation, and it will strengthen our economy and put 
hardworking Americans back to work.
  As elected leaders promoting the welfare of the American people, it 
is our most sacred responsibility, and this is why we must continue to 
work together to ensure that American workers have the skills and the 
training needed to compete in this modern workforce.
  In August, I traveled throughout my district, meeting with local 
employers and workers, and they all shared one major concern: the 
desperate need to close the skills gap.
  There are good paying jobs right here at home, but our people aren't 
able to fill them, and that is unacceptable. The skills gap is 
weakening our national and local economies, and we can no longer afford 
the price of an underprepared workforce. That is why I call on my 
colleagues to vote ``yes'' and to reauthorize CTE.
  Voting ``yes'' will not only strengthen our economy, but will help 
make the American Dream a reality for millions of Americans. Voting 
``yes'' will absolutely make a difference in the lives of those you 
serve. Today we have an opportunity to get it right, an opportunity to 
level the playing field, and to put the needs of the American people 
first. Let's make America stronger by passing this commonsense, 
bipartisan legislation. I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes.'' I hope 
the Senate will move swiftly in also passing this crucial piece of 
legislation.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 
minute to the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Allen).
  Mr. ALLEN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Career technical education is critical to the development of a 
growing workforce. As I go into the schools today, I often ask the 
students: Why are you getting an education?
  These are questions that I ask the students: Why is education 
important?
  The answer is to get a good job, to build a career.
  Our schools teach children all the necessary and important subjects, 
but it is important that we offer programs that prepare students for 
the workforce. We have to work to bridge the existing gap between the 
business community and education. That means encouraging students to 
find their passions early on and choosing programs that will build 
their resumes and set them up for their chosen occupation.
  As a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, a 
member of the Congressional Career and Technical Education Caucus, and 
with over 40 years in the business world, I am a strong supporter of 
this bill. Growing this economy starts with jobs and getting people 
back to work. So why not start by preparing America's future workforce 
early?
  I urge support of the Strengthening Career and Technical Education 
for the 21st Century Act.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 
minute to the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Kennedy). I would like 
to thank him for all his leadership and work on promoting American 
manufacturing, STEM and STEAM education, and CTE.
  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleagues, 
Congresswoman Clark and Congressman Thompson, for their extraordinary 
leadership, as they always seek ways to advance career and technical 
education training.
  According to a recent report, Mr. Speaker, in my home State of 
Massachusetts, three out of five job openings in our Commonwealth 6 
years from now will require less than a college degree. That means that 
students who are just starting their second week of middle school this 
week could walk straight out of their high school graduation and into a 
job in their own backyard.
  They will only be prepared for those jobs, though, if we ensure that 
their curriculum is informed by the needs of companies in their 
communities. Businesses and voc-tech schools in my district are already 
creating innovative partnerships that allow students to learn in their 
classrooms and then gain hands-on experience on factory floors.
  Guided by their example, I introduced the Perkins Modernization Act 
to align the curriculum that our students are learning today with the 
needs of the employers who will hire them tomorrow. I am grateful that 
the sponsors of this legislation included that language, and I hope the 
Senate will follow their lead by quickly taking up and passing this 
legislation.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Curbelo), another very effective member of 
the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.
  Mr. CURBELO of Florida. I thank Mr. Thompson for yielding, and I 
thank him for his leadership on this bill. I would also like to thank 
Ms. Clark, our chairman, and the ranking member for making this 
possible.
  I think all of my colleagues have explained all the details in this 
bill, the important reforms that are in it, but what I want to focus on 
is the critical message that it sends young people and, really, all 
aspiring people all over this country, Mr. Speaker.
  For a long time--and I was a school board member, so I know this--
young people were told that there was only one path to success: a 
traditional 4-year degree. And anyone who didn't do that was looked 
down upon, and we stigmatized a lot of young people in this country.
  What this Congress is doing today together--Republicans and 
Democrats--is sending a strong message to students in high school 
today, students in middle school, and people who are adults but still 
aspiring and looking to acquire job skills so that they can get a good 
job, that there are many pathways to success. I think that is equally 
as important as the reforms, as the changes, as the updating of this 
important bill that we are advancing, the strong, wonderful message it 
is sending to the young people of this country.
  I thank everyone for their leadership, and I urge all my colleagues 
to vote for this legislation.

[[Page H5380]]

  

  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Norcross).
  Mr. NORCROSS. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  I rise in support of H.R. 5587.
  First, I want to thank the Members for coming together and certainly 
their staffs for recognizing the important piece of this legislation 
where we are going.
  As we heard before, a 4-year college is a great pathway for some, but 
it certainly isn't for everyone. I, myself, am a product of the other 
4-year school, an apprenticeship out of the IBEW that allowed me for 
many, many years to support my family being an electrician.
  In New Jersey, my home State, 7 out of 10 jobs that are coming up in 
the next few years will require less than that 4-year degree, and that 
reemphasizes why we are here today.
  This important bill will go a long way to provide students with 
alternative pathways to earn a fair day's pay for a fair day's work. I, 
along with Representative McKinley, formed the Congressional Building 
Trades Caucus to work on these issues, and we will be meeting later 
this week to discuss these important items. Apprenticeships are a 
partnership between employers and employees. They come together and 
will increase the outcomes.
  Once again, I want to thank all those involved for their hard work. I 
urge the Senate to take this up quickly.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I have no other speakers, 
so I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance 
of my time.
  Today we have heard Democrats and Republicans from across the United 
States speak in support of H.R. 5587. This legislation builds upon the 
investments this Chamber has made in the education system and updates 
CTE to allow our students to be competitive in a global economy.
  I want to give special thanks to the Committee on Education and the 
Workforce staff, who worked so hard to support Members in drafting this 
bill that has received such broad bipartisan support.
  I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, as well as our 
Senate colleagues, to quickly take up and approve this commonsense 
legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, career and technical education helps men and women 
across the country achieve the American Dream of finding and seizing 
opportunities to work hard and to succeed within the workforce.
  The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century 
Act makes the positive reforms necessary to ensure more Americans are 
able to access life-changing education and experience that will allow 
them to do just that, to achieve the American Dream.

                              {time}  1530

  I am pleased that we have been able to work across the aisle in a 
bipartisan manner--my hope is that we will be able to work in a 
bicameral manner with the Senate, and I encourage swift action in the 
Senate--to ensure that this generation is equipped with the tools 
needed to remain competitive in today's workforce. I believe this is an 
effort that we can all support.
  Mr. Speaker, the title of this bill is Strengthening Career and 
Technical Education for the 21st Century Act. Normally, we usually find 
some kind of an acronym--something short and catchy--to call this. 
Those initials don't lend to that process, but I would have to say I 
like to refer to this legislation as the opportunity bill. It is the 
opportunity for those young people who are looking to enter the 
workforce and want to go on to a path to be able to earn a family-
sustaining wage, to be successful through career and technical 
education training.
  It is an opportunity bill for those families who today find 
themselves depressed and caught in unemployment and looking to get back 
into the workforce and greater opportunity. It is an opportunity bill. 
It is an opportunity bill for those families that, maybe, for 
generations have found themselves trapped in poverty and without an 
exit strategy, Mr. Speaker. This bill is an opportunity bill. It is an 
exit ramp from poverty for those families, those Americans.
  For those who are job creators who can't grow or maybe even start 
their business or sustain their business because they can't find 
qualified and trained workers, this is an opportunity bill, Mr. 
Speaker. I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on H.R. 5587.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Duncan of Tennessee). The question is on 
the motion offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Thompson) 
that the House suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 5587, as 
amended.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds 
being in the affirmative, the ayes have it.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas 
and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this motion will be postponed.

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