SAFELY ENSURING LIVES FUTURE DEPLOYMENT AND RESEARCH IN VEHICLE EVOLUTION ACT; Congressional Record Vol. 163, No. 143
(House of Representatives - September 06, 2017)

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    SAFELY ENSURING LIVES FUTURE DEPLOYMENT AND RESEARCH IN VEHICLE 
                             EVOLUTION ACT

  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill 
(H.R. 3388) to provide for information on highly automated driving 
systems to be made available to prospective buyers, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 3388

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Safely 
     Ensuring Lives Future Deployment and Research In Vehicle 
     Evolution Act'' or the ``SELF DRIVE Act''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
     is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
Sec. 2. Purpose.
Sec. 3. NHTSA authority and State preemption for autonomous motor 
              vehicles.
Sec. 4. Updated or new motor vehicle safety standards for highly 
              automated vehicles.
Sec. 5. Cybersecurity of automated driving systems.
Sec. 6. General exemptions.
Sec. 7. Motor vehicle testing or evaluation.
Sec. 8. Information on highly automated driving systems made available 
              to prospective buyers.
Sec. 9. Highly Automated Vehicle Advisory Council.
Sec. 10. Rear seat occupant alert system.
Sec. 11. Headlamps.
Sec. 12. Privacy plan required for highly automated vehicles.
Sec. 13. Definitions.

     SEC. 2. PURPOSE.

       The purpose of this Act is to memorialize the Federal role 
     in ensuring the safety of highly automated vehicles as it 
     relates to design, construction, and performance, by 
     encouraging the testing and deployment of such vehicles.

     SEC. 3. NHTSA AUTHORITY AND STATE PREEMPTION FOR AUTONOMOUS 
                   MOTOR VEHICLES.

       Section 30103 of title 49, United States Code, is amended--

[[Page H6668]]

       (1) by amending subsection (b) to read as follows:
       ``(b) Preemption.--
       ``(1) Highly automated vehicles.--No State or political 
     subdivision of a State may maintain, enforce, prescribe, or 
     continue in effect any law or regulation regarding the 
     design, construction, or performance of highly automated 
     vehicles, automated driving systems, or components of 
     automated driving systems unless such law or regulation is 
     identical to a standard prescribed under this chapter.
       ``(2) Motor vehicle standard.--When a motor vehicle safety 
     standard is in effect under this chapter, a State or 
     political subdivision of a State may prescribe or continue in 
     effect a standard applicable to the same aspect of 
     performance of a motor vehicle or motor vehicle equipment 
     only if the standard is identical to the standard prescribed 
     under this chapter.
       ``(3) Rules of construction.--
       ``(A) In general.--Nothing in this subsection may be 
     construed to prohibit a State or a political subdivision of a 
     State from maintaining, enforcing, prescribing, or continuing 
     in effect any law or regulation regarding registration, 
     licensing, driving education and training, insurance, law 
     enforcement, crash investigations, safety and emissions 
     inspections, congestion management of vehicles on the street 
     within a State or political subdivision of a State, or 
     traffic unless the law or regulation is an unreasonable 
     restriction on the design, construction, or performance of 
     highly automated vehicles, automated driving systems, or 
     components of automated driving systems.
       ``(B) Motor vehicle dealers.--Nothing in this subsection 
     may be construed to prohibit a State or political subdivision 
     of a State from maintaining, enforcing, prescribing, or 
     continuing in effect any law or regulation regarding the 
     sale, distribution, repair, or service of highly automated 
     vehicles, automated driving systems, or components of 
     automated driving systems by a dealer, manufacturer, or 
     distributor.
       ``(C) Conformity with federal law.--Nothing in this 
     subsection shall be construed to preempt, restrict, or limit 
     a State or political subdivision of a State from acting in 
     accordance with any other Federal law.
       ``(4) Higher performance requirement.--However, the United 
     States Government, a State, or a political subdivision of a 
     State may prescribe a standard for a motor vehicle, motor 
     vehicle equipment, highly automated vehicle, or automated 
     driving system obtained for its own use that imposes a higher 
     performance requirement than that required by the otherwise 
     applicable standard under this chapter.
       ``(5) State enforcement.--A State may enforce a standard 
     that is identical to a standard prescribed under this 
     chapter.''; and
       (2) by amending subsection (e) to read as follows:
       ``(e) Common Law Liability.--
       ``(1) In general.--Compliance with a motor vehicle safety 
     standard prescribed under this chapter does not exempt a 
     person from liability at common law.
       ``(2) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed to preempt common law claims.''.

     SEC. 4. UPDATED OR NEW MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS FOR 
                   HIGHLY AUTOMATED VEHICLES.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 301 of subtitle VI of title 49, 
     United States Code, is amended by inserting after section 
     30128 the following new section:

     ``Sec. 30129. Updated or new motor vehicle safety standards 
       for highly automated vehicles

       ``(a) Safety Assessment Certification.--
       ``(1) Final rule.--Not later than 24 months after the date 
     of the enactment of this section, the Secretary of 
     Transportation shall issue a final rule requiring the 
     submission of safety assessment certifications regarding how 
     safety is being addressed by each entity developing a highly 
     automated vehicle or an automated driving system. Such rule 
     shall include--
       ``(A) a specification of which entities are required to 
     submit such certifications;
       ``(B) a clear description of the relevant test results, 
     data, and other contents required to be submitted by such 
     entity, in order to demonstrate that such entity's vehicles 
     are likely to maintain safety, and function as intended and 
     contain fail safe features, to be included in such 
     certifications; and
       ``(C) a specification of the circumstances under which such 
     certifications are required to be updated or resubmitted.
       ``(2) Interim requirement.--Until the final rule issued 
     under paragraph (1) takes effect, safety assessment letters 
     shall be submitted to the National Highway Traffic Safety 
     Administration as contemplated by the Federal Automated 
     Vehicles Policy issued in September 2016, or any successor 
     guidance issued on highly automated vehicles requiring a 
     safety assessment letter.
       ``(3) Periodic review and updating.--Not later than 5 years 
     after the date on which the final rule is issued under 
     paragraph (1), and not less frequently than every 5 years 
     thereafter, the Secretary shall--
       ``(A) review such rule; and
       ``(B) update such rule if the Secretary considers it 
     necessary.
       ``(4) Rules of construction.--
       ``(A) No conditions on deployment.--Nothing in this 
     subsection may be construed to limit or affect the 
     Secretary's authority under any other provision of law. The 
     Secretary may not condition deployment or testing of highly 
     automated vehicles on review of safety assessment 
     certifications.
       ``(B) No new authorities.--No new authorities are granted 
     to the Secretary under this section other than the 
     promulgation of the rule pursuant to paragraph (1).
       ``(5) Review and research.--To accommodate the development 
     and deployment of highly automated vehicles and to ensure the 
     safety and security of highly automated vehicles and motor 
     vehicles and others that will share the roads with highly 
     automated vehicles, not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this section, the Secretary shall--
       ``(A) initiate or continue a review of the Federal motor 
     vehicle safety standards in effect on such date of enactment; 
     and
       ``(B) initiate or continue research regarding new Federal 
     motor vehicle safety standards.
       ``(b) Rulemaking and Safety Priority Plan.--
       ``(1) In general.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this section, the Secretary shall make available 
     to the public and submit to the Committee on Energy and 
     Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
     Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a 
     rulemaking and safety priority plan, as necessary to 
     accommodate the development and deployment of highly 
     automated vehicles and to ensure the safety and security of 
     highly automated vehicles and motor vehicles and others that 
     will share the roads with highly automated vehicles, to--
       ``(A) update the motor vehicle safety standards in effect 
     on such date of enactment;
       ``(B) issue new motor vehicle safety standards; and
       ``(C) consider how objective ranges in performance 
     standards could be used to test motor vehicle safety 
     standards, which safety standards would be appropriate for 
     such testing, and whether additional authority would 
     facilitate such testing.
       ``(2) Inclusion of priorities.--
       ``(A) Priorities.--The plan required by paragraph (1) shall 
     detail the overall priorities of the National Highway Traffic 
     Safety Administration for the 5 years following the issuance 
     of the plan, including both priorities with respect to highly 
     automated vehicles and priorities with respect to other 
     safety initiatives of the Administration, in order to meet 
     the Nation's motor vehicle safety challenges.
       ``(B) Identification of elements that may require 
     standards.--For highly automated vehicles, the National 
     Highway Traffic Safety Administration should identify 
     elements that may require performance standards including 
     human machine interface, sensors, and actuators, and consider 
     process and procedure standards for software and 
     cybersecurity as necessary.
       ``(3) Periodic updating.--The plan required by paragraph 
     (1) shall be updated every 2 years, or more frequently if the 
     Secretary considers it necessary.
       ``(4) Rulemaking proceedings on updated or new motor 
     vehicle safety standards.--
       ``(A) In general.--Not later than 18 months after the date 
     of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall initiate 
     the first rulemaking proceeding in accordance with the 
     rulemaking and safety priority plan required by paragraph 
     (1).
       ``(B) Prioritization of subsequent proceedings.--The 
     Secretary shall continue initiating rulemaking proceedings in 
     accordance with such plan. The Secretary may change at any 
     time those priorities to address matters the Secretary 
     considers of greater priority. If the Secretary makes such a 
     change, the Secretary shall complete an interim update of the 
     priority plan, make such update available to the public, and 
     submit such update to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of 
     the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, 
     Science, and Transportation of the Senate.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The analysis for chapter 301 of 
     subtitle VI of title 49, United States Code, is amended by 
     inserting after the item relating to section 30128 the 
     following new item:

``30129. Updated or new motor vehicle safety standards for highly 
              automated vehicles.''.

     SEC. 5. CYBERSECURITY OF AUTOMATED DRIVING SYSTEMS.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 301 of subtitle VI of title 49, 
     United States Code, is amended by inserting after section 
     30129 (as added by section 4) the following new section:

     ``Sec. 30130. Cybersecurity of automated driving systems

       ``(a) Cybersecurity Plan.--A manufacturer may not sell, 
     offer for sale, introduce or deliver for introduction into 
     commerce, or import into the United States, any highly 
     automated vehicle, vehicle that performs partial driving 
     automation, or automated driving system unless such 
     manufacturer has developed a cybersecurity plan that includes 
     the following:
       ``(1) A written cybersecurity policy with respect to the 
     practices of the manufacturer for detecting and responding to 
     cyber attacks, unauthorized intrusions, and false and 
     spurious messages or vehicle control commands. This policy 
     shall include--
       ``(A) a process for identifying, assessing, and mitigating 
     reasonably foreseeable vulnerabilities from cyber attacks or 
     unauthorized intrusions, including false and spurious 
     messages and malicious vehicle control commands; and
       ``(B) a process for taking preventive and corrective action 
     to mitigate against vulnerabilities in a highly automated 
     vehicle or a vehicle that performs partial driving 
     automation, including incident response plans, intrusion 
     detection and prevention systems that safeguard key controls, 
     systems, and procedures through testing or monitoring, and 
     updates to such process based on changed circumstances.
       ``(2) The identification of an officer or other individual 
     of the manufacturer as the point of contact with 
     responsibility for the management of cybersecurity.
       ``(3) A process for limiting access to automated driving 
     systems.

[[Page H6669]]

       ``(4) A process for employee training and supervision for 
     implementation and maintenance of the policies and procedures 
     required by this section, including controls on employee 
     access to automated driving systems.
       ``(b) Effective Date.--This section shall take effect 180 
     days after the date of enactment of this section.''.
       (b) Enforcement Authority.--Section 30165(a)(1) of title 
     49, United States Code, is amended by inserting ``30130,'' 
     after ``30127,''.
       (c) Clerical Amendment.--The analysis for chapter 301 of 
     subtitle VI of title 49, United States Code, is amended by 
     inserting after the item relating to section 30129 (as added 
     by section 4) the following new item:

``30130. Cybersecurity of automated driving systems.''.

     SEC. 6. GENERAL EXEMPTIONS.

       Section 30113 of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(3)(B)--
       (A) in clause (iii), by striking ``; or'' and inserting a 
     semicolon;
       (B) in clause (iv), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; or''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(v) the exemption would make easier the development or 
     field evaluation of--
       ``(I) a feature of a highly automated vehicle providing a 
     safety level at least equal to the safety level of the 
     standard for which exemption is sought; or
       ``(II) a highly automated vehicle providing an overall 
     safety level at least equal to the overall safety level of 
     nonexempt vehicles.'';
       (2) in subsection (c), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(5) if the application is made under subsection 
     (b)(3)(B)(v) of this section--
       ``(A) such development, testing, and other data necessary 
     to demonstrate that the motor vehicle is a highly automated 
     vehicle; and
       ``(B) a detailed analysis that includes supporting test 
     data, including both on-road and validation and testing data 
     showing (as applicable) that--
       ``(i) the safety level of the feature at least equals the 
     safety level of the standard for which exemption is sought; 
     or
       ``(ii) the vehicle provides an overall safety level at 
     least equal to the overall safety level of nonexempt 
     vehicles.'';
       (3) in subsection (d), by striking ``A manufacturer is 
     eligible'' and all that follows and inserting the following:
       ``(1) Eligibility under subsection (b)(3)(B)(i).--A 
     manufacturer is eligible for an exemption under subsection 
     (b)(3)(B)(i) of this section (including an exemption under 
     subsection (b)(3)(B)(i) relating to a bumper standard 
     referred to in subsection (b)(1)) only if the Secretary 
     determines that the manufacturer's total motor vehicle 
     production in the most recent year of production is not more 
     than 10,000.
       ``(2) Eligibility under subsection (b)(3)(B)(iii).--A 
     manufacturer is eligible for an exemption under subsection 
     (b)(3)(B)(iii) of this section only if the Secretary 
     determines the exemption is for not more than 2,500 vehicles 
     to be sold in the United States in any 12-month period.
       ``(3) Eligibility under subsection (b)(3)(B)(ii), (iv), or 
     (v).--A manufacturer is eligible for an exemption under 
     subsection (b)(3)(B)(ii), (iv), or (v) of this section only 
     if the Secretary determines the exemption is for not more 
     than 100,000 vehicles per manufacturer to be sold, leased, or 
     otherwise introduced into commerce in the United States in 
     any 12-month period.
       ``(4) Limitation on number of vehicles exempted.--All 
     exemptions granted to a manufacturer under subsections 
     (b)(3)(B)(i) through (v) shall not exceed a total of (i) 
     25,000 vehicles manufactured within the first 12-month 
     period, (ii) 50,000 vehicles manufactured within the second 
     12-month period, (iii) 100,000 vehicles manufactured within 
     the third 12-month period, and, (iv) 100,000 vehicles 
     manufactured within the fourth 12-month period. Any renewals 
     under subsections (b)(3)(B)(i) through (v) shall not exceed a 
     total of 100,000 vehicles manufactured within a 12-month 
     period.'';
       (4) in subsection (e), by striking ``An exemption or 
     renewal'' and all that follows and inserting the following:
       ``(1) Exemption under subsection (b)(3)(B)(i).--An 
     exemption or renewal under subsection (b)(3)(B)(i) of this 
     section may be granted for not more than 3 years.
       ``(2) Exemption under subsection (b)(3)(B)(iii).--An 
     exemption or renewal under subsection (b)(3)(B)(iii) this 
     section may be granted for not more than 2 years.
       ``(3) Exemption under subsection (b)(3)(B)(ii), (iv), or 
     (v).--An exemption or renewal under subsection (b)(3)(B)(ii), 
     (iv), or (v) of this section may be granted for not more than 
     4 years.''; and
       (5) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(i) Limitation on Certain Exemptions.--No exemption from 
     crashworthiness standards of motor vehicle safety standards 
     shall be granted under subsection (b)(3)(B)(v) until the 
     Secretary issues the safety assessment certification rule 
     pursuant to section 30129(a) and the rulemaking and safety 
     priority plan pursuant to section 30129(b) and one year has 
     passed from the date by which the Secretary has issued both 
     such rule and such plan. This subsection shall not apply to 
     exemptions from occupant protection standards if the 
     exemption is for a vehicle that will not carry its operator 
     or passengers. This subsection shall not apply to exemptions 
     from crashworthiness standards if the exemption sought is for 
     a standard addressing the steering control system and it is 
     for a vehicle that--
       ``(1) will not have a steering control system;
       ``(2) provides impact protection to an occupant in the 
     front left seat at a level at least equal to the level 
     provided in nonexempt vehicles; and
       ``(3) provides a safety level at least equal to the safety 
     level of the standard for which the exemption is sought.
       ``(j) Reporting Requirement.--A manufacturer granted an 
     exemption under subsection (b)(3)(B)(ii), (iv), or (v), shall 
     provide information about all crashes of which it has actual 
     knowledge involving such exempted vehicles, regardless of 
     whether a claim is submitted to the manufacturer, in 
     accordance with part 579 of title 49, Code of Federal 
     Regulations.
       ``(k) Process and Analysis.--
       ``(1) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
     of enactment of this subsection, the Secretary of 
     Transportation shall publish in the Federal Register a notice 
     that details the process and analysis used for the 
     consideration of exemption or renewal applications under 
     subsection (b)(3)(B)(v).
       ``(2) Periodic review and updating.--The notice required by 
     paragraph (1) shall be reviewed every 5 years and updated if 
     the Secretary considers it necessary.
       ``(l) Exemption Database.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall establish a publicly 
     available and searchable electronic database of each motor 
     vehicle for which an exemption from motor vehicle safety 
     standards prescribed under this chapter or a bumper standard 
     prescribed under chapter 325 has been granted.
       ``(2) Vehicle identification number.--The database 
     established under paragraph (1) shall be searchable by 
     Vehicle Identification Number and shall include no 
     information identifying the vehicle owner.''.

     SEC. 7. MOTOR VEHICLE TESTING OR EVALUATION.

       Section 30112(b)(10) of title 49, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) by striking ``that prior to the date of enactment of 
     this paragraph'';
       (2) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``motor vehicles into 
     the United States that are certified'' and inserting ``into 
     the United States motor vehicles that are certified, or motor 
     vehicle equipment utilized in a motor vehicle that is 
     certified,'';
       (3) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; or'';
       (4) by redesignating subparagraphs (A) through (C) as 
     clauses (i) through (iii), respectively, and moving their 
     margins 2 ems to the right;
       (5) by striking ``evaluation by a manufacturer that agrees 
     not to sell or offer for sale'' and inserting the following: 
     ``evaluation by--
       ``(A) a manufacturer that agrees not to sell or lease or 
     offer for sale or lease''; and
       (6) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(B) a manufacturer of highly automated vehicles, 
     automated driving systems, or components of automated driving 
     systems that agrees not to sell or lease or offer for sale or 
     lease the highly automated vehicles, automated driving 
     systems, or components of automated driving systems at the 
     conclusion of the testing or evaluation and--
       ``(i) has submitted to the Secretary--

       ``(I) the name of the individual, partnership, corporation, 
     or institution of higher education and a point of contact;
       ``(II) the residence address of the individual, 
     partnership, corporation, or institution of higher education 
     and State of incorporation if applicable;
       ``(III) a description of each type of motor vehicle used 
     during development of highly automated vehicles, automated 
     driving systems, or components of automated driving systems 
     manufactured by the individual, partnership, corporation, or 
     institution of higher education; and
       ``(IV) proof of insurance for any State in which the 
     individual, partnership, corporation, or institution of 
     higher education intends to test or evaluate highly automated 
     vehicles; and

       ``(ii) if applicable, has identified an agent for service 
     of process in accordance with part 551 of title 49, Code of 
     Federal Regulations.''.

     SEC. 8. INFORMATION ON HIGHLY AUTOMATED DRIVING SYSTEMS MADE 
                   AVAILABLE TO PROSPECTIVE BUYERS.

       (a) Research.--Not later than 3 years after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation shall 
     complete research to determine the most effective method and 
     terminology for informing consumers for each highly automated 
     vehicle or a vehicle that performs partial driving automation 
     about the capabilities and limitations of that vehicle. The 
     Secretary shall determine whether such information is based 
     upon or includes the terminology as defined by SAE 
     International in Recommended Practice Report J3016 (published 
     September 2016) or whether such description should include 
     alternative terminology.
       (b) Rulemaking.--After the completion of the study required 
     under subsection (a), the Secretary shall initiate a 
     rulemaking proceeding to require manufacturers to inform 
     consumers of the capabilities and limitations of a vehicle's 
     driving automation system or feature for any highly automated 
     vehicle or any vehicle that performs partial driving 
     automation.

     SEC. 9. HIGHLY AUTOMATED VEHICLE ADVISORY COUNCIL.

       (a) Establishment.--Subject to the availability of 
     appropriations, not later than 6 months after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation shall 
     establish in the National Highway Traffic Safety 
     Administration a Highly Automated Vehicle Advisory Council 
     (hereinafter referred to as the ``Council'').
       (b) Membership.--Members of the Council shall include a 
     diverse group representative of business, academia and 
     independent researchers, State and local authorities, safety 
     and consumer advocates, engineers, labor organizations, 
     environmental experts, a representative of the

[[Page H6670]]

     National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and other 
     members determined to be appropriate by the Secretary. Any 
     subcommittee of the Council shall be composed of not less 
     than 15 and not more than 30 members appointed by the 
     Secretary.
       (c) Terms.--Members of the Council shall be appointed by 
     the Secretary of Transportation and shall serve for a term of 
     three years.
       (d) Vacancies.--Any vacancy occurring in the membership of 
     the Council shall be filled in the same manner as the 
     original appointment for the position being vacated. The 
     vacancy shall not affect the power of the remaining members 
     to execute the duties of the Council.
       (e) Duties and Subcommittees.--The Council may form 
     subcommittees as needed to undertake information gathering 
     activities, develop technical advice, and present best 
     practices or recommendations to the Secretary regarding--
       (1) advancing mobility access for the disabled community 
     with respect to the deployment of automated driving systems 
     to identify impediments to their use and ensure an awareness 
     of the needs of the disabled community as these vehicles are 
     being designed for distribution in commerce;
       (2) mobility access for senior citizens and populations 
     underserved by traditional public transportation services and 
     educational outreach efforts with respect to the testing and 
     distribution of highly automated vehicles in commerce;
       (3) cybersecurity for the testing, deployment, and updating 
     of automated driving systems with respect to supply chain 
     risk management, interactions with Information Sharing and 
     Analysis Centers and Information Sharing and Analysis 
     Organizations, and a framework for identifying and 
     implementing recalls of motor vehicles or motor vehicle 
     equipment;
       (4) the development of a framework that allows 
     manufacturers of highly automated vehicles to share with each 
     other and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
     relevant, situational information related to any testing or 
     deployment event on public streets resulting or that 
     reasonably could have resulted in damage to the vehicle or 
     any occupant thereof and validation of such vehicles in a 
     manner that does not risk public disclosure of such 
     information or disclosure of confidential business 
     information;
       (5) labor and employment issues that may be affected by the 
     deployment of highly automated vehicles;
       (6) the environmental impacts of the deployment of highly 
     automated vehicles, and the development and deployment of 
     alternative fuel infrastructure alongside the development and 
     deployment of highly automated vehicles;
       (7) protection of consumer privacy and security of 
     information collected by highly automated vehicles;
       (8) cabin safety for highly automated vehicle passengers, 
     and how automated driving systems may impact collision 
     vectors, overall crashworthiness, and the use and placement 
     of airbags, seatbelts, anchor belts, head restraints, and 
     other protective features in the cabin;
       (9) the testing and deployment of highly automated vehicles 
     and automated driving systems in areas that are rural, 
     remote, mountainous, insular, or unmapped to evaluate 
     operational limitations caused by natural geographical or 
     man-made features, or adverse weather conditions, and to 
     enhance the safety and reliability of highly automated 
     vehicles and automated driving systems used in such areas 
     with such features or conditions; and
       (10) independent verification and validation procedures for 
     highly automated vehicles that may be useful to safeguard 
     motor vehicle safety.
       (f) Report to Congress.--The recommendations of the Council 
     shall also be reported to the Committee on Energy and 
     Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
     Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate.
       (g) Federal Advisory Committee Act.--The establishment and 
     operation of the Council and any subcommittees of the Council 
     shall conform to the requirements of the Federal Advisory 
     Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.).
       (h) Technical Assistance.--On request of the Council, the 
     Secretary shall provide such technical assistance to the 
     Council as the Secretary determines to be necessary to carry 
     out the Council's duties.
       (i) Detail of Federal Employees.--On the request of the 
     Council, the Secretary may detail, with or without 
     reimbursement, any of the personnel of the Department of 
     Transportation to the Council to assist the Council in 
     carrying out its duties. Any detail shall not interrupt or 
     otherwise affect the civil service status or privileges of 
     the Federal employee.
       (j) Payment and Expenses.--Members of the Council shall 
     serve without pay, except travel and per diem will be paid 
     each member for meetings called by the Secretary.
       (k) Termination.--The Council and any subcommittees of the 
     Council shall terminate 6 years after the date of enactment 
     of this Act.

     SEC. 10. REAR SEAT OCCUPANT ALERT SYSTEM.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 301 of subtitle VI of title 49, 
     United States Code, is amended by inserting after section 
     30130 (as added by section 5) the following new section:

     ``Sec. 30131. Rear seat occupant alert system

       ``(a) Rulemaking Required.--Not later than 2 years after 
     the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall 
     issue a final rule requiring all new passenger motor vehicles 
     weighing less than 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight to be 
     equipped with an alarm system to alert the operator to check 
     rear designated seating positions after the vehicle motor or 
     engine is deactivated by the operator.
       ``(b) Phase-in.--The rule issued pursuant to subsection (a) 
     shall require full compliance with the rule beginning on 
     September 1st of the calendar year that begins 2 years after 
     the date on which the final rule is issued.
       ``(c) Definitions.--For purposes of this section--
       ``(1) the term `passenger motor vehicle' has the meaning 
     given that term in section 32101; and
       ``(2) the term `rear designated seating position' means any 
     designated seating position that is rearward of the front 
     seat.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The analysis for chapter 301 of 
     subtitle VI of title 49, United States Code, is amended by 
     inserting after the item relating to section 30130 (as added 
     by section 5) the following new item:

``30131. Rear seat occupant alert system.''.

     SEC. 11. HEADLAMPS.

       (a) Safety Research Initiative.--Not later than 2 years 
     after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
     Transportation shall complete research into the development 
     of updated motor vehicle safety standards or performance 
     requirements for motor vehicle headlamps that would improve 
     the performance of headlamps and improve overall safety.
       (b) Rulemaking or Report.--
       (1) Rulemaking.--After the completion of the research 
     required by subsection (a), the Secretary shall initiate a 
     rulemaking proceeding to revise the motor vehicle safety 
     standards regarding headlamps if the Secretary determines 
     that a revision of the standards meets the requirements and 
     considerations set forth in subsections (a) and (b) of 
     section 30111 of title 49, United States Code.
       (2) Report.--If the Secretary determines that a revision to 
     the standard described in paragraph (1) does not meet the 
     requirements and considerations set forth in such 
     subsections, the Secretary shall submit a report describing 
     the reasons for not revising the standard to the Committee on 
     Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the 
     Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the 
     Senate.

     SEC. 12. PRIVACY PLAN REQUIRED FOR HIGHLY AUTOMATED VEHICLES.

       (a) Privacy Plan.--A manufacturer may not sell, offer for 
     sale, introduce or deliver for introduction in interstate 
     commerce, or import into the United States, any highly 
     automated vehicle, vehicle that performs partial driving 
     automation, or automated driving system unless the 
     manufacturer has developed a privacy plan that includes the 
     following:
       (1) A written privacy plan with respect to the collection, 
     use, sharing, and storage of information about vehicle owners 
     or occupants collected by a highly automated vehicle, vehicle 
     that performs partial driving automation, or automated 
     driving system. Such policy shall include the following:
       (A) The practices of the manufacturer with respect to the 
     way that information about vehicle owners or occupants is 
     collected, used, shared, or stored.
       (B) The practices of the manufacturer with respect to the 
     choices offered to vehicle owners or occupants regarding the 
     collection, use, sharing, and storage of such information.
       (C) The practices of the manufacturer with respect to the 
     data minimization, de-identification, and retention of 
     information about vehicle owners or occupants.
       (D) The practices of the manufacturer with respect to 
     extending its privacy plan to the entities it shares such 
     information with.
       (2) A method for providing notice to vehicle owners or 
     occupants about the privacy policy.
       (3) If information about vehicle owners or occupants is 
     altered or combined so that the information can no longer 
     reasonably be linked to the highly automated vehicle, vehicle 
     that performs partial driving automation, or automated 
     driving system from which the information is retrieved, the 
     vehicle owner, or occupants, the manufacturer is not required 
     to include the process or practices regarding that 
     information in the privacy policy.
       (4) If information about an occupant is anonymized or 
     encrypted the manufacturer is not required to include the 
     process or practices regarding that information in the 
     privacy policy.
       (b) Study.--The Federal Trade Commission shall conduct a 
     study and submit a report to the Committee on Energy and 
     Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
     Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate on the 
     highly automated vehicle marketplace, including an 
     examination of the following issues:
       (1) Which entities in the ecosystem have access to vehicle 
     owner or occupant data.
       (2) Which entities in the highly automated vehicle 
     marketplace have privacy plans.
       (3) What are the terms and disclosures made in such privacy 
     plans, including regarding the collection, use, sharing, and 
     storage of vehicle owner or occupant data.
       (4) What disclosures are made to consumers about such 
     privacy plans.
       (5) What methods are available to enable deletion of 
     information about vehicle owners or occupants from any data 
     storage system within the vehicle (other than a system that 
     is critical to the safety or operation of the vehicle) before 
     the vehicle is sold, leased, or rented, or otherwise occupied 
     by a new owner or occupant.
       (c) Federal Trade Commission Enforcement.--A violation of 
     subsection (a) shall be treated as a an unfair or deceptive 
     act or practice within the meaning of section 5(a)(1) of the 
     Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 45(a)(1)). The 
     Federal Trade Commission shall enforce this section in the 
     same manner, by the same means, and with the same 
     jurisdiction, powers, and duties as though all applicable 
     terms and provisions of the Federal Trade Commission Act were 
     incorporated into and made a part of this Act.
       (d) Effective Date.--This section shall take effect 180 
     days after the date of enactment of

[[Page H6671]]

     this section and shall only apply to highly automated 
     vehicles, vehicles that perform partial driving automation, 
     or automated driving systems first introduced after the 
     effective date of this section.

     SEC. 13. DEFINITIONS.

       (a) Amendments to Title 49, United States Code.--Section 
     30102 of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by redesignating paragraphs (1) through (13) as 
     paragraphs (2), (3), (4), (5), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), 
     (13), (15), (16), and (17), respectively;
       (B) by inserting before paragraph (2) (as so redesignated) 
     the following:
       ``(1) `automated driving system' means the hardware and 
     software that are collectively capable of performing the 
     entire dynamic driving task on a sustained basis, regardless 
     of whether such system is limited to a specific operational 
     design domain.'';
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (5) (as so redesignated) 
     the following:
       ``(6) `dynamic driving task' means all of the real time 
     operational and tactical functions required to operate a 
     vehicle in on-road traffic, excluding the strategic functions 
     such as trip scheduling and selection of destinations and 
     waypoints, and including--
       ``(A) lateral vehicle motion control via steering;
       ``(B) longitudinal vehicle motion control via acceleration 
     and deceleration;
       ``(C) monitoring the driving environment via object and 
     event detection, recognition, classification, and response 
     preparation;
       ``(D) object and event response execution;
       ``(E) maneuver planning; and
       ``(F) enhancing conspicuity via lighting, signaling, and 
     gesturing.
       ``(7) `highly automated vehicle'--
       ``(A) means a motor vehicle equipped with an automated 
     driving system; and
       ``(B) does not include a commercial motor vehicle (as 
     defined in section 31101).'';
       (D) by inserting after paragraph (13) (as so redesignated) 
     the following:
       ``(14) `operational design domain' means the specific 
     conditions under which a given driving automation system or 
     feature thereof is designed to function.''; and
       (E) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(18) `vehicle that performs partial driving automation' 
     does not include a commercial motor vehicle (as defined in 
     section 31101).''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(c) Revisions to Certain Definitions.--
       ``(1) If SAE International (or its successor organization) 
     revises the definition of any of the terms defined in 
     paragraph (1), (6), or (14) of subsection (a) in Recommended 
     Practice Report J3016, it shall notify the Secretary of the 
     revision. The Secretary shall publish a notice in the Federal 
     Register to inform the public of the new definition unless, 
     within 90 days after receiving notice of the new definition 
     and after opening a period for public comment on the new 
     definition, the Secretary notifies SAE International (or its 
     successor organization) that the Secretary has determined 
     that the new definition does not meet the need for motor 
     vehicle safety, or is otherwise inconsistent with the 
     purposes of this chapter. If the Secretary so notifies SAE 
     International (or its successor organization), the existing 
     definition in subsection (a) shall remain in effect.
       ``(2) If the Secretary does not reject a definition revised 
     by SAE International (or its successor organization) as 
     described in paragraph (1), the Secretary shall promptly make 
     any conforming amendments to the regulations and standards of 
     the Secretary that are necessary. The revised definition 
     shall apply for purposes of this chapter. The requirements of 
     section 553 of title 5 shall not apply to the making of any 
     such conforming amendments.
       ``(3) Pursuant to section 553 of title 5, the Secretary may 
     update any of the definitions in paragraph (1), (6), or (14) 
     of subsection (a) if the Secretary determines that materially 
     changed circumstances regarding highly automated vehicles 
     have impacted motor vehicle safety such that the definitions 
     need to be updated to reflect such circumstances.''.
       (b) Definitions in This Act.--As used in this Act--
       (1) the term ``automated driving system'' has the meaning 
     given such term in subsection (a) of section 30102 of title 
     49, United States Code, subject to any revisions made to the 
     definition of such term pursuant to subsection (c) of such 
     section;
       (2) the term ``highly automated vehicle'' has the meaning 
     given such term in subsection (a) of section 30102 of title 
     49, United States Code, not subject to any revision under 
     subsection (c) of such section; and
       (3) the term ``vehicle that performs partial driving 
     automation'' has the meaning given such term in subsection 
     (a) of section 30102 of title 49, United States Code, not 
     subject to any revision under subsection (c) of such section.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Ohio (Mr. Latta) and the gentlewoman from Illinois (Ms. Schakowsky) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio.


                             General Leave

  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and 
insert extraneous material in the Record.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Ohio?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Walden), who is the chairman of the Energy and Commerce 
Committee, and I would like to thank him for all the work he has done 
on this bill.
  Mr. WALDEN. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleagues on both sides 
of the aisle who have put enormous work into that, all the members of 
the committee, and especially Mr. Latta for his great leadership.
  Today marks a really important milestone in the pursuit to make our 
roadways safer and support American leadership in self-driving 
innovation. So the SELF DRIVE Act, H.R. 3388, is something we can all 
support.
  Simply put, the rapidly advancing technology behind highly autonomous 
vehicles is stunning. I speak from some experience because a few months 
ago I got the opportunity to ride in a self-driving car with engineers 
and experienced a vehicle perform without any need for human 
intervention.
  Though we can look to a future that fulfills the promise of these 
innovations, we cannot ignore the current troubling trend in the number 
of lives that are lost on our roadways in America. Given the latest 
roadway fatality numbers, this technology is especially needed today.
  Almost 40,000 people lost their lives on our roads last year. That 
represents another yearly increase in traffic-related fatalities. In my 
own State of Oregon, traffic fatalities were the highest they have seen 
in 14 years--up 20 percent from the prior year.
  Statistics tell us 94 percent of accidents relate to human behavior. 
During our morning commute into work, just look around. We see folks on 
their phones in the cars next to us doing other things. While the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration can't write a safety 
standard to make us all perfect drivers, it can work to avoid 
lifesaving technologies to avoid collisions. That is part of what this 
bipartisan legislation will put in place.
  This bill is also about ensuring America stays a global leader in the 
development of self-driving technology. After all, the auto industry is 
responsible for more than 7 million American jobs nationwide and drives 
more than $900 billion into the economy each year. We want to see these 
numbers grow, we want this innovation to occur here, and we want to 
bring greater traffic safety to our roadways.
  Additionally, self-driving cars hold the promise of better access to 
transportation for our Nation's 47 million senior citizens, 27 million 
Americans with severe disabilities, and the many communities across the 
country underserved by public transportation.
  For Americans to enjoy all these benefits, we needed to put together 
a framework that is national and will drive it, and that is what this 
bill does.
  I want to commend Mr. Latta, Ms. Schakowsky, Mr. Upton, Mrs. Dingell, 
and my friend, Frank Pallone, the ranking member on the committee, for 
all their great work on this legislation. We can be proud of the 
product the Energy and Commerce Committee has brought to the floor.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge people to support H.R. 3388.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the bipartisan approach to 
autonomous vehicles reflected in the SELF DRIVE Act. As ranking member 
of the Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection Subcommittee, I have 
been so pleased to be able to work with Chairman Latta to reach 
agreements on the legislation before the House today. It is not the 
bill I think that either one of us would have written on our own, but 
it does reflect a bipartisan agreement that we reached after months of 
negotiation, and I appreciate that very much.
  Autonomous vehicles have great potential to improve safety on our 
roads by reducing accidents caused by human error, which most accidents 
are. My goal throughout this process has been to make sure that this 
technology is deployed safely and that we also advance existing safety 
technologies.
  The SELF DRIVE Act lays out a framework for the National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration, NHTSA,

[[Page H6672]]

to promote safe adoption of AVs. Mandatory safety assessment 
certifications will ensure that NHTSA receives the data that it needs 
to evaluate safety as autonomous vehicles appear on our roads. Within a 
year of enactment, NHTSA will lay out a priority plan for what new 
safety standards need to be written and which existing standards must 
be updated. In addition, the bill requires manufacturers to write 
cybersecurity and consumer privacy plans as they develop AV technology.
  The legislation allows for exemptions to existing vehicle safety 
standards. For example, there may be some vehicles that really don't 
need a steering wheel. It is hard to imagine now. But we ensure that 
NHTSA explains its process for granting any safety exemptions. The 
maximum number of exemptions per automobile will scale up 
incrementally.
  To receive an exemption, a manufacturer must show equivalent safety, 
a manufacturer must report crashes involving exempted vehicles, and 
exempted vehicles must be listed in a public database.
  This bill also has safety improvements that go beyond autonomous 
vehicles. NHTSA will work to improve the performance of headlamps. In 2 
years, NHTSA will issue a rule requiring an alert system to warn 
drivers if a child or pet is left in the backseat. Already this year, 
37 children have died from heatstroke after being left in hot cars. 
This hot cars provision, which Congressman Tim Ryan, Congressman Peter 
King, and I introduced as a standalone bill, will save lives.

  A broad range of stakeholders have been involved and will be involved 
in the future of self-driving workers. That is why we set up an 
advisory council which will include industry, academics, labor, State 
and local government, consumer advocates, and environmental experts.
  As self-driving cars are developed, we must examine critical issues. 
Will seniors and people with disabilities share in the benefits of 
autonomous vehicles? Ensuring accessibility may require further policy 
changes. We also need to grapple with the disruption self-driving cars 
may cause in employment. Even though this legislation generally 
excludes commercial vehicles--and additional clarity may be needed--
self-driving cars may displace workers who make their livelihoods 
behind the wheel.
  Once the House passes this bill, I look forward to working with 
stakeholders and our Senate colleagues to send consensus legislation to 
the President's desk. I believe we could go further to improve consumer 
safety and strengthen protections to put consumers in control of their 
data. We must also keep working to refine the Federal, State, and local 
roles in ensuring safe roads and protecting access to courts when 
necessary.
  Mr. Speaker, today's vote is the next step in that process. I urge my 
colleagues to vote in favor of the SELF DRIVE Act, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, first, let me just thank the gentlewoman from Illinois, 
the ranking member on the subcommittee, for her hard work on the 
legislation. I really appreciate it.
  Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise in support of H.R. 3388, the SELF 
DRIVE Act, which we advanced out of the Energy and Commerce Committee 
on a unanimous, bipartisan vote of 54-0 in July. This compromise 
legislation aims to improve consumer safety by reducing traffic-related 
fatalities and injuries, clarify the Federal and State roles, and 
stimulate job growth and economic opportunities.
  Many of you have heard these roadway safety statistics, but they 
again bear repeating. Each year, approximately 6 million Americans are 
involved in car accidents resulting in nearly 2 million injuries. 
Ninety-four percent of the accidents are attributed to human errors or 
decisions. In 2016 approximately 40,000 people lost their lives on U.S. 
highways. Sadly, in my home State of Ohio, traffic deaths have been on 
the rise over the last few years.
  We have an opportunity today to support and promote the safe testing 
and deploying of this life-saving technology. U.S. companies are 
investing major resources in the research and development of this 
technology and should not be held up by regulatory barriers that were 
created when self-driving cars were science fiction. We must act, and 
we must act now.
  The SELF DRIVE Act establishes a streamlined path for the testing, 
development, and deployment of self-driving cars in the United States. 
While this technology is currently being tested in certain parts of the 
country, there are limits to who can test and what technology can be 
used in cars today. Federal motor vehicle safety standards need to be 
updated because self-driving cars may not have the traditional steering 
wheels and brake pedals that all cars have today.
  Additionally, this legislation maximizes opportunities for research 
and development here in the United States to create jobs and grow 
economic opportunities so that the United States can remain a global 
leader in this industry. With this legislation, innovation can flourish 
without the heavy hand of government.
  Finally, this legislation will enhance the ability of our senior 
citizens, the disability community, and individuals in underserved 
communities enjoy more mobility and live more independently.
  This legislation is the first of its kind, focused on the car of the 
future that is more of a supercomputer on wheels. This issue started 
with our good friend and colleague, Dr. Burgess, who held the first 
disrupter series hearing on self-driving cars last Congress.
  Again, we would also not be where we are today if it weren't for the 
leadership of Chairperson Walden and the great working relationship and 
cooperation of Ranking Member Pallone, Ranking Member Schakowsky, and 
Ranking Member Dingell, as well as our many cosponsors. I appreciate 
their comments, suggestions, and input.
  We have held multiple hearings, technology showcases, and real-life 
demonstrations for our committee's members to learn about the 
opportunities and challenges presented by self-driving cars.
  I also want to acknowledge the stakeholders who have been willing to 
work with us. The automotive industry is a competitive and vibrant 
marketplace and touches every congressional district in the country.

                              {time}  1130

  In the process of drafting and marking up this legislation, we had 
over 300 meetings with automakers, tech companies, suppliers, trade 
associations, the disability community, senior State transportation 
leaders, and, last but not least, the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration.
  Safety should and always will be our number one priority. We have 
said and will continue to say: Safety first, safety last, safety 
always. I truly believe this bill will make a real difference for 
everyday Americans.
  In closing, I want to thank our great staff for their hard work late 
nights and weekends to get us where we are to this historic vote.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Pallone), the ranking member of the Energy and Commerce 
Committee, and I thank him for his support.
  Mr. PALLONE. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 3388, the SELF 
DRIVE Act.
  I want to start by thanking Chairmen Walden and Latta, Ranking Member 
Schakowsky, and the other members of the Energy and Commerce Committee 
for all their work to reach a bipartisan agreement on this bill.
  Self-driving cars have the potential in the future to reduce deaths 
and injuries from car crashes, particularly those that result from 
driver distraction. This bill allows for testing and deployment of 
self-driving cars to help the United States reach that potential 
sooner.
  This legislation also includes important provisions that ensure 
safety is the top priority as self-driving cars are developed. For 
example, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will be 
required to issue rules and new safety standards for highly automated 
vehicles.
  The auto industry will be required to submit safety assessment 
certifications that detail how their vehicles

[[Page H6673]]

are tested and function on the road. We also insist that any 
manufacturer entering this market must have cybersecurity and privacy 
practices in place before their cars are sold.
  Self-driving cars will not come all at once. Human drivers will be on 
the roads for the foreseeable future. So this bill also contains 
legislative initiatives geared toward protecting drivers and 
passengers, including requirements to ensure kids are not forgotten in 
hot cars and that all new cars have the latest technology in their 
headlamps.
  It also ensures NHTSA is able to consider whether a car functions as 
intended, not just whether it meets a specific standard. We also 
encourage NHTSA to come up with a plan on how it can alter testing 
using ranges so that cars cannot be built just to meet a particular 
test.
  This bill is not perfect. It is a bipartisan compromise and a product 
of what we can accomplish when we work together. As this bill moves to 
the Senate, I remain committed to continuing bipartisan efforts to 
address any issues and to ensure that safety is not compromised.
  I want to thank, again, all of the key leaders on both the Democratic 
and Republican side for making this happen today.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Upton), chairman of the Energy Subcommittee on the Energy 
and Commerce Committee.
  Mr. UPTON. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this bill, H.R. 3388, 
the SELF DRIVE Act. This legislation and technology is, indeed, going 
to play a very important role in improving motor vehicle safety and 
addressing the rising number of traffic-related fatalities.
  As the birthplace of the automobile industry, my home State of 
Michigan is a well-known home to innovative suppliers and manufacturers 
that make our cars and trucks safer, more efficient, and, yes, more 
affordable. It is also a nexus of engineering and research talent, 
which makes it perfect for the development of the next phase of 
vehicular mobility: autonomous vehicles. It is here.
  In 2015, more than 35,000 folks lost their lives on U.S. highways. 
Early estimates indicate that number may have increased to more than 
40,000 last year. In Michigan, there were 1,064 traffic facilities, a 7 
percent increase over the previous year. NHTSA has found that 94 
percent of these fatalities are related to human error.
  This legislation on autonomous vehicles, which includes the PAVE Act, 
authored by myself and my good friend from Michigan, Debbie Dingell, 
will go a long way to taking human error out of driving and making 
roads safer for every American.
  Forget about ``The Jetsons.'' It is over. The future of the 
automobile is here, and this bill will give the automotive industry the 
tools it needs to completely revolutionize how we are going to get 
around for generations to come.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Matsui), a member of the Digital Commerce and 
Consumer Protection Subcommittee and a major contributor to this 
legislation.
  Ms. MATSUI. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the SELF DRIVE 
Act. With this legislation, we have the opportunity to unlock 
autonomous vehicle innovation and help improve the quality of life for 
millions.
  Today, so many of our neighbors, friends, and family face mobility 
challenges. Many seniors and people with disabilities are not able to 
use a car to do errands, go to doctor appointments, and visit loved 
ones. For millions of people who travel our roads, this technology has 
the potential to prevent accidents and save lives. That is why we must 
act to put policies in place that allow AVs to be tested and deployed, 
with an emphasis on consumer protections.
  In my home district of Sacramento and across California, we recognize 
the promise of AV technology and are developing a pathway for its safe 
testing and deployment. Sacramento's ATOS lab aims to foster a public-
private consortium of government agencies and AV companies by 
leveraging Sacramento's 5G network, an ideal location. The legislation 
we are considering today allows California to continue to lead, while 
protecting roadway safety.

  With the SELF DRIVE Act, we are preserving the important AV 
deployment work happening at the State level and also creating the 
foundation for a strong Federal framework to build on our progress and 
protect drivers and pedestrians.
  I am also pleased that this bill contains language on legislation I 
introduced, the MORE Act, which ensures technology companies, auto 
manufacturers, and new market entrants are on a level playing field for 
testing AVs.
  Just as the development of the personal computer has revolutionized 
our daily lives, so, too, will the employment of autonomous vehicle 
technology.
  This legislation, which passed the Energy and Commerce Committee 
unanimously, puts us on a path towards innovation that, up until 
recently, seemed unimaginable. I look forward to working with my 
colleagues on both sides of the aisle as we work together to move this 
legislation forward.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Burgess), chairman of the Health Subcommittee on the Energy and 
Commerce Committee.
  Mr. BURGESS. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, the country has stood, first, in awe of the power that 
was unleashed on the Texas-Louisiana coast, and then in admiration of 
constituents up and down the Texas and Louisiana coast as they face 
this difficulty and work together to get through it.
  This bill today is also a product of people working together. Through 
at least two sessions of Congress we have now come with self-driving 
vehicle legislation that is going to change our economy.
  This bill will allow developers room to grow, while making certain 
that the technology is safe for consumers. This act will create jobs 
and ensure that we remain the global leader in innovation. Most 
importantly, the self-driving vehicle legislation has the ability to 
save lives.
  Throughout my life, I have seen the lifesaving effects of 
advancements in vehicle technology, starting with the seat belt, to the 
air bag, to antilock brakes. Self-driving vehicles are the next step in 
this trajectory.
  The Energy and Commerce Committee has dedicated a lot to this 
technology and its ability to save lives, and, certainly, the last term 
of Congress, the Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade Subcommittee that 
Mr. Latta now chairs. I am proud to see the product of our work come to 
the floor.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Eshoo), a member of the Energy and Commerce 
Committee.
  Ms. ESHOO. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman from Illinois for 
yielding and for her leadership and work on the great Energy and 
Commerce Committee in the House.
  My congressional district is home to the engineers, innovators, and 
developers who are pioneering the technologies that are transitioning 
us to a driverless world. That is why I support H.R. 3388, and it is my 
hope that the regulatory framework established by this bill is going to 
ensure that the United States of America is the leader in the world's 
next great revolution in transportation. I believe that we are, that we 
will be, and that this bill boosts the effort.
  Throughout committee consideration of this bill, I stressed the need 
for bipartisanship on this issue so that the American people would have 
confidence in the steps that we were taking. And so it is. It is, I 
think, in the spirit of the original Federal automotive safety 
standards that passed Congress nearly unanimously in 1966.
  This bill was improved significantly in the committee, and the final 
bill, very importantly, preserves the role that States have played to 
regulate matters such as vehicle registration, licensing, insurance, 
and liability, while, at the Federal level, ensuring that manufacturers 
submit safety certifications to NHTSA, placing the agency on the path 
toward issuing full safety standards for autonomous vehicles.
  The bill also includes my language to require a study of the 
environmental impacts of autonomous vehicles, as well as the 
intersection between autonomous and electric vehicles. The AV

[[Page H6674]]

revolution is happening on top of the ongoing electrification 
revolution, and I think the AV advisory council can provide important 
insight to Congress, States, and localities about how to support 
growing these fleets.
  For all these reasons and more, Mr. Speaker, I urge all House Members 
to support H.R. 3388. I think it deserves unanimous support, as it did 
in our committee, and that this will be good for America and keep us in 
a leadership position on the all-important issues that are established 
by this bill.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Mississippi (Mr. Harper), vice chairman of the Digital Commerce and 
Consumer Protection Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee.
  Mr. HARPER. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 3388, the SELF 
DRIVE Act.
  The bipartisan bill we are considering today is vital not only to all 
Americans, but especially individuals with disabilities.
  My wife, Sidney, and I have an adult son, Livingston, who has special 
needs. He wants to go everywhere. He has a job Monday through Friday, 
but he can't drive, so he is dependent on his family and friends to get 
him around. In the disability community, the lack of transportation is 
the number one obstacle to employment and security in society.
  I previously introduced the Disability Mobility Advisory Council Act, 
which creates a forum for individuals with disabilities to work with 
manufacturers, suppliers, and regulators to identify impediments and 
ways in which the needs of this community can best be met by self-
driving car technology. I appreciate the chairman including the general 
intent of my bill in the SELF DRIVE Act.
  Self-driving vehicles can open the door for the disability community 
to access new job markets and opportunities and to have an even more 
active role in our society.
  I urge support of this bill.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Michigan (Mrs. Dingell), a member of the Digital Commerce and 
Consumer Protection Subcommittee and someone who has put in a lot of 
time and effort on this legislation.
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague, Congresswoman Jan 
Schakowsky, for yielding and for her leadership on making this happen, 
as well as thanking Chairman Latta, Chairman Walden, Ranking Member 
Pallone, and my good friend Fred Upton from Michigan.
  The hard work here has gotten us to the point where we are today. The 
SELF DRIVE Act is going to improve our economy and save lives on the 
road.
  Passing this bill today means we are one step closer to signing a 
responsible framework for the deployment of highly automated vehicles 
into law. It means we are going to improve mobility for seniors and 
people with disabilities, reduce congestion on the road, improve energy 
consumption, and, as everyone has said, actually improve safety on the 
road.

                              {time}  1145

  More than 35,000 people died on our roadways. And as you heard Mr. 
Upton say, we are hearing 40,000 self-driving cars has the promise to 
save lives when 90 percent of those are by human error, but only if we 
get it right. And that is why it is so important that we study these 
issues and do this the right way.
  Our legislation ensures that safety is at the forefront by requiring 
manufacturers to submit safety assessment certifications before one 
self-driving vehicle hits the road. It also requires that 
manufacturers, for the very first time, submit a plan for how we will 
address both cybersecurity and data privacy. It is moving the needle 
forward on safety while providing a reactive and flexible framework for 
the regulation of self-driving cars.
  Today we are one step closer to reshaping American innovation for 
generations to come. We cannot let this opportunity slip by us. It is 
essential to ensure the future of American innovation because this is 
fundamentally an issue of American competitiveness.
  Automated vehicles are going to be developed, whether we want it or 
not, and it is a question about whether we are going to remain in the 
driver's seat and not secede it to China or India or Western Europe.
  The SELF DRIVE Act steers us in the right direction on these 
important issues.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Lance).
  Mr. LANCE. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the SELF 
DRIVE Act. This groundbreaking work of the Energy and Commerce 
Committee is the first major step toward establishing a clear legal and 
regulatory framework for autonomous vehicle deployment.
  Self-driving cars are going to transform many aspects of American 
life and our economy. Autonomous vehicle technology will spur job 
creation while increasing productivity, accessibility, and safety for 
consumers across the country.
  The potential benefits are tremendous. Those with limited mobility 
will have new transportation options, and self-driving cars can reverse 
the rising trend of distracted and impaired drivers, road accidents, 
and highway fatalities. Autonomous vehicles can help turn the tide.
  Innovators are waiting to jump into this exciting new market. We need 
to be their partners in this 21st century groundbreaking achievement.
  I thank Chairman Latta and Ranking Member Schakowsky for leading this 
bipartisan effort through the U.S. House. Let's drive into the future. 
I urge a ``yes'' vote.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I am now pleased to yield 2 minutes to 
the gentlewoman from the great State of New York (Ms. Clarke), a member 
of our subcommittee.
  Ms. CLARKE of New York. Mr. Speaker, I rise to support H.R. 3388, the 
SELF DRIVE Act. As you may know, autonomous vehicles are the wave of 
the future, and they are here now.
  As innovative technology for these vehicles develop, our Nation's 
transportation system will be transformed, decreasing the number of 
traffic collisions, enhancing mobility for the elderly, disabled, and 
poor, and lowering fuel consumption.
  My constituents in the Ninth Congressional District of New York will 
benefit greatly from autonomous vehicles, which will allow for smarter, 
faster, and more fuel-efficient travel.
  I am pleased that proper cybersecurity protections are included in 
the legislation. As you may know, cybersecurity protections for self-
driving vehicles is of great interest, particularly in today's 
environment, to ensure that these vehicles not only meet technological 
challenges, but there is a plan in place to meet public safety 
standards and prevent and tackle potential hacks and/or terrorism.
  I am so pleased that H.R. 3407, the legislation I introduced with 
Congressman Adam Kinzinger is included in H.R. 3388. The cybersecurity 
portion of the bill requires manufacturers to develop a written 
cybersecurity policy. Within the cybersecurity policy, manufacturers 
would address the following: one, a process for identifying, assessing, 
and mitigating reasonable foreseeable vulnerabilities from cyber 
attacks or unauthorized intrusions; and two, a process for taking 
preventive and corrective action to mitigate against these 
vulnerabilities, including incident response plans, intrusion 
detection, and prevention systems that safeguard key controls, systems, 
and procedures through testing and/or monitoring.
  This legislation requires companies to develop a more comprehensive 
cybersecurity plan, which can mitigate, correct, intersect, and 
identify imminent threats. Fostering consumer confidence will include 
ensuring an established system built to protect sensitive information 
in our technological age. I am pleased to be a Member of this 
committee.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Bilirakis).
  Mr. BILIRAKIS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the SELF DRIVE 
Act, which will improve transportation safety, stimulate economic 
growth, and ensure we are embracing the full potential of technological 
advances in the automotive industry with respect to autonomous 
vehicles.
  I am especially proud that my bill, the ACCESS Act, has been included 
in this important legislative package, which ensures that self-driving 
cars are

[[Page H6675]]

developed with seniors and the underserved in mind.
  Approximately 20 percent of Floridians are over the age of 65, and 
many struggle with simple tasks most of us take for granted, such as 
getting to work, going to the doctor, taking a trip to the grocery 
store or across town to visit family.
  Self-driving cars hold the power to safely put seniors and our 
constituents back in the driver's seat of their lives, providing them 
with greater independence and mobility. I urge all my colleagues to 
support the passage of this very important bill.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from California (Mr. McNerney), my colleague on the Energy 
and Commerce Committee.

  Mr. McNERNEY. Mr. Speaker, this has been a bipartisan effort. It has 
been good. We made some progress. I want to say a few things, though.
  I am proud to be a cosponsor of the SELF DRIVE Act. This legislation 
puts us on a path towards safely deploying autonomous vehicles. I am 
glad to see that it has strong bipartisan support.
  Autonomous vehicles offer many benefits, including tremendous 
lifesaving potential. Approximately 40,000 people are killed on our 
highways every year in deadly automobile accidents. About 3,600 of 
those accidents took place in my home State of California.
  AVs can also transform mobility for millions of people who otherwise 
face difficulty driving, such as seniors and those with disabilities, 
including 3.8 million veterans in our country living with service-
connected disabilities. That is more than 17 percent of veterans in 
this country.
  AVs can help connect underserved communities, as well as reduce 
traffic congestion on our roads, and increase our Nation's productivity 
and competitiveness in the global economy.
  While I am glad that we are taking these steps for this legislation 
today, our work cannot stop here. As the technology evolves, we must 
ensure that the benefits are being maximized for consumers. This means 
making sure that the vehicles are safely and appropriately tested, that 
strong consumer privacy and cybersecurity protections are in place, and 
that we are fully preparing Americans for the new employment 
opportunities that this industry will create.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, may I ask how much time I have 
remaining?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Illinois has 3\1/2\ 
minutes remaining. The gentleman from Ohio has 7\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Indiana (Mr. Bucshon).
  Mr. BUCSHON. Mr. Speaker, self-driving cars, once a providence of 
science fiction, are quickly becoming a reality. Self-driving vehicle 
technology has the potential to increase access to transportation in 
our rural communities, freedom for those unable to drive today, and 
improved safety for thousands of Hoosiers and other citizens across the 
country.
  Furthermore, development of this innovative technology maintains 
America's technological leadership in the world and presents new 
economic opportunities for our citizens.
  The SELF DRIVE Act creates a regulatory framework to allow for self-
driving vehicle technology to continue moving forward while also 
ensuring consumers are protected.
  I ask my colleagues to join me today and vote in favor of this 
bipartisan package.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the Congressman from 
Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to join my colleagues on 
the floor of the House dealing with autonomous vehicles. I think this 
is one of the most important issues that nobody is really focused on. I 
wish it were not on the suspension calendar and we had a chance to 
spend several hours discussing it here.
  What you have done is forge a bipartisan coalition to be able to 
leapfrog going forward, to be able to not just focus on safety, but how 
autonomous vehicles have the opportunity to reshape the American 
landscape dealing with recovering right-of-way and being able to have 
new economic opportunities.
  But this must be done right. The fact that ``Driver'' is the number 1 
category of employment for men without a college education, means there 
could be some problems here. If we don't do it right, we can actually 
increase congestion rather than decrease it.
  But I think you have established the framework to allow us to go 
forward, to be able to capitalize on this innovation, to be able to 
accelerate American leadership and avoid the problem we had with drones 
where the FAA was not really capable of dealing with drones which were 
more like flying cell phones than dealing with jets. You are trying to 
lay a foundation that I think is going to help us avoid that problem, 
and it is going to pay dividends for years to come.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Oklahoma (Mr. Mullin).
  Mr. MULLIN. Mr. Speaker, the House today will vote on an important 
piece of Federal legislation regarding self-driving vehicles that many 
on this body on both sides of the aisle have worked on.
  This legislation promises to make roads safer by reducing traffic-
related fatalities and unlock new economic opportunities and jobs in 
the U.S. It is also vital in our efforts to promote innovation.
  Industry is driving the development of self-driving vehicles, but in 
certain situations, companies building and testing the car of the 
future may need some flexibility or certainty.
  With this legislation, I hope the research, development, and testing 
that is unleashed will stimulate additional knowledge and innovation 
for passenger motor safety.
  We, as the government, need to make sure that safety is first and 
foremost in our consideration. Passing this legislation will help get 
lifesaving technology to the public, perhaps preventing deaths in the 
not-so-near future.
  I strongly support this bipartisan legislation, and I urge my 
colleagues to do the same.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson), the ranking member of the Science, 
Space, and Technology Committee.
  Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, let me thank the 
majority and minority of the Energy and Commerce Committee for bringing 
this unanimous legislation to the floor on self-driving vehicles, which 
are revolutionizing the way we conceptualize travel.
  Self-driving cars have the potential to lower our infrastructure and 
mobility costs, enhance safety on our roads, and enhance mobility in 
our cities.
  However, like any complex technology, self-driving cars pose new 
challenges for the regulatory landscape and our labor markets. That is 
why I am pleased to support H.R. 3388, the SELF DRIVE Act, which seeks 
to foster innovation in this space while offering protection for 
consumers.
  The SELF DRIVE Act is one of the many important bills that will need 
to be considered by Congress in order to define Federal and State 
regulatory roles, provide the U.S. Department of Transportation the 
tools it needs to update safety standards, and ensure that the American 
people are not left behind as we transition to a 21st century 
workforce. Particularly, I am pleased to see that H.R. 3388 allows the 
creation of the Highly Automated Vehicle Advisory Council.
  Mr. Speaker, self-driving vehicles are revolutionizing the way that 
we conceptualize travel. Self-driving cars have the potential to lower 
our infrastructure and mobility costs, enhance safety on our roads, and 
enhance mobility within our cities. However, like any complex 
technology, self-driving cars pose new challenges for the regulatory 
landscape and our labor markets. That is why I am pleased to support 
H.R. 3388--the SELF DRIVE Act, which seeks to foster innovation in this 
space while offering protection for consumers.
  The SELF DRIVE Act is one of many important bills that will need to 
be considered by Congress in order to define federal and state 
regulatory roles, provide the U.S. Department of Transportation the 
tools it needs to update safety standards, and ensure that the American 
people are not left behind as we transition to a 21st Century 
workforce. In particular, I am pleased to see that H.R. 3388 allows for 
the creation of a Highly Automated Vehicle Advisory Council, which can 
properly consider the labor and employment issues that may be affected 
by the deployment of highly automated vehicles.

[[Page H6676]]

  I have been working on separate legislation to create a new 
retraining program for workers who are displaced from their jobs due to 
the adoption of autonomous vehicle technology. I am very grateful for 
Representative Joe Barton and Representative Bob Latta's staff for 
working with my office to craft and refine that legislation. I believe 
that we are getting closer to a final product, which will ultimately 
recognize the inevitable changes to the labor market that this country 
will experience in the face of automated technologies.
  Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to support H.R. 3388. I know that members 
of the Energy & Commerce Committee have worked tirelessly to bring this 
measure to the floor after hundreds of meetings with relevant 
stakeholders. I encourage my colleagues to support this bill and look 
forward to working cooperatively with members on other bills that will 
address other aspects of self-driving vehicles and the ramifications 
that will have on our economy and our country.

                              {time}  1200

  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Mimi Walters).
  Mrs. MIMI WALTERS of California. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support 
of H.R. 3388, the SELF DRIVE Act, which will help advance the 
deployment of self-driving vehicles by allowing testing of this life-
changing technology.
  Back home in Orange County, long commutes and congestion are a way of 
life. Sadly, traffic accidents, often fatal, are also a daily 
occurrence in my district and across the country.
  Some predict self-driving vehicles could save 300,000 lives each 
decade. In Orange County alone, the deployment of this technology could 
save the lives of 150 people every year.
  I am especially proud that a piece of legislation I drafted, the MORE 
Act, is included in the SELF DRIVE Act. The MORE Act will help advance 
self-driving vehicle technology because it allows new entrants to the 
automobile industry, such as tech and ride-hailing companies, to test 
this lifesaving technology on public roads.
  The SELF-DRIVE Act has the potential to make our roads safer, 
alleviate congestion, and improve mobility for seniors and individuals 
with disabilities.
  I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Ohio (Mr. Ryan), the sponsor and my partner on the HOT CARS Act, 
included in this legislation.
  Mr. RYAN of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I also thank the chairman from Bowling Green, Ohio, home 
of the Harvard of the Midwest, Bowling Green State University, and 
Ranking Member Schakowsky for including the language, as she said, for 
the HOT CARS Act.
  We lose about 37 children a year who accidentally get left in the 
backseat of a car when a parent or grandparent accidentally forgets 
that they are there, they change their routine, and 37 kids a year pass 
away. It is one of the most tragic circumstances we have to deal with 
in this country. Ms. Schakowsky and I, along with Peter King from New 
York, have championed this bill. I just want to say thank you for 
including it in here.
  These cars get hot fast, up to 125 degrees. This allows the companies 
now to put sensors in there. When we leave our keys in the car or when 
we leave our lights on, we get a ding or a bell. Now we will know if 
someone is in the backseat. There will be an alert that the car 
companies will put into the cars to allow us to recognize and prevent 
37 deaths a year.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman for working in a bipartisan way, 
and thank Ranking Member Schakowsky for her leadership. She has been 
championing this a long time, and I appreciate it.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Costello).
  Mr. COSTELLO of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of 
the SELF DRIVE Act. With over 127,000 vehicle crashes in Pennsylvania 
in 2015, advances in deploying self-driving technology are critical to 
helping make our roads safer.
  Importantly, self-driving cars can also increase mobility for seniors 
and individuals with disabilities and can reduce carbon emissions.
  As with many innovations, we must recognize the importance of safety, 
including cybersecurity vulnerabilities, when it comes to self-driving 
cars.
  Provisions of my cybersecurity legislation, which were included as 
part of the bill we are voting on today, directs the Secretary of 
Transportation to create a Federal advisory council on cybersecurity. 
The council will be responsible for gathering information and providing 
advice related to the cybersecurity of self-driving vehicles, and it 
will ensure both public and private sector stakeholders are 
communicating about cybersecurity concerns before they become a crisis.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank Chairman Walden, Chairman Latta, and staff for 
their work to bring this bill to the floor.
  Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, in closing, let me just say some thank 
yous. I thank the chairman of our subcommittee, Chairman Latta, for his 
great work. I also thank Chairman Walden, and, of course, all of the 
staff on his side of the aisle for their work to help us reach this 
bipartisan agreement. I especially want to thank them for the inclusion 
of the HOT CARS legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank Ranking Member Pallone on our side and also 
thank Michelle Ash, Lisa Goldman, Caroline Paris-Behr, and my staff, 
Matt Hayward, for their great work on the subcommittee on this 
legislation.
  We will continue working together to send consensus legislation. I 
appreciate the opportunity to work with Chairman Latta and to get this 
to the floor today as a suspension bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, again, I thank the gentlewoman, the ranking 
member on the subcommittee, for all of her hard work on this 
legislation. Again, we wouldn't be here without the bipartisanship that 
we had on this piece of legislation.
  Also, again, I want to thank our staff. There were a lot of weekends 
and nights that they put in to make sure that we got this bill to where 
we are today.
  But, again, as has been mentioned today, we have been talking about 
what this legislation is going to do. We have been looking at safety, 
cybersecurity, privacy, making sure that some folks in the community 
right now who aren't able to get out, some of our senior population, 
and those with disabilities, have the ability to be able to get around 
to go to jobs and go to the grocery store.
  The legislation has been a culmination of a lot of work over two 
sessions. Again, I want to thank Dr. Burgess for his hard work that he 
did in the last Congress as the chairman of the subcommittee.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LIPINSKI. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 3388, the SELF 
DRIVE Act. Connected and automated vehicles are a rapidly evolving 
technology that are novel today, but will be a reality tomorrow. This 
legislation will provide the auto industry, consumers, and policymakers 
with the certainty they need to advance automated vehicle technology. 
Automated vehicles have the potential to increase safety, improve 
mobility, and decrease congestion while improving the efficiency of our 
transportation network.
  As the co-chairman of the Congressional Unmanned Systems Caucus and 
an engineer, I have for the past three years been convening automated 
vehicle stakeholders to discuss the policy issues related to the 
development and deployment of these new technologies. In addition, I 
authored the Future TRIP Act during the 114th Congress. Key provisions 
of that bill, including the establishment of a regional transportation 
center to study automated vehicles were passed into law in the FAST 
Act. It is imperative that we maintain the United States' 
manufacturing.
  I commend my colleagues on the Energy and Commerce Committee for 
their bipartisan work on this important legislation. The SELF DRIVE Act 
includes language will promote industry growth by preventing a 
potentially stifling patchwork of differing local regulations. By 
asserting the authority of the federal government to regulate these 
vehicles and corresponding safety standards, the Committee has struck 
the right balance by allowing states to retain their traditional roles 
in driver licensing, insurance, and vehicle registration in a way that 
does not impede innovation. In addition, I am pleased that the bill 
enables the Department of Transportation to review the vehicle systems 
through the Safety Assessment Letter process.

[[Page H6677]]

  Automated vehicles are highly complex, and present a number of 
equally complex policy considerations. While this bill is a significant 
step forward in defining the federal government's role in this emerging 
technology, I believe there is more work to be done with respect to 
ensuring that NHTSA has appropriate resources to carry out the federal 
role in oversight and regulation, and to ensuring the privacy of 
consumers' data. Data sharing between government and industry holds the 
possibility of improving safety operations and performance, but must be 
a collaborative partnership, and must protect consumers' personally 
identifiable data.
  For that reason, I have an amendment that has been made in order to 
the Fiscal Year 2018 Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development 
appropriations bill, that we will consider later today. The amendment 
will provide the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration with an 
additional $9 million for the Salaries and Expenses account. These 
funds will enable the agency to expand its workforce, define new 
testing protocols as the technology emerges, and better partner with 
industry and state and local governments to conduct adequate oversight.
  In addition, I continue to have concerns about the collection, use, 
and privacy of consumers' data. A recent report issued at the direction 
of myself and my colleague, Congresswoman Comstock, the Government 
Accountability Office found while nearly all of the major auto 
manufacturers now offer vehicles with connected technologies, NHTSA has 
not clearly defined its roles and responsibilities as they relate to 
the privacy of vehicle data, making it difficult for NHTSA to 
coordinate with other federal agencies to effectively oversee these 
emerging technologies.
  We still have important issues to consider, including insurance, 
cyber-security, and data sharing. I look forward to continuing to 
collaborate with my colleagues to examine this evolving industry, and 
defining the federal government's role in promoting industry while 
protecting the public. I urge my colleagues to support this bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Latta) that the House suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, H.R. 3388, as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill, as amended, was passed.
  The title of the bill was amended so as to read: ``A bill to amend 
title 49, United States Code, regarding the authority of the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration over highly automated vehicles, 
to provide safety measures for such vehicles, and for other 
purposes.''.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________