CONDEMNING NORTH KOREA'S DEVELOPMENT OF MULTIPLE INTERCONTINENTAL BALLISTIC MISSILES
(House of Representatives - April 03, 2017)

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[Pages H2605-H2609]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




   CONDEMNING NORTH KOREA'S DEVELOPMENT OF MULTIPLE INTERCONTINENTAL 
                           BALLISTIC MISSILES

  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and 
agree to the resolution (H. Res. 92) condemning North Korea's 
development of multiple intercontinental ballistic missiles, and for 
other purposes, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
  The text of the resolution is as follows:

                               H. Res. 92

       Whereas the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), 
     also known as North Korea, possesses a ballistic missile and 
     nuclear weapons development program that poses a grave threat 
     to the United States, United States allies South Korea and 
     Japan, and to regional and global security;
       Whereas North Korea's ballistic missile program has 
     demonstrated an increasing ability to reach the United 
     States, which constitutes a credible and growing threat to 
     the security of the American people;
       Whereas North Korea has demonstrated a willingness and 
     ability to proliferate its ballistic missile and nuclear 
     weapons technology to a variety of countries, including the 
     Islamic Republic of Iran and the Syrian Arab Republic, which 
     the United States has designated as state sponsors of 
     terrorism;
       Whereas, on January 6, 2016, North Korea detonated a 
     nuclear device, marking its fourth nuclear test to date;
       Whereas, on February 7, 2016, North Korea, utilizing a 
     modified version of the Taepodong-2 ballistic missile, 
     launched a ``satellite'' into space;
       Whereas according to the U.S. Intelligence Community's 2016 
     Worldwide Threat Assessment, North Korea is ``committed to 
     developing a long-range, nuclear-armed missile that is 
     capable of posing a direct threat to the United States; it 
     has publicly displayed its KN08 road-mobile ICBM on multiple 
     occasions'';
       Whereas, on April 28, 2016, Deputy Secretary of State 
     Antony Blinken, in a hearing before the Foreign Affairs 
     Committee of the House of Representatives, testified ``the 
     benefits of [the trilateral] relationship are crystal clear 
     in the face of the region's most acute challenge--the 
     challenge from North Korea and its provocative acts in the 
     nuclear missile domain'';
       Whereas, on August 24, 2016, North Korea successfully 
     tested a submarine-launched ballistic missile, firing the 
     missile over 300 miles from a submerged submarine;
       Whereas, on September 9, 2016, North Korea conducted its 
     fifth nuclear test, which it claimed was a warhead that could 
     be miniaturized for its ballistic missiles;
       Whereas, on September 15, 2016, Admiral Harry Harris, 
     Commander of U.S. Pacific Command, stated ``Combining nuclear 
     warheads with ballistic missile technology in the hands of a 
     volatile leader like Kim Jong-un, is a recipe for 
     disaster.'';
       Whereas, on September 16, 2016, Secretary of Defense Ashton 
     Carter stated ``Everyone can see that North Korea is 
     determined to try to expand its missile threat to the 
     peninsula, to the region, and to the United States.'';
       Whereas in 2016 North Korea willfully and repeatedly 
     violated multiple United Nations Security Council 
     resolutions, through its nuclear tests, missile tests, and 
     satellite launch;
       Whereas, on January 6, 2017, Deputy Secretary of State 
     Antony Blinken stated that North Korea had conducted 24 
     missile tests in the past year, as well as two nuclear tests 
     and ``in our assessment, we have a qualitative improvement in 
     their capabilities in the past year as a result of this 
     unprecedented level of activity'';
       Whereas, on January 8, 2017, North Korea declared that it 
     is ready to test-launch an intercontinental ballistic missile 
     (ICBM);
       Whereas, on February 11, 2017, North Korea launched an 
     intermediate-range ballistic missile off its eastern coast 
     while President Donald Trump hosted Japanese Prime Minister 
     Shinzo Abe on an official visit to the United States;
       Whereas, on February 18, 2017, the People's Republic of 
     China announced that it would suspend all coal imports from 
     North Korea, a significant source of revenue to the North 
     Korean regime;
       Whereas, on February 27, 2017, the United Nations Panel of 
     Experts on North Korea determined that ``The Democratic 
     People's Republic of Korea is flouting sanctions through 
     trade in prohibited goods, with evasion techniques that are 
     increasing in scale, scope and sophistication.'';
       Whereas, on March 6, 2017, North Korea launched four 
     intermediate range missiles, three of which landed 
     approximately 200 miles off the coast of Japan;
       Whereas South Korea and the United States have made an 
     alliance decision to deploy the Terminal High Altitude Area 
     Defense (THAAD) system as a self-defensive measure to ensure 
     the security of South Korea and its people, and to protect 
     alliance military forces from the growing threat of North 
     Korea's nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program; and
       Whereas a nuclear North Korea with a functional and 
     operational intercontinental ballistic missile program would 
     pose a direct threat to the United States and United States 
     interests: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved, That the House of Representatives--
       (1) condemns North Korea's development of multiple 
     intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs);
       (2) welcomes the deployment of the Terminal High Altitude 
     Area Defense (THAAD) system in South Korea to counter North 
     Korea's missile threat, which supports an alliance security 
     decision;
       (3) urges the Government of the People's Republic of China 
     to immediately cease its diplomatic intimidation and economic 
     coercion against South Korea in an attempt to block the THAAD 
     deployment;
       (4) reaffirms the United States support for a layered, 
     integrated, multi-tier missile defense system to protect 
     Americans and allies in Northeast Asia;
       (5) supports continued bilateral security cooperation 
     between the United States and South Korea and the 
     consideration of additional measures to strengthen the 
     alliance, including expanded foreign military sales, joint 
     exercises, and other actions as appropriate;
       (6) reaffirms, in view of the ICBM threat by North Korea, 
     the commitment of the United States to its alliances and to 
     trilateral cooperation with South Korea and Japan, which is 
     critical for the preservation of peace and stability in 
     Northeast Asia and throughout the world;
       (7) supports and urges the full implementation of the 
     intelligence sharing agreement between Japan and South Korea 
     signed on November 23, 2016, concerning the direct exchange 
     of intelligence on North Korean threats;
       (8) calls upon the People's Republic of China to use its 
     considerable leverage to pressure North Korean leaders to 
     cease their provocative behavior and abandon and dismantle 
     their nuclear and missile programs, and comply with all 
     relevant United Nations Security Council resolutions;
       (9) calls on the United States to fully enforce all 
     existing economic sanctions on North Korea and to seek to 
     continuously adapt the sanctions regime to address evasive 
     techniques employed by the North Korean regime; and
       (10) calls on the Secretary of State to undertake a 
     comprehensive and rigorous diplomatic effort to urge allies 
     and other countries to fully enforce, and build upon, 
     existing international sanctions on North Korea.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Royce) and the gentleman from California (Mr. Sherman) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California (Mr. Royce).

[[Page H2606]]

  



                             General Leave

  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
all Members may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their 
remarks and to include any extraneous material in the Record.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from California?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, let me begin here by thanking Mr. Wilson for his 
leadership on H. Res. 92. What this resolution does is to describe in 
alarming detail the growing sophistication of North Korea's missile and 
nuclear weapons program. This, of course, poses a direct threat to the 
United States as well as to our allies.
  Last year alone, North Korea, as we will recall, conducted more than 
20 missile tests, including one from a submarine, and they are doing 
this in pursuit of an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of 
striking the United States. Kim Jong-un has detonated two separate 
nuclear devices in the same year, a first for this rogue regime. Today, 
the Kim regime's aggression continues, and recent satellite imagery 
indicates that Pyongyang is now prepared to detonate its sixth nuclear 
device.
  With every test, North Korea gains valuable knowledge that has 
enabled it to make significant improvements to this developing arsenal. 
Bear in mind that North Korea has cooperated on its program with these 
countries, and I would like the Members to think on this: they have 
cooperated with Iran, they have cooperated with Syria on a nuclear 
program, and they have cooperated with Pakistan. This, of course, is 
undermining U.S. security, but, frankly, it undermines the security of 
the entire global counter-proliferation system.
  That is why I strongly support the passage of this resolution. I have 
been in North Korea, and let me tell you, this resolution, which 
condemns North Korea's development of an ICBM and calls for the United 
States and others to immediately address this urgent threat, is very 
necessary at this time.
  Fortunately, the new administration already has several tools at its 
disposal. One of those is a bill that we wrote up in the committee, a 
bill authored by myself and Eliot Engel, the North Korea Sanctions and 
Policy Enhancement Act. It was signed last year, and it was also taken 
up at the U.N. Security Council and passed at the Security Council 
office. This resolution, among other things, empowers the President to 
ramp up pressure on the North Korean regime by sanctioning foreign 
companies that do business with--and therefore enable--the regime.
  The deployment of the anti-missile defense system THAAD to the Korean 
Peninsula must also continue as quickly as possible, and China should 
end its economic intimidation of our ally South Korea in response to 
this deployment. THAAD will serve as a vital first line of defense 
protecting U.S. personnel in the region and protecting our allies from 
Kim Jong-un.
  As this resolution notes, China needs to do its part to implement the 
sanctions contained in multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions. 
President Trump should press this issue with President Xi when the two 
meet this week. With these steps, I believe the United States can again 
exert effective pressure on the Kim regime.
  As H. Res. 92 emphasizes, Congress stands ready to help counter North 
Korea's belligerent behavior and maintain peace and maintain stability 
in the Asia Pacific.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

                                         House of Representatives,


                                  Committee on Armed Services,

                                   Washington, DC, March 30, 2017.
     Hon. Edward R. Royce,
     Chairman, Committee on Foreign Affairs,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chairman: I am writing to you concerning H. Res. 
     92, a resolution ``Condemning North Korea's development of 
     multiple intercontinental ballistic missiles, and for other 
     purposes,'' as amended. There are certain provisions in the 
     legislation which fall within the Rule X jurisdiction of the 
     Committee on Armed Services.
       In the interest of permitting your committee to proceed 
     expeditiously to floor consideration of this important 
     legislation, I am willing to waive this committee's further 
     consideration of H. Res. 92. I do so with the understanding 
     that by waiving consideration of the resolution the Committee 
     on Armed Services does not waive any future jurisdictional 
     claim over the subject matters contained in the legislation 
     which fall within its Rule X jurisdiction.
       Please place a copy of this letter and your response 
     acknowledging our jurisdictional interest into the 
     Congressional Record during consideration of the measure on 
     the House floor. Thank you for the cooperative spirit in 
     which you have worked regarding this matter and others 
     between our respective committees.
           Sincerely,
                                    William M. ``Mac'' Thornberry,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                 Committee on Foreign Affairs,

                                   Washington, DC, March 30, 2017.
     Hon. William M. ``Mac'' Thornberry,
     Chairman, House Armed Services Committee,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chairman: Thank you for consulting with the 
     Committee on Foreign Affairs on H. Res. 92, Condemning North 
     Korea's development of multiple intercontinental ballistic 
     missiles, and for agreeing to be discharged from further 
     consideration of that resolution so that it may proceed 
     expeditiously to consideration by the House.
       I agree that your forgoing further action on this measure 
     does not in any way diminish or alter the jurisdiction of the 
     Committee on Armed Services, or prejudice its jurisdictional 
     prerogatives on this resolution or similar legislation in the 
     future.
       I will seek to place our letters on H. Res. 92 into the 
     Congressional Record during floor consideration. I appreciate 
     your cooperation regarding this legislation and look forward 
     to continuing to work with your Committee as this measure 
     moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                  Edward R. Royce,
                                                         Chairman.

  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H. Res. 92.
  I am the chief Democratic cosponsor and the gentleman from South 
Carolina is the sponsor of this resolution condemning North Korea's 
development of multiple intercontinental ballistic missiles, and for 
other purposes. It should be noted that this resolution now has 120 
bipartisan cosponsors, including the ranking member and chairman of the 
committee, the chairman of the Asia and the Pacific Subcommittee, and 
myself as ranking member of the Asia and the Pacific Subcommittee.
  This resolution is necessary at a time when the regime of Kim Jong-un 
is as belligerent as ever. His intentions are clear. He is conducting 
intermediate and intercontinental ballistic missile tests and nuclear 
tests for the purpose of being in a position to intimidate the United 
States and the rest of the world. Just this month the regime in 
Pyongyang released a fake propaganda video showing the imagined 
destruction of a U.S. aircraft carrier by its forces.
  In addition to the five nuclear weapons North Korea has already 
tested, Kim Jong-un continues to test ballistic missiles, including 
submarine-launched ballistic missiles, and is moving toward 
intercontinental ballistic missiles. These missiles have as one of 
their chief purposes to be able to reach the continental United States 
and particularly the Pacific Coast of the United States.
  We used to have the luxury of saying that North Korea just wants 
attention; they just want this or that concession. But now their goal 
is clear. It is to threaten hundreds of millions of Americans. It is 
clear that North Korea is testing missiles and bombs for the purpose of 
developing warheads that can do just that.
  The resolution we are considering today, H. Res. 92, condemns North 
Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile tests, calls for the United 
States to apply economic sanctions on North Korea, and calls on China 
to pressure North Korean leaders to cease their provocative behavior, 
abandon and dismantle their nuclear missile program, and it calls upon 
China to curtail, or at least threaten to curtail, their economic 
support of Pyongyang.
  President Xi is coming to the United States. He will meet with our 
President in Florida. And I hope that the recent comments that we are 
going to handle this issue on our own are not what comes out of 
Florida, because, instead, we must demand that China pressure North 
Korea.

[[Page H2607]]

  According to the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, 
China accounts for over 90 percent of North Korea's foreign trade and 
approximately 95 percent of its foreign direct investment. Beijing 
needs to know that there are serious challenges to its relationship 
with the United States if it does not assist us in this effort. 
Officials in Beijing cannot assume that their companies will always 
have access to the United States market.
  There are those who say it is unthinkable to link our trading 
relationship with China to its position on North Korea. I believe it is 
unthinkable for us not to use all the tools at our disposal to try to 
prevent the least predictable leader in the world--and perhaps the 
least stable--from having the capacity to hit the United States 
mainland with intercontinental nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the 
gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Wilson), who is a senior member of 
both the Foreign Affairs Committee and the Armed Services Committee and 
the author of this resolution.
  Mr. WILSON of South Carolina. Mr. Speaker, I was grateful to visit 
North Korea on a congressional delegation in 2003 with House Foreign 
Affairs Ranking Member Eliot Engel on a delegation led by Congressman 
Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania. While there, we witnessed a regime 
obsessed with a Potemkin-like appearance and preservation to the 
detriment of its own citizens who have been reduced to destitution and 
starvation.

                              {time}  1715

  After seeing the devastation of the people at the hands of the 
totalitarian regime, I have been even more invested in the need to hold 
the regime in Pyongyang accountable for threatening neighbors.
  In early February, I introduced this bipartisan resolution in 
response to North Korea's threat to test an intercontinental ballistic. 
Their threat is concerning because an ICBM has the capability of 
reaching the West Coast of the United States.
  The rapid pace of North Korea's growing offensive nuclear weapons 
development is alarming to the United States and our allies. In just a 
few short months, North Korea has appeared to successfully test an 
ICBM; launched a satellite; tested four simultaneous ballistic 
missiles, three of which landed in Japanese territorial waters; had a 
failed missile launch; and tested a ballistic missile engine. The 
regime also claims to be planning another nuclear test for later this 
month.
  Sadly revealing, the regime in North Korea recently released a 
propaganda video depicting a missile striking a U.S. aircraft carrier 
and calling for the destruction of the American people.
  North Korea is rapidly advancing their capabilities, working to 
miniaturize nuclear technology to deliver a nuclear weapon anywhere in 
the world. Sadly, 8 years of strategic patience only enabled the 
dictatorship. We cannot afford to stand by as this regime grows in 
power and influence, threatening the United States and our allies.
  I am grateful that President Donald Trump is taking the regime and 
its threats seriously. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and Secretary of 
State Rex Tillerson recently visited our allies in South Korea and 
Japan; and the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, has 
led the efforts for strengthening international sanctions against North 
Korea.
  The administration has also demonstrated peace through strength by 
backing up their commitments to our allies with action. We have begun 
deploying the THAAD missile defense system, recently resumed the annual 
military training exercises with South Korea, and deployed attack 
drones to support our servicemembers stationed in the region. This 
defends the extraordinary people of South Korea, who have developed one 
of the most prosperous nations on Earth.
  As we work to check the growing influence and missile capability of 
North Korea, Congress, too, has a vital role, starting with passage of 
H. Res. 92 to forcefully condemn North Korea for these actions and call 
for the consideration of all available sanctions on the regime and the 
individuals or businesses who sustain it. We are clear: the United 
States must stand strong against North Korea for American families and 
our South Korean allies.
  I appreciate the consideration of H. Res. 92, with 120 bipartisan 
cosponsors. I know that America is fortunate to have the leadership of 
House Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce, serving in a bipartisan manner 
with Ranking Member Eliot Engel.
  I urge my colleagues to vote in support of the resolution.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen), the chairman emeritus of the committee who 
chairs the Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Middle East and North 
Africa and has authored previous legislation to address the North 
Korean threat.
  Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN. Mr. Speaker, I commend the commitment that Chairman 
Royce and Ranking Member Engel have shown in holding North Korea 
accountable for its illicit activity, and it is a long list.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to also commend my good friend and colleague, 
Congressman Joe Wilson, for authoring this important measure, H. Res. 
92, condemning North Korea's development of multiple intercontinental 
ballistic missiles, or ICBMs.
  Recently, North Korea has made the calculation that it either needs 
to flex its muscles through the test of ballistic missiles or, at the 
very least, provoke an international response so that the regime can 
use it as propaganda against the West.
  We have seen dozens of missile tests over the past year, and, just as 
troubling, at least two nuclear tests. I know that this is resolution 
condemning North Korea's provocative action, but I do think this is an 
opportunity to call attention to the Iranian nuclear and ballistic 
missile program. What I and some of my colleagues have been saying for 
years now is that Iran has been following the North Korea playbook.
  We signed a weak and dangerous nuclear deal with North Korea, and 
what was the result? A nuclear-armed Pyongyang that is testing and 
upgrading its ballistic and nuclear program unchecked and possibly even 
proliferating these materials, or at least the know-how, to Iran.
  We concluded a weak and dangerous nuclear deal with Iran, and you can 
be sure, if we don't do more to press Iran, we will be welcoming 
another dangerous regime to the nuclear weapons club.
  While we rightfully condemn North Korea for its provocations, we must 
be mindful that, if we follow the same path and make the same mistakes, 
it will be Iran in a few years that will have a nuclear weapon and 
ballistic missile program that can threaten global security, and that 
is in none of our interests.
  I urge my colleagues to fully support Mr. Wilson's measure, Mr. 
Speaker, but I also urge them to realize the failures of past policies 
and what got us here to this point with North Korea and not to allow 
the same mistakes to happen with respect to Iran.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Chabot), a senior member of the Foreign 
Affairs Committee.
  Mr. CHABOT. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H. Res. 92, condemning 
North Korea's development of multiple intercontinental ballistic 
missiles.
  Without question, North Korea's relentless effort to develop 
ballistic missiles poses a serious threat to the security of the United 
States, especially to our allies in the region, and possibly all across 
the globe.
  For the past several years, Kim Jong-un has made significant strides 
in their nuclear missile program. It seems like every few weeks we hear 
new reports concerning the growing North Korea nuclear threat. North 
Korea has conducted multiple nuclear tests and demonstrated that it is 
bound and determined to develop a ballistic missile capable of 
delivering a nuclear warhead to the continental United States.
  It has also become abundantly clear that the Kim regime will continue 
to

[[Page H2608]]

work toward a nuclear warhead, no matter the cost. Just today, a senior 
North Korean defector stated that the young, irresponsible dictator 
will do anything to remain in power and that Kim believes nuclear 
weapons will help guarantee his rule.
  We must condemn these actions and begin taking concrete steps to 
mitigate the growing North Korean threat. I also believe we must work 
closer than ever with our South Korean partners and increase our 
already strong security alliance by assisting with technological 
developments, carrying out more joint exercises, and quickly making the 
Terminal High Altitude Area Defense systems, or THAAD, in South Korea 
operational.
  I commend my friend, Mr. Wilson of South California, for his 
leadership in championing H. Res. 92. I also want to thank Chairman 
Royce and the ranking member, Mr. Eliot Engel, for, again, using the 
format of the Foreign Affairs Committee in a bipartisan manner.
  This is one committee in the House--and there are a few others--that 
works very much in a bipartisan manner. This is one we do need to be 
united on. The threat from Kim Jong-un is serious. It is dangerous. It 
is a threat to world peace. We need to take it seriously. H. Res. 92 
goes in the right direction. I, again, want to thank Mr. Wilson for 
proposing it.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I will add a comment to the upcoming visit of President 
Xi to Florida and President Trump's statement in advance of that: Well, 
we don't need China to get tough on North Korea.
  The fact is, President Trump has not given us a plan that would put 
effective pressure on Pyongyang that does not involve China. There is 
no magic road to dealing with the North Korean threat that does not go 
through Beijing.
  My fear is that, in the guise of being the tough guy who doesn't need 
China's help, in fact, President Trump is preparing to fail to get 
China's help in controlling North Korea, is preparing to be weak in 
dealing with China and to weakly accept their unwillingness to act, and 
then disguising it all in some machismo statement of strength: Oh, we 
don't need China.
  We do need China. There is no plan to control North Korea that 
doesn't involve China. Macho statements are not an excuse for real 
strength in dealing with President Xi.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from California (Mrs. Mimi Walters of California).
  Mrs. MIMI WALTERS of California. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support 
of H. Res. 92, condemning North Korea's development of multiple 
intercontinental ballistic missiles.
  The world has watched in fear as this brutal dictatorship has labored 
to miniaturize a nuclear warhead capable of being delivered by an ICBM. 
Across the 45th District, Californians are anxious about the growing 
threat from North Korea and its efforts to develop the capability to 
strike the West Coast.
  Orange County is home to a large Korean-American population who have 
spoken out forcefully against this rogue regime, fearing for the life 
of their Korean kin and the safety of the entire world. As I tell all 
concerned constituents when I am back home in California, and I will 
repeat here today: I share your concern and will do all I can to ensure 
we eliminate this threat.
  Mr. Speaker, just today, an interview with the most high-profile 
North Korean defector in two decades was released. The man's warning 
was dire: Kim Jong-un will use nuclear weapons at the slightest sign of 
an imminent threat to his rule.
  The time for the old strategy of strategic patience has passed. We 
must take serious actions now to prevent a nuclear weapon from ever 
threatening the United States or one of our allies. I urge the 
President to address this grave threat with the Chinese President at 
their upcoming summit.
  I thank my friend, the gentleman from South Carolina, for undertaking 
this effort, and I am proud to join him in this fight.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.

  Mr. Speaker, I would simply say that I commend the gentleman from 
South Carolina, Mr. Wilson, for authoring this resolution, which has 
secured the support of 120 bipartisan cosponsors, including the chair 
and ranking member of the full committee and the chair and, in my case, 
ranking member of the relevant subcommittee.
  I, again, call on my colleagues to join me in supporting H. Res. 92, 
condemning North Korea's development of multiple intercontinental 
ballistic missiles, and for other purposes.
  We need an official congressional condemnation of North Korea's 
continued ballistic missile testing and its related nuclear program. We 
need to ramp up sanctions on North Korea, while applying pressure to 
China, hopefully later this week, for being North Korea's economic 
lifeline.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, North Korea, as we all know, poses an urgent threat to 
the United States and to our allies. Experts say that, in less than 4 
years, Kim Jung-un will likely have the ability to make a reliable 
intercontinental ballistic missile topped by a nuclear warhead capable 
of targeting the continental United States. They also expect that, by 
then, North Korea may have accumulated enough nuclear material to build 
up to 100 warheads for those ICBMs they have been making.
  In an interview, the President says he is going to discuss this 
growing threat and Kim Jung-un's behavior with Chinese President Xi 
this week. As he says, China has great influence over North Korea, and 
China will either decide to help us with North Korea or they won't, 
but, if they do, that will be very good for China.
  It will be good for China because we have made it very clear that 
this is a key interest of the United States. We do not want to see 
North Korea able to proliferate this kind of weaponry. They have 
already tested this off of a submarine. It would be irresponsible for 
us, China, and every member of the international community not to take 
steps now to cut off all hard currency into North Korea that allows 
that regime to continue down this path.

                              {time}  1730

  This threat is real, and that demands real response. I appreciate Joe 
Wilson bringing this resolution because, as he notes, one other point 
that I think we have to make, the deployment of THAAD needs to be 
completed as quickly as possible.
  The President must also utilize the economic tools that Congress has 
given him with the act authored by myself and Mr. Engel to cut off 
funding for the regime of Kim Jong-un. I would also encourage the 
administration to pursue all opportunities to strengthen our economic 
and security relationships with our partners throughout the Asia 
Pacific right now because, as we know, our allies there are equally 
concerned about this development.
  I thank the author of this resolution, Mr. Joe Wilson, and, of 
course, my committee's ranking member, Mr. Engel. I want to thank Mr. 
Sherman as well for working on this resolution.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. JOHNSON of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I stand in strong support of H. 
Res. 92, Condemning North Korea's development of multiple 
intercontinental ballistic missiles.
  The security of our nation and allies rests on a global community of 
nations acting in a responsible manner. For too long the Asia-Pacific 
region has been rocked with instability because of North Korea's 
irresponsible behavior. Last year, the North Korean regime conducted 
two nuclear tests and twenty missile tests, including successfully 
testing a submarine-launched ballistic missile. This is a marked 
increase from two nuclear tests and 42 missile tests over the previous 
seven years. In February 2017, North Korea fired a ballistic missile 
that landed in the sea between the Korean Peninsula and Japan, sending 
shockwaves among our two closest allies in the Asia-Pacific.
  Passing this resolution will reaffirm our commitment to trilateral 
missile defense cooperation with South Korea and Japan and to an 
interoperable, multi-tier missile defense system that will protect 
Americans and our allies on the Korean Peninsula. At a time of 
increasing belligerence by North Korea, our allies need such security 
assurances. This bill will also urge the President to promptly deploy 
the

[[Page H2609]]

Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system in South Korea, 
apply all available economic sanctions on North Korea, and consider 
additional measures to strengthen bilateral security cooperation with 
South Korea, including increases in foreign military sales and joint 
exercises.
  Like many of my colleagues, the constituents whom I represent want 
assurance that the United States is secure from all external threats, 
including the potential threat of weaponized intercontinental ballistic 
missiles (ICBMs). ICBMs are designed to travel between 5,500 km and 
10,000 km. California is about 9,000 km from North Korea. Given that 
the North Korean regime has made steady advances in its nuclear weapons 
program over the past few years, it is not surprising that my 
California colleagues are increasingly alarmed by Pyongyang's actions.
  The level of bipartisan support for H. Res. 92 reflects the 
importance of the threat North Korea poses to global stability. Our 
security and the security of our allies is an issue that crosses party 
lines. It is imperative to our national security interests that North 
Korea does not develop a weaponized ICBM capable of reaching any part 
of our country.
  This resolution provides more assurance to our allies in the Asia-
Pacific and sends a message to the North Korean regime that all 
Americans are united in our determination to safeguard our country 
against foreign threats. I strongly urge my colleagues to vote yes on 
the resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Royce) that the House suspend the rules 
and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 92, as amended.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds 
being in the affirmative, the ayes have it.
  Mr. ROYCE of California. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and 
nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this motion will be postponed.

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