PROTECTING YOUNG VICTIMS FROM SEXUAL ABUSE AND SAFE SPORT AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017; Congressional Record Vol. 164, No. 19
(House of Representatives - January 29, 2018)

Text available as:

Formatting necessary for an accurate reading of this text may be shown by tags (e.g., <DELETED> or <BOLD>) or may be missing from this TXT display. For complete and accurate display of this text, see the PDF.


[Pages H633-H644]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




PROTECTING YOUNG VICTIMS FROM SEXUAL ABUSE AND SAFE SPORT AUTHORIZATION 
                              ACT OF 2017

  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill (S. 534) to prevent the sexual abuse of minors and amateur 
athletes by requiring the prompt reporting of sexual abuse to law 
enforcement authorities, and for other purposes, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                                 S. 534

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Protecting 
     Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization 
     Act of 2017''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents of this Act 
     is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

          TITLE I--PROTECTING YOUNG VICTIMS FROM SEXUAL ABUSE

Sec. 101. Required reporting of child and sexual abuse.
Sec. 102. Civil remedy for personal injuries.

      TITLE II--UNITED STATES CENTER FOR SAFE SPORT AUTHORIZATION

Sec. 201. Expansion of the purposes of the corporation.
Sec. 202. Designation of the United States Center for Safe Sport.
Sec. 203. Additional requirements for granting sanctions for amateur 
              athletic competitions.
Sec. 204. General requirements for youth-serving amateur sports 
              organizations.

          TITLE I--PROTECTING YOUNG VICTIMS FROM SEXUAL ABUSE

     SEC. 101. REQUIRED REPORTING OF CHILD AND SEXUAL ABUSE.

       (a) Reporting Requirement.--Section 226 of the Victims of 
     Child Abuse Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. 20341) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by striking ``A person who'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(1) Covered professionals.--A person who''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(2) Covered individuals.--A covered individual who learns 
     of facts that give reason to suspect that a child has 
     suffered an incident of child abuse, including sexual abuse, 
     shall as soon as possible make a report of the suspected 
     abuse to the agency designated by the Attorney General under 
     subsection (d).'';
       (2) in subsection (b), in the matter preceding paragraph 
     (1), by striking ``subsection (a)'' and inserting 
     ``subsection (a)(1)'';
       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (7), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in paragraph (8), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting a semicolon; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(9) the term `covered individual' means an adult who is 
     authorized, by a national governing body, a member of a 
     national governing body, or an amateur sports organization 
     that participates in interstate or international amateur 
     athletic competition, to interact with a minor or amateur 
     athlete at an amateur sports organization facility or at any 
     event sanctioned by a national governing body, a member of a 
     national governing body, or such an amateur sports 
     organization;
       ``(10) the term `event' includes travel, lodging, practice, 
     competition, and health or medical treatment;
       ``(11) the terms `amateur athlete', `amateur athletic 
     competition', `amateur sports organization', `international 
     amateur athletic competition', and `national governing body' 
     have the meanings given the terms in section 220501(b) of 
     title 36, United States Code; and
       ``(12) the term `as soon as possible' means within a 24-
     hour period.'';
       (4) in subsection (d), in the first sentence, by inserting 
     ``and for all covered individuals'' after ``reside'';
       (5) in subsection (f), in the first sentence--
       (A) by striking ``and on all'' and inserting ``on all''; 
     and
       (B) by inserting ``and for all covered individuals,'' after 
     ``lands,'';
       (6) in subsection (h), by inserting ``and all covered 
     individuals,'' after ``facilities,''; and
       (7) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(i) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed to require a victim of child abuse to self-
     report the abuse.''.
       (b) Penalty for Failure To Report.--Section 2258 of title 
     18, United States Code, is amended by inserting ``or a 
     covered individual as described in subsection (a)(2) of such 
     section 226 who,'' after ``facility,''.

     SEC. 102. CIVIL REMEDY FOR PERSONAL INJURIES.

       Section 2255 of title 18, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by striking subsection (a) and inserting the following:
       ``(a) In General.--Any person who, while a minor, was a 
     victim of a violation of section 1589, 1590, 1591, 2241(c), 
     2242, 2243, 2251, 2251A, 2252, 2252A, 2260, 2421, 2422, or 
     2423 of this title and who suffers personal injury as a 
     result of such violation, regardless of whether the injury 
     occurred while such person was a minor, may sue in any 
     appropriate United States District Court and shall recover 
     the actual damages such person sustains or liquidated damages 
     in the amount of $150,000, and the cost of the action, 
     including reasonable attorney's fees and other litigation 
     costs reasonably incurred. The court may also award punitive 
     damages and such other preliminary and equitable relief as 
     the court determines to be appropriate.'';
       (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``filed within'' and all 
     that follows through the end and inserting the following: 
     ``filed--
       ``(1) not later than 10 years after the date on which the 
     plaintiff reasonably discovers the later of--
       ``(A) the violation that forms the basis for the claim; or
       ``(B) the injury that forms the basis for the claim; or
       ``(2) not later than 10 years after the date on which the 
     victim reaches 18 years of age.''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(c) Venue; Service of Process.--
       ``(1) Venue.--Any action brought under subsection (a) may 
     be brought in the district court of the United States that 
     meets applicable requirements relating to venue under section 
     1391 of title 28.
       ``(2) Service of process.--In an action brought under 
     subsection (a), process may be served in any district in 
     which the defendant--
       ``(A) is an inhabitant; or
       ``(B) may be found.''.

      TITLE II--UNITED STATES CENTER FOR SAFE SPORT AUTHORIZATION

     SEC. 201. EXPANSION OF THE PURPOSES OF THE CORPORATION.

       Section 220503 of title 36, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in paragraph (13), by striking ``; and'' and inserting 
     a semicolon;
       (2) in paragraph (14), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(15) to promote a safe environment in sports that is free 
     from abuse, including emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, 
     of any amateur athlete.''.

     SEC. 202. DESIGNATION OF THE UNITED STATES CENTER FOR SAFE 
                   SPORT.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 2205 of title 36, United States 
     Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

         ``Subchapter III--United States Center for Safe Sport

     ``Sec. 220541. Designation of United States Center for Safe 
       Sport

       ``(a) In General.--The United States Center for Safe Sport 
     shall--
       ``(1) serve as the independent national safe sport 
     organization and be recognized worldwide as the independent 
     national safe sport organization for the United States;
       ``(2) exercise jurisdiction over the corporation, each 
     national governing body, and each paralympic sports 
     organization with regard to safeguarding amateur athletes 
     against abuse, including emotional, physical, and sexual 
     abuse, in sports;
       ``(3) maintain an office for education and outreach that 
     shall develop training, oversight practices, policies, and 
     procedures to prevent the abuse, including emotional, 
     physical, and sexual abuse, of amateur athletes participating 
     in amateur athletic activities through national governing 
     bodies and paralympic sports organizations;

[[Page H634]]

       ``(4) maintain an office for response and resolution that 
     shall establish mechanisms that allow for the reporting, 
     investigation, and resolution, pursuant to subsection (c), of 
     alleged sexual abuse in violation of the Center's policies 
     and procedures; and
       ``(5) ensure that the mechanisms under paragraph (4) 
     provide fair notice and an opportunity to be heard and 
     protect the privacy and safety of complainants.
       ``(b) Policies and Procedures.--The policies and procedures 
     developed under subsection (a)(3) shall apply as though they 
     were incorporated in and made a part of section 220524 of 
     this title.
       ``(c) Binding Arbitration.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Center may, in its discretion, 
     utilize a neutral arbitration body and develop policies and 
     procedures to resolve allegations of sexual abuse within its 
     jurisdiction to determine the opportunity of any amateur 
     athlete, coach, trainer, manager, administrator, or official, 
     who is the subject of such an allegation, to participate in 
     amateur athletic competition.
       ``(2) Preservation of rights.--Nothing in this section 
     shall be construed as altering, superseding, or otherwise 
     affecting the right of an individual within the Center's 
     jurisdiction to pursue civil remedies through the courts for 
     personal injuries arising from abuse in violation of the 
     Center's policies and procedures, nor shall the Center 
     condition the participation of any such individual in a 
     proceeding described in paragraph (1) upon an agreement not 
     to pursue such civil remedies.
       ``(d) Limitation on Liability.--
       ``(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), an 
     applicable entity shall not be liable for damages in any 
     civil action for defamation, libel, slander, or damage to 
     reputation arising out of any action or communication, if the 
     action arises from the execution of the responsibilities or 
     functions described in this section, section 220542, or 
     section 220543.
       ``(2) Exception.--Paragraph (1) shall not apply in any 
     action in which an applicable entity acted with actual 
     malice, or provided information or took action not pursuant 
     to this section, section 220542, or section 220543.
       ``(3) Definition of applicable entity.--In this subsection, 
     the term `applicable entity' means--
       ``(A) the Center;
       ``(B) a national governing body;
       ``(C) a paralympic sports organization;
       ``(D) an amateur sports organization or other person 
     sanctioned by a national governing body under section 220525;
       ``(E) an amateur sports organization reporting under 
     section 220530;
       ``(F) any officer, employee, agent, or member of an entity 
     described in subparagraph (A), (B), (C), (D), or (E); and
       ``(G) any individual participating in a proceeding pursuant 
     to this section.

     ``Sec. 220542. Additional duties.

       ``(a) In General.--The Center shall--
       ``(1) develop training, oversight practices, policies, and 
     procedures for implementation by a national governing body or 
     paralympic sports organization to prevent the abuse, 
     including emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, of any 
     amateur athlete; and
       ``(2) include in the policies and procedures developed 
     under section 220541(a)(3)--
       ``(A) a requirement that all adult members of a national 
     governing body, a paralympic sports organization, or a 
     facility under the jurisdiction of a national governing body 
     or paralympic sports organization, and all adults authorized 
     by such members to interact with an amateur athlete, report 
     immediately any allegation of child abuse of an amateur 
     athlete who is a minor to--
       ``(i) the Center, whenever such members or adults learn of 
     facts leading them to suspect reasonably that an amateur 
     athlete who is a minor has suffered an incident of child 
     abuse; and
       ``(ii) law enforcement consistent with section 226 of the 
     Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. 20341);
       ``(B) a mechanism, approved by a trained expert on child 
     abuse, that allows a complainant to report easily an incident 
     of child abuse to the Center, a national governing body, law 
     enforcement authorities, or other appropriate authorities;
       ``(C) reasonable procedures to limit one-on-one 
     interactions between an amateur athlete who is a minor and an 
     adult (who is not the minor's legal guardian) at a facility 
     under the jurisdiction of a national governing body or 
     paralympic sports organization without being in an observable 
     and interruptible distance from another adult, except under 
     emergency circumstances;
       ``(D) procedures to prohibit retaliation, by any national 
     governing body or paralympic sports organization, against any 
     individual who makes a report under subparagraph (A) or 
     subparagraph (B);
       ``(E) oversight procedures, including regular and random 
     audits conducted by subject matter experts unaffiliated with, 
     and independent of, a national governing body or a paralympic 
     sports organization of each national governing body and 
     paralympic sports organization to ensure that policies and 
     procedures developed under that section are followed 
     correctly and that consistent training is offered and given 
     to all adult members who are in regular contact with amateur 
     athletes who are minors, and subject to parental consent, to 
     members who are minors, regarding prevention of child abuse; 
     and
       ``(F) a mechanism by which a national governing body or 
     paralympic sports organization can--
       ``(i) share confidentially a report of suspected child 
     abuse of an amateur athlete who is a minor by a member of a 
     national governing body or paralympic sports organization, or 
     an adult authorized by a national governing body, paralympic 
     sports organization, or an amateur sports organization to 
     interact with an amateur athlete who is a minor, with the 
     Center, which in turn, may share with relevant national 
     governing bodies, paralympic sports organizations, and other 
     entities; and
       ``(ii) withhold providing to an adult who is the subject of 
     an allegation of child abuse authority to interact with an 
     amateur athlete who is a minor until the resolution of such 
     allegation.
       ``(b) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed to limit the ability of a national governing 
     body or paralympic sports organization to impose an interim 
     measure to prevent an individual who is the subject of an 
     allegation of sexual abuse from interacting with an amateur 
     athlete prior to the Center exercising its jurisdiction over 
     a matter.

     ``Sec. 220543. Records, audits, and reports

       ``(a) Records.--The Center shall keep correct and complete 
     records of account.
       ``(b) Report.--The Center shall submit an annual report to 
     Congress, including--
       ``(1) an audit conducted and submitted in accordance with 
     section 10101; and
       ``(2) a description of the activities of the Center.''.
       (b) Conforming Amendment.--Section 220501(b) of title 36, 
     United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by redesignating paragraphs (4) through (8) as 
     paragraphs (6) through (10), respectively; and
       (2) by inserting after paragraph (3), the following:
       ``(4) `Center' means the United States Center for Safe 
     Sport designated under section 220541.
       ``(5) `child abuse' has the meaning given the term in 
     section 212 of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (34 
     U.S.C. 20302).''.
       (c) Technical Amendment.--The table of contents of chapter 
     2205 of title 36, United States Code, is amended by adding at 
     the end the following:

        ``subchapter iii -- united states center for safe sport

``220541. Designation of United States Center for Safe Sport.
``220542. Additional duties.
``220543. Records, audits, and reports.''.

     SEC. 203. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTING SANCTIONS FOR 
                   AMATEUR ATHLETIC COMPETITIONS.

       Section 220525(b)(4) is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``; and'' and 
     inserting a semicolon;
       (2) in subparagraph (F), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(G) the amateur sports organization or person requesting 
     sanction from a national governing body will implement and 
     abide by the policies and procedures to prevent the abuse, 
     including emotional, physical, and child abuse, of amateur 
     athletes participating in amateur athletic activities 
     applicable to such national governing body.''.

     SEC. 204. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR YOUTH-SERVING AMATEUR 
                   SPORTS ORGANIZATIONS.

       (a) In General.--Subchapter II of chapter 2205 of title 36, 
     United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the 
     following:

     ``Sec. 220530. Other amateur sports organizations

       ``(a) In General.--An applicable amateur sports 
     organization shall--
       ``(1) comply with the reporting requirements of section 226 
     of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. 20341);
       ``(2) establish reasonable procedures to limit one-on-one 
     interactions between an amateur athlete who is a minor and an 
     adult (who is not the minor's legal guardian) at a facility 
     under the jurisdiction of the applicable amateur sports 
     organization without being in an observable and interruptible 
     distance from another adult, except under emergency 
     circumstances;
       ``(3) offer and provide consistent training to all adult 
     members who are in regular contact with amateur athletes who 
     are minors, and subject to parental consent, to members who 
     are minors, regarding prevention and reporting of child abuse 
     to allow a complainant to report easily an incident of child 
     abuse to appropriate persons; and
       ``(4) prohibit retaliation, by the applicable amateur 
     sports organization, against any individual who makes a 
     report under paragraph (1).
       ``(b) Definition of Applicable Amateur Sports 
     Organization.--In this section, the term `applicable amateur 
     sports organization' means an amateur sports organization--
       ``(1) that is not otherwise subject to the requirements 
     under subchapter III;
       ``(2) that participates in an interstate or international 
     amateur athletic competition; and
       ``(3) whose membership includes any adult who is in regular 
     contact with an amateur athlete who is a minor.''.
       (b) Technical Amendment.--The table of contents of chapter 
     2205 of title 36, United States Code, is amended by inserting 
     after the item relating to section 220529 the following:

``220530. Other amateur sports organizations.''.


[[Page H635]]


  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Poe) and the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee) each 
will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.


                             General Leave

  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend 
their remarks and include extraneous material on S. 534, currently 
under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Texas?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 5 minutes.
  Mr. Speaker, I am pleased that today we are voting on S. 534, the 
Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization 
Act of 2017. This important legislation protects child athletes from 
both sexual and physical abuse.
  Over the past year, the Nation was horrified to learn of the decades 
of abuse that occurred within USA Gymnastics by Dr. Larry ``Lecherous'' 
Nassar. The middle name was added by me, Mr. Speaker. Last week, Nassar 
was sentenced to between 40 and 175 years' incarceration after pleading 
guilty to several counts of sexual assault.
  Over 150 women and girls gave victim impact statements. How a serial 
predator like Dr. Nassar could have preyed on so many young girls for 
such a long time in such a flagrant fashion is appalling.
  Our amateur gymnasts were failed. They were failed by the very people 
who are supposed to protect them and do no harm, as doctors are 
supposed to do.
  In the past weeks, we have not only seen Dr. Nassar brought to 
justice, but we have also seen many others held accountable for their 
roles of commission and omission associated with these atrocities. 
Though we are glad to see justice finally served in this case, we must 
take appropriate measures to prevent this from occurring again. This 
bill will do that.
  Under current law, the Victims of Child Abuse Act requires persons 
engaged in certain activities and professions on Federal lands or in 
Federal facilities to report child abuse. Failure to report could 
subject such persons to criminal penalties.
  This bill expands these mandatory reporting requirements to adults 
working at national governing boards, that is, amateur sports 
organizations recognized by the United States Olympic Committee, such 
as USA Gymnastics or USA Tennis, or at sanctioned events. The bill also 
charters a new organization called Safe Sport, tasked with preventing 
child abuse within the national governing bodies through education and 
handling reports of misconduct.
  Safe Sport will assure these national governing bodies abide by such 
policies and procedures to assure that predators like Dr. Nassar will 
never again be permitted to terrorize young athletes with impunity.
  I would like to thank Mrs. Brooks of Indiana for her hard work on 
this issue and for assembling a bipartisan team of cosponsors. 
Protecting our young people, including those who have sacrificed so 
much to represent the United States, such as Olympic athletes, is and 
should be a bipartisan undertaking.
  I commend my colleagues for their support, and I urge them to vote in 
favor of S. 534.
  Mr. Speaker, I have 133 victim impact statements of young women that 
were made at this sentencing, and I want to read just a few phrases 
from some of these strong athletes who had the courage to come forward 
and tell what Dr. Nassar did to them.
  The first one is from Donna Markham. Donna's daughter Chelsey was an 
athlete under the supervision of Nassar. She could not give a victim 
impact statement, and here is why, according to her mother, Donna: ``In 
2009, she took her own life. She couldn't deal with the pain anymore. 
Every day I miss her. It all started with him.''
  Danielle Moore: ``I hope being reduced to a prison number''--she is 
talking to Nassar--``will define you as it defined me for so many 
years. I will no longer be known as a number, and I will be Dr. 
Danielle Moore.''
  Megan Halicek: ``As I stand here, I still flash back to the feelings 
of fear, laying frozen in his office, my sweating, shaking body, 
adrenaline pumping, painfully clutching the sides of the table, waiting 
for the sick treatment to be over.''
  Gwen Anderson: ``I still remember him saying, `It's okay. I know 
you're not used to being touched there, but it will feel better.''
  And here is what Gwen's coach had to say, Thomas Brennan: ``For the 
record, go to hell. . . . What you did to everyone else who trusted you 
and sent girls your way is disgusting, reprehensible, unforgivable.''
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of S. 534, the Protecting Young 
Victims From Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017, but 
I thank my colleagues here in the House, Congresswoman Brooks and 
Congresswoman Frankel of Florida.
  In Michigan, there was a volcanic action. One might call it the 
``Nassar volcano.'' It acted, and there was no reaction. It was 
deadening silence. No one responded to the volcano that kept pouring 
poisonous lava in the way of young, beautiful athletes.
  I would hope and wish that I was not on the floor today with my 
colleague from Texas having to discuss this life-changing experience 
for these young athletes who wanted to do nothing else but to make 
their families proud first, maybe exceed, and be able to adhere to 
their faith, determination, and resolve and make their Nation, their 
State, their school proud of them, young girls, women, who, heretofore, 
Mr. Speaker, had been held back or told that this sport was not for 
them.
  I am reminded of the women's hockey team, and I heard a young hockey 
player indicate that her grandmother said that hockey was not for 
girls.
  All they wanted to do was to make us proud. All they wanted to do is 
to show the strength of women and the resolve of women. That is why I 
think this bill not only is important, Mr. Speaker, but it is timely to 
come today; but all of us would have wished, with no condemnation, that 
we had it 5 years ago or 10 years ago.
  But remember what I said: the volcanic action was faced with 
deafening silence, for those who knew and for the girls who wanted to 
make us proud thought that the best way to resolve it or to handle it 
was to embrace it, accept it, suffer, and still make us proud.
  That is why I believe this bill is crucial, and I am very glad to be 
on the floor with the two House sponsors, and I thank Senator Feinstein 
for her efforts, because this bill would prevent the sexual abuse of 
minors and amateur athletes by requiring the prompt reporting of sexual 
abuse to law enforcement authorities.
  This is a reasonable and important measure that is intended to 
protect young athletes--and listen to the sound of the volcano--from 
abuse and preserve the sanctity of sports associated with the U.S. 
Olympic Committee, the organization responsible for preparing and 
training young athletes who might one day represent our Nation 
competitively all over the world.
  How proud we are as we sit and view them on the Nation's televisions, 
the Summer Olympics and the Winter Olympics that are about to start. 
How shameful it is that we have to have this legislation to protect 
them and, as well, the deadening silence at Michigan State University 
and Dr. Nassar. I guess the only words that he could say are how 
ashamed and embarrassed and sorry he is.
  Eons and eons and eons of young women now live with that pain. 
Children deserve to fully enjoy the innocence of their youth by 
exploring the curiosities of the world, taking pleasure in the art, 
participating in sports free of abuse.
  Yes, I am going to defend the parents. I know some of them are overly 
eager. We have seen them at Little League, and we have seen them at 
football competition for little ones and middle school and high school, 
and they are overly enthusiastic. You can't condemn a parent for being 
proud of their child. And if that child wants to be engaged in sports, 
you can't condemn that parent for trying to get

[[Page H636]]

them the best doctor and best instructor. Those parents were not 
protected--deafening silence.
  Sexual abuse of children and youth is an abhorrent practice that is 
intolerable in any context, and we must take appropriate measures to 
eliminate it from youth sports. Young people look to adults to protect 
them and keep them safe. We all have a responsibility to do so. With S. 
534, we have an opportunity to ensure that individuals abide by this 
duty.
  Certain other professionals, such as doctors, dentists, social 
workers, psychologists, teachers, and daycare workers, are already 
bound by law to report suspected abuse to law enforcement. Finally, S. 
534 will require the same of adults who interact with young athletes in 
connection with sports activities organized by the national governing 
bodies of various sports.
  The urgent need for this legislation is best illustrated by the 
horrible abuse and exploitation of numerous young gymnasts at the hands 
of Dr. Larry Nassar, who victimized young athletes participating in USA 
Gymnastics over the course of 20 years--20 years, two decades.
  All of our hearts should break. In those 20 years, there were lives 
ruined. They will never be the vibrant, excited young women that they 
were as they entered this wonderful experience of showing their 
prowess, their genius, and their strength. The stories of abuse and 
suffering of these young women are heartbreaking.
  Many complaints of sexual and emotional abuse by Nassar and others 
went unreported for years, allowing coaches, instructors, and doctors 
to repeatedly victimize gymnasts as young as 6 years old. The shocking 
failure of anyone to report accusations to law enforcement or even keep 
track of complaints internally made it possible for some of these 
predators to commit multiple horrific acts over time. We entrust the 
care of our children and young athletes to those we hope will uphold 
the trust and not abuse it.
  One of the more than 150 girls and women victimized by Dr. Nassar was 
recently quoted as saying:

       He has everything he needs to be an incredible leader. He 
     has the personality, the skill, and the knowledge, and he's 
     using it to prey on people. What a waste.

  Last week, a Michigan judge sentenced Nassar to a prison sentence of 
up to 175 years. The judge called Nassar's assaults on scores of girls 
and women under the pretense that he was treating them as ``precise, 
calculated, manipulative, devious, despicable.'' She also indicated 
what a debasing human being he was and is.
  We must continue to do more to help protect our young athletes, and 
this bill will greatly assist in that effort. However, I must note a 
concern with a change the bill before us would make to the Senate-
passed version of S. 534.
  The bill unanimously passed by the Senate would authorize funding to 
be provided to the U.S. Center for Safe Sport in the amount of $1 
million for each of the next 4 years. Unfortunately, the version of the 
bill before us strips this funding authorization. I believe we should 
have taken up the Senate bill without amendment.
  Safe Sport is charged with important responsibilities under this bill 
with respect to receiving and investigating all allegations of abuse 
and setting policies to prevent future abuse, so this bill has taken 
out that language from the Senate.

                              {time}  1715

  It is critical that we ensure that the center is provided the 
resources for those things to be done immediately. By doing so, I hope 
we will prevent the type of abuse and suffering perpetrated by the 
people like Larry Nassar.
  In a recent open letter from the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians 
Association to athletes everywhere, they wrote:

       The goal of Olympianism is to place sport at the service of 
     the harmonious development of humankind, womankind, with a 
     view to promoting a peaceful society concerned with the 
     preservation of human dignity. Now we must ask: How can 
     athlete dignity be preserved when the responsible 
     institutions fail so in their oversight?

  In an apology letter to Team USA from the United States Olympic 
Committee issued last week, the committee admitted that they had failed 
these young athletes.
  Frankly, I believe that whole committee and system should be 
overhauled, reviewed, inspected, and changed. While the USA Gymnastics 
scandal is unfortunate, let it be an example and an incentive to 
prevent such abuse from happening in the nooks and crannies of this 
Nation, in the villages and cities and counties where young people who 
are starry-eyed and ready to accept the leadership of an adult are 
ready to show their proudness as well as their talent, their strength, 
and their resolve. I hope that we will never end that here in America.
  Mr. Speaker, accordingly, I encourage my colleagues to join me in 
supporting this important legislation. I hope we will see fit to fund 
it.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.
  Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the comments of my friend from Texas. Just 
so it is clear, I agree with her on the money. It should have been 
funded, but it was ruled an earmark, and we can't do earmarks anymore. 
We have to go through another process to get that funding. A good 
reason why we ought to have earmarks.
  Mr. Speaker, Amanda Barterian said this at the sentencing hearing: 
``I refuse to let Larry Nassar take anything more from here. He has 
already taken enough.''
  Nicole Walker said this at the sentencing hearing: ``I have anxiety 
and sleep disorders all because of what you''--Nassar--``did to me.''
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from Indiana (Mrs. 
Brooks), a former U.S. attorney.
  Mrs. BROOKS of Indiana. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Poe) for yielding me time.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this legislation, S. 534.
  I also want to thank my colleague from the other side of the aisle, 
the co-chair of the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues that I co-
chair, Representative Lois Frankel from Florida, for helping me get 
this bill to this point and for helping us support Senator Feinstein 
and Senator Thune as they move the bill in the Senate.
  In less than 2 weeks, over 200 American athletes will represent our 
Nation at the highest levels of sport in the 2018 Olympic Winter Games 
in PyeongChang.
  These athletes have prepared their entire lives for these games, and 
their performances are a result of countless hours of practice, self-
discipline, and sacrifice.
  Tragically, we have also learned that many of our young athletes have 
been subjected to sexual abuse at the hands of those who were supposed 
to be supporting them reach their Olympic goals.
  We have seen more than 156 women use their voices to share their 
agonizing stories of sexual abuse at the hands of a doctor they and 
their parents were told to trust, Dr. Larry Nassar.
  Their decision to publicly reveal their traumatic experiences is 
nothing short of heroic, and it was instrumental is ensuring that 
Nassar will never again touch another young athlete.
  Now, after a 2016 Indianapolis Star investigation exposed what is now 
known as the worst sexual abuse scandal in athletics to date, we are 
taking action to prevent this heinous action from ever taking place 
again.
  Today, the House will vote on the Protecting Young Victims from 
Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017. This 
bipartisanship legislation mandates training, increases requirements 
for reporting abuse, and reforms a broken system that has failed too 
many victims.
  This bill requires any individual who interacts with our amateur 
athletes to report suspected child abuse, including sexual abuse, 
within 24 hours. If they fail to do so, they will be held accountable 
by the new law.
  To prevent future emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, this bill 
designates the United States Center for Safe Sport to develop, 
implement, and enforce policies, procedures, and mandatory training for 
national governing bodies and their members.
  The center will ensure that, when reports of abuse are made, they are 
investigated. It protects those who report abuse from retaliation. As 
commonsense would dictate, it requires that, until the investigation is 
closed, an adult who is subject to allegations

[[Page H637]]

of abuse against a minor is prohibited from interacting with minors.
  As the Nassar sentencings come to a close and the Olympic games 
quickly approach, we are reminded of the importance of protecting the 
safety and well-being of all of our athletes.
  Today, we are strengthening protections for victims to ensure 
transparency and accountability, and putting the safety and the health 
of our athletes and every young athlete who has ever dreamed of the 
Olympic stage first.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for consideration of this bill and 
I urge my colleagues to pass the Senate bill.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Florida (Ms. Frankel), the cosponsor of the House bill, and I 
thank her for her leadership on these issues.
  Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank Mr. Poe and Ms. 
Jackson Lee for leading this debate today. And, of course, I want to 
thank Susan Brooks, my co-chair of the Congressional Caucus for Women's 
Issues, for her support. This is an example of bipartisanship at its 
best. And, of course, I also thank Dianne Feinstein over in the Senate, 
whose bill we are taking up, our companion bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the Protecting Young Victims from 
Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act. It is a long name, but 
it is important. It came about on the heels of reports of sexual abuse 
at the highest levels of USA Gymnastics.
  Me Too has come to the Olympics, and we have heard from more than 150 
very brave young women, extraordinary not only in their talent but in 
their courage, who have shared their harrowing stories of sexual abuse 
at the hands of a doctor, Larry Nassar, who they were told to trust.
  One of these stories is from Mattie Larson, who was a budding young 
gymnast and a future Olympic medalist. At age 14, she hurt her hip and 
was sent to Dr. Nassar, the well-known and now disgraced doctor who 
cared for hundreds of athletes like Mattie.
  Instead of healing her hip, he crippled her mind. For 5 years, this 
doctor molested this young woman. She became so desperate at one point 
that she feigned a slip and fall and a concussion just to try to get 
out of ever going back to the Olympic facility.
  Mattie said: ``. . . I just couldn't take any more abuse. I was 
broken. Larry, my coaches, and USA Gymnastics turned the sport I fell 
in love with as a kid into my personal living hell.''
  These children are children, like Mattie, who want to represent our 
country and who give up so much of their childhood, getting up early, 
practicing hard, on weekends going to competitions, and then only to be 
subjected to sexual abuse by the team doctor, and then either ignored 
or encouraged to keep silent.
  I say shame, shame, shame on those who enabled this.
  It may be too late to protect Mattie and Olympic stars like Aly 
Raisman, but this legislation, by requiring proper reporting and 
notifying procedures, will protect our future young athletes. I urge my 
colleagues to support this very, very good bipartisanship legislation.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, Katherine Gordon said this at the 
sentencing: ``Sexual assault is distant until you realize each girl in 
the news is a broken mirror.''
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. 
Bishop).
  Mr. BISHOP of Michigan. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of S. 
534, the Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport 
Authorization Act of 2017.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) for giving me 
this opportunity to speak.
  Mr. Speaker, last week was a tough week in my district and in our 
country. In a courtroom in Lansing, Michigan, 156 victims, one by one, 
bravely faced depraved sexual predator Larry Nassar to recount their 
personal story of unimaginable and despicable atrocities.
  As we now know, reports of sexual misconduct were routinely dismissed 
or flatly ignored by the management of USA Gymnastics. As a direct 
result, hundreds of young women, all of whom relied on these trusted 
professionals all around them, were sexually assaulted under the guise 
of medical treatment.
  The court did its part this week and sentenced Nassar to a maximum 
prison term where he will spend the rest of his life. But the 
investigation continues and others will be held accountable in days to 
come.
  For our part during this process, Members of Congress must do 
everything in their power to ensure that this never happens again. With 
that as our objective, I believe this bill takes a dramatic step in the 
right direction.

  Now, I must say in all candor, I stand before you today in absolute 
disbelief; disbelief in the layers of mismanagement that should have 
prevented this from happening, but also disbelief that it takes an act 
of Congress to ensure a congressionally chartered organization fulfill 
its obligation to care for and protect the young athletes with whom 
their parents have entrusted.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to join my constituents in offering our 
heartfelt prayers to the victims and their families for the nightmare 
that they have experienced.
  To all of you: Please know my colleagues and I will do everything in 
our power to be your strong advocate and to ensure justice.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to advocate and support this 
legislation
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, as we have listened to various speakers, I am glad that 
we are joined by men and women of the United States Congress. All of us 
have indicated the sadness in which we do this now.
  But I think it is also important to take note of the fact of 
individuals who have to be held responsible. We know that the president 
of the university was asked to resign, or in fact has resigned. As we 
go forward, there will be others as well.
  This should be the clarion call, even as this legislation is passed 
and signed by the President, for all of these agencies and associations 
that run sports for children to do their own vetting and internal 
assessment of individuals who are not there for the benefit of children 
but are there for the benefit of themselves.
  156-plus women were molested by this doctor. One of the victims said 
something that stops your breath. This could have been stopped in 1997, 
more than 20 years ago.
  So this legislation should move swiftly to the President's desk.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1730

  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman 
from Minnesota (Mr. Paulsen).
  Mr. PAULSEN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I 
thank the gentleman for his leadership as well as the author, Mrs. 
Brooks, for her leadership on this issue.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the Protecting Young Victims 
from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act. In the wake of the 
horrendous revelations of sexual abuse brought to the forefront by the 
recent USA Gymnastics case, it is clear that measures do need to be put 
in place to protect young athletes and keep them safe.
  No child should ever be put in the position of having their innocence 
robbed from them, which is why we need to have the highest protections 
of the law from those looking to exploit them and take advantage of 
their vulnerability.
  I would encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this 
bipartisan bill which will require amateur athletic-governing bodies to 
immediately report sex abuse allegations to local or Federal law 
enforcement and also to make it safe and easy for victims to report 
that abuse.
  As the Olympics approach, there is no doubt, we will all be reminded, 
unfortunately, of the recent sexual abuse case that took place with the 
gymnastics team. But this is our opportunity to take action, to do 
everything in our power to make sure that this does not happen again, 
and to protect all of our young and future athletes, giving them the 
confidence that they will never be put in a situation where an adult or 
someone who may have inappropriate intentions does not have the ability 
to do so.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.

[[Page H638]]

  Mr. Speaker, when I read the quote from the accuser who said this 
could have been stopped in 1997, the article's headline was that eight 
times Larry Nassar could have been stopped. Eight times. So it is 
important to take note of this legislation as a clarion call, and these 
words are most important.
  This provision makes it unlawful for an adult who is authorized by a 
national governing body, a member of a national governing body, or an 
amateur sports organization that participates in interstate or 
international amateur athletic competition to interact with a minor or 
amateur athlete at specific events to fail to report as soon as 
possible child and sexual abuse to local law enforcement or another 
agency.
  Many times members of the Judiciary Committee don't like wide nets. 
We have a responsibility to adhere to the Constitution. But we are the 
committee that has the responsibility of upholding the rule of law. And 
to all of those who are now in this wide net, that is the rule of law: 
to be able to protect our children against massive sexual abuse as they 
pursue their dreams.
  Just a comment, the requirement would arise on a person that learns 
of the facts that give reason to suspect that a child has suffered an 
incident of child abuse, including sexual abuse; and, therefore, those 
who can say or attempt to say, ``I couldn't understand what the child 
was saying; it wasn't clear,'' but if they got a sense that there was a 
problem, they come under that net. I believe that that is appropriate.
  Let me also indicate that there is a long list of sheroes who have 
been impacted by Dr. Nassar. My constituent stated, on January 16, a 
former Olympic gymnast who wowed the world, Simone Biles, said that she 
was abused by Dr. Nassar.
  The long list of Dr. Nassar's victims include U.S. Olympic gymnasts 
McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman, and Gabby Douglas. They represented the 
country and made us proud. And can you imagine? They were abused. Let 
me thank the many organizations that have worked hard to advance this 
legislation, including Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, RAINN, 
the Nation's largest antisexual violence organization. They have been 
magnificent.
  I include in the Record a number of letters, Mr. Speaker, because 
each day approximately 600 individuals are affected by sexual violence, 
most of whom are children or parents seeking support, and they are 
served by this organization.
  The first letter I include in the Record supporting this legislation 
is from RAINN, which urges the House of Representatives and others to 
pass this legislation so that it can move quickly into the position to 
be signed by the President.

                                                        RAINN,

                                Washington, DC, November 27, 2017.
     Hon. Paul Ryan,
     Speaker of the House,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. John Thune,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Susan Brooks,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Minority Leader,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Steny Hoyer,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Dianne Feinstein,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Lois Frankel,
     House of Representatives.
       Dear House and Senate Leaders: RAINN, the nation's largest 
     anti-sexual violence organization, urges the House of 
     Representatives to pass the Protecting Young Victims from 
     Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act.
       Every two minutes in America, someone is sexually 
     assaulted. Every eight minutes, that individual is a child. 
     The Senate-passed bill, which has RAINN's support and 
     reflects months of bipartisan work and deliberation, is an 
     important step forward in ensuring that young athletes can 
     train and compete in the safe environments they deserve. The 
     legislation strengthens and streamlines the process for 
     reporting abuse of amateur athletes, and requires officials 
     and coaches who work with prospective Olympians to undergo 
     training on sexual abuse.
       Survivors are reaching out to RAINN, which operates the 
     National Sexual Assault Hotline, in record numbers. There has 
     been a 21 percent increase in those contacting our hotline. 
     Each day, RAINN's victim service programs provide support to 
     approximately 600 individuals affected by sexual violence, 
     assisting a record 19,432 people in October alone. Many who 
     contact the Hotline are children or parents seeking support.
       We urge the House of Representatives to advance this 
     legislation, as passed by the Senate, without delay. Doing so 
     will demonstrate a commitment to ensuring young athletes who 
     dream of representing our nation at the highest levels can 
     achieve their goals safely and in a respectful environment.
       Thank you and please do not hesitate to contact RAINN with 
     questions or concerns.
           Sincerely,
                                        Rebecca W. O'Connor, Esq.,
                                  Vice President of Public Policy.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, every 2 minutes in America, someone is 
sexually assaulted; every 8 minutes, that individual is a child.
  Let me include in the Record a letter from the U.S. Olympians and 
Paralympians Association, and I would like to call out their names. 
These are all athletes: Dick Fosbury, track and field; Willie Banks, 
track and field; Allison Baver, speedskating; Carol Brown, rowing; 
Candace Cable, Paralympic track and field; Caryn Davies, rowing; Gary 
Hall, Sr., swimming; Micki King, diving; Carol Lewis, track and field; 
John Naber, swimming; Bill Toomey, track and field; Iris Zimmerman, 
fencing.

                                     U.S. Olympians & Paralympians


                                                  Association.

       An open letter from the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians 
     Association to athletes everywhere:
       We hear you.
       We have heard your many stories detailing the sexual and 
     emotional abuse you endured while training and competing in 
     pursuit of your goals and your dreams. We applaud your 
     individual and collective courage and conviction in coming 
     forward and telling all . . . and calling out those who 
     abused your trust.
       We are both appalled by the actions of those who hurt you 
     and deeply saddened by your suffering. For those whose 
     stories we haven't heard (and may never hear), we respect 
     your decision and your privacy . . . but also acknowledge the 
     pain you feel in silence.
       We are united in saying that there is no place for abuse in 
     sport--at any age, at any level, in any venue. As Olympic and 
     Paralympic alumni, we want you to know we are a family that 
     stands strong for the ideals of the Olympic and Paralympic 
     movements.
       When we, as athletes, returned from past Games, we shared 
     an understanding that ``The goal of Olympism is to place 
     sport at the service of the harmonious development of 
     humankind, with a view to promoting a peaceful society 
     concerned with the preservation of human dignity.'' Now we 
     must ask how can athlete dignity be preserved when the 
     responsible institutions fail so in their oversight?
       So what shall we do? We shall continue to advocate for 
     education and safe sport, to teach young boys and girls to 
     recognize the signs of abuse and provide a safe place to 
     speak without repercussion. Parents, coaches and trainers 
     need to be educated to recognize the signs and learn how to 
     behave properly in coaching situations. We shall support 
     Title IX, the U.S. Center for SafeSport and pending federal 
     legislation to protect our athletes.
       For any of you who are currently in need (or know someone 
     who is), the newly created and independent U.S. Center for 
     SafeSport is available for confidential 24/7 reporting and 
     crisis support:
       SafeSport.org
       24/7 SafeSport Crisis Helpline 866-200-0796
       We know the power of commitment to a belief and to goals; 
     our goal is that your experiences are never repeated. 
     Together, we shall seek to create a way of life based on the 
     joy of effort.
       Together in sport,
       United States Olympians and Paralympians Association 
     Executive Committee
       President Dick Fosbury--Track and Field, 1968
       Willie Banks--Track and Field, 1980/1984/1988
       Allison Baver--Speedskating, 2002/2006/2010
       Carol Brown--Rowing 1976/1980/1984
       Candace Cable--Paralympic Track and Field, 1980/1988/1992/
     1996, Alpine Skiing, 1992; Nordic Skiing,1994/1998/2002/2006
       Caryn Davies--Rowing, 2004/2008/2012
       Gary Hall Sr.--Swimming, 1968/1972/1976
       Micki King--Diving, 1968/1972
       Carol Lewis--Track and Field, 1980/1984/1988
       John Naber--Swimming, 1976
       Bill Toomey--Track and Field, 1968
       Iris Zimmerman--Fencing, 2000

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, likewise, I include in the Record a 
letter, dated November 16, 2017, from the CWLA, Child Welfare League of 
America, an organization that worked on this issue.


[[Page H639]]




                                                         CWLA,

                                Washington, DC, November 16, 2017.
     Hon. Paul Ryan,
     Speaker of the House,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. John Thune,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Minority Leader,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Steny Hoyer,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Dianne Feinstein,
     U.S. Senate.
       Dear Speaker Ryan, Leader Pelosi, Congressman McCarthy, 
     Congressman Hoyer, Senator Thune, and Senator Feinstein:
       The Child Welfare League of America, after months of 
     bipartisan work and deliberation, urges the House of 
     Representatives to pass the Protecting Young Victims from 
     Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act.
       This bipartisan legislation has now passed the Senate and 
     we firmly believe it will help to address some of the recent 
     reports of child sexual abuse that occurred against some of 
     this nation's finest young athletes while training for the 
     United States Olympic team. Based on past history and 
     reports, CWLA believes that stronger legislative action is 
     required so that this history does not continue to repeat 
     itself.
       Over these past several months we have been able to work 
     with key congressional offices to enhance the responsibility 
     and the accountability of U.S. Olympic organizations. Several 
     parts of this bill, including the authorization and funding 
     for the U.S. Center for Safe Sport, are critical to this 
     accountability.
       We hope the House of Representatives will act without delay 
     so parents and young athletes can live out their dreams of 
     competing on behalf of this country and do so with the 
     assurance they will be safe and respected.
       Thank you for your attention on behalf of children.
           Sincerely,
     Christine James-Brown,
       President/CEO, Child Welfare League of America.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record a letter from 
the DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence. They have worked along with 
RAINN and have emphasized that the Nation's youngest have been impacted 
by this dastardly series of actions.

                                          DC Coalition Against

                                            Domestic Violence,

                                Washington, DC, November 20, 2017.
     Hon. Paul Ryan,
     Speaker of the House,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Susan Brooks,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. John Thune,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Minority Leader,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Lois Frankel,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Steny Hoyer,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Dianne Feinstein,
     U.S. Senate.
       Dear Speaker Ryan, Leader Pelosi, Ms. Brooks, Ms. Frankel, 
     Mr. McCarthy, Mr. Hoyer, Mr. Thune, and Ms. Feinstein:
       The DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence urges the House 
     of Representatives to pass the Protecting Young Victims from 
     Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act.
       This bipartisan legislation is imperative to respond to the 
     numerous disclosures of child sexual abuse by our nation's 
     youngest and most accomplished athletes while they were 
     training for the U.S. Olympics. Intervention and prevention 
     measures through this legislation are desperately needed to 
     keep our children safe and hold offenders and entities 
     accountable for their actions and their silence. 
     Authorization and funding for the U.S. Center for Safe Sport 
     will be the first significant step toward this goal.
       We ask the House of Representatives to swiftly and 
     expeditiously pass this legislation to protect our young 
     athletes and show them they are valued and deserve to excel 
     in their chosen sport without fear of and violence from those 
     they trust.
       Thank you for your commitment to ending sexual abuse, 
     please do not hesitate to contact our office if we can be of 
     further assistance in this charge.
           Sincerely,
                                                    Karma Cottman,
                                               Executive Director.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record a letter from 
Professor Emeritus Howard M. Rubin from DePaul University who speaks 
about sexual abuse. ``My wife, Barbara Blaine, knew the lasting damage 
that is caused when a child is abused having been a child victim.''

                                                 DePaul University


                                               College of Law,

                             Chicago, Illinois, November 16, 2017.
     Re: SB.534/ HR 1973--Protecting Young Victims from Sexual 
         Abuse Act of 2017

     Senator Dianne Feinstein,
     Senator John Thune,
     Representative Susan Brooks,
     Representative Lois Frankel.
       Dear Lawmakers: I am writing to enthusiastically support 
     S.534/HR 1973 and to express my appreciation for your work in 
     drafting and advancing this legislation. In the wake of the 
     deluge of sexual harassment scandals breaking on a daily 
     basis, the American public is crying out for recognition of 
     women's rights, and the rights of victims of sexual abuse and 
     harassment.
       While there is no way to quantify the struggles of one 
     victim against another a young victim's childhood is 
     indelibly harmed by sexual abuse. My wife, Barbara Blaine, 
     knew the lasting damage that is caused when a child is abused 
     having been a child victim. For her entire adult life she 
     fought selflessly and tirelessly to ensure the safety and 
     well-being of survivors, to prevent children from suffering 
     abuse, and to hold accountable those responsible. Abusers and 
     their enablers utilizing their power and status as shields 
     against prosecution and retribution were dragged out into the 
     light of justice and accountability by Barbara's ceaseless 
     crusade as advocate.
       One of Barbara's passions was confronting unfair statute of 
     limitations. They protected abusers and punished young 
     victims unable to confront their abuse till later in life. 
     The language in S.534 that extends statute of limitations for 
     victims of child sexual abuse pertaining to federal crimes is 
     a tribute to her efforts.
       Barbara cast a bright light against the darkness, but 
     tragically, her flame was snuffed out far too soon. She left 
     this world suddenly and before she could finish her life's 
     work. It is upon us now to stoke the embers left in the wake 
     of that lifetime, that her legacy might live on forever 
     through S.534, and cast such a spark so as to permanently 
     light the way towards justice for those who have been abused.
       I would consider it an honor to be included in the list of 
     supporters for S.534.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Howard M Rubin,
                                               Professor Emeritus.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record a letter from 
the National Children's Alliance, which has been working with other 
advocacy groups and, again, has done longstanding work against child 
abuse, supporting this legislation.

                                   National Children Alliance,

                                Washington, DC, November 20, 2017.
     Hon. Paul Ryan,
     Speaker of the House,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     U.S. House of Representatives.
     Hon. John Thune,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Susan Brooks,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Minority Leader,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Steny Hoyer,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Dianne Feinstein,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Lois Frankel,
     House of Representatives.
       Dear Speaker Ryan and Leader Pelosi:
       Dear Congressman McCarthy and Congressman Hoyer:
       Dear Senator Thune and Senator Feinstein:
       Dear Congresswoman Brooks and Congresswoman Frankel: The 
     National Children's Alliance, in cooperation with numerous 
     other advocacy groups, encourages the House of 
     Representatives to pass the Protecting Young Victims from 
     Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act (S.534).
       Having recently passed the Senate, this bipartisan 
     legislation seeks to address the numerous reports of 
     childhood sexual abuse that have occurred against our 
     nation's young athletes. The recent press surrounding the 
     United States' Olympic trainees only serves to heighten the 
     need for a strong legislative response.
       The NCA's longstanding work on child abuse leads us to 
     believe that this legislation will increase the 
     accountability of U.S. Olympic organizations and help ensure 
     that incidences of this nature are not repeated. In 
     particular, authorization and funding for the U.S. Center for 
     Safe Sport is one of the critical provisions of this bill 
     that will actively enhance U.S. Olympic organizations' 
     responsibility in these matters. It establishes an office for 
     education and outreach to develop the appropnate training, 
     policies, and procedures to combat and prevent the emotional, 
     physical, and sexual abuse, of young athletes competing in 
     athletic activities sponsored by national governing bodies 
     and Paralympic sports organizations.
       We hope that the House of Representatives will take swift 
     action and stand with us in ensuring that our young athletes 
     are protected as they stave to compete on behalf of our 
     nation.
       Thank you for your consideration of our youth.
           Sincerely,

                                                Teresa Huizar,

                                               Executive Director,
                                     National Children's Alliance.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. CHILD USA: Let's End Child Abuse and Neglect said

[[Page H640]]

in a letter, which I include in the Record: ``This bill would shine 
much needed sunlight on the problem of abuse in sports. It will protect 
children in the future.''

                                                    CHILD USA,

                                                November 20, 2017.
     Hon. Paul Ryan,
     Speaker of the House,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. John Thune,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Susan Brooks,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Minority Leader,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Steny Hoyer,
     House of Representatives.
     Hon. Dianne Feinstein,
     U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Lois Frankel,
     House of Representatives.
       Dear Speaker Ryan, Leader Pelosi, Congressman McCarthy, 
     Congressman Hoyer, Senator Thune, Senator Feinstein, 
     Congresswoman Brooks, and Congresswoman Frankel:
       CHILD USA urges the House of Representatives to pass the 
     Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport 
     Authorization Act. This bill would shine much needed sunlight 
     on the problem of abuse in sports. It will protect children 
     in the future.
       The bill, as passed by the Senate, institutes important and 
     minimally necessary measures to ensure the protection of 
     children from abuse in sports: (1) mandatory reporting of 
     child abuse to SafeSport and the authorities. Many states do 
     not mandate such reporting and, therefore, the bill fills 
     that need; (2) a rule against retaliation for those who 
     report suspected abuse; (3) a limitation on coaches and other 
     adults from taking a child to a place that is not observable 
     by others; and (4) for the first time, makes amateur sports 
     organizations accountable for abuse of children. Taken 
     together, these are large steps forward.
       The epidemic of child abuse in the United States needs 
     Congress to lead the way on child protection with this bill. 
     Children deserve the protections of the Protecting Young 
     Victims Act and they need it now. Thank you for your efforts 
     for the protection of America's children.
           Sincerely,
                                                Marci A. Hamilton,
                                                              CEO.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I also include in the Record a letter 
from the United States Olympic Committee, dated January 24, 2018.

                              United States Olympic Committee,

                           Colorado Springs, CO, January 24, 2018.
       To Team USA: The athlete testimony that just concluded in 
     the Nassar hearings framed the tragedy through the eyes of 
     the victims and survivors, and was worse than our own worst 
     fears. It was powerful because of the strength of the 
     victims, survivors and parents, who so eloquently and 
     forcefully told their stories and so rightfully demanded 
     justice. The USOC should have been there to hear it in 
     person, and I am deeply sorry that did not happen.
       The purpose of this message is to tell all of Nassar's 
     victims and survivors, directly, how incredibly sorry we are 
     We have said it in other contexts, but we have not been 
     direct enough with you. We are sorry for the pain caused by 
     this terrible man, and sorry that you weren't afforded a safe 
     opportunity to pursue your sports dreams. The Olympic family 
     is among those that have failed you.
       I know this apology is not enough. We have been working on 
     taking steps at the USOC and mandating changes among National 
     Governing Bodies to ensure this does not happen again. Our 
     next steps will be these:
       1. We Must Change the Culture of the Sport. This was the 
     primary recommendation of the independent Deborah Daniels 
     Report on USA Gymnastics and the athlete testimony underlined 
     its importance. We heard athletes describe being unsure or 
     unaware of how to report abuse and to whom, and sometimes 
     even what constitutes abuse. We heard athletes describe being 
     afraid or discouraged from reporting abuse. We heard athletes 
     describe feeling hurt, betrayed, discounted and alone. Since 
     October of last year, we have been engaged in direct talks 
     with USAG leadership on this fundamental point. New 
     leadership at the board level is critical and you recently 
     saw three USAG board resignations. Further changes are 
     necessary to help create a culture that fosters safe sport 
     practice, offers athletes strong resources in education and 
     reporting, and ensures the healing of the victims and 
     survivors. This includes a full turnover of leadership from 
     the past, which means that all current USAG directors must 
     resign.
       2. We Must Change the Governance Structure of the NGB. We 
     need to help USA Gymnastics better support its mission, which 
     is to provide the best resources and safest environment for 
     athletes to train and compete. We have strongly considered 
     decertifying USAG as a National Governing Body. But USA 
     Gymnastics includes clubs and athletes who had no hand in 
     this and who need to be supported. We believe it would hurt 
     more than help the athletes and their sport. But we will 
     pursue decertification if USA Gymnastics does not fully 
     embrace the necessary changes in their governance structure 
     along with other mandated changes under review right now.
       3. We Must Know Who Knew What and When. The USOC has 
     decided to launch an investigation by an independent third 
     party to examine how an abuse of this proportion could have 
     gone undetected for so long. We need to know when complaints 
     were brought forward and to who. This investigation will 
     include both USAG and the USOC, and we believe USAG will 
     cooperate fully. We will make the results public.
       4. We Must Support Safe Sport Victims and Survivors. Team 
     USA safe sport assault victims and survivors need access to 
     testing, treatment and counseling. The USOC will devote 
     substantial funds to help provide these resources to victims 
     and survivors. We are working on the details of how this 
     funding will become available to athletes and will 
     communicate them soon.
       I hope that all members of Team USA remember that the USOC 
     ombudsman office is always available to provide free, 
     independent and confidential help to athletes with concerns 
     or questions about safe sport or other matters. Contact 
     information, along with other helpful athlete resources, are 
     here.
       In order to bring even more focus and urgency to these 
     important points, the USOC board of directors has mobilized a 
     board-level working group chaired by independent board member 
     Susanne Lyons.
       Finally, I invite any member of Team USA to communicate 
     with me or Ms. Lyons directly if there is more that you think 
     the Olympic family can or should be doing for you and your 
     families.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Scott Blackmun,
                                          Chief Executive Officer.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank Mr. Poe for his 
longstanding work on these issues, the two House cosponsors, and the 
Senator, and I want to end with, with that volcanic action, there was 
no reaction, a deafening silence. Let us, with the passage of this 
bill, begin the journey of commitment, along with our acknowledgment of 
the Me Too movement that we will never be silent again.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of S. 534, the ``Protecting Young 
Victims from Sexual Abuse Act''.
  This bill will help prevent the sexual abuse of minors and amateur 
athletes by requiring the prompt reporting of sexual abuse to law 
enforcement authorities.
  This is a reasonable and important measure that is intended to 
protect young athletes from abuse and preserve the sanctity of sports 
associated with the U.S. Olympic Committee--the organization 
responsible for preparing and training young athletes who might one day 
represent our Nation competitively all over the world.
  Children deserve to fully enjoy the innocence of their youth--by 
exploring the curiosities of the world, taking pleasure in the arts, 
and participating in sports--free from abuse.
  Sexual abuse of children and youth is an abhorrent practice that is 
intolerable in any context, and we must take appropriate measures to 
eliminate it from youth sports.
  Young people look to adults to protect them and keep them safe. We 
all have a responsibility to do so. With S. 534, we have an opportunity 
to ensure that individuals abide by this duty.
  Certain other professionals--such as doctors, dentists, social 
workers, psychologists, teachers, and daycare workers, are already 
bound by law to report suspected abuse to law enforcement. S. 534 will 
require the same of adults who interact with young athletes in 
connection with sports activities organized by the national governing 
bodies of various sports.
  The urgent need for this legislation is best illustrated by the 
horrible abuse and exploitation of numerous young gymnasts at the hands 
of Dr. Larry Nassar, who victimized young athletes participating in USA 
Gymnastics over the course of 20 years. The stories of abuse and 
suffering of these young women are heartbreaking.
  Many complaints of sexual and emotional abuse by Nassar and others 
went unreported for years--allowing coaches, instructors, and doctors 
to repeatedly victimize gymnasts as young as six years old.
  The shocking failure of anyone to report accusations to law 
enforcement, or even keep track of complaints internally, made it 
possible for some of these predators to commit multiple, horrific acts 
over time.
  We entrust the care of our children and young athletes in the hands 
of those we hope to uphold that trust and not abuse it.
  One of the more than 150 girls and women victimized by Dr. Nassar was 
recently quoted as saying, ``He has everything he needs to be an 
incredible leader. He has the personality . . . the skill . . . the 
knowledge. And he's using that to prey on people . . . what a waste.''
  Last week, a Michigan judge sentenced Nassar to a prison sentence of 
up to 175 years. The judge described Nassar's assault of scores of 
girls and women, under the pretense that he was treating them, as 
``precise,

[[Page H641]]

calculated, manipulative, devious and despicable.''
  We must continue to do more to help protect our young athletes, and 
this bill will greatly assist in that effort. However, I must note a 
concern with a change the bill before us would make to the Senate-
passed version of S. 534. The bill unanimously passed by the Senate 
would authorize funding to be provided to the U.S. Center for Safe 
Sport in the amount of $1 million for each of the next five years.
  Unfortunately, the version of the bill before us strips this funding 
authorization. I believe we should have taken up the Senate bill, 
without amendment. Safe Sport is charged with important 
responsibilities under this bill--with respect to receiving and 
investigating allegations of abuse and setting policies to prevent 
future abuse. It is critical that we ensure that the Center is provided 
the resources for those things to be done immediately and effectively.
  By doing so, I hope we will prevent the type of abuse and suffering 
perpetrated by people like Larry Nassar.
  In a recent open letter from the U.S. Olympians and Paralympians 
Association to athletes everywhere, they wrote: ``The goal of Olympism 
is to place sport at the service of the harmonious development of 
humankind, with a view to promoting a peaceful society concerned with 
the preservation of human dignity. Now we must ask how can athlete 
dignity be preserved when the responsible institutions fail so in their 
oversight?''
  In an apology letter to Team USA from the United States Olympic 
Committee issued last week, the Committee admitted that it had failed 
its young athletes.
  While the USA Gymnastics scandal is unfortunate, let it be an example 
and incentive to prevent such abuse from happening again.
  Accordingly, I encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this 
important legislation.
  The ``Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse Act'' is a necessary 
measure to ensure young athletes in this country are able to pursue 
their athletic dreams in safe environments, free of the fear of being 
victimized by predators.
  I thank the many organizations that have worked hard to advance this 
legislation, including Rape Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), 
the Nation's largest anti-sexual violence organization.
  I'd like to enter into the record a letter from RAINN, which 
indicates survivors are reaching out to its National Sexual Assault 
Hotline in record numbers, at a 21 percent increase.
  Each day approximately 600 individuals affected by sexual violence 
are served, most of whom are children or parents seeking support.
  For the foregoing reasons, I urge my colleagues to join me in 
supporting this bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask support of the legislation, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the gentlewoman from Texas, not only for 
her support of the legislation, but also for her long-time working on 
these issues of victims of crime, and her involvement in legislation in 
the past and in the future on matters such as this.
  This is not a happy event, Mr. Speaker. This legislation, as Mr. 
Bishop said, it is unfortunate that Congress had to get involved in 
this issue. Congress is going to get involved, and we are going to try 
to rectify the problems of the past and hold people accountable for 
crimes in the future.
  We are talking about the symbol of everything that is good, and 
right, and beautiful about America: these Olympics, the Olympians, and 
particularly the gymnasts who represent America; the training they go 
through; the zeal for which they represent our country and work. Yet, 
while all of that was going on, bad things were happening to them.
  Our gymnasts who just participated in the last Olympics, who won 
medals, gold medals, they endured abuse, yet they went forward to 
represent our country in the United States Olympics.
  People who harm those girls and other athletes, male and female, they 
need to be held accountable, not just Larry Nassar, but other people 
need to be held accountable. This is where law enforcement needs to be 
involved.
  Mr. Speaker, I am a former judge, and I want to commend the judge in 
this case, Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, for allowing all of these victims 
to testify in open court. They had the courage to come forward and tell 
very difficult things, things that are difficult for us to even listen 
to here on the House floor. They said it, and they wanted the criminal 
to know what he had done to them impacted them.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate the judge for allowing that, but 
also the sentence that she imposed. I want to read a few more of the 
statements, Mr. Speaker:
  Jessica Rodriguez: ``USA Gymnastics should be held accountable for 
each and every one of these acts of abuse they allowed to happen.''
  Taryn Look: ``I was still a child. . . . I wanted to end my life.''
  Mattie Larson: ``I was at the height of my career at 19, and the 
Olympics were just a year away, and I just couldn't take any more of 
the abuse. I was broken. Larry, my coaches, and USA Gymnastics turned a 
sport I fell in love with as a kid to my personal living hell.''
  Mr. Speaker, all of these brave Americans came forward and testified 
about what had happened to them. And we should--they are all Olympians 
for that. They all deserve the gold medal for what they did 
representing our country and their strength and their courage to 
testify in open court about what happened to them.
  The defendant, the convicted criminal, wrote a letter to the judge, 
Mr. Speaker, saying he couldn't take all of this abuse against him for 
having to listen to all of the statements by the victims. Are you 
kidding me? He is not the victim. He is the criminal, and he belongs in 
jail.
  He belongs in jail, as these victims have said, for the rest of his 
life, to keep him away from little girls. And I am glad that that is 
where he is going, but he is not a victim. Because of the mental abuse 
that he caused on victims of crime, he needs to remember what he has 
done. And I am glad that we have finally got this legislation passed in 
such a quick method. It is proof, Mr. Speaker, that we can work pretty 
fast, we also can work in a bipartisan manner, and we can also work 
with the Senate getting legislation that is important to America 
passed.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to read one last statement, and I include in the 
Record the 133 written statements that I have, subject to length 
limitation in the Record.

                        Statements by 133 people

       Kyle Stephens: ``Little girls don't stay little forever, 
     they grow into strong women that return to destroy your 
     world.''
       Jessica Thomashow: ``What you did to me was twisted. You 
     manipulated me and my family. How dare you.
       Donna Markham (Speaking on behalf of her daughter, Chelsey, 
     who killed herself 10 years ago.): ``In 2009, she took her 
     own life. She couldn't deal with the pain anymore. Every day 
     I miss her, every day. It all started with him.''
       Jade Capua: ``I am no longer broken by you. Every day I 
     grow a new strength and look into the mirror to see a strong, 
     unbreakable person. Nothing will ever take away what you've 
     done to me or to the others that started behind me. However, 
     we can walk free and radiate the strength that we've gained 
     from your horrific acts, something you will never be able to 
     do.''
       Alexis Moore: ``I don't like the word victim. I am a 
     survivor, but more so I am me. Those 10 years are a part of 
     my story. They have helped define who I am today.''
       Olivia Cowan: On Michigan State University and USA 
     Gymnastics:
       ``If they would have taken action when it was first 
     reported, they would have saved me.''
       Nicole Soos: ``I thought he was a famous doctor. There was 
     no way he would do anything inappropriately in front of my 
     mom. I was wrong.''
       Ashley Erickson: ``Today I can say I'm finally ready to 
     face you . . . Why did you do this? You were the adult, you 
     were the doctor.''
       Rebecca Mark: ``He molested me and he molested me with my 
     mom in the room.''
       Bethany Bauman: ``I am 100% confident, that if he had not 
     been caught, he would have continued to do this for the rest 
     of his life.''
       Kate Mahon: ``By publicly speaking out against Larry 
     Nassar, I'm not just speaking out for myself. I'm speaking 
     out for all the girls and women of the past, present, and 
     future that have been or will be affected by sexual 
     assault.''
       Danielle Moore; ``I hope being reduced to a (prison) number 
     will define you as it defined me for so many years. I will no 
     longer be known as a number, and I will be Dr. Danielle 
     Moore.''
       Melissa Imrie: ``Everybody's story that I listened to today 
     is just an echo of everything that I've went through. They're 
     just speaking like it's my voice.''
       Megan Halicek: ``As I stand here, I still flash back to the 
     feelings of fear, laying frozen in his office, my sweating 
     shaking body, adrenaline pumping, painfully clutching the 
     sides of the table, waiting for the sick treatment to be 
     over.''
       Jamie Dantzscher: ``There is no therapy, no cure for 
     monsters like you. You are pure evil.''

[[Page H642]]

       Brianne Randall: ``I was a 17-year-old that reported your 
     abuse to police in 2004. You used my vulnerability at the 
     time to sexually abuse me. I reported you to police 
     immediately and had a rape kit done . . . you had the 
     audacity to tell [police] I misunderstood the treatment 
     because I wasn't comfortable with my body. How dare you? 
     Sadly they took your word instead of mine.''
       Anna Ludes (video statement): ``I felt so special and lucky 
     that Larry Nassar would take the time to help me. But it 
     turned out that he was a molester.''
       Lindsey Schuett (video statement): ``If anyone deserves to 
     never see the light of day again it is this man.''
       Marion Siebert: ``You hindered the trajectories of our 
     lives that we and our parents worked so very hard for, and 
     changed the rest of our lives in ways that we're still 
     realizing and dealing with every day. This is what makes this 
     crime so heinous.''
       Katelyn Skrabis (statement read on her behalf): ``Nothing 
     can change what Larry Nassar did to me.''
       Taylor Stevens (statement read on her behalf): ``Because of 
     you my life has been forever changed. I have to live with the 
     fact that I am a victim of sexual assault.''
       Breanne Rata (statement read on her behalf): ``My only 
     relief is knowing my picture is no longer on the wall of your 
     Michigan State office.''
       Erin McCann: ``I was told over and over again how honored I 
     should feel for seeing Dr. Nassar . . . It was no honor. It 
     was disgust. It took more than it should have from me.''
       Jennifer Rood-Bedford: ``The road to healing looks steep 
     from where I am standing now, but I am a warrior.''
       Gina Nichols (on behalf of her daughter, Olympic hopeful 
     Maggie Nichols): ``You are not a real doctor. You are a 
     serial child molester, a pedophile.''
       Tiffany Lopez Thomas: ``I imagine hitting you if I ever had 
     the opportunity to see you again. Instead I will allow my 
     thoughts and my feelings to hit your heart.''
       Jeanette Antolin: ``You made me believe you were my friend. 
     I truly believe you are the spawn of Satan. There's no 
     therapy that will fix the evil that's deep inside you.''
       Kayla Spicher: ``I was sexually assaulted, but I was 
     unaware, not because I was naive, but because I was a 
     child.''
       Gwen Anderson: ``I still remember him saying, ``It's OK. I 
     know you're not used to being touched there, but it will feel 
     better.''
       Thomas Brennan (Gwen's coach): ``For the record, go to hell 
     . . . What you did to everyone else who trusted you and sent 
     girls your way is disgusting, reprehensible, unforgivable.''
       Amanda Thomashow; ``Larry, the thing you didn't realize 
     when you were sexually assaulting me . . . was that you were 
     building an army of survivors who would ultimately expose you 
     for who you are. From this rubble we will rise as an army of 
     female warriors.''
       Jaime Doski: ``I want to show my family how strong I am and 
     that I'm a survivor.''
       Jenelle Moul: ``I hope you are never able to walk outside 
     those [prison] walls as a free man. Most importantly I hope 
     all of the survivors you hurt are able to heal from the 
     damage you have done.''
       Madeline Jones: ``Before every appointment, I cried in the 
     bathroom. After every appointment, I couldn't wait to get 
     home and shower.''
       Amanda Barterian: ``I refuse to let Larry Nassar take 
     anything more from here. He's already taken enough.''
       Jennifer Hayes: ``You parted my legs and forcefully pushed 
     your dry fingers in my vagina . . . You had created a secure 
     world where you brainwashed everyone around you.''
       Nicole Walker: ``I have anxiety and sleep disorders all 
     because of what you did to me.''
       Chelsea Williams: ``He manipulated me with such ease, with 
     such finesse. This is perhaps what scares me the most about 
     him.''
       Stephanie Robinson: ``While I came to this stand as a 
     victim, I leave as victor.''
       Carrie Hogan: ``I am broken, I'm tired, I feel like life 
     has been desperately sucked out of me.''
       Helena Weick: ``This is not my shame anymore. It's yours.''
       Amanda Cormier: ``These things happened to me in his office 
     long ago were not short lived and uncomfortable moments. They 
     were lifelong traumas that changed the way I walk in the 
     world.''
       McKayla Maroney (statement read on her behalf): ``He abused 
     my trust. He abused my body and he left scars on my psyche 
     that will never go away. It all started when I was 13 or 14 
     years old. It didn't end until I left the sport.''
       Annette Hill: ``As your former patient, I trusted you, 
     Larry. You sexually abused me.''
       Aly Raisman: ``I will not rest until every last trace of 
     your influence on this sport has been destroyed like the 
     cancer it is.''
       Lyndsy Carr Gamet: ``I was a carefree silly little girl 
     until this happened and afterwards there was a cloud and the 
     cloud has followed me into every relationship in my life, 
     especially the most important ones.''
       Taylor Cole: ``This man has broken my world.''
       Jessica Smith: ``I'm mortified that I didn't understand 
     exactly what that meant at that time.''
       Arianna Guerrero: ``I am only 16. I should not even know 
     what an impact statement is. I shouldn't know what the inside 
     of a courtroom looks like. You have a hard time looking at me 
     now. But you didn't seem to have a problem when I was half 
     naked on your table.''
       Nicole Reeb: ``[Michigan State University's] response has 
     compounded my pain. I am frustrated and outraged at the 
     administration's inability to take responsibility for handing 
     over children and girls to a predator for almost 20 years. I 
     no longer bleed green.''
       Christine Harrison: ``You knew what you were doing was 
     wrong and you only asked for forgiveness because you got 
     caught.''
       Jessica Tarrant (recorded video): ``I wasn't even alive yet 
     the first time he sexually assaulted someone and I was only 
     one when he was first reported.''
       Brian Tarrant (Jessica's father): ``I just want to say, 
     Larry, you did nothing to defeat her.''
       Mary Fisher-Follmer (on behalf of her two daughters, 
     Katherine Payne and Maureen Payne): ``As you deteriorate in 
     prison, I want you to remember you lost.''
       Katie Rasmussen: ``No one did anything because no one 
     believed me. They didn't understand how such a respectable 
     doctor would do something like that. And I don't understand 
     how a 14-year-old could make that up.''
       Madeline Johnson: ``I realized the only way I could get him 
     to stop was if I lied and told him pain was all gone.''
       Chelsea Zerfas: ``I avoided going to practice when I knew I 
     had to see him . . . I felt like I couldn't breathe and I'd 
     tremble in fear.''
       Samantha Ursch: ``I'm not pretending it didn't happen 
     anymore. I'm just moving past it.''
       Kara Johnson: ``The framed photos of patients on his wall 
     told an incredible story of a doctor who could heal anyone.''
       Clasina Syrovy: ``When girls came forward and told an adult 
     the adults didn't listen. Why didn't they listen? What good 
     is it to teach children to tell an adult if the grown-up 
     doesn't listen, doesn't take action?''
       Brad Johnson (Kara and Madeline's father): ``Your story is 
     dark, sinister, and pure evil.''
       William Michell (Larissa's father): ``You sowed a 
     destructive black seed in my daughter's innocent mind and 
     body.''
       Amy Labadie: ``Come hell or high water we'll take every 
     last one of you down that could have stopped this monster.''
       Ashley Yost: ``That's something a 25-year-old shouldn't 
     have to do . . . sleep in their parents' bed because they're 
     afraid of a monster.''
       Marie Anderson: ``While his fingers were inside of me, he 
     would apply pressure to the outside of my lower abdomen and 
     massage the inside of my vaginal area.''
       Kassie Powell: ``You hid for years behind Olympic rings and 
     a Spartan [Michigan State University's mascot] head, but now 
     there is nowhere left for you to hide.''
       Doug Powell (Kassie's father): ``I want you to fear and 
     cry, and no one to listen. I want you to remain alive for 
     your eternal life in those [prison] walls.''
       Megan Ginter: ``I am done being ashamed of something that 
     was out of my control.''
       Katherine Gordon: ``Sexual assault is distant until you 
     realize each girl in the news is a broken mirror.''
       Katelynne Hall: ``What if someone would have taken the 
     abuse seriously?''
       Anya Gillengarten: ``I thought the things that Larry Nassar 
     did to me would send me to Hell.''
       Amanda McGeachie: ``MSU has failed to represent us; failed 
     to respect us; failed to take accountability for our safety. 
     After being a proud Spartum alum . . . I now feel ashamed to 
     have represented a school who will not take accountability.''
       Lindsay Woolever: ``You were in the best position to help 
     people but you chose to do the opposite.''
       Hannah Morrow: ``Life's handed me lemons, and you'd best 
     believe that I am well prepared to make lemonade.''
       Jordyn Wieber: ``Even though I am a victim, I won't live my 
     life as one. I am an Olympian.
       Alexis Alvarado: ``I was only a child when this abuse 
     started. I didn't know what he was doing was wrong.''
       Morgan McCaul: ``You violated the very principle of your 
     calling: Do no harm.''
       Trinea Gonczar: ``It's time for me to stand up for these 
     little girls and not stand behind you anymore. Goodbye, 
     Larry. May god bless your dark broken soul.''
       Larissa Michell Boyce: ``Today is a new day. Today I am 
     claiming my freedom from you. Today I am breaking free from 
     the chains you put me in 20 years ago. Today I am finally 
     free. I am standing here reclaiming the voice that you stole 
     from me. I am reclaiming my confidence. I am reclaiming the 
     power you took from me. I am reclaiming Larissa Michell, that 
     innocent girl you abused. I am no longer that little girl. I 
     am taking her back, I have the control now.''
       Bayle Pickel: ``How could you do something so horrible to 
     an innocent young girl?''
       Adam Boyce (Larissa's husband): ``It was and still is very 
     real for us.''
       Bailey Lorencen: ``While my mind heals and filters out the 
     evil sickness that you unwillingly bestowed upon my body your 
     mind will get darker and darker and you will hate yourself 
     almost as much as everyone hates you in this room right 
     now.''
       Valerie Webb: ``To all my sisters, we need to stand, fight 
     back and not rest until this mess is up mopped up; each and 
     every crumb.''
       Whitney Mergens: ``All I want is for this darkness to go 
     away. I don't want to look in

[[Page H643]]

     the mirror and have to convince myself that I'm okay. I want 
     to stand there and see a strong woman other than a damaged 
     one. Standing here today I know the light is near.''
       Marta Stern: ``I will no longer carry the weight of what 
     you did to me so long ago. The burden is yours.''
       Melody Posthuma-Vanderveen: ``We need to call out the 
     deeper issue at hand. We live in a society where action is 
     not taken when it's most needed.''
       Emma Ann Miller: ``[Michigan State University] is still 
     sending bills to my mom for appointments where I was sexually 
     assaulted.''
       Amanda Smith: ``I will not stop speaking until I am heard, 
     until we are heard, until things are changed.''
       Taylor Livingston: ``Everyone who continued to allow this 
     man, knowing full well what he was doing, is to blame.''
       Lindsey Lemke: ``Larry, I hope you . . . and all others 
     realize you've pissed off the wrong army of women.''
       Christy Lemke-Akeo (mother of gymnast Lindsey Lemke): 
     ``These girls had no idea this wasn't a medical procedure.''
       Krista Wakeman: ``You're a sick man, Larry. I hope you rot 
     in prison because that's where you belong.''
       Paula Daniels (on behalf of daughter Samantha Daniels): 
     ``When you lay down to sleep at night I want you to see every 
     little girl's face that you've abused. Hundreds of girls 
     Larry, innocent girls who trusted you--and know these little 
     girls are all grown-up now and I pray that they haunt you 
     every single day.''
       Alliree Gingerich (statement read on her behalf): ``Not one 
     day goes by where I don't replay the abuse my head.''

  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, here is what Natalie Woodland said: 
``I am strong, and I am beautiful, and I am bold, and no one, 
especially you''--Nassar--``can take that away from me. . . . While 
standing up here, I'm finally realizing that I'm not alone.''
  And she is not alone. We are on her side. We should be on the side of 
victims of crime, and this legislation will promote a better 
atmosphere: a lawful, good atmosphere for our gymnasts and other 
athletes to work in. The people who committed these crimes need to be 
held accountable, and society has started with the first culprit, Larry 
``Lecherous'' Nassar, and there should be more to follow.
  And that is just the way it is, Mr. Speaker. I yield back the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record the following 
statements from the Nassar trial:

       Megan Farnsworth (statement read on her behalf): ``He took 
     away something I can't get back. He took it 18 years ago when 
     he did his procedures, and again when I was adult and learned 
     what he had been doing.''
       Kourtney Weidner (statement read on her behalf): ``Through 
     these years I've experienced increase in anxiety and 
     stress.''
       Charla Burill (statement read on her behalf): ``You were 
     the doctor who would give me a hug, who seemed to 
     understand.''
       Lauren Michalak (statement read on her behalf): ``It makes 
     me feel disgusted that a man that was so respected in the 
     community could take advantage of a girl who was only in 8th 
     grade.''
       Sherry Bradley (mother of Vanasia Bradley): ``I am sick to 
     my stomach with disgust and betrayal.''
       Presley Allison: ``I was abused while my own mother was in 
     the room.''
       Kamerin Moore: ``You molested a little girl who had just 
     lost her father . . . you used my father's death as another 
     opportunity to manipulate the trust I put in you.''
       Catherine Hannum: ``What he did to me . . . is disgusting, 
     vile, and wrong. I am going to find my sense of self again 
     and it starts with this letter.''
       Jessica Chedler Rodriguez: ``USA Gymnastics should be held 
     accountable for each and every one of these acts of abuse 
     they allowed to happen.''
       Taryn Look: ``I was still a child . . . . I wanted to end 
     my life.''
       Mattie Larson: ``I was at the height of my career at 19 and 
     the Olympics were just a year away and I just couldn't take 
     any more of the abuse. I was broken. Larry, my coaches, and 
     USA Gymnastics turned the sport I fell in love with as a kid 
     to my personal living hell.''
       Whitney Burns: ``As this man's hands were touching places I 
     had never let any man touch, I told myself I could make it 
     one more second without the anger exploding inside me. `One 
     more second, Whitney, you can make it one more second.' ''
       Isabell Hutchins (statement read on her behalf): ``I 
     couldn't accept the fact that it happened to me and I was in 
     denial for a long time.''
       Natalie Woodland: ``I am strong, and I am beautiful, and I 
     am bold, and no one, especially not you can take that away 
     from me . . . While standing up here I'm finally realizing 
     that I'm not alone.''
       Jillian Swinehart: ``You have to be the most sick and 
     twisted person ever to do that to young girls.''
       Anne Swinehart (Jillian's mother): ``To think, I let this 
     happen to my child while I was sitting right there.''
       Alison Chauvette: ``He was in no way treating my body. He 
     was, however using his position, manipulating me as a person 
     changing the person I was, preying on me, a young girl, to 
     fulfil his sick fantasies.''
       Anna Dayton: ``You were supposed to be the good guy. 
     Instead you used your power and your authority to take 
     advantage of me, to take away my trust, and strip me of my 
     innocence.''
       Olivia Venuto (statement read on her behalf): ``I know that 
     we will overcome this.''
       Sarah (no last name provided): ``By coming forward, we 
     victims of Larry Nassar can help see that justice is 
     served.''
       Kristen Thelen: ``In that moment of terror and confusion, I 
     completely froze.''
       Alexandra Romano (statement read by her sister Danielle 
     Romano): ``The pain is just beginning for you. You disgust me 
     and everyone else in this world and like many other girls 
     said, today is the last day you are anything to me. You are a 
     sad excuse for a human being and from now on you're dead to 
     us.''
       Jessica Howard (statement read on her behalf): ``My mother 
     blames herself.''
       Arianna Castillo: ``He told me I had to go through pain in 
     order to be successful in the sport.''
       Selena Brennan: ``Today is your time to face me. I want you 
     to continue to look at me while I speak because that is the 
     attention I deserve . . . I want you to know you have not 
     defeated me.''
       Kaylee McDowell: ``My body is scarred by you . . . You 
     covered me with your illness and I will be contaminated by 
     you for the rest of my life.''
       Emily Morales: ``He would rub one hand up and down my leg 
     and butt as the other ungloved hand penetrated me . . . He 
     talked about how my muscles were so tight.''
       Abigail Mealy: ``The final level of your horrible pyramid 
     of lies is when I had to lie on a table in your basement next 
     to your lit fireplace and your children's toys surrounding me 
     while you 'treated' me for my back problems.''
       Ashley Bremer: ``He was only acting as my friend to gain my 
     trust.''
       Brooke Hylek: ``All I ever wanted to do was feel better and 
     go back to the sport I loved without any pain.''
       Abigayle Bergeron: ``I was a victim of Larry Nassar but I 
     will not let that define me.''
       Emily Meinke: ``My initial gut reaction was to question the 
     technique . . . I couldn't help but wonder how inserting his 
     bare fingers in my vagina was supposed to make my pain 
     disappear. Since I hadn't even had my period yet I assumed it 
     was my vagina but I really didn't know for sure.''
       Morgan Valley (statement read by her mother, Dawn Valley): 
     ``This so-called doctor took advantage of my pain and my 
     innocence.''
       Marty Valley (father of Morgan Valley): ``We're overcome by 
     anger and guilt for not protecting our beautiful, precious 
     daughter. As difficult as it is for us as parents, we know 
     it's nothing compared to what these young women are going 
     through.''
       Christina Barba: ``We know that a single candle can light a 
     dark room. Imagine what all these flames can do. We will not 
     live in darkness. We will burn brightly. To all the abuses 
     and predators and harassers and enablers, we will burn your 
     pedestals and hiding places to the ground. All your darkest 
     secrets will be brought to light. We are strong and will not 
     let you snuff out our light. We will burn brightly and not 
     with hate but with hope.''
       Makayla Thrush: ``Nobody should ever have to question their 
     doctor, especially one who was the doctor for the US Olympic 
     team.''
       Sterling Riethman: ``Larry did not violate Jane Doe. He did 
     not sexually assault Jane Doe . . . he violated real girls 
     and real women. Well, those little girls are here today and 
     we said it before and we'll say it again, time's up. The 
     truth will come out.''
       Kaylee Lorincz: ``You made a critical mistake. You 
     underestimated the mind, power, and will of your victims, 
     these accomplished athletes.''
       Rachael Denhollander (Her testimony to the IndyStar began 
     the legal case): ``I can call what you did evil and wicked 
     because it was . . . I can call it evil because I know what 
     goodness is. And this is why I pity you.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Poe) that the House suspend the rules and 
pass S. 534, as amended.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds 
being in the affirmative, the ayes have it.
  Mr. POE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this motion will be postponed.

[[Page H644]]

  

                          ____________________