NATIONAL GEOLOGIC MAPPING ACT REAUTHORIZATION ACT; Congressional Record Vol. 164, No. 179
(House of Representatives - November 13, 2018)

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[Pages H9475-H9476]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




           NATIONAL GEOLOGIC MAPPING ACT REAUTHORIZATION ACT

  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill (H.R. 4033) to reauthorize the National Geologic Mapping Act of 
1992.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 4033

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``National Geologic Mapping 
     Act Reauthorization Act''.

     SEC. 2. REAUTHORIZATION OF NATIONAL GEOLOGIC MAPPING ACT OF 
                   1992.

       (a) Reauthorization.--
       (1) In general.--Section 9(a) of the National Geologic 
     Mapping Act of 1992 (43 U.S.C. 31h(a)) is amended by striking 
     ``2018'' and inserting ``2023''.
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 4(b)(1) of the National 
     Geologic Mapping Act of 1992 (43 U.S.C. 31c(b)(1)) is amended 
     by striking ``Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009'' 
     each place it appears in subparagraphs (A) and (B) and 
     inserting ``National Geologic Mapping Act Reauthorization 
     Act''.
       (b) Geologic Mapping Advisory Committee.--Section 5(a)(3) 
     of the National Geologic Mapping Act of 1992 (43 U.S.C. 
     31d(a)(3)) is amended by striking ``Associate Director for 
     Geology'' and inserting ``Associate Director for Core Science 
     Systems''.
       (c) Clerical Amendments.--Section 3 of the National 
     Geologic Mapping Act of 1992 (43 U.S.C. 31b) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (4), by striking ``section 6(d)(3)'' and 
     inserting ``section 4(d)(3)'';
       (2) in paragraph (5), by striking ``section 6(d)(1)'' and 
     inserting ``section 4(d)(1)''; and
       (3) in paragraph (9), by striking ``section 6(d)(2)'' and 
     inserting ``section 4(d)(2)''.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Colorado (Mr. Lamborn) and the gentlewoman from Hawaii (Ms. Hanabusa) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Colorado.

[[Page H9476]]

  



                             General Leave

  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and 
include extraneous materials on the bill under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Colorado?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I am proud to sponsor H.R. 4033, the National Geologic 
Mapping Act Reauthorization Act. This commonsense measure will continue 
funding for advanced digital geologic maps in three-dimensional models 
by reauthorizing funding for the program through 2023. An identical 
companion bill, S. 1787, was introduced in the Senate by Senator 
Murkowski and has been favorably reported out of the Senate Energy and 
Natural Resources Committee.
  Geologic maps provide valuable information needed for identifying 
energy, mineral, and water resources, geologic and environmental 
hazards, unstable grounds subject to landslides, swelling soils, 
floodplains, and abandoned mine lands.
  With this knowledge, communities and citizens are able to plan for 
septic systems in rural areas, water treatment facilities, road 
construction and maintenance, home construction, and other 
infrastructure.
  The Geologic Mapping Act of 1992 established the National Cooperative 
Geologic Mapping Program, or NCGMP. This program allows for 
coordination between the United States Geological Survey and the 
various state geological surveys, allowing for geologic maps to be 
produced efficiently and cost-effectively.
  The original authorizing act also created the National Geologic 
Database, which catalogs data on most geologic maps ever produced in 
the U.S., which to date has resulted in more than 100,000 products.
  Each State and Puerto Rico has an advisory committee and a review 
panel to analyze the effectiveness of these projects. More than 8,500 
new geologic maps have been produced through the NCGMP, with an average 
of 350 new maps and reports created each year. That is about one a day. 
About 53 percent of the United States now has been mapped as a result.
  The benefits from this program have been felt by end users across the 
country. Geologic maps in Kentucky, for example, have assisted city 
planners, water systems developers, and producers of coal and other 
mineral resources. In Ohio, developers and engineers who used geologic 
maps were estimated to save an average of $50,000 on each project. In 
my home State of Colorado, this program resulted in the production of 
an advanced geologic map and companion report that showcased 
recreational and historical mining, leading to efficiency opportunities 
from Leadville to Salida.
  Reauthorizing the National Geologic Mapping Act through H.R. 4033 
will continue to provide the economic and developmental benefits of 
geologic mapping, with effects enjoyed across the Nation.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge adoption of the measure and I reserve the balance 
of my time.
  Ms. HANABUSA. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 4033, and I 
yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. 
Brown) to give his remarks.
  Mr. BROWN of Maryland. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague, the 
gentlewoman from Hawaii (Ms. Hanabusa).
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 4033, the National Geologic 
Mapping Act Reauthorization Act, a bipartisan, practical piece of 
legislation.
  I am proud to have cosponsored this bill with my friend from Colorado 
and colleague on the Natural Resources Committee, Congressman Lamborn.
  Our bill would reauthorize the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping 
Program for an additional 5 years, which is the primary source of funds 
to produce geologic maps in the United States.
  Even though most people are not familiar with geologic maps, it is 
hard to overstate their importance.
  Geologic maps are essential in supporting a variety of industries, 
services, and activities that hold immense societal and economic value.

                              {time}  1600

  Geologic maps are used to locate groundwater resources and evaluate 
groundwater quality leading to better land and habitat management 
decisions.
  Geologic maps help city planners, emergency responders, and 
landowners assess how vulnerable an area is to sinkholes, landslides, 
earthquakes, floods, and other deadly and destructive natural hazards.
  Geologic maps enable the government and industry to locate and 
develop mineral resources used for a variety of scientific applications 
and in military technology and in consumer products.
  Further, geologic maps provide valuable information that engineers 
and developers use when designing and constructing highways, bridges, 
tunnels, and other transportation assets.
  In my home State of Maryland, the value and importance of geologic 
maps are evident. Even though Maryland is a compact State, it has an 
incredible variety of landscapes and geology stretching from the 
beaches on the Atlantic Coast to the Appalachian Mountains.
  This type of diversity in our geology demands a robust understanding 
of the science and an extensive mapping of underground formations.
  On top of this, Maryland is home to several institutions that rely on 
the secondary and tertiary benefits of the USGS geologic mapping 
program. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Prince George's 
County, the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, and our military 
cyber operations in Fort Meade all reap the rewards of a Nation that 
has broadened its knowledge and capabilities by investing in geological 
mapping.
  There is no doubt the U.S. mapping program is vital to our Nation's 
safety and prosperity, and I urge a vote in favor.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague and friend across the 
aisle, Mr. Brown, for his work on this bill. It was a good 
collaboration. I appreciate his remarks tonight, and I appreciate what 
he did. I look forward to working with him in the future.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. HANABUSA. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  This bill would extend the tenure of a very successful bedrock 
science program for an additional 5 years, as well as make some 
technical changes to the law.
  Since 1992, the National Geologic Mapping Act has supported geologic 
mapping in the United States through the establishment of the National 
Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, or NCGMP. The NCGMP is 
responsible for supporting geologic mapping within the United States 
and has done so successfully for over 25 years by supporting efforts at 
the Federal, State, and university levels.
  Geologic maps are used in several important ways: mineral, energy, 
and water resource exploration; geoscience research; toxic and nuclear 
waste disposal; environmental land use planning; decreasing the impact 
of natural hazards; constructing and maintaining infrastructure; and 
much more.
  Reliable and accurate geologic mapping is underappreciated by, and in 
most cases invisible to, the public, but it underpins huge sectors of 
our economy and is essential for improving the health and safety of 
every American.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank Representatives Lamborn and Brown for their work 
on this bill and am happy to voice my support of it.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Simpson). The question is on the motion 
offered by the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Lamborn) that the House 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 4033.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

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