MOTION TO INSTRUCT CONFEREES ON H.R. 2, AGRICULTURE AND NUTRITION ACT OF 2018; Congressional Record Vol. 164, No. 121
(House of Representatives - July 18, 2018)

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[Pages H6493-H6495]
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 MOTION TO INSTRUCT CONFEREES ON H.R. 2, AGRICULTURE AND NUTRITION ACT 
                                OF 2018

  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to take from the 
Speaker's table the bill (H.R. 2) to provide for the reform and 
continuation of agricultural and other programs of the Department of 
Agriculture through fiscal year 2023, and for other purposes, with the 
Senate amendment thereto, disagree to the Senate amendment, and request 
a conference with the Senate thereon.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Texas?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to instruct conferees at 
the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Peterson moves that the managers on the part of the 
     House at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two 
     Houses on Senate amendment to the bill H.R. 2 (an Act to 
     provide for the reform and continuation of agricultural and 
     other programs of the Department of Agriculture through 
     fiscal year 2023, and for other purposes) be instructed to 
     insist on section 11101 of the House bill (relating to animal 
     disease preparedness and response) with an amendment to 
     section 10417(d)(1)(B) of the Animal Health Protection Act (7 
     U.S.C. 8316(d)(1)(B)), as proposed to be added to such Act by 
     such section 11101, to strike ``2023'' and insert 
     ``thereafter''.

  Mr. PETERSON (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
consent that the reading be dispensed with.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Minnesota?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 7 of rule XXII, the 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Peterson) and the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Conaway) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Minnesota.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, we have a lot of anxiety out in the countryside because 
of trade, because of RFS, because of low prices, and because of weather 
in my area. What we are trying to do here is avoid another potential 
problem, and that is what can happen with an animal disease outbreak in 
this country.
  In Minnesota, we suffered the biggest animal disease outbreak we have 
ever seen in this country when we got avian influenza in our turkey 
flock. It was devastating. The producers lost $113 million. We lost $3 
billion in the country, and we saw the effect of not being prepared.
  This isn't just a poultry problem. This also relates to foot-and-
mouth disease, to PEDv, to cattle fever tick that Congressman Vela has 
informed me about, and to other diseases that present a serious threat 
for the viability of the livestock operations in the communities and 
supply chains across the country that depend on them.
  In the House bill, we have a provision for $450 million of permanent 
funding over 5 years for programs, including the National Animal Health 
Laboratory Network, the National Animal Disease Preparedness and 
Response Program, and the National Animal Vaccine Bank. The Senate 
provides an authorization for appropriations, but there is no permanent 
funding in the Senate bill.
  While the appropriations committees deserve credit because they have 
put some funding into these programs over the years, the problem is 
that APHIS and the people who deal with this at the State level can't 
depend on it because you never know what it is going to be from year to 
year because the appropriators are the ones who have to decide. We want 
to make this permanent, and we are hoping that the Senate will accede 
to our ideas.
  Animal disease programs are important investments in the health of 
our Nation's animals, our people, and the security of our food supply. 
As part of their work on the farm bill, conferees should insist on 10-
year mandatory funding for animal disease preparedness and response 
programs to provide the certainty for both the farmers, for the 
consumers, and for the people who deal with this at the regulatory 
level.
  Mr. Speaker, I include my full statement in the Record.
  The mood in farm country is bad. It's bad because of the 
Administration's trade war; it's

[[Page H6494]]

bad because of declines in farm income; and it's bad because of 
volatile weather like the floods in the southern part of my district. 
Farmers and ranchers are staring a historically bad year in the face, 
and another hit would mean devastation for many of them.
  And that's exactly what an animal disease outbreak would cause. 
Minnesota is the nation's largest producer of turkeys. Following an 
outbreak of avian influenza in 2013 and 2014, it is estimated that 
poultry producers in my state lost $113 million in existing production, 
approximately $3 billion nationally, and it cost taxpayers almost $1 
billion.
  Hungry consumers are affected too. The price of a dozen eggs in 2015 
was double what it was before the outbreak.
  This isn't just a poultry problem. Foot and Mouth Disease, PEDv, 
Cattle Fever Tick and other diseases present a serious threat to the 
viability of livestock operations and the communities and supply chains 
across the country that depend on them. Outbreaks mean culling animals 
and suspending production, and because fewer animals come into 
processing facilities, layoffs in local communities.
  Disease outbreaks also impact farmers who grow feed. One study 
estimates that a future outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease could cost 
corn growers $44 billion and soybean growers nearly $25 billion. And 
there's a national security aspect to animal disease preparedness. The 
bipartisan Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense found that our current 
commitment to animal disease outbreaks leaves us vulnerable to attack 
on our food supply.
  If we are serious about addressing these outbreaks, we must invest in 
preparation and response tools to tackle these diseases early. That 
level of effort is impossible without long-term funding certainty.
  Currently, the House bill provides $450 million in mandatory funding 
over five years for programs including the National Animal Health 
Laboratory Network, the National Animal Disease Preparedness and 
Response Program, and the National Animal Vaccine Bank. The Senate 
provides an authorization for appropriations, but no mandatory funding. 
While the Appropriations Committees deserve credit for providing some 
funding for these programs in their bills, animal health is not a 
short-term issue or an issue we should short change. APHIS, state 
officials, and producers need to know that adequate funding for these 
programs is going to be available for their work to pay off.
  Animal disease programs are important investments in the health of 
our nation's animals, our people, and the security of our food supply. 
As part of their work on the farm bill, conferees should insist on ten-
year, mandatory funding for Animal Disease Preparedness and Response 
Programs to provide the certainty that both farmers and consumers need. 
I am submitting for the Record a letter in support of these provisions 
from the Animal Agriculture Coalition, which represents livestock 
producers and animal health professionals nationwide.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support the motion to instruct, 
and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, the ranking member's motion is very much in the spirit 
of the House position. I am really appreciative of that. Quite frankly, 
it makes our bill better.
  H.R. 2 makes the historic commitment to protecting our Nation's 
livestock herd and, frankly, our national security by establishing and 
funding forward-looking animal health initiatives that address existing 
and emerging pest and disease threats.
  Mr. Speaker, I look forward to continuing this discussion in 
conference, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to support the motion, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CONAWAY. Mr. Speaker, I appreciate my colleague's motion, and I 
ask Members to support it.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate has expired.
  Without objection, the previous question is ordered on the motion to 
instruct.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to instruct.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mr. PETERSON. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, this 15-
minute vote on the motion to instruct will be followed by 5-minute 
votes on:
  Suspending the rules and adopting H. Res. 990;
  Suspending the rules and passing H.R. 1037;
  Ordering the previous question on H. Res. 1001; and
  Adopting H. Res. 1001, if ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 392, 
nays 20, not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 336]

                               YEAS--392

     Abraham
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Amodei
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Banks (IN)
     Barletta
     Barr
     Barragan
     Barton
     Beatty
     Bera
     Bergman
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (MI)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blum
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Capuano
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Coffman
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Comstock
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Costello (PA)
     Courtney
     Cramer
     Crawford
     Crist
     Crowley
     Cuellar
     Culberson
     Cummings
     Curbelo (FL)
     Curtis
     Davidson
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny
     Davis, Rodney
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     Delaney
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Demings
     Denham
     DeSaulnier
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Donovan
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duffy
     Duncan (TN)
     Dunn
     Ellison
     Emmer
     Engel
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Estes (KS)
     Esty (CT)
     Evans
     Faso
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx
     Frankel (FL)
     Frelinghuysen
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallagher
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Gowdy
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green, Al
     Green, Gene
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Guthrie
     Gutierrez
     Handel
     Harper
     Hartzler
     Hastings
     Heck
     Hensarling
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (LA)
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill
     Himes
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga
     Hultgren
     Hunter
     Hurd
     Issa
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Jenkins (KS)
     Jenkins (WV)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson, E. B.
     Johnson, Sam
     Joyce (OH)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kihuen
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Knight
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Lance
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee
     Lesko
     Levin
     Lewis (GA)
     Lewis (MN)
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Love
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan Grisham, M.
     Lujan, Ben Ray
     Lynch
     MacArthur
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marino
     Marshall
     Mast
     Matsui
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     McNerney
     McSally
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Messer
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Newhouse
     Noem
     Nolan
     Norcross
     Norman
     Nunes
     O'Halleran
     O'Rourke
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pascrell
     Paulsen
     Payne
     Pearce
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Pingree
     Pittenger
     Pocan
     Poe (TX)
     Poliquin
     Polis
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reichert
     Renacci
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Roe (TN)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rohrabacher
     Rooney, Francis
     Rooney, Thomas J.
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Rosen
     Roskam
     Ross
     Rothfus
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce (CA)
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Russell
     Rutherford
     Ryan (OH)
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Sewell (AL)
     Shea-Porter
     Sherman
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sinema
     Sires
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Smucker
     Soto
     Stefanik
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Taylor
     Tenney
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres
     Trott
     Tsongas
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Walters, Mimi
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters, Maxine
     Watson Coleman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall

[[Page H6495]]


     Yarmuth
     Yoder
     Yoho
     Young (AK)
     Young (IA)
     Zeldin

                                NAYS--20

     Amash
     Biggs
     Brat
     Brooks (AL)
     Garrett
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Griffith
     Harris
     Hice, Jody B.
     Jones
     Jordan
     Kelly (MS)
     Labrador
     Massie
     McClintock
     Perry
     Posey
     Rokita
     Sanford

                             NOT VOTING--16

     Bass
     Black
     Blackburn
     Cardenas
     Castor (FL)
     DeSantis
     Duncan (SC)
     Gaetz
     Goodlatte
     Hanabusa
     Moore
     Richmond
     Roby
     Shuster
     Speier
     Walz

                              {time}  1520

  Messrs. BIGGS, LABRADOR, MASSIE, JONES, JODY B. HICE of Georgia, 
ROKITA, JORDAN, BROOKS of Alabama, BRAT, GOSAR, GARRETT, and KELLY of 
Mississippi changed their vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Messrs. DUNCAN of Tennessee, TIPTON, FERGUSON, Mrs. NOEM, Messrs. 
COOK, SMITH of Texas, and SAM JOHNSON of Texas changed their vote from 
``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the motion to instruct conferees was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table
  Stated for:
  Mr. GOODLATTE. Mr. Speaker, I was unavoidably detained. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``yea'' on rollcall No. 336.

                          ____________________