DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 6
(House of Representatives - January 11, 2019)

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     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019

  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 28, I call 
up the bill (H.R. 266) making appropriations for the Department of the 
Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2019, and for other purposes, and ask for its immediate 
consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 28, the bill is 
considered read.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                                H.R. 266

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
     following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
     Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Department of 
     the Interior, environment, and related agencies for the 
     fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, and for other 
     purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Bureau of Land Management

                   management of lands and resources

       For necessary expenses for protection, use, improvement, 
     development, disposal, cadastral surveying, classification, 
     acquisition of easements and other interests in lands, and 
     performance of other functions, including maintenance of 
     facilities, as authorized by law, in the management of lands 
     and their resources under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of 
     Land Management, including the general administration of the 
     Bureau, and assessment of mineral potential of public lands 
     pursuant to section 1010(a) of Public Law 96-487 (16 U.S.C. 
     3150(a)), $1,196,143,000, to remain available until expended, 
     including all such amounts as are collected from permit 
     processing fees, as authorized but made subject to future 
     appropriation by section 35(d)(3)(A)(i) of the Mineral 
     Leasing Act (30 U.S.C. 191), except that amounts from permit 
     processing fees may be used for any bureau-related expenses 
     associated with the processing of oil and gas applications 
     for permits to drill and related use of authorizations:  
     Provided, That of the amounts made available under this 
     heading, $2,000,000 shall be made available to carry out the 
     Colorado River Basin salinity control program.
       In addition, $39,696,000 is for Mining Law Administration 
     program operations, including the cost of administering the 
     mining claim fee program, to remain available until expended, 
     to be reduced by amounts collected by the Bureau and credited 
     to this appropriation from mining claim maintenance fees and 
     location fees that are hereby authorized for fiscal year 
     2019, so as to result in a final appropriation estimated at 
     not more than $1,196,143,000, and $2,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, from communication site rental fees 
     established by the Bureau for the cost of administering 
     communication site activities.

                            land acquisition

       For expenses necessary to carry out sections 205, 206, and 
     318(d) of Public Law 94-579, including administrative 
     expenses and acquisition of lands or waters, or interests 
     therein, $26,016,000, to be derived from the Land and Water 
     Conservation Fund and to remain available until expended.

                   oregon and california grant lands

       For expenses necessary for management, protection, and 
     development of resources and for construction, operation, and 
     maintenance of access roads, reforestation, and other 
     improvements on the revested Oregon and California Railroad 
     grant lands, on other Federal lands in the Oregon and 
     California land-grant counties of Oregon, and on adjacent 
     rights-of-way; and acquisition of lands or interests therein, 
     including existing connecting roads on or adjacent to such 
     grant lands; $106,543,000, to remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That 25 percent of the aggregate of all 
     receipts during the current fiscal year from the revested 
     Oregon and California Railroad grant lands is hereby made a 
     charge against the Oregon and California land-grant fund and 
     shall be transferred to the General Fund in the Treasury in 
     accordance with the second paragraph of subsection (b) of 
     title II of the Act of August 28, 1937 (43 U.S.C. 2605).

                           range improvements

       For rehabilitation, protection, and acquisition of lands 
     and interests therein, and improvement of Federal rangelands 
     pursuant to section 401 of the Federal Land Policy and 
     Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1751), notwithstanding any 
     other Act, sums equal to 50 percent of all moneys received 
     during the prior fiscal year under sections 3 and 15 of the 
     Taylor Grazing Act (43 U.S.C. 315b, 315m) and the amount 
     designated for range improvements from grazing fees and 
     mineral leasing receipts from Bankhead-Jones lands 
     transferred to the Department of the Interior pursuant to 
     law, but not less than $10,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That not to exceed $600,000 shall be 
     available for administrative expenses.

               service charges, deposits, and forfeitures

       For administrative expenses and other costs related to 
     processing application documents and other authorizations for 
     use and disposal of public lands and resources, for costs of 
     providing copies of official public land documents, for 
     monitoring construction, operation, and termination of 
     facilities in conjunction with use authorizations, and for 
     rehabilitation of damaged property, such amounts as may be 
     collected under Public Law 94-579 (43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), 
     and under section 28 of the Mineral Leasing Act (30 U.S.C. 
     185), to remain available until expended:  Provided, That 
     notwithstanding any provision to the contrary of section 
     305(a) of Public Law 94-579 (43 U.S.C. 1735(a)), any moneys 
     that have been or will be received pursuant to that section, 
     whether as a result of forfeiture, compromise, or settlement, 
     if not appropriate for refund pursuant to section 305(c) of 
     that Act (43 U.S.C. 1735(c)), shall be available and may be 
     expended under the authority of this Act by the Secretary to 
     improve, protect, or rehabilitate any public lands 
     administered through the Bureau of Land Management which have 
     been damaged by the action of a resource developer, 
     purchaser, permittee, or any unauthorized person, without 
     regard to whether all moneys collected from each such action 
     are used on the exact lands damaged which led to the action:  
     Provided further, That any such moneys that are in excess of 
     amounts needed to repair damage to the exact land for which 
     funds were collected may be used to repair other damaged 
     public lands.

                       miscellaneous trust funds

       In addition to amounts authorized to be expended under 
     existing laws, there is hereby

[[Page H470]]

     appropriated such amounts as may be contributed under section 
     307 of Public Law 94-579 (43 U.S.C. 1737), and such amounts 
     as may be advanced for administrative costs, surveys, 
     appraisals, and costs of making conveyances of omitted lands 
     under section 211(b) of that Act (43 U.S.C. 1721(b)), to 
     remain available until expended.

                       administrative provisions

       The Bureau of Land Management may carry out the operations 
     funded under this Act by direct expenditure, contracts, 
     grants, cooperative agreements and reimbursable agreements 
     with public and private entities, including with States. 
     Appropriations for the Bureau shall be available for 
     purchase, erection, and dismantlement of temporary 
     structures, and alteration and maintenance of necessary 
     buildings and appurtenant facilities to which the United 
     States has title; up to $100,000 for payments, at the 
     discretion of the Secretary, for information or evidence 
     concerning violations of laws administered by the Bureau; 
     miscellaneous and emergency expenses of enforcement 
     activities authorized or approved by the Secretary and to be 
     accounted for solely on the Secretary's certificate, not to 
     exceed $10,000:  Provided, That notwithstanding Public Law 
     90-620 (44 U.S.C. 501), the Bureau may, under cooperative 
     cost-sharing and partnership arrangements authorized by law, 
     procure printing services from cooperators in connection with 
     jointly produced publications for which the cooperators share 
     the cost of printing either in cash or in services, and the 
     Bureau determines the cooperator is capable of meeting 
     accepted quality standards:  Provided further, That projects 
     to be funded pursuant to a written commitment by a State 
     government to provide an identified amount of money in 
     support of the project may be carried out by the Bureau on a 
     reimbursable basis. Appropriations herein made shall not be 
     available for the destruction of healthy, unadopted, wild 
     horses and burros in the care of the Bureau or its 
     contractors or for the sale of wild horses and burros that 
     results in their destruction for processing into commercial 
     products.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

                          resource management

       For necessary expenses of the United States Fish and 
     Wildlife Service, as authorized by law, and for scientific 
     and economic studies, general administration, and for the 
     performance of other authorized functions related to such 
     resources, $1,292,067,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2020:  Provided, That not to exceed $17,818,000 
     shall be used for implementing subsections (a), (b), (c), and 
     (e) of section 4 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 
     U.S.C. 1533) (except for processing petitions, developing and 
     issuing proposed and final regulations, and taking any other 
     steps to implement actions described in subsection (c)(2)(A), 
     (c)(2)(B)(i), or (c)(2)(B)(ii)).

                              construction

       For construction, improvement, acquisition, or removal of 
     buildings and other facilities required in the conservation, 
     management, investigation, protection, and utilization of 
     fish and wildlife resources, and the acquisition of lands and 
     interests therein; $50,413,000, to remain available until 
     expended.

                            land acquisition

       For expenses necessary to carry out chapter 2003 of title 
     54, United States Code, including administrative expenses, 
     and for acquisition of land or waters, or interest therein, 
     in accordance with statutory authority applicable to the 
     United States Fish and Wildlife Service, $45,189,000, to be 
     derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund and to 
     remain available until expended:  Provided, That none of the 
     funds appropriated for specific land acquisition projects may 
     be used to pay for any administrative overhead, planning or 
     other management costs.

            cooperative endangered species conservation fund

       For expenses necessary to carry out section 6 of the 
     Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1535), $49,495,000, 
     to remain available until expended, of which $18,695,000 is 
     to be derived from the Cooperative Endangered Species 
     Conservation Fund; and of which $30,800,000 is to be derived 
     from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                     national wildlife refuge fund

       For expenses necessary to implement the Act of October 17, 
     1978 (16 U.S.C. 715s), $13,228,000.

               north american wetlands conservation fund

       For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
     North American Wetlands Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 4401 et 
     seq.), $43,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                neotropical migratory bird conservation

       For expenses necessary to carry out the Neotropical 
     Migratory Bird Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 6101 et seq.), 
     $3,910,000, to remain available until expended.

                multinational species conservation fund

       For expenses necessary to carry out the African Elephant 
     Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 4201 et seq.), the Asian Elephant 
     Conservation Act of 1997 (16 U.S.C. 4261 et seq.), the 
     Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Act of 1994 (16 U.S.C. 5301 
     et seq.), the Great Ape Conservation Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 
     6301 et seq.), and the Marine Turtle Conservation Act of 2004 
     (16 U.S.C. 6601 et seq.), $12,061,000, to remain available 
     until expended.

                    state and tribal wildlife grants

       For wildlife conservation grants to States and to the 
     District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the United States 
     Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, 
     and Indian tribes under the provisions of the Fish and 
     Wildlife Act of 1956 and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination 
     Act, for the development and implementation of programs for 
     the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, including species 
     that are not hunted or fished, $65,571,000, to remain 
     available until expended:  Provided, That of the amount 
     provided herein, $4,209,000 is for a competitive grant 
     program for Indian tribes not subject to the remaining 
     provisions of this appropriation:  Provided further, That 
     $6,362,000 is for a competitive grant program to implement 
     approved plans for States, territories, and other 
     jurisdictions and at the discretion of affected States, the 
     regional Associations of fish and wildlife agencies, not 
     subject to the remaining provisions of this appropriation:  
     Provided further, That the Secretary shall, after deducting 
     $10,571,000 and administrative expenses, apportion the amount 
     provided herein in the following manner: (1) to the District 
     of Columbia and to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, each a 
     sum equal to not more than one-half of 1 percent thereof; and 
     (2) to Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin 
     Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
     Islands, each a sum equal to not more than one-fourth of 1 
     percent thereof:  Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
     apportion the remaining amount in the following manner: (1) 
     one-third of which is based on the ratio to which the land 
     area of such State bears to the total land area of all such 
     States; and (2) two-thirds of which is based on the ratio to 
     which the population of such State bears to the total 
     population of all such States:  Provided further, That the 
     amounts apportioned under this paragraph shall be adjusted 
     equitably so that no State shall be apportioned a sum which 
     is less than 1 percent of the amount available for 
     apportionment under this paragraph for any fiscal year or 
     more than 5 percent of such amount:  Provided further, That 
     the Federal share of planning grants shall not exceed 75 
     percent of the total costs of such projects and the Federal 
     share of implementation grants shall not exceed 65 percent of 
     the total costs of such projects:  Provided further, That the 
     non-Federal share of such projects may not be derived from 
     Federal grant programs:  Provided further, That any amount 
     apportioned in 2019 to any State, territory, or other 
     jurisdiction that remains unobligated as of September 30, 
     2020, shall be reapportioned, together with funds 
     appropriated in 2021, in the manner provided herein.

                       administrative provisions

       The United States Fish and Wildlife Service may carry out 
     the operations of Service programs by direct expenditure, 
     contracts, grants, cooperative agreements and reimbursable 
     agreements with public and private entities. Appropriations 
     and funds available to the United States Fish and Wildlife 
     Service shall be available for repair of damage to public 
     roads within and adjacent to reservation areas caused by 
     operations of the Service; options for the purchase of land 
     at not to exceed $1 for each option; facilities incident to 
     such public recreational uses on conservation areas as are 
     consistent with their primary purpose; and the maintenance 
     and improvement of aquaria, buildings, and other facilities 
     under the jurisdiction of the Service and to which the United 
     States has title, and which are used pursuant to law in 
     connection with management, and investigation of fish and 
     wildlife resources:  Provided, That notwithstanding 44 U.S.C. 
     501, the Service may, under cooperative cost sharing and 
     partnership arrangements authorized by law, procure printing 
     services from cooperators in connection with jointly produced 
     publications for which the cooperators share at least one-
     half the cost of printing either in cash or services and the 
     Service determines the cooperator is capable of meeting 
     accepted quality standards:  Provided further, That the 
     Service may accept donated aircraft as replacements for 
     existing aircraft:  Provided further, That notwithstanding 31 
     U.S.C. 3302, all fees collected for non-toxic shot review and 
     approval shall be deposited under the heading ``United States 
     Fish and Wildlife Service--Resource Management'' and shall be 
     available to the Secretary, without further appropriation, to 
     be used for expenses of processing of such non-toxic shot 
     type or coating applications and revising regulations as 
     necessary, and shall remain available until expended.

                         National Park Service

                 operation of the national park system

       For expenses necessary for the management, operation, and 
     maintenance of areas and facilities administered by the 
     National Park Service and for the general administration of 
     the National Park Service, $2,500,369,000, of which 
     $10,032,000 for planning and interagency coordination in 
     support of Everglades restoration and $141,961,000 for 
     maintenance, repair, or rehabilitation projects for 
     constructed assets and $149,075,000 for cyclic maintenance 
     projects for constructed assets shall remain available until 
     September 30, 2020:  Provided, That funds appropriated under 
     this heading in this Act are available for the purposes of 
     section 5 of Public Law 95-348:  Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding section 9(a) of the United

[[Page H471]]

     States Semiquincentennial Commission Act of 2016 (Public Law 
     114-196; 130 Stat. 691), $500,000 of the funds made available 
     under this heading shall be provided to the organization 
     selected under section 9(b) of that Act for expenditure by 
     the United States Semiquincentennial Commission in accordance 
     with that Act.

                  national recreation and preservation

       For expenses necessary to carry out recreation programs, 
     natural programs, cultural programs, heritage partnership 
     programs, environmental compliance and review, international 
     park affairs, and grant administration, not otherwise 
     provided for, $64,138,000.

                       historic preservation fund

       For expenses necessary in carrying out the National 
     Historic Preservation Act (division A of subtitle III of 
     title 54, United States Code), $91,910,000, to be derived 
     from the Historic Preservation Fund and to remain available 
     until September 30, 2020:  Provided , That of the funds 
     provided for the Historic Preservation Fund, $500,000 is for 
     competitive grants for the survey and nomination of 
     properties to the National Register of Historic Places and as 
     National Historic Landmarks associated with communities 
     currently under-represented, as determined by the Secretary, 
     $13,000,000 is for competitive grants to preserve the sites 
     and stories of the Civil Rights movement, $8,000,000 is for 
     grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and 
     $5,000,000 is for competitive grants for the restoration of 
     historic properties of national, State and local significance 
     listed on or eligible for inclusion on the National Register 
     of Historic Places, to be made without imposing the usage or 
     direct grant restrictions of section 101(e)(3) (54 U.S.C. 
     302904) of the National Historical Preservation Act:  
     Provided further, That such competitive grants shall be made 
     without imposing the matching requirements in section 
     302902(b)(3) of title 54, United States Code, to States and 
     Indian tribes as defined in chapter 3003 of such title, 
     Native Hawaiian organizations, local governments, including 
     Certified Local Governments, and non-profit organizations.

                              construction

       For construction, improvements, repair, or replacement of 
     physical facilities, and compliance and planning for programs 
     and areas administered by the National Park Service, 
     $364,704,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That notwithstanding any other provision of law, for any 
     project initially funded in fiscal year 2019 with a future 
     phase indicated in the National Park Service 5-Year Line Item 
     Construction Plan, a single procurement may be issued which 
     includes the full scope of the project:  Provided further, 
     That the solicitation and contract shall contain the clause 
     availability of funds found at 48 CFR 52.232-18:  Provided 
     further, That National Park Service Donations, Park 
     Concessions Franchise Fees, and Recreation Fees may be made 
     available for the cost of adjustments and changes within the 
     original scope of effort for projects funded by the National 
     Park Service Construction appropriation:  Provided further, 
     That the Secretary of the Interior shall consult with the 
     Committees on Appropriations, in accordance with current 
     reprogramming thresholds, prior to making any charges 
     authorized by this section.

                 land acquisition and state assistance

       For expenses necessary to carry out chapter 2003 of title 
     54, United States Code, including administrative expenses, 
     and for acquisition of lands or waters, or interest therein, 
     in accordance with the statutory authority applicable to the 
     National Park Service, $174,444,000, to be derived from the 
     Land and Water Conservation Fund and to remain available 
     until expended, of which $124,006,000 is for the State 
     assistance program and of which $15,000,000 shall be for the 
     American Battlefield Protection Program grants as authorized 
     by chapter 3081 of title 54, United States Code.

                          centennial challenge

       For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of 
     section 101701 of title 54, United States Code, relating to 
     challenge cost share agreements, $23,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, for Centennial Challenge projects 
     and programs:  Provided, That not less than 50 percent of the 
     total cost of each project or program shall be derived from 
     non-Federal sources in the form of donated cash, assets, or a 
     pledge of donation guaranteed by an irrevocable letter of 
     credit.

                       administrative provisions

                     (including transfer of funds)

       In addition to other uses set forth in section 101917(c)(2) 
     of title 54, United States Code, franchise fees credited to a 
     sub-account shall be available for expenditure by the 
     Secretary, without further appropriation, for use at any unit 
     within the National Park System to extinguish or reduce 
     liability for Possessory Interest or leasehold surrender 
     interest. Such funds may only be used for this purpose to the 
     extent that the benefitting unit anticipated franchise fee 
     receipts over the term of the contract at that unit exceed 
     the amount of funds used to extinguish or reduce liability. 
     Franchise fees at the benefitting unit shall be credited to 
     the sub-account of the originating unit over a period not to 
     exceed the term of a single contract at the benefitting unit, 
     in the amount of funds so expended to extinguish or reduce 
     liability.
       For the costs of administration of the Land and Water 
     Conservation Fund grants authorized by section 105(a)(2)(B) 
     of the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 
     109-432), the National Park Service may retain up to 3 
     percent of the amounts which are authorized to be disbursed 
     under such section, such retained amounts to remain available 
     until expended.
       National Park Service funds may be transferred to the 
     Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department of 
     Transportation, for purposes authorized under 23 U.S.C. 204. 
     Transfers may include a reasonable amount for FHWA 
     administrative support costs.

                    United States Geological Survey

                 surveys, investigations, and research

       For expenses necessary for the United States Geological 
     Survey to perform surveys, investigations, and research 
     covering topography, geology, hydrology, biology, and the 
     mineral and water resources of the United States, its 
     territories and possessions, and other areas as authorized by 
     43 U.S.C. 31, 1332, and 1340; classify lands as to their 
     mineral and water resources; give engineering supervision to 
     power permittees and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 
     licensees; administer the minerals exploration program (30 
     U.S.C. 641); conduct inquiries into the economic conditions 
     affecting mining and materials processing industries (30 
     U.S.C. 3, 21a, and 1603; 50 U.S.C. 98g(1)) and related 
     purposes as authorized by law; and to publish and disseminate 
     data relative to the foregoing activities; $1,148,457,000, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2020; of which $100,000 
     shall be made available to the United States Geological 
     Survey Mineral Resources Program for the development of a map 
     depicting pyrrhotite occurrences throughout the United 
     States; of which $84,337,000 shall remain available until 
     expended for satellite operations; and of which $15,164,000 
     shall be available until expended for deferred maintenance 
     and capital improvement projects that exceed $100,000 in 
     cost:  Provided, That none of the funds provided for the 
     ecosystem research activity shall be used to conduct new 
     surveys on private property, unless specifically authorized 
     in writing by the property owner:  Provided further, That no 
     part of this appropriation shall be used to pay more than 
     one-half the cost of topographic mapping or water resources 
     data collection and investigations carried on in cooperation 
     with States and municipalities:  Provided further, That of 
     the amounts made available under this heading, not less than 
     $200,000 shall be used for activities to better understand 
     mechanisms that result in toxins being present in harmful 
     algal blooms.

                       administrative provisions

       From within the amount appropriated for activities of the 
     United States Geological Survey such sums as are necessary 
     shall be available for contracting for the furnishing of 
     topographic maps and for the making of geophysical or other 
     specialized surveys when it is administratively determined 
     that such procedures are in the public interest; construction 
     and maintenance of necessary buildings and appurtenant 
     facilities; acquisition of lands for gauging stations, 
     observation wells, and seismic equipment; expenses of the 
     United States National Committee for Geological Sciences; and 
     payment of compensation and expenses of persons employed by 
     the Survey duly appointed to represent the United States in 
     the negotiation and administration of interstate compacts:  
     Provided, That activities funded by appropriations herein 
     made may be accomplished through the use of contracts, 
     grants, or cooperative agreements as defined in section 6302 
     of title 31, United States Code:  Provided further, That the 
     United States Geological Survey may enter into contracts or 
     cooperative agreements directly with individuals or 
     indirectly with institutions or nonprofit organizations, 
     without regard to 41 U.S.C. 6101, for the temporary or 
     intermittent services of students or recent graduates, who 
     shall be considered employees for the purpose of chapters 57 
     and 81 of title 5, United States Code, relating to 
     compensation for travel and work injuries, and chapter 171 of 
     title 28, United States Code, relating to tort claims, but 
     shall not be considered to be Federal employees for any other 
     purposes.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

                        ocean energy management

       For expenses necessary for granting and administering 
     leases, easements, rights-of-way and agreements for use for 
     oil and gas, other minerals, energy, and marine-related 
     purposes on the Outer Continental Shelf and approving 
     operations related thereto, as authorized by law; for 
     environmental studies, as authorized by law; for implementing 
     other laws and to the extent provided by Presidential or 
     Secretarial delegation; and for matching grants or 
     cooperative agreements, $179,266,000, of which $129,450,000 
     is to remain available until September 30, 2020, and of which 
     $49,816,000 is to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That this total appropriation shall be reduced by amounts 
     collected by the Secretary and credited to this appropriation 
     from additions to receipts resulting from increases to lease 
     rental rates in effect on August 5, 1993, and from cost 
     recovery fees from activities conducted by the Bureau of 
     Ocean Energy Management pursuant to the Outer Continental 
     Shelf Lands Act, including studies, assessments, analysis, 
     and miscellaneous administrative activities:  Provided 
     further, That the sum herein appropriated shall be reduced as 
     such collections are received during the fiscal year, so as 
     to result in a final fiscal year 2019 appropriation estimated 
     at not more than

[[Page H472]]

     $129,450,000:  Provided further, That not to exceed $3,000 
     shall be available for reasonable expenses related to 
     promoting volunteer beach and marine cleanup activities.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

             offshore safety and environmental enforcement

       For expenses necessary for the regulation of operations 
     related to leases, easements, rights-of-way and agreements 
     for use for oil and gas, other minerals, energy, and marine-
     related purposes on the Outer Continental Shelf, as 
     authorized by law; for enforcing and implementing laws and 
     regulations as authorized by law and to the extent provided 
     by Presidential or Secretarial delegation; and for matching 
     grants or cooperative agreements, $145,475,000, of which 
     $121,351,000 is to remain available until September 30, 2020, 
     and of which $24,124,000 is to remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That this total appropriation shall be 
     reduced by amounts collected by the Secretary and credited to 
     this appropriation from additions to receipts resulting from 
     increases to lease rental rates in effect on August 5, 1993, 
     and from cost recovery fees from activities conducted by the 
     Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement pursuant to 
     the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, including studies, 
     assessments, analysis, and miscellaneous administrative 
     activities:  Provided further, That the sum herein 
     appropriated shall be reduced as such collections are 
     received during the fiscal year, so as to result in a final 
     fiscal year 2019 appropriation estimated at not more than 
     $121,351,000.
       For an additional amount, $41,765,000, to remain available 
     until expended, to be reduced by amounts collected by the 
     Secretary and credited to this appropriation, which shall be 
     derived from non-refundable inspection fees collected in 
     fiscal year 2019, as provided in this Act:  Provided, That to 
     the extent that amounts realized from such inspection fees 
     exceed $41,765,000, the amounts realized in excess of 
     $41,765,000 shall be credited to this appropriation and 
     remain available until expended:  Provided further, That for 
     fiscal year 2019, not less than 50 percent of the inspection 
     fees expended by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental 
     Enforcement will be used to fund personnel and mission-
     related costs to expand capacity and expedite the orderly 
     development, subject to environmental safeguards, of the 
     Outer Continental Shelf pursuant to the Outer Continental 
     Shelf Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.), including the 
     review of applications for permits to drill.

                           oil spill research

       For necessary expenses to carry out title I, section 1016, 
     title IV, sections 4202 and 4303, title VII, and title VIII, 
     section 8201 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, $12,700,000, 
     which shall be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust 
     Fund, to remain available until expended.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

                       regulation and technology

       For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of the 
     Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, Public 
     Law 95-87, $114,900,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2020:  Provided, That appropriations for the Office of 
     Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement may provide for 
     the travel and per diem expenses of State and tribal 
     personnel attending Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
     Enforcement sponsored training.
       In addition, for costs to review, administer, and enforce 
     permits issued by the Office pursuant to section 507 of 
     Public Law 95-87 (30 U.S.C. 1257), $40,000, to remain 
     available until expended:  Provided, That fees assessed and 
     collected by the Office pursuant to such section 507 shall be 
     credited to this account as discretionary offsetting 
     collections, to remain available until expended:  Provided 
     further, That the sum herein appropriated from the general 
     fund shall be reduced as collections are received during the 
     fiscal year, so as to result in a fiscal year 2019 
     appropriation estimated at not more than $114,900,000.

                    abandoned mine reclamation fund

       For necessary expenses to carry out title IV of the Surface 
     Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, Public Law 95-87, 
     $22,952,000, to be derived from receipts of the Abandoned 
     Mine Reclamation Fund and to remain available until expended: 
      Provided, That pursuant to Public Law 97-365, the Department 
     of the Interior is authorized to use up to 20 percent from 
     the recovery of the delinquent debt owed to the United States 
     Government to pay for contracts to collect these debts:  
     Provided further, That funds made available under title IV of 
     Public Law 95-87 may be used for any required non-Federal 
     share of the cost of projects funded by the Federal 
     Government for the purpose of environmental restoration 
     related to treatment or abatement of acid mine drainage from 
     abandoned mines:  Provided further, That such projects must 
     be consistent with the purposes and priorities of the Surface 
     Mining Control and Reclamation Act:  Provided further, That 
     amounts provided under this heading may be used for the 
     travel and per diem expenses of State and tribal personnel 
     attending Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
     Enforcement sponsored training.
       In addition, $115,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended, for grants to States and federally recognized 
     Indian Tribes for reclamation of abandoned mine lands and 
     other related activities in accordance with the terms and 
     conditions in Senate report 115-276:  Provided, That such 
     additional amount shall be used for economic and community 
     development in conjunction with the priorities in section 
     403(a) of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 
     1977 (30 U.S.C. 1233(a)):  Provided further, That of such 
     additional amount, $75,000,000 shall be distributed in equal 
     amounts to the 3 Appalachian States with the greatest amount 
     of unfunded needs to meet the priorities described in 
     paragraphs (1) and (2) of such section, $30,000,000 shall be 
     distributed in equal amounts to the 3 Appalachian States with 
     the subsequent greatest amount of unfunded needs to meet such 
     priorities, and $10,000,000 shall be for grants to federally 
     recognized Indian Tribes without regard to their status as 
     certified or uncertified under the Surface Mining Control and 
     Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 U.S.C. 1233(a)), for reclamation 
     of abandoned mine lands and other related activities in 
     accordance with the terms and conditions in Senate report 
     115-276 and shall be used for economic and community 
     development in conjunction with the priorities in section 
     403(a) of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 
     1977:  Provided further, That such additional amount shall be 
     allocated to States and Indian Tribes within 60 days after 
     the date of enactment of this Act.

        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education

                      operation of indian programs

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For expenses necessary for the operation of Indian 
     programs, as authorized by law, including the Snyder Act of 
     November 2, 1921 (25 U.S.C. 13), the Indian Self-
     Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 
     5301 et seq.), the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 
     2001-2019), and the Tribally Controlled Schools Act of 1988 
     (25 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.), $2,403,890,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2020, except as otherwise provided 
     herein; of which not to exceed $8,500 may be for official 
     reception and representation expenses; of which not to exceed 
     $76,000,000 shall be for welfare assistance payments:  
     Provided, That in cases of designated Federal disasters, the 
     Secretary may exceed such cap, from the amounts provided 
     herein, to provide for disaster relief to Indian communities 
     affected by the disaster:  Provided further, That federally 
     recognized Indian tribes and tribal organizations of 
     federally recognized Indian tribes may use their tribal 
     priority allocations for unmet welfare assistance costs:  
     Provided further, That not to exceed $680,673,000 for school 
     operations costs of Bureau-funded schools and other education 
     programs shall become available on July 1, 2019, and shall 
     remain available until September 30, 2020:  Provided further, 
     That not to exceed $54,174,000 shall remain available until 
     expended for housing improvement, road maintenance, attorney 
     fees, litigation support, land records improvement, and the 
     Navajo-Hopi Settlement Program:  Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, including but not 
     limited to the Indian Self-Determination Act of 1975 (25 
     U.S.C. 5301 et seq.) and section 1128 of the Education 
     Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 2008), not to exceed 
     $81,036,000 within and only from such amounts made available 
     for school operations shall be available for administrative 
     cost grants associated with grants approved prior to July 1, 
     2019:  Provided further, That any forestry funds allocated to 
     a federally recognized tribe which remain unobligated as of 
     September 30, 2020, may be transferred during fiscal year 
     2021 to an Indian forest land assistance account established 
     for the benefit of the holder of the funds within the 
     holder's trust fund account:  Provided further, That any such 
     unobligated balances not so transferred shall expire on 
     September 30, 2021:  Provided further, That in order to 
     enhance the safety of Bureau field employees, the Bureau may 
     use funds to purchase uniforms or other identifying articles 
     of clothing for personnel.

                         contract support costs

       For payments to tribes and tribal organizations for 
     contract support costs associated with Indian Self-
     Determination and Education Assistance Act agreements with 
     the Bureau of Indian Affairs for fiscal year 2019, such sums 
     as may be necessary, which shall be available for obligation 
     through September 30, 2020:  Provided, That notwithstanding 
     any other provision of law, no amounts made available under 
     this heading shall be available for transfer to another 
     budget account.

                              construction

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For construction, repair, improvement, and maintenance of 
     irrigation and power systems, buildings, utilities, and other 
     facilities, including architectural and engineering services 
     by contract; acquisition of lands, and interests in lands; 
     and preparation of lands for farming, and for construction of 
     the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project pursuant to Public Law 
     87-483; $359,419,000, to remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That such amounts as may be available for the 
     construction of the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project may be 
     transferred to the Bureau of Reclamation:  Provided further, 
     That not to exceed 6 percent of contract authority available 
     to the Bureau of Indian Affairs from the Federal Highway 
     Trust Fund may be used to cover the road program management 
     costs of the Bureau:  Provided further,

[[Page H473]]

     That any funds provided for the Safety of Dams program 
     pursuant to the Act of November 2, 1921 (25 U.S.C. 13), shall 
     be made available on a nonreimbursable basis:  Provided 
     further, That for fiscal year 2019, in implementing new 
     construction, replacement facilities construction, or 
     facilities improvement and repair project grants in excess of 
     $100,000 that are provided to grant schools under Public Law 
     100-297, the Secretary of the Interior shall use the 
     Administrative and Audit Requirements and Cost Principles for 
     Assistance Programs contained in part 12 of title 43, Code of 
     Federal Regulations, as the regulatory requirements:  
     Provided further, That such grants shall not be subject to 
     section 12.61 of title 43, Code of Federal Regulations; the 
     Secretary and the grantee shall negotiate and determine a 
     schedule of payments for the work to be performed:  Provided 
     further, That in considering grant applications, the 
     Secretary shall consider whether such grantee would be 
     deficient in assuring that the construction projects conform 
     to applicable building standards and codes and Federal, 
     tribal, or State health and safety standards as required by 
     section 1125(b) of title XI of Public Law 95-561 (25 U.S.C. 
     2005(b)), with respect to organizational and financial 
     management capabilities:  Provided further, That if the 
     Secretary declines a grant application, the Secretary shall 
     follow the requirements contained in section 5206(f) of 
     Public Law 100-297 (25 U.S.C. 2504(f)):  Provided further, 
     That any disputes between the Secretary and any grantee 
     concerning a grant shall be subject to the disputes provision 
     in section 5208(e) of Public Law 107-110 (25 U.S.C. 2507(e)): 
      Provided further, That in order to ensure timely completion 
     of construction projects, the Secretary may assume control of 
     a project and all funds related to the project, if, within 18 
     months of the date of enactment of this Act, any grantee 
     receiving funds appropriated in this Act or in any prior Act, 
     has not completed the planning and design phase of the 
     project and commenced construction:  Provided further, That 
     this appropriation may be reimbursed from the Office of the 
     Special Trustee for American Indians appropriation for the 
     appropriate share of construction costs for space expansion 
     needed in agency offices to meet trust reform implementation: 
     Provided further, That of the funds made available under this 
     heading, $10,000,000 shall be derived from the Indian 
     Irrigation Fund established by section 3211 of the WIIN Act 
     (Public Law 114-322; 130 Stat. 1749).

 indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
                                indians

       For payments and necessary administrative expenses for 
     implementation of Indian land and water claim settlements 
     pursuant to Public Laws 99-264, 100-580, 101-618, 111-11, 
     111-291, and 114-322, and for implementation of other land 
     and water rights settlements, $55,457,000, to remain 
     available until expended:  Provided, That the Secretary shall 
     make payments in such amounts as necessary to satisfy the 
     total authorized amount for the Navajo Nation Water Rights 
     Trust Fund.

                 indian guaranteed loan program account

       For the cost of guaranteed loans and insured loans, 
     $9,279,000, of which $1,252,000 is for administrative 
     expenses, as authorized by the Indian Financing Act of 1974:  
     Provided, That such costs, including the cost of modifying 
     such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974:  Provided further, That 
     these funds are available to subsidize total loan principal, 
     any part of which is to be guaranteed or insured, not to 
     exceed $123,565,389.

                       administrative provisions

       The Bureau of Indian Affairs may carry out the operation of 
     Indian programs by direct expenditure, contracts, cooperative 
     agreements, compacts, and grants, either directly or in 
     cooperation with States and other organizations.
       Notwithstanding Public Law 87-279 (25 U.S.C. 15), the 
     Bureau of Indian Affairs may contract for services in support 
     of the management, operation, and maintenance of the Power 
     Division of the San Carlos Irrigation Project.
       Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no funds 
     available to the Bureau of Indian Affairs for central office 
     oversight and Executive Direction and Administrative Services 
     (except executive direction and administrative services 
     funding for Tribal Priority Allocations, regional offices, 
     and facilities operations and maintenance) shall be available 
     for contracts, grants, compacts, or cooperative agreements 
     with the Bureau of Indian Affairs under the provisions of the 
     Indian Self-Determination Act or the Tribal Self-Governance 
     Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-413).
       In the event any tribe returns appropriations made 
     available by this Act to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, this 
     action shall not diminish the Federal Government's trust 
     responsibility to that tribe, or the government-to-government 
     relationship between the United States and that tribe, or 
     that tribe's ability to access future appropriations.
       Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no funds 
     available to the Bureau of Indian Education, other than the 
     amounts provided herein for assistance to public schools 
     under 25 U.S.C. 452 et seq., shall be available to support 
     the operation of any elementary or secondary school in the 
     State of Alaska.
       No funds available to the Bureau of Indian Education shall 
     be used to support expanded grades for any school or 
     dormitory beyond the grade structure in place or approved by 
     the Secretary of the Interior at each school in the Bureau of 
     Indian Education school system as of October 1, 1995, except 
     that the Secretary of the Interior may waive this prohibition 
     to support expansion of up to one additional grade when the 
     Secretary determines such waiver is needed to support 
     accomplishment of the mission of the Bureau of Indian 
     Education, or more than one grade to expand the elementary 
     grade structure for Bureau-funded schools with a K-2 grade 
     structure on October 1, 1996. Appropriations made available 
     in this or any prior Act for schools funded by the Bureau 
     shall be available, in accordance with the Bureau's funding 
     formula, only to the schools in the Bureau school system as 
     of September 1, 1996, and to any school or school program 
     that was reinstated in fiscal year 2012. Funds made available 
     under this Act may not be used to establish a charter school 
     at a Bureau-funded school (as that term is defined in section 
     1141 of the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 2021)), 
     except that a charter school that is in existence on the date 
     of the enactment of this Act and that has operated at a 
     Bureau-funded school before September 1, 1999, may continue 
     to operate during that period, but only if the charter school 
     pays to the Bureau a pro rata share of funds to reimburse the 
     Bureau for the use of the real and personal property 
     (including buses and vans), the funds of the charter school 
     are kept separate and apart from Bureau funds, and the Bureau 
     does not assume any obligation for charter school programs of 
     the State in which the school is located if the charter 
     school loses such funding. Employees of Bureau-funded schools 
     sharing a campus with a charter school and performing 
     functions related to the charter school's operation and 
     employees of a charter school shall not be treated as Federal 
     employees for purposes of chapter 171 of title 28, United 
     States Code.
       Notwithstanding any other provision of law, including 
     section 113 of title I of appendix C of Public Law 106-113, 
     if in fiscal year 2003 or 2004 a grantee received indirect 
     and administrative costs pursuant to a distribution formula 
     based on section 5(f) of Public Law 101-301, the Secretary 
     shall continue to distribute indirect and administrative cost 
     funds to such grantee using the section 5(f) distribution 
     formula.
       Funds available under this Act may not be used to establish 
     satellite locations of schools in the Bureau school system as 
     of September 1, 1996, except that the Secretary may waive 
     this prohibition in order for an Indian tribe to provide 
     language and cultural immersion educational programs for non-
     public schools located within the jurisdictional area of the 
     tribal government which exclusively serve tribal members, do 
     not include grades beyond those currently served at the 
     existing Bureau-funded school, provide an educational 
     environment with educator presence and academic facilities 
     comparable to the Bureau-funded school, comply with all 
     applicable Tribal, Federal, or State health and safety 
     standards, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, and 
     demonstrate the benefits of establishing operations at a 
     satellite location in lieu of incurring extraordinary costs, 
     such as for transportation or other impacts to students such 
     as those caused by busing students extended distances:  
     Provided, That no funds available under this Act may be used 
     to fund operations, maintenance, rehabilitation, construction 
     or other facilities-related costs for such assets that are 
     not owned by the Bureau:  Provided further, That the term 
     ``satellite school'' means a school location physically 
     separated from the existing Bureau school by more than 50 
     miles but that forms part of the existing school in all other 
     respects.

                          Departmental Offices

                        Office of the Secretary

                        departmental operations

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For necessary expenses for management of the Department of 
     the Interior and for grants and cooperative agreements, as 
     authorized by law, $131,673,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2020; of which not to exceed $15,000 may be for 
     official reception and representation expenses; and of which 
     up to $1,000,000 shall be available for workers compensation 
     payments and unemployment compensation payments associated 
     with the orderly closure of the United States Bureau of 
     Mines; and of which $9,000,000 for the Office of Valuation 
     Services is to be derived from the Land and Water 
     Conservation Fund and shall remain available until expended; 
     and of which $9,704,000 for Indian land, mineral, and 
     resource valuation activities shall remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That funds for Indian land, mineral, and 
     resource valuation activities may, as needed, be transferred 
     to and merged with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
     Indian Education ``Operation of Indian Programs'' account and 
     the Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians 
     ``Federal Trust Programs'' account:  Provided further, That 
     funds made available through contracts or grants obligated 
     during fiscal year 2019, as authorized by the Indian Self-
     Determination Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.), shall 
     remain available until expended by the contractor or grantee: 
     Provided further, That within available amounts provided 
     under this heading, the Secretary of the Interior shall 
     designate the rest area bound by Alexandria Avenue, West 
     Boulevard Drive, and the George Washington Memorial Parkway 
     on the Mount Vernon Trail within the George Washington

[[Page H474]]

     Memorial Parkway as the ``Peter B. Webster III Memorial 
     Area'' and any reference in a law, map regulation, document, 
     paper, or other record of the United States to the rest area 
     shall be deemed to be a reference to the ``Peter B. Webster 
     III Memorial Area''; Provided further, That the Secretary of 
     the Interior shall accept and expend private contributions 
     for the design, procurement, preparation, and installation of 
     a plaque honoring Peter B. Webster III on the condition that 
     the Director of the National Park Service shall approve the 
     design and placement of the plaque: Provided further, That of 
     the amounts made available under this heading, $400,000 shall 
     be made available to the commission established by section 
     3(a) of the Alyce Spotted Bear and Walter Soboleff Commission 
     on Native Children Act (Public Law 114-244; 130 Stat. 981).

                       administrative provisions

       For fiscal year 2019, up to $400,000 of the payments 
     authorized by chapter 69 of title 31, United States Code, may 
     be retained for administrative expenses of the Payments in 
     Lieu of Taxes Program:  Provided, That the amounts provided 
     under this Act specifically for the Payments in Lieu of Taxes 
     program are the only amounts available for payments 
     authorized under chapter 69 of title 31, United States Code:  
     Provided further, That in the event the sums appropriated for 
     any fiscal year for payments pursuant to this chapter are 
     insufficient to make the full payments authorized by that 
     chapter to all units of local government, then the payment to 
     each local government shall be made proportionally:  Provided 
     further, That the Secretary may make adjustments to payment 
     to individual units of local government to correct for prior 
     overpayments or underpayments:  Provided further, That no 
     payment shall be made pursuant to that chapter to otherwise 
     eligible units of local government if the computed amount of 
     the payment is less than $100.

                            Insular Affairs

                       assistance to territories

       For expenses necessary for assistance to territories under 
     the jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior and other 
     jurisdictions identified in section 104(e) of Public Law 108-
     188, $100,688,000, of which: (1) $91,240,000 shall remain 
     available until expended for territorial assistance, 
     including general technical assistance, maintenance 
     assistance, disaster assistance, coral reef initiative 
     activities, and brown tree snake control and research; grants 
     to the judiciary in American Samoa for compensation and 
     expenses, as authorized by law (48 U.S.C. 1661(c)); grants to 
     the Government of American Samoa, in addition to current 
     local revenues, for construction and support of governmental 
     functions; grants to the Government of the Virgin Islands, as 
     authorized by law; grants to the Government of Guam, as 
     authorized by law; and grants to the Government of the 
     Northern Mariana Islands , as authorized by law (Public Law 
     94-241; 90 Stat. 272); and (2) $9,448,000 shall be available 
     until September 30, 2020, for salaries and expenses of the 
     Office of Insular Affairs:  Provided, That all financial 
     transactions of the territorial and local governments herein 
     provided for, including such transactions of all agencies or 
     instrumentalities established or used by such governments, 
     may be audited by the Government Accountability Office, at 
     its discretion, in accordance with chapter 35 of title 31, 
     United States Code:  Provided further, That Northern Mariana 
     Islands Covenant grant funding shall be provided according to 
     those terms of the Agreement of the Special Representatives 
     on Future United States Financial Assistance for the Northern 
     Mariana Islands approved by Public Law 104-134:  Provided 
     further, That the funds for the program of operations and 
     maintenance improvement are appropriated to institutionalize 
     routine operations and maintenance improvement of capital 
     infrastructure with territorial participation and cost 
     sharing to be determined by the Secretary based on the 
     grantee's commitment to timely maintenance of its capital 
     assets:  Provided further, That any appropriation for 
     disaster assistance under this heading in this Act or 
     previous appropriations Acts may be used as non-Federal 
     matching funds for the purpose of hazard mitigation grants 
     provided pursuant to section 404 of the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 
     5170c).

                      compact of free association

       For grants and necessary expenses, $3,563,000, to remain 
     available until expended, as provided for in sections 
     221(a)(2) and 233 of the Compact of Free Association for the 
     Republic of Palau; and section 221(a)(2) of the Compacts of 
     Free Association for the Government of the Republic of the 
     Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia, as 
     authorized by Public Law 99-658 and Public Law 108-188.

                       Administrative Provisions

                     (including transfer of funds)

       At the request of the Governor of Guam, the Secretary may 
     transfer discretionary funds or mandatory funds provided 
     under section 104(e) of Public Law 108-188 and Public Law 
     104-134, that are allocated for Guam, to the Secretary of 
     Agriculture for the subsidy cost of direct or guaranteed 
     loans, plus not to exceed three percent of the amount of the 
     subsidy transferred for the cost of loan administration, for 
     the purposes authorized by the Rural Electrification Act of 
     1936 and section 306(a)(1) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural 
     Development Act for construction and repair projects in Guam, 
     and such funds shall remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That such costs, including the cost of modifying 
     such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974:  Provided further, That 
     such loans or loan guarantees may be made without regard to 
     the population of the area, credit elsewhere requirements, 
     and restrictions on the types of eligible entities under the 
     Rural Electrification Act of 1936 and section 306(a)(1) of 
     the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act:  Provided 
     further, That any funds transferred to the Secretary of 
     Agriculture shall be in addition to funds otherwise made 
     available to make or guarantee loans under such authorities.

                        Office of the Solicitor

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Office of the Solicitor, 
     $65,674,000.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General, 
     $52,486,000.

           Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians

                         federal trust programs

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For the operation of trust programs for Indians by direct 
     expenditure, contracts, cooperative agreements, compacts, and 
     grants, $112,380,000, to remain available until expended, of 
     which not to exceed $19,016,000 from this or any other Act, 
     may be available for historical accounting:  Provided, That 
     funds for trust management improvements and litigation 
     support may, as needed, be transferred to or merged with the 
     Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education, 
     ``Operation of Indian Programs'' account; the Office of the 
     Solicitor, ``Salaries and Expenses'' account; and the Office 
     of the Secretary, ``Departmental Operations'' account:  
     Provided further, That funds made available through contracts 
     or grants obligated during fiscal year 2019, as authorized by 
     the Indian Self-Determination Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 5301 et 
     seq.), shall remain available until expended by the 
     contractor or grantee:  Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary 
     shall not be required to provide a quarterly statement of 
     performance for any Indian trust account that has not had 
     activity for at least 15 months and has a balance of $15 or 
     less:  Provided further, That the Secretary shall issue an 
     annual account statement and maintain a record of any such 
     accounts and shall permit the balance in each such account to 
     be withdrawn upon the express written request of the account 
     holder:  Provided further, That not to exceed $50,000 is 
     available for the Secretary to make payments to correct 
     administrative errors of either disbursements from or 
     deposits to Individual Indian Money or Tribal accounts after 
     September 30, 2002:  Provided further, That erroneous 
     payments that are recovered shall be credited to and remain 
     available in this account for this purpose:  Provided 
     further, That the Secretary shall not be required to 
     reconcile Special Deposit Accounts with a balance of less 
     than $500 unless the Office of the Special Trustee receives 
     proof of ownership from a Special Deposit Accounts claimant:  
     Provided further, That notwithstanding section 102 of the 
     American Indian Trust Fund Management Reform Act of 1994 
     (Public Law 103-412) or any other provision of law, the 
     Secretary may aggregate the trust accounts of individuals 
     whose whereabouts are unknown for a continuous period of at 
     least five years and shall not be required to generate 
     periodic statements of performance for the individual 
     accounts:  Provided further, That with respect to the eighth 
     proviso, the Secretary shall continue to maintain sufficient 
     records to determine the balance of the individual accounts, 
     including any accrued interest and income, and such funds 
     shall remain available to the individual account holders.

                        Department-wide Programs

                        wildland fire management

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For necessary expenses for fire preparedness, fire 
     suppression operations, fire science and research, emergency 
     rehabilitation, fuels management activities, and rural fire 
     assistance by the Department of the Interior, $1,116,076,000, 
     to remain available until expended, of which not to exceed 
     $18,427,000 shall be for the renovation or construction of 
     fire facilities:  Provided, That such funds are also 
     available for repayment of advances to other appropriation 
     accounts from which funds were previously transferred for 
     such purposes:  Provided further, That of the funds provided 
     $188,000,000 is for fuels management activities:  Provided 
     further, That of the funds provided $20,470,000 is for burned 
     area rehabilitation:  Provided further, That persons hired 
     pursuant to 43 U.S.C. 1469 may be furnished subsistence and 
     lodging without cost from funds available from this 
     appropriation:  Provided further, That notwithstanding 42 
     U.S.C. 1856d, sums received by a bureau or office of the 
     Department of the Interior for fire protection rendered 
     pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 1856 et seq., protection of United 
     States property, may be credited to the appropriation from 
     which funds were expended to provide that protection, and are 
     available without fiscal year limitation:  Provided further, 
     That using the amounts designated under this title of this 
     Act, the Secretary of

[[Page H475]]

     the Interior may enter into procurement contracts, grants, or 
     cooperative agreements, for fuels management activities, and 
     for training and monitoring associated with such fuels 
     management activities on Federal land, or on adjacent non-
     Federal land for activities that benefit resources on Federal 
     land:  Provided further, That the costs of implementing any 
     cooperative agreement between the Federal Government and any 
     non-Federal entity may be shared, as mutually agreed on by 
     the affected parties:  Provided further, That notwithstanding 
     requirements of the Competition in Contracting Act, the 
     Secretary, for purposes of fuels management activities, may 
     obtain maximum practicable competition among: (1) local 
     private, nonprofit, or cooperative entities; (2) Youth 
     Conservation Corps crews, Public Lands Corps (Public Law 109-
     154), or related partnerships with State, local, or nonprofit 
     youth groups; (3) small or micro-businesses; or (4) other 
     entities that will hire or train locally a significant 
     percentage, defined as 50 percent or more, of the project 
     workforce to complete such contracts:  Provided further, That 
     in implementing this section, the Secretary shall develop 
     written guidance to field units to ensure accountability and 
     consistent application of the authorities provided herein:  
     Provided further, That funds appropriated under this heading 
     may be used to reimburse the United States Fish and Wildlife 
     Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service for the 
     costs of carrying out their responsibilities under the 
     Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) to 
     consult and conference, as required by section 7 of such Act, 
     in connection with wildland fire management activities:  
     Provided further, That the Secretary of the Interior may use 
     wildland fire appropriations to enter into leases of real 
     property with local governments, at or below fair market 
     value, to construct capitalized improvements for fire 
     facilities on such leased properties, including but not 
     limited to fire guard stations, retardant stations, and other 
     initial attack and fire support facilities, and to make 
     advance payments for any such lease or for construction 
     activity associated with the lease:  Provided further, That 
     the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of 
     Agriculture may authorize the transfer of funds appropriated 
     for wildland fire management, in an aggregate amount not to 
     exceed $50,000,000, between the Departments when such 
     transfers would facilitate and expedite wildland fire 
     management programs and projects:  Provided further, That 
     funds provided for wildfire suppression shall be available 
     for support of Federal emergency response actions:  Provided 
     further, That funds appropriated under this heading shall be 
     available for assistance to or through the Department of 
     State in connection with forest and rangeland research, 
     technical information, and assistance in foreign countries, 
     and, with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, shall be 
     available to support forestry, wildland fire management, and 
     related natural resource activities outside the United States 
     and its territories and possessions, including technical 
     assistance, education and training, and cooperation with 
     United States and international organizations.

                    central hazardous materials fund

       For necessary expenses of the Department of the Interior 
     and any of its component offices and bureaus for the response 
     action, including associated activities, performed pursuant 
     to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, 
     and Liability Act (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.), $10,010,000, to 
     remain available until expended.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration

                natural resource damage assessment fund

       To conduct natural resource damage assessment, restoration 
     activities, and onshore oil spill preparedness by the 
     Department of the Interior necessary to carry out the 
     provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
     Compensation, and Liability Act (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.), the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), 
     the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.), and 
     54 U.S.C. 100721 et seq., $7,767,000, to remain available 
     until expended.

                          working capital fund

       For the operation and maintenance of a departmental 
     financial and business management system, information 
     technology improvements of general benefit to the Department, 
     cybersecurity, and the consolidation of facilities and 
     operations throughout the Department, $56,735,000, to remain 
     available until expended:  Provided, That none of the funds 
     appropriated in this Act or any other Act may be used to 
     establish reserves in the Working Capital Fund account other 
     than for accrued annual leave and depreciation of equipment 
     without prior approval of the Committees on Appropriations of 
     the House of Representatives and the Senate:  Provided 
     further, That the Secretary may assess reasonable charges to 
     State, local and tribal government employees for training 
     services provided by the National Indian Program Training 
     Center, other than training related to Public Law 93-638:  
     Provided further, That the Secretary may lease or otherwise 
     provide space and related facilities, equipment or 
     professional services of the National Indian Program Training 
     Center to State, local and tribal government employees or 
     persons or organizations engaged in cultural, educational, or 
     recreational activities (as defined in section 3306(a) of 
     title 40, United States Code) at the prevailing rate for 
     similar space, facilities, equipment, or services in the 
     vicinity of the National Indian Program Training Center:  
     Provided further, That all funds received pursuant to the two 
     preceding provisos shall be credited to this account, shall 
     be available until expended, and shall be used by the 
     Secretary for necessary expenses of the National Indian 
     Program Training Center:  Provided further, That the 
     Secretary may enter into grants and cooperative agreements to 
     support the Office of Natural Resource Revenue's collection 
     and disbursement of royalties, fees, and other mineral 
     revenue proceeds, as authorized by law.

                        administrative provision

       There is hereby authorized for acquisition from available 
     resources within the Working Capital Fund, aircraft which may 
     be obtained by donation, purchase or through available excess 
     surplus property:  Provided, That existing aircraft being 
     replaced may be sold, with proceeds derived or trade-in value 
     used to offset the purchase price for the replacement 
     aircraft.

                  office of natural resources revenue

       For necessary expenses for management of the collection and 
     disbursement of royalties, fees, and other mineral revenue 
     proceeds, and for grants and cooperative agreements, as 
     authorized by law, $137,505,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2020; of which $41,727,000 shall remain 
     available until expended for the purpose of mineral revenue 
     management activities:  Provided, That notwithstanding any 
     other provision of law, $15,000 shall be available for 
     refunds of overpayments in connection with certain Indian 
     leases in which the Secretary concurred with the claimed 
     refund due, to pay amounts owed to Indian allottees or 
     tribes, or to correct prior unrecoverable erroneous payments.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior

                     (including transfers of funds)

               emergency transfer authority--intra-bureau

       Sec. 101.  Appropriations made in this title shall be 
     available for expenditure or transfer (within each bureau or 
     office), with the approval of the Secretary, for the 
     emergency reconstruction, replacement, or repair of aircraft, 
     buildings, utilities, or other facilities or equipment 
     damaged or destroyed by fire, flood, storm, or other 
     unavoidable causes:  Provided, That no funds shall be made 
     available under this authority until funds specifically made 
     available to the Department of the Interior for emergencies 
     shall have been exhausted:  Provided further, That all funds 
     used pursuant to this section must be replenished by a 
     supplemental appropriation, which must be requested as 
     promptly as possible.

             emergency transfer authority--department-wide

       Sec. 102.  The Secretary may authorize the expenditure or 
     transfer of any no year appropriation in this title, in 
     addition to the amounts included in the budget programs of 
     the several agencies, for the suppression or emergency 
     prevention of wildland fires on or threatening lands under 
     the jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior; for the 
     emergency rehabilitation of burned-over lands under its 
     jurisdiction; for emergency actions related to potential or 
     actual earthquakes, floods, volcanoes, storms, or other 
     unavoidable causes; for contingency planning subsequent to 
     actual oil spills; for response and natural resource damage 
     assessment activities related to actual oil spills or 
     releases of hazardous substances into the environment; for 
     the prevention, suppression, and control of actual or 
     potential grasshopper and Mormon cricket outbreaks on lands 
     under the jurisdiction of the Secretary, pursuant to the 
     authority in section 417(b) of Public Law 106-224 (7 U.S.C. 
     7717(b)); for emergency reclamation projects under section 
     410 of Public Law 95-87; and shall transfer, from any no year 
     funds available to the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation 
     and Enforcement, such funds as may be necessary to permit 
     assumption of regulatory authority in the event a primacy 
     State is not carrying out the regulatory provisions of the 
     Surface Mining Act:  Provided, That appropriations made in 
     this title for wildland fire operations shall be available 
     for the payment of obligations incurred during the preceding 
     fiscal year, and for reimbursement to other Federal agencies 
     for destruction of vehicles, aircraft, or other equipment in 
     connection with their use for wildland fire operations, with 
     such reimbursement to be credited to appropriations currently 
     available at the time of receipt thereof:  Provided further, 
     That for wildland fire operations, no funds shall be made 
     available under this authority until the Secretary determines 
     that funds appropriated for ``wildland fire suppression'' 
     shall be exhausted within 30 days:  Provided further, That 
     all funds used pursuant to this section must be replenished 
     by a supplemental appropriation, which must be requested as 
     promptly as possible:  Provided further, That such 
     replenishment funds shall be used to reimburse, on a pro rata 
     basis, accounts from which emergency funds were transferred.

                        authorized use of funds

       Sec. 103.  Appropriations made to the Department of the 
     Interior in this title shall be available for services as 
     authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, 
     when authorized by the Secretary, in total amount not to 
     exceed $500,000; purchase and replacement of motor vehicles, 
     including specially

[[Page H476]]

     equipped law enforcement vehicles; hire, maintenance, and 
     operation of aircraft; hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
     purchase of reprints; payment for telephone service in 
     private residences in the field, when authorized under 
     regulations approved by the Secretary; and the payment of 
     dues, when authorized by the Secretary, for library 
     membership in societies or associations which issue 
     publications to members only or at a price to members lower 
     than to subscribers who are not members.

            authorized use of funds, indian trust management

       Sec. 104.  Appropriations made in this Act under the 
     headings Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
     Education, and Office of the Special Trustee for American 
     Indians and any unobligated balances from prior 
     appropriations Acts made under the same headings shall be 
     available for expenditure or transfer for Indian trust 
     management and reform activities. Total funding for 
     historical accounting activities shall not exceed amounts 
     specifically designated in this Act for such purpose.

           redistribution of funds, bureau of indian affairs

       Sec. 105.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
     Secretary of the Interior is authorized to redistribute any 
     Tribal Priority Allocation funds, including tribal base 
     funds, to alleviate tribal funding inequities by transferring 
     funds to address identified, unmet needs, dual enrollment, 
     overlapping service areas or inaccurate distribution 
     methodologies. No tribe shall receive a reduction in Tribal 
     Priority Allocation funds of more than 10 percent in fiscal 
     year 2019. Under circumstances of dual enrollment, 
     overlapping service areas or inaccurate distribution 
     methodologies, the 10 percent limitation does not apply.

                 ellis, governors, and liberty islands

       Sec. 106.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
     Secretary of the Interior is authorized to acquire lands, 
     waters, or interests therein including the use of all or part 
     of any pier, dock, or landing within the State of New York 
     and the State of New Jersey, for the purpose of operating and 
     maintaining facilities in the support of transportation and 
     accommodation of visitors to Ellis, Governors, and Liberty 
     Islands, and of other program and administrative activities, 
     by donation or with appropriated funds, including franchise 
     fees (and other monetary consideration), or by exchange; and 
     the Secretary is authorized to negotiate and enter into 
     leases, subleases, concession contracts or other agreements 
     for the use of such facilities on such terms and conditions 
     as the Secretary may determine reasonable.

                outer continental shelf inspection fees

       Sec. 107. (a) In fiscal year 2019, the Secretary shall 
     collect a nonrefundable inspection fee, which shall be 
     deposited in the ``Offshore Safety and Environmental 
     Enforcement'' account, from the designated operator for 
     facilities subject to inspection under 43 U.S.C. 1348(c).
       (b) Annual fees shall be collected for facilities that are 
     above the waterline, excluding drilling rigs, and are in 
     place at the start of the fiscal year. Fees for fiscal year 
     2019 shall be:
       (1) $10,500 for facilities with no wells, but with 
     processing equipment or gathering lines;
       (2) $17,000 for facilities with 1 to 10 wells, with any 
     combination of active or inactive wells; and
       (3) $31,500 for facilities with more than 10 wells, with 
     any combination of active or inactive wells.
       (c) Fees for drilling rigs shall be assessed for all 
     inspections completed in fiscal year 2019. Fees for fiscal 
     year 2019 shall be:
       (1) $30,500 per inspection for rigs operating in water 
     depths of 500 feet or more; and
       (2) $16,700 per inspection for rigs operating in water 
     depths of less than 500 feet.
       (d) The Secretary shall bill designated operators under 
     subsection (b) within 60 days, with payment required within 
     30 days of billing. The Secretary shall bill designated 
     operators under subsection (c) within 30 days of the end of 
     the month in which the inspection occurred, with payment 
     required within 30 days of billing.

     bureau of ocean energy management, regulation and enforcement 
                             reorganization

       Sec. 108.  The Secretary of the Interior, in order to 
     implement a reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
     Management, Regulation and Enforcement, may transfer funds 
     among and between the successor offices and bureaus affected 
     by the reorganization only in conformance with the 
     reprogramming guidelines described in Senate report 115-276.

  contracts and agreements for wild horse and burro holding facilities

       Sec. 109.  Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, 
     the Secretary of the Interior may enter into multiyear 
     cooperative agreements with nonprofit organizations and other 
     appropriate entities, and may enter into multiyear contracts 
     in accordance with the provisions of section 3903 of title 
     41, United States Code (except that the 5-year term 
     restriction in subsection (a) shall not apply), for the long-
     term care and maintenance of excess wild free roaming horses 
     and burros by such organizations or entities on private land. 
     Such cooperative agreements and contracts may not exceed 10 
     years, subject to renewal at the discretion of the Secretary.

                       mass marking of salmonids

       Sec. 110.  The United States Fish and Wildlife Service 
     shall, in carrying out its responsibilities to protect 
     threatened and endangered species of salmon, implement a 
     system of mass marking of salmonid stocks, intended for 
     harvest, that are released from federally operated or 
     federally financed hatcheries including but not limited to 
     fish releases of coho, chinook, and steelhead species. Marked 
     fish must have a visible mark that can be readily identified 
     by commercial and recreational fishers.

              contracts and agreements with indian affairs

       Sec. 111.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     during fiscal year 2019, in carrying out work involving 
     cooperation with State, local, and tribal governments or any 
     political subdivision thereof, Indian Affairs may record 
     obligations against accounts receivable from any such 
     entities, except that total obligations at the end of the 
     fiscal year shall not exceed total budgetary resources 
     available at the end of the fiscal year.

                   humane transfer of excess animals

       Sec. 112.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
     Secretary of the Interior may transfer excess wild horses or 
     burros that have been removed from the public lands to other 
     Federal, State, and local government agencies for use as work 
     animals:  Provided, That the Secretary may make any such 
     transfer immediately upon request of such Federal, State, or 
     local government agency:  Provided further, That any excess 
     animal transferred under this provision shall lose its status 
     as a wild free-roaming horse or burro as defined in the Wild 
     Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act:  Provided further, That 
     any Federal, State, or local government agency receiving 
     excess wild horses or burros as authorized in this section 
     shall not: destroy the horses or burros in a way that results 
     in their destruction into commercial products; sell or 
     otherwise transfer the horses or burros in a way that results 
     in their destruction for processing into commercial products; 
     or euthanize the horses or burros except upon the 
     recommendation of a licensed veterinarian, in cases of severe 
     injury, illness, or advanced age.

        department of the interior experienced services program

       Sec. 113. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law 
     relating to Federal grants and cooperative agreements, the 
     Secretary of the Interior is authorized to make grants to, or 
     enter into cooperative agreements with, private nonprofit 
     organizations designated by the Secretary of Labor under 
     title V of the Older Americans Act of 1965 to utilize the 
     talents of older Americans in programs authorized by other 
     provisions of law administered by the Secretary and 
     consistent with such provisions of law.
       (b) Prior to awarding any grant or agreement under 
     subsection (a), the Secretary shall ensure that the agreement 
     would not--
       (1) result in the displacement of individuals currently 
     employed by the Department, including partial displacement 
     through reduction of non-overtime hours, wages, or employment 
     benefits;
       (2) result in the use of an individual under the Department 
     of the Interior Experienced Services Program for a job or 
     function in a case in which a Federal employee is in a layoff 
     status from the same or substantially equivalent job within 
     the Department; or
       (3) affect existing contracts for services.

                    payments in lieu of taxes (pilt)

       Sec. 114.  Section 6906 of title 31, United States Code, is 
     amended by striking ``fiscal year 2018'' and inserting 
     ``fiscal year 2019''.

                              sage-grouse

       Sec. 115.  None of the funds made available by this or any 
     other Act may be used by the Secretary of the Interior to 
     write or issue pursuant to section 4 of the Endangered 
     Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1533)--
       (1) a proposed rule for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus 
     urophasianus);
       (2) a proposed rule for the Columbia basin distinct 
     population segment of greater sage-grouse.

                          technical correction

       Sec. 116.  Division II of Public Law 104-333 (54 U.S.C. 
     320101 note), as amended by section 116(b)(2) of Public Law 
     114-113, is amended in each of sections 208, 310, and 607, by 
     striking ``2017'' and inserting ``2019''.


  damage to department of the interior facilities by volcanic eruption

       Sec. 117.  (a) Not later than 60 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Interior shall 
     submit to Congress a report on each facility and related 
     infrastructure of the Department of the Interior damaged by a 
     volcanic eruption covered by a major disaster declared by the 
     President in calendar year 2018 in accordance with section 
     401 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5170) (referred to in this section 
     as a ``covered facility'').
       (b) The report submitted under subsection (a) shall 
     include--
       (1) an inventory of all covered facilities;
       (2) a description of--
       (A) any closures of covered facilities; and
       (B) the estimated impact on visitorship to covered 
     facilities open to the public as a result of a volcanic 
     eruption; and
       (3) a plan--
       (A) to restore or replace covered facilities; and
       (B) to restore visitorship levels to covered facilities 
     open to the public to historic visitorship levels.

[[Page H477]]

       (c) In preparing the plan required under subsection (b)(3), 
     the Secretary of the Interior shall--
       (1) engage the community in which the covered facility is 
     located, including the State and units of local government; 
     and
       (2) include the estimated costs of carrying out the 
     activities described in the plan.
       Sec. 118. (a) There are appropriated under the heading 
     ``Operation of Indian Programs'' under the heading ``Bureau 
     of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education'', in 
     addition to any other amounts made available under such 
     heading and in order to provide additional funding for hiring 
     staff for tribal detention facilities, including addressing 
     the needs of newly funded tribal detention facilities, 
     $2,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2020.
       (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, the 
     total amount appropriated under the heading ``Working Capital 
     Fund'' for the Department of the Interior is hereby reduced 
     by $2,000,000.

                                TITLE II

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

                         Science and Technology

                    (including rescission of funds)

       For science and technology, including research and 
     development activities, which shall include research and 
     development activities under the Comprehensive Environmental 
     Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; necessary 
     expenses for personnel and related costs and travel expenses; 
     procurement of laboratory equipment and supplies; and other 
     operating expenses in support of research and development, 
     $717,723,000, to remain available until September 30, 2020:  
     Provided, That of the funds included under this heading, 
     $5,000,000 shall be for Research: National Priorities as 
     specified in Senate report 115-276:  Provided further, That 
     of unobligated balances from appropriations made available 
     under this heading, $11,250,000 are permanently rescinded:  
     Provided further, That no amounts may be rescinded pursuant 
     to the preceding proviso from amounts made available in the 
     first proviso for Research: National Priorities:  Provided 
     further, That of the amounts made available under this 
     heading, not less than $5,000,000 shall be used to 
     investigate health impacts from exposure to harmful algal 
     blooms and cyanobacteria toxins, and to develop innovative 
     methods to monitor, characterize, and predict blooms for 
     early action.

                 Environmental Programs and Management

                    (including rescission of funds)

       For environmental programs and management, including 
     necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for personnel 
     and related costs and travel expenses; hire of passenger 
     motor vehicles; hire, maintenance, and operation of aircraft; 
     purchase of reprints; library memberships in societies or 
     associations which issue publications to members only or at a 
     price to members lower than to subscribers who are not 
     members; administrative costs of the brownfields program 
     under the Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
     Revitalization Act of 2002; implementation of a coal 
     combustion residual permit program under section 2301 of the 
     Water and Waste Act of 2016; and not to exceed $9,000 for 
     official reception and representation expenses, 
     $2,659,675,000, to remain available until September 30, 2020: 
      Provided, That of the funds included under this heading, 
     $15,000,000 shall be for Environmental Protection: National 
     Priorities as specified in Senate report 115-276:  Provided 
     further, That of the funds included under this heading, 
     $454,958,000 shall be for Geographic Programs specified in 
     the tables in the explanatory statement described in section 
     436 of this Act:  Provided further, That of the unobligated 
     balances from appropriations made available under this 
     heading, $61,676,000 are permanently rescinded:  Provided 
     further, That no amounts may be rescinded pursuant to the 
     preceding proviso from amounts made available in the first 
     proviso for Environmental Protection: National Priorities, 
     from amounts made available in the second proviso for 
     Geographic Programs, or from the National Estuary Program (33 
     U.S.C. 1330).
       In addition, $5,000,000 to remain available until expended, 
     for necessary expenses of activities described in section 
     26(b)(1) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 
     2625(b)(1)):  Provided, That fees collected pursuant to that 
     section of that Act and deposited in the ``TSCA Service Fee 
     Fund'' as discretionary offsetting receipts in fiscal year 
     2019 shall be retained and used for necessary salaries and 
     expenses in this appropriation and shall remain available 
     until expended:  Provided further, That the sum herein 
     appropriated in this paragraph from the general fund for 
     fiscal year 2019 shall be reduced by the amount of 
     discretionary offsetting receipts received during fiscal year 
     2019, so as to result in a final fiscal year 2019 
     appropriation from the general fund estimated at not more 
     than $0:  Provided further, That to the extent that amounts 
     realized from such receipts exceed $5,000,000, those amount 
     in excess of $5,000,000 shall be deposited in the ``TSCA 
     Service Fee Fund'' as discretionary offsetting receipts in 
     fiscal year 2019, shall be retained and used for necessary 
     salaries and expenses in this account, and shall remain 
     available until expended:  Provided further, That of the 
     funds included in the first paragraph under this heading, the 
     Chemical Risk Review and Reduction program project shall be 
     allocated for this fiscal year, excluding the amount of any 
     fees appropriated, not less than the amount of appropriations 
     for that program project for fiscal year 2014.

                      Office of Inspector General

       For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
     in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act 
     of 1978, $41,489,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2020.

                        Buildings and Facilities

       For construction, repair, improvement, extension, 
     alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities of, 
     or for use by, the Environmental Protection Agency, 
     $34,467,000, to remain available until expended.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For necessary expenses to carry out the Comprehensive 
     Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 
     1980 (CERCLA), including sections 111(c)(3), (c)(5), (c)(6), 
     and (e)(4) (42 U.S.C. 9611) $1,091,947,000, to remain 
     available until expended, consisting of such sums as are 
     available in the Trust Fund on September 30, 2018, as 
     authorized by section 517(a) of the Superfund Amendments and 
     Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and up to $1,091,947,000 
     as a payment from general revenues to the Hazardous Substance 
     Superfund for purposes as authorized by section 517(b) of 
     SARA:  Provided, That funds appropriated under this heading 
     may be allocated to other Federal agencies in accordance with 
     section 111(a) of CERCLA:  Provided further, That of the 
     funds appropriated under this heading, $8,718,000 shall be 
     paid to the ``Office of Inspector General'' appropriation to 
     remain available until September 30, 2020, and $17,398,000 
     shall be paid to the ``Science and Technology'' appropriation 
     to remain available until September 30, 2020.

          Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program

       For necessary expenses to carry out leaking underground 
     storage tank cleanup activities authorized by subtitle I of 
     the Solid Waste Disposal Act, $91,941,000, to remain 
     available until expended, of which $66,572,000 shall be for 
     carrying out leaking underground storage tank cleanup 
     activities authorized by section 9003(h) of the Solid Waste 
     Disposal Act; $25,369,000 shall be for carrying out the other 
     provisions of the Solid Waste Disposal Act specified in 
     section 9508(c) of the Internal Revenue Code:  Provided, That 
     the Administrator is authorized to use appropriations made 
     available under this heading to implement section 9013 of the 
     Solid Waste Disposal Act to provide financial assistance to 
     federally recognized Indian tribes for the development and 
     implementation of programs to manage underground storage 
     tanks.

                       Inland Oil Spill Programs

       For expenses necessary to carry out the Environmental 
     Protection Agency's responsibilities under the Oil Pollution 
     Act of 1990, $18,209,000, to be derived from the Oil Spill 
     Liability trust fund, to remain available until expended.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

       For environmental programs and infrastructure assistance, 
     including capitalization grants for State revolving funds and 
     performance partnership grants, $3,575,041,000, to remain 
     available until expended, of which--
       (1) $1,394,000,000 shall be for making capitalization 
     grants for the Clean Water State Revolving Funds under title 
     VI of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act; and of which 
     $864,000,000 shall be for making capitalization grants for 
     the Drinking Water State Revolving Funds under section 1452 
     of the Safe Drinking Water Act:  Provided, That for fiscal 
     year 2019, to the extent there are sufficient eligible 
     project applications and projects are consistent with State 
     Intended Use Plans, not less than 10 percent of the funds 
     made available under this title to each State for Clean Water 
     State Revolving Fund capitalization grants shall be used by 
     the State for projects to address green infrastructure, water 
     or energy efficiency improvements, or other environmentally 
     innovative activities:  Provided further, That for fiscal 
     year 2019, funds made available under this title to each 
     State for Drinking Water State Revolving Fund capitalization 
     grants may, at the discretion of each State, be used for 
     projects to address green infrastructure, water or energy 
     efficiency improvements, or other environmentally innovative 
     activities:  Provided further, That notwithstanding section 
     603(d)(7) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the 
     limitation on the amounts in a State water pollution control 
     revolving fund that may be used by a State to administer the 
     fund shall not apply to amounts included as principal in 
     loans made by such fund in fiscal year 2019 and prior years 
     where such amounts represent costs of administering the fund 
     to the extent that such amounts are or were deemed reasonable 
     by the Administrator, accounted for separately from other 
     assets in the fund, and used for eligible purposes of the 
     fund, including administration:  Provided further, That for 
     fiscal year 2019, notwithstanding the provisions of 
     subsections (g)(1), (h), and (l) of section 201 of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act, grants made under title 
     II of such Act for American Samoa, Guam, the commonwealth of 
     the Northern Marianas, the United States Virgin Islands, and 
     the District of Columbia may also be made for the purpose of 
     providing assistance: (1) solely for facility

[[Page H478]]

     plans, design activities, or plans, specifications, and 
     estimates for any proposed project for the construction of 
     treatment works; and (2) for the construction, repair, or 
     replacement of privately owned treatment works serving one or 
     more principal residences or small commercial establishments: 
      Provided further, That for fiscal year 2019, notwithstanding 
     the provisions of such subsections (g)(1), (h), and (l) of 
     section 201 and section 518(c) of the Federal Water Pollution 
     Control Act, funds reserved by the Administrator for grants 
     under section 518(c) of the Federal Water Pollution Control 
     Act may also be used to provide assistance: (1) solely for 
     facility plans, design activities, or plans, specifications, 
     and estimates for any proposed project for the construction 
     of treatment works; and (2) for the construction, repair, or 
     replacement of privately owned treatment works serving one or 
     more principal residences or small commercial establishments: 
      Provided further, That for fiscal year 2019, notwithstanding 
     any provision of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act and 
     regulations issued pursuant thereof, up to a total of 
     $2,000,000 of the funds reserved by the Administrator for 
     grants under section 518(c) of such Act may also be used for 
     grants for training, technical assistance, and educational 
     programs relating to the operation and management of the 
     treatment works specified in section 518(c) of such Act:  
     Provided further, That for fiscal year 2019, funds reserved 
     under section 518(c) of such Act shall be available for 
     grants only to Indian tribes, as defined in section 518(h) of 
     such Act and former Indian reservations in Oklahoma (as 
     determined by the Secretary of the Interior) and Native 
     Villages as defined in Public Law 92-203:  Provided further, 
     That for fiscal year 2019, notwithstanding the limitation on 
     amounts in section 518(c) of the Federal Water Pollution 
     Control Act, up to a total of 2 percent of the funds 
     appropriated, or $30,000,000, whichever is greater, and 
     notwithstanding the limitation on amounts in section 1452(i) 
     of the Safe Drinking Water Act, up to a total of 2 percent of 
     the funds appropriated, or $20,000,000, whichever is greater, 
     for State Revolving Funds under such Acts may be reserved by 
     the Administrator for grants under section 518(c) and section 
     1452(i) of such Acts:  Provided further, That for fiscal year 
     2019, notwithstanding the amounts specified in section 205(c) 
     of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, up to 1.5 percent 
     of the aggregate funds appropriated for the Clean Water State 
     Revolving Fund program under the Act less any sums reserved 
     under section 518(c) of the Act, may be reserved by the 
     Administrator for grants made under title II of the Federal 
     Water Pollution Control Act for American Samoa, Guam, the 
     Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, and United States 
     Virgin Islands:  Provided further, That for fiscal year 2019, 
     notwithstanding the limitations on amounts specified in 
     section 1452(j) of the Safe Drinking Water Act, up to 1.5 
     percent of the funds appropriated for the Drinking Water 
     State Revolving Fund programs under the Safe Drinking Water 
     Act may be reserved by the Administrator for grants made 
     under section 1452(j) of the Safe Drinking Water Act:  
     Provided further, That 10 percent of the funds made available 
     under this title to each State for Clean Water State 
     Revolving Fund capitalization grants and 20 percent of the 
     funds made available under this title to each State for 
     Drinking Water State Revolving Fund capitalization grants 
     shall be used by the State to provide additional subsidy to 
     eligible recipients in the form of forgiveness of principal, 
     negative interest loans, or grants (or any combination of 
     these), and shall be so used by the State only where such 
     funds are provided as initial financing for an eligible 
     recipient or to buy, refinance, or restructure the debt 
     obligations of eligible recipients only where such debt was 
     incurred on or after the date of enactment of this Act, or 
     where such debt was incurred prior to the date of enactment 
     of this Act if the State, with concurrence from the 
     Administrator, determines that such funds could be used to 
     help address a threat to public health from heightened 
     exposure to lead in drinking water or if a Federal or State 
     emergency declaration has been issued due to a threat to 
     public health from heightened exposure to lead in a municipal 
     drinking water supply before the date of enactment of this 
     Act:  Provided further, That in a State in which such an 
     emergency declaration has been issued, the State may use more 
     than 20 percent of the funds made available under this title 
     to the State for Drinking Water State Revolving Fund 
     capitalization grants to provide additional subsidy to 
     eligible recipients;
       (2) $15,000,000 shall be for architectural, engineering, 
     planning, design, construction and related activities in 
     connection with the construction of high priority water and 
     wastewater facilities in the area of the United States-Mexico 
     Border, after consultation with the appropriate border 
     commission:  Provided, That no funds provided by this 
     appropriations Act to address the water, wastewater and other 
     critical infrastructure needs of the colonias in the United 
     States along the United States-Mexico border shall be made 
     available to a county or municipal government unless that 
     government has established an enforceable local ordinance, or 
     other zoning rule, which prevents in that jurisdiction the 
     development or construction of any additional colonia areas, 
     or the development within an existing colonia the 
     construction of any new home, business, or other structure 
     which lacks water, wastewater, or other necessary 
     infrastructure;
       (3) $25,000,000 shall be for grants to the State of Alaska 
     to address drinking water and wastewater infrastructure needs 
     of rural and Alaska Native Villages:  Provided, That of these 
     funds: (A) the State of Alaska shall provide a match of 25 
     percent; (B) no more than 5 percent of the funds may be used 
     for administrative and overhead expenses; and (C) the State 
     of Alaska shall make awards consistent with the Statewide 
     priority list established in conjunction with the Agency and 
     the U.S. Department of Agriculture for all water, sewer, 
     waste disposal, and similar projects carried out by the State 
     of Alaska that are funded under section 221 of the Federal 
     Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1301) or the 
     Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1921 et 
     seq.) which shall allocate not less than 25 percent of the 
     funds provided for projects in regional hub communities;
       (4) $80,000,000 shall be to carry out section 104(k) of the 
     Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
     Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), including grants, interagency 
     agreements, and associated program support costs:  Provided, 
     That not more than 25 percent of the amount appropriated to 
     carry out section 104(k) of CERCLA shall be used for site 
     characterization, assessment, and remediation of facilities 
     described in section 101(39)(D)(ii)(II) of CERCLA:  Provided 
     further, That at least 10 percent shall be allocated for 
     assistance in persistent poverty counties:  Provided further, 
     That for purposes of this section, the term ``persistent 
     poverty counties'' means any county that has had 20 percent 
     or more of its population living in poverty over the past 30 
     years, as measured by the 1990 and 2000 decennial censuses 
     and the most recent Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates;
       (5) $50,000,000 shall be for grants under title VII, 
     subtitle G of the Energy Policy Act of 2005;
       (6) $50,000,000 shall be for targeted airshed grants in 
     accordance with the terms and conditions in Senate report 
     115-276;
       (7) $4,000,000 shall be to carry out the water quality 
     program authorized in section 5004(d) of the Water 
     Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (Public Law 
     114-322); and
       (8) $1,093,041,000 shall be for grants, including 
     associated program support costs, to States, federally 
     recognized tribes, interstate agencies, tribal consortia, and 
     air pollution control agencies for multi-media or single 
     media pollution prevention, control and abatement and related 
     activities, including activities pursuant to the provisions 
     set forth under this heading in Public Law 104-134, and for 
     making grants under section 103 of the Clean Air Act for 
     particulate matter monitoring and data collection activities 
     subject to terms and conditions specified by the 
     Administrator, of which: $47,745,000 shall be for carrying 
     out section 128 of CERCLA; $9,646,000 shall be for 
     Environmental Information Exchange Network grants, including 
     associated program support costs; $1,498,000 shall be for 
     grants to States under section 2007(f)(2) of the Solid Waste 
     Disposal Act, which shall be in addition to funds 
     appropriated under the heading ``Leaking Underground Storage 
     Tank Trust Fund Program'' to carry out the provisions of the 
     Solid Waste Disposal Act specified in section 9508(c) of the 
     Internal Revenue Code other than section 9003(h) of the Solid 
     Waste Disposal Act; $17,848,000 of the funds available for 
     grants under section 106 of the Federal Water Pollution 
     Control Act shall be for State participation in national- and 
     State-level statistical surveys of water resources and 
     enhancements to State monitoring programs; $27,000,000 shall 
     be for multipurpose grants, including interagency agreements.

      Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program Account

       For the cost of direct loans and for the cost of guaranteed 
     loans, as authorized by the Water Infrastructure Finance and 
     Innovation Act of 2014, $5,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That such costs, including the cost of 
     modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of 
     the Congressional Budget Act of 1974:  Provided further, That 
     these funds are available to subsidize gross obligations for 
     the principal amount of direct loans, including capitalized 
     interest, and total loan principal, including capitalized 
     interest, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to 
     exceed $610,000,000.
       In addition, fees authorized to be collected pursuant to 
     sections 5029 and 5030 of the Water Infrastructure Finance 
     and Innovation Act of 2014 shall be deposited in this 
     account, to remain available until expended.
       In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
     direct and guaranteed loan programs, notwithstanding section 
     5033 of the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act 
     of 2014, $5,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2020.

       Administrative Provisions--Environmental Protection Agency

             (including transfers and rescission of funds)

       For fiscal year 2019, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 6303(1) and 
     6305(1), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
     Agency, in carrying out the Agency's function to implement 
     directly Federal environmental programs required or 
     authorized by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal 
     program, may award cooperative agreements to federally 
     recognized Indian tribes or Intertribal consortia, if 
     authorized by their member

[[Page H479]]

     tribes, to assist the Administrator in implementing Federal 
     environmental programs for Indian tribes required or 
     authorized by law, except that no such cooperative agreements 
     may be awarded from funds designated for State financial 
     assistance agreements.
       The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is 
     authorized to collect and obligate pesticide registration 
     service fees in accordance with section 33 of the Federal 
     Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as amended by 
     Public Law 112-177, the Pesticide Registration Improvement 
     Extension Act of 2012.
       Notwithstanding section 33(d)(2) of the Federal 
     Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) (7 U.S.C. 
     136w-8(d)(2)), the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency may assess fees under section 33 of FIFRA 
     (7 U.S.C. 136w-8) for fiscal year 2019.
       The Administrator is authorized to transfer up to 
     $300,000,000 of the funds appropriated for the Great Lakes 
     Restoration Initiative under the heading ``Environmental 
     Programs and Management'' to the head of any Federal 
     department or agency, with the concurrence of such head, to 
     carry out activities that would support the Great Lakes 
     Restoration Initiative and Great Lakes Water Quality 
     Agreement programs, projects, or activities; to enter into an 
     interagency agreement with the head of such Federal 
     department or agency to carry out these activities; and to 
     make grants to governmental entities, nonprofit 
     organizations, institutions, and individuals for planning, 
     research, monitoring, outreach, and implementation in 
     furtherance of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the 
     Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.
       The Science and Technology, Environmental Programs and 
     Management, Office of Inspector General, Hazardous Substance 
     Superfund, and Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund 
     Program Accounts, are available for the construction, 
     alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and renovation of 
     facilities, provided that the cost does not exceed $150,000 
     per project.
       For fiscal year 2019, and notwithstanding section 518(f) of 
     the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1377(f)), 
     the Administrator is authorized to use the amounts 
     appropriated for any fiscal year under section 319 of the Act 
     to make grants to Indian tribes pursuant to sections 319(h) 
     and 518(e) of that Act.
       The Administrator is authorized to use the amounts 
     appropriated under the heading ``Environmental Programs and 
     Management'' for fiscal year 2019 to provide grants to 
     implement the Southeastern New England Watershed Restoration 
     Program.
       The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is 
     authorized to collect and obligate fees in accordance with 
     section 3024 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 U.S.C. 
     6939g) for fiscal year 2019.
       Of the unobligated balances available for the ``State and 
     Tribal Assistance Grants'' account, $109,078,000 are hereby 
     permanently rescinded:  Provided, That no amounts may be 
     rescinded from amounts that were designated by the Congress 
     as an emergency requirement pursuant to the Concurrent 
     Resolution on the Budget or the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 or from amounts that were made 
     available by subsection (a) of section 196 of the Continuing 
     Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 114-223), 
     as amended by the Further Continuing and Security Assistance 
     Appropriations Act, 2017 (Public Law 114-254).
       Using funds appropriated under this title, the 
     Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall 
     implement the recommendations described in the report of the 
     Office of Inspector General of the Environmental Protection 
     Agency entitled ``Management Weakness Delayed Response to 
     Flint Water Crisis'', numbered 18-P-0221, and dated July 19, 
     2018, to ensure clean and safe water compliance under the 
     Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300f et seq.). If the 
     Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency does not 
     implement 1 or more recommendations required by the preceding 
     sentence, the Administrator shall submit to the Committees on 
     Appropriations and Environment and Public Works of the Senate 
     and the Committees on Appropriations and Energy and Commerce 
     of the House of Representatives a report explaining why the 
     Administrator did not implement the recommendation and 
     identifying specific actions the Administrator is 
     implementing to address the concerns raised in the report.

                               TITLE III

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

  office of the under secretary for natural resources and environment

       For necessary expenses of the Office of the Under Secretary 
     for Natural Resources and Environment, $875,000:  Provided, 
     That funds made available by this Act to any agency in the 
     Natural Resources and Environment mission area for salaries 
     and expenses are available to fund up to one administrative 
     support staff for the office.

                             Forest Service

                     forest and rangeland research

       For necessary expenses of forest and rangeland research as 
     authorized by law, $300,000,000, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2022, of which not less than $500,000 shall be 
     made available for wood utilization research to develop woody 
     and agricultural biomass conversion of low-value woody 
     biomass using microwave-assisted liquefaction:  Provided, 
     That of the funds provided, $77,000,000 is for the forest 
     inventory and analysis program:  Provided further, That all 
     authorities for the use of funds, including the use of 
     contracts, grants, and cooperative agreements, available to 
     execute the Forest and Rangeland Research appropriation, are 
     also available in the utilization of these funds for Fire 
     Science Research.

                       state and private forestry

       For necessary expenses of cooperating with and providing 
     technical and financial assistance to States, territories, 
     possessions, and others, and for forest health management, 
     and conducting an international program as authorized, 
     $333,990,000, to remain available through September 30, 2022, 
     as authorized by law; of which $65,490,000 is to be derived 
     from the Land and Water Conservation Fund to be used for the 
     Forest Legacy Program, to remain available until expended.

                         national forest system

       For necessary expenses of the Forest Service, not otherwise 
     provided for, for management, protection, improvement, and 
     utilization of the National Forest System, and for hazardous 
     fuels management on or adjacent to such lands, 
     $1,937,653,000, to remain available through September 30, 
     2022:  Provided, That of the funds provided, $40,000,000 
     shall be deposited in the Collaborative Forest Landscape 
     Restoration Fund for ecological restoration treatments as 
     authorized by 16 U.S.C. 7303(f):  Provided further, That of 
     the funds provided, $368,000,000 shall be for forest 
     products:  Provided further, That of the funds provided, 
     $435,000,000 shall be for hazardous fuels management 
     activities, of which not to exceed $15,000,000 may be used to 
     make grants, using any authorities available to the Forest 
     Service under the ``State and Private Forestry'' 
     appropriation, for the purpose of creating incentives for 
     increased use of biomass from National Forest System lands:  
     Provided further, That $20,000,000 may be used by the 
     Secretary of Agriculture to enter into procurement contracts 
     or cooperative agreements or to issue grants for hazardous 
     fuels management activities, and for training or monitoring 
     associated with such hazardous fuels management activities on 
     Federal land, or on non-Federal land if the Secretary 
     determines such activities benefit resources on Federal land: 
      Provided further, That funds made available to implement the 
     Community Forestry Restoration Act, Public Law 106-393, title 
     VI, shall be available for use on non-Federal lands in 
     accordance with authorities made available to the Forest 
     Service under the ``State and Private Forestry'' 
     appropriations:  Provided further, That notwithstanding 
     section 33 of the Bankhead Jones Farm Tenant Act (7 U.S.C. 
     1012), the Secretary of Agriculture, in calculating a fee for 
     grazing on a National Grassland, may provide a credit of up 
     to 50 percent of the calculated fee to a Grazing Association 
     or direct permittee for a conservation practice approved by 
     the Secretary in advance of the fiscal year in which the cost 
     of the conservation practice is incurred. And, that the 
     amount credited shall remain available to the Grazing 
     Association or the direct permittee, as appropriate, in the 
     fiscal year in which the credit is made and each fiscal year 
     thereafter for use on the project for conservation practices 
     approved by the Secretary.

                  capital improvement and maintenance

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For necessary expenses of the Forest Service, not otherwise 
     provided for, $449,000,000, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2022, for construction, capital improvement, 
     maintenance and acquisition of buildings and other facilities 
     and infrastructure; and for construction, reconstruction, 
     decommissioning of roads that are no longer needed, including 
     unauthorized roads that are not part of the transportation 
     system, and maintenance of forest roads and trails by the 
     Forest Service as authorized by 16 U.S.C. 532-538 and 23 
     U.S.C. 101 and 205:  Provided, That funds becoming available 
     in fiscal year 2019 under the Act of March 4, 1913 (16 U.S.C. 
     501) shall be transferred to the General Fund of the Treasury 
     and shall not be available for transfer or obligation for any 
     other purpose unless the funds are appropriated.

                            land acquisition

                    (including rescission of funds)

       For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of 
     chapter 2003 of title 54, United States Code, including 
     administrative expenses, and for acquisition of land or 
     waters, or interest therein, in accordance with statutory 
     authority applicable to the Forest Service, $74,099,000, to 
     be derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund and to 
     remain available until expended.
       Of the unobligated balances from amounts made available for 
     Land Acquisition and derived from the Land and Water 
     Conservation Fund, $16,028,000 is hereby permanently 
     rescinded from projects with cost savings or failed or 
     partially failed projects that had funds returned:  Provided, 
     That no amounts may be rescinded from amounts that were 
     designated by the Congress as an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget or the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

         acquisition of lands for national forests special acts

       For acquisition of lands within the exterior boundaries of 
     the Cache, Uinta, and

[[Page H480]]

     Wasatch National Forests, Utah; the Toiyabe National Forest, 
     Nevada; and the Angeles, San Bernardino, Sequoia, and 
     Cleveland National Forests, California; and the Ozark-St. 
     Francis and Ouachita National Forests, Arkansas; as 
     authorized by law, $700,000, to be derived from forest 
     receipts.

            acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges

       For acquisition of lands, such sums, to be derived from 
     funds deposited by State, county, or municipal governments, 
     public school districts, or other public school authorities, 
     and for authorized expenditures from funds deposited by non-
     Federal parties pursuant to Land Sale and Exchange Acts, 
     pursuant to the Act of December 4, 1967 (16 U.S.C. 484a), to 
     remain available through September 30, 2021, (16 U.S.C. 516-
     617a, 555a; Public Law 96-586; Public Law 76-589, 76-591; and 
     Public Law 78-310).

                         range betterment fund

       For necessary expenses of range rehabilitation, protection, 
     and improvement, 50 percent of all moneys received during the 
     prior fiscal year, as fees for grazing domestic livestock on 
     lands in National Forests in the 16 Western States, pursuant 
     to section 401(b)(1) of Public Law 94-579, to remain 
     available through September 30, 2022, of which not to exceed 
     6 percent shall be available for administrative expenses 
     associated with on-the-ground range rehabilitation, 
     protection, and improvements.

    gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research

       For expenses authorized by 16 U.S.C. 1643(b), $45,000, to 
     remain available through September 30, 2022, to be derived 
     from the fund established pursuant to the above Act.

        management of national forest lands for subsistence uses

       For necessary expenses of the Forest Service to manage 
     Federal lands in Alaska for subsistence uses under title VIII 
     of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (16 
     U.S.C. 3111 et seq.), $2,500,000, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2022.

                        wildland fire management

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For necessary expenses for forest fire presuppression 
     activities on National Forest System lands, for emergency 
     wildland fire suppression on or adjacent to such lands or 
     other lands under fire protection agreement, and for 
     emergency rehabilitation of burned-over National Forest 
     System lands and water, $3,229,620,000, to remain available 
     through September 30, 2022:  Provided, That such funds 
     including unobligated balances under this heading, are 
     available for repayment of advances from other appropriations 
     accounts previously transferred for such purposes:  Provided 
     further, That any unobligated funds appropriated in a 
     previous fiscal year for hazardous fuels management may be 
     transferred to the ``National Forest System'' account:  
     Provided further, That such funds shall be available to 
     reimburse State and other cooperating entities for services 
     provided in response to wildfire and other emergencies or 
     disasters to the extent such reimbursements by the Forest 
     Service for non-fire emergencies are fully repaid by the 
     responsible emergency management agency:  Provided further, 
     That funds provided shall be available for support to Federal 
     emergency response:  Provided further, That the costs of 
     implementing any cooperative agreement between the Federal 
     Government and any non-Federal entity may be shared, as 
     mutually agreed on by the affected parties:  Provided 
     further, That funds designated for wildfire suppression, 
     shall be assessed for cost pools on the same basis as such 
     assessments are calculated against other agency programs.

               administrative provisions--forest service

                     (including transfers of funds)

       Appropriations to the Forest Service for the current fiscal 
     year shall be available for: (1) purchase of passenger motor 
     vehicles; acquisition of passenger motor vehicles from excess 
     sources, and hire of such vehicles; purchase, lease, 
     operation, maintenance, and acquisition of aircraft to 
     maintain the operable fleet for use in Forest Service 
     wildland fire programs and other Forest Service programs; 
     notwithstanding other provisions of law, existing aircraft 
     being replaced may be sold, with proceeds derived or trade-in 
     value used to offset the purchase price for the replacement 
     aircraft; (2) services pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 2225, and not to 
     exceed $100,000 for employment under 5 U.S.C. 3109; (3) 
     purchase, erection, and alteration of buildings and other 
     public improvements (7 U.S.C. 2250); (4) acquisition of land, 
     waters, and interests therein pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 428a; (5) 
     for expenses pursuant to the Volunteers in the National 
     Forest Act of 1972 (16 U.S.C. 558a, 558d, and 558a note); (6) 
     the cost of uniforms as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; and 
     (7) for debt collection contracts in accordance with 31 
     U.S.C. 3718(c).
       Any appropriations or funds available to the Forest Service 
     may be transferred to the Wildland Fire Management 
     appropriation for forest firefighting, emergency 
     rehabilitation of burned-over or damaged lands or waters 
     under its jurisdiction, and fire preparedness due to severe 
     burning conditions upon the Secretary's notification of the 
     House and Senate Committees on Appropriations that all fire 
     suppression funds appropriated under the heading ``Wildland 
     Fire Management'' will be obligated within 30 days:  
     Provided, That all funds used pursuant to this paragraph must 
     be replenished by a supplemental appropriation which must be 
     requested as promptly as possible.
       Not more than $50,000,000 of funds appropriated to the 
     Forest Service shall be available for expenditure or transfer 
     to the Department of the Interior for wildland fire 
     management, hazardous fuels management, and State fire 
     assistance when such transfers would facilitate and expedite 
     wildland fire management programs and projects.
       Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, the Forest 
     Service may transfer unobligated balances of discretionary 
     funds appropriated to the Forest Service by this Act to or 
     within the National Forest System Account, or reprogram funds 
     to be used for the purposes of hazardous fuels management and 
     urgent rehabilitation of burned-over National Forest System 
     lands and water, such transferred funds shall remain 
     available through September 30, 2022:  Provided, That none of 
     the funds transferred pursuant to this section shall be 
     available for obligation without written notification to and 
     the prior approval of the Committees on Appropriations of 
     both Houses of Congress:  Provided further, That this section 
     does not apply to funds appropriated to the FLAME Wildfire 
     Suppression Reserve Fund or funds derived from the Land and 
     Water Conservation Fund.
       Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
     for assistance to or through the Agency for International 
     Development in connection with forest and rangeland research, 
     technical information, and assistance in foreign countries, 
     and shall be available to support forestry and related 
     natural resource activities outside the United States and its 
     territories and possessions, including technical assistance, 
     education and training, and cooperation with U.S., private, 
     and international organizations. The Forest Service, acting 
     for the International Program, may sign direct funding 
     agreements with foreign governments and institutions as well 
     as other domestic agencies (including the U.S. Agency for 
     International Development, the Department of State, and the 
     Millennium Challenge Corporation), U.S. private sector firms, 
     institutions and organizations to provide technical 
     assistance and training programs overseas on forestry and 
     rangeland management.
       Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
     for expenditure or transfer to the Department of the 
     Interior, Bureau of Land Management, for removal, 
     preparation, and adoption of excess wild horses and burros 
     from National Forest System lands, and for the performance of 
     cadastral surveys to designate the boundaries of such lands.
       None of the funds made available to the Forest Service in 
     this Act or any other Act with respect to any fiscal year 
     shall be subject to transfer under the provisions of section 
     702(b) of the Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1944 
     (7 U.S.C. 2257), section 442 of Public Law 106-224 (7 U.S.C. 
     7772), or section 10417(b) of Public Law 107-171 (7 U.S.C. 
     8316(b)).
       None of the funds available to the Forest Service may be 
     reprogrammed without the advance approval of the House and 
     Senate Committees on Appropriations in accordance with the 
     reprogramming procedures contained in Senate report 115-276.
       Not more than $82,000,000 of funds available to the Forest 
     Service shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund of 
     the Department of Agriculture and not more than $14,500,000 
     of funds available to the Forest Service shall be transferred 
     to the Department of Agriculture for Department Reimbursable 
     Programs, commonly referred to as Greenbook charges. Nothing 
     in this paragraph shall prohibit or limit the use of 
     reimbursable agreements requested by the Forest Service in 
     order to obtain services from the Department of Agriculture's 
     National Information Technology Center and the Department of 
     Agriculture's International Technology Service.
       Of the funds available to the Forest Service, up to 
     $5,000,000 shall be available for priority projects within 
     the scope of the approved budget, which shall be carried out 
     by the Youth Conservation Corps and shall be carried out 
     under the authority of the Public Lands Corps Act of 1993 (16 
     U.S.C. 1721 et seq.).
       Of the funds available to the Forest Service, $4,000 is 
     available to the Chief of the Forest Service for official 
     reception and representation expenses.
       Pursuant to sections 405(b) and 410(b) of Public Law 101-
     593, of the funds available to the Forest Service, up to 
     $3,000,000 may be advanced in a lump sum to the National 
     Forest Foundation to aid conservation partnership projects in 
     support of the Forest Service mission, without regard to when 
     the Foundation incurs expenses, for projects on or 
     benefitting National Forest System lands or related to Forest 
     Service programs:  Provided, That of the Federal funds made 
     available to the Foundation, no more than $300,000 shall be 
     available for administrative expenses:  Provided further, 
     That the Foundation shall obtain, by the end of the period of 
     Federal financial assistance, private contributions to match 
     funds made available by the Forest Service on at least a one-
     for-one basis:  Provided further, That the Foundation may 
     transfer Federal funds to a Federal or a non-Federal 
     recipient for a project at the same rate that the recipient 
     has obtained the non-Federal matching funds.
       Pursuant to section 2(b)(2) of Public Law 98-244, up to 
     $3,000,000 of the funds available to the Forest Service may 
     be advanced to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation in a 
     lump sum to aid cost-share conservation

[[Page H481]]

     projects, without regard to when expenses are incurred, on or 
     benefitting National Forest System lands or related to Forest 
     Service programs:  Provided, That such funds shall be matched 
     on at least a one-for-one basis by the Foundation or its sub-
     recipients:  Provided further, That the Foundation may 
     transfer Federal funds to a Federal or non-Federal recipient 
     for a project at the same rate that the recipient has 
     obtained the non-Federal matching funds.
       Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
     for interactions with and providing technical assistance to 
     rural communities and natural resource-based businesses for 
     sustainable rural development purposes.
       Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
     for payments to counties within the Columbia River Gorge 
     National Scenic Area, pursuant to section 14(c)(1) and (2), 
     and section 16(a)(2) of Public Law 99-663.
       Any funds appropriated to the Forest Service may be used to 
     meet the non-Federal share requirement in section 502(c) of 
     the Older Americans Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 3056(c)(2)).
       The Forest Service shall not assess funds for the purpose 
     of performing fire, administrative, and other facilities 
     maintenance and decommissioning.
       Notwithstanding any other provision of law, of any 
     appropriations or funds available to the Forest Service, not 
     to exceed $500,000 may be used to reimburse the Office of the 
     General Counsel (OGC), Department of Agriculture, for travel 
     and related expenses incurred as a result of OGC assistance 
     or participation requested by the Forest Service at meetings, 
     training sessions, management reviews, land purchase 
     negotiations and similar matters unrelated to civil 
     litigation. Future budget justifications for both the Forest 
     Service and the Department of Agriculture should clearly 
     display the sums previously transferred and the sums 
     requested for transfer.
       An eligible individual who is employed in any project 
     funded under title V of the Older Americans Act of 1965 (42 
     U.S.C. 3056 et seq.) and administered by the Forest Service 
     shall be considered to be a Federal employee for purposes of 
     chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code.
       Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, through 
     the Office of Budget and Program Analysis, the Forest Service 
     shall report no later than 30 business days following the 
     close of each fiscal quarter all current and prior year 
     unobligated balances, by fiscal year, budget line item and 
     account, to the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                         Indian Health Service

                         indian health services

       For expenses necessary to carry out the Act of August 5, 
     1954 (68 Stat. 674), the Indian Self-Determination and 
     Education Assistance Act, the Indian Health Care Improvement 
     Act, and titles II and III of the Public Health Service Act 
     with respect to the Indian Health Service, $4,072,385,000, 
     together with payments received during the fiscal year 
     pursuant to sections 231(b) and 233 of the Public Health 
     Service Act (42 U.S.C. 238(b), 238b), for services furnished 
     by the Indian Health Service:  Provided, That funds made 
     available to tribes and tribal organizations through 
     contracts, grant agreements, or any other agreements or 
     compacts authorized by the Indian Self-Determination and 
     Education Assistance Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 450), shall be 
     deemed to be obligated at the time of the grant or contract 
     award and thereafter shall remain available to the tribe or 
     tribal organization without fiscal year limitation:  Provided 
     further, That $2,000,000 shall be available for grants or 
     contracts with public or private institutions to provide 
     alcohol or drug treatment services to Indians, including 
     alcohol detoxification services:  Provided further, That 
     $964,819,000 for Purchased/Referred Care, including 
     $53,000,000 for the Indian Catastrophic Health Emergency 
     Fund, shall remain available until expended:  Provided 
     further, That of the funds provided, up to $36,000,000 shall 
     remain available until expended for implementation of the 
     loan repayment program under section 108 of the Indian Health 
     Care Improvement Act:  Provided further, That of the funds 
     provided, $15,000,000 shall remain available until expended 
     to supplement funds available for operational costs at tribal 
     clinics operated under an Indian Self-Determination and 
     Education Assistance Act compact or contract where health 
     care is delivered in space acquired through a full service 
     lease, which is not eligible for maintenance and improvement 
     and equipment funds from the Indian Health Service, and 
     $58,000,000 shall be for costs related to or resulting from 
     accreditation emergencies, of which up to $4,000,000 may be 
     used to supplement amounts otherwise available for Purchased/
     Referred Care:  Provided further, That the amounts collected 
     by the Federal Government as authorized by sections 104 and 
     108 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (25 U.S.C. 
     1613a and 1616a) during the preceding fiscal year for breach 
     of contracts shall be deposited to the Fund authorized by 
     section 108A of that Act (25 U.S.C. 1616a-1) and shall remain 
     available until expended and, notwithstanding section 108A(c) 
     of that Act (25 U.S.C. 1616a-1(c)), funds shall be available 
     to make new awards under the loan repayment and scholarship 
     programs under sections 104 and 108 of that Act (25 U.S.C. 
     1613a and 1616a):  Provided further, That the amounts made 
     available within this account for the Substance Abuse and 
     Suicide Prevention Program, for opioid Prevention, Treatment 
     and Recovery Services, for the Domestic Violence Prevention 
     Program, for the Zero Suicide Initiative, for the housing 
     subsidy authority for civilian employees, for aftercare pilot 
     programs at Youth Regional Treatment Centers, to improve 
     collections from public and private insurance at Indian 
     Health Service and tribally operated facilities, and for 
     accreditation emergencies shall be allocated at the 
     discretion of the Director of the Indian Health Service and 
     shall remain available until expended:  Provided further, 
     That funds provided in this Act may be used for annual 
     contracts and grants for which the performance period falls 
     within 2 fiscal years, provided the total obligation is 
     recorded in the year the funds are appropriated:  Provided 
     further, That the amounts collected by the Secretary of 
     Health and Human Services under the authority of title IV of 
     the Indian Health Care Improvement Act shall remain available 
     until expended for the purpose of achieving compliance with 
     the applicable conditions and requirements of titles XVIII 
     and XIX of the Social Security Act, except for those related 
     to the planning, design, or construction of new facilities:  
     Provided further, That funding contained herein for 
     scholarship programs under the Indian Health Care Improvement 
     Act shall remain available until expended:  Provided further, 
     That amounts received by tribes and tribal organizations 
     under title IV of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act 
     shall be reported and accounted for and available to the 
     receiving tribes and tribal organizations until expended:  
     Provided further, That the Bureau of Indian Affairs may 
     collect from the Indian Health Service, and from tribes and 
     tribal organizations operating health facilities pursuant to 
     Public Law 93-638, such individually identifiable health 
     information relating to disabled children as may be necessary 
     for the purpose of carrying out its functions under the 
     Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 
     et seq.):  Provided further, That the accreditation emergency 
     funds may be used, as needed, to carry out activities 
     typically funded under the Indian Health Facilities account.

                         contract support costs

       For payments to tribes and tribal organizations for 
     contract support costs associated with Indian Self-
     Determination and Education Assistance Act agreements with 
     the Indian Health Service for fiscal year 2019, such sums as 
     may be necessary:  Provided, That notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, no amounts made available under this 
     heading shall be available for transfer to another budget 
     account.

                        indian health facilities

       For construction, repair, maintenance, improvement, and 
     equipment of health and related auxiliary facilities, 
     including quarters for personnel; preparation of plans, 
     specifications, and drawings; acquisition of sites, purchase 
     and erection of modular buildings, and purchases of trailers; 
     and for provision of domestic and community sanitation 
     facilities for Indians, as authorized by section 7 of the Act 
     of August 5, 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2004a), the Indian Self-
     Determination Act, and the Indian Health Care Improvement 
     Act, and for expenses necessary to carry out such Acts and 
     titles II and III of the Public Health Service Act with 
     respect to environmental health and facilities support 
     activities of the Indian Health Service, $877,504,000, to 
     remain available until expended:  Provided, That 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
     appropriated for the planning, design, construction, 
     renovation or expansion of health facilities for the benefit 
     of an Indian tribe or tribes may be used to purchase land on 
     which such facilities will be located:  Provided further, 
     That not to exceed $500,000 may be used by the Indian Health 
     Service to purchase TRANSAM equipment from the Department of 
     Defense for distribution to the Indian Health Service and 
     tribal facilities:  Provided further, That none of the funds 
     appropriated to the Indian Health Service may be used for 
     sanitation facilities construction for new homes funded with 
     grants by the housing programs of the United States 
     Department of Housing and Urban Development:  Provided 
     further, That not to exceed $2,700,000 from this account and 
     the ``Indian Health Services'' account may be used by the 
     Indian Health Service to obtain ambulances for the Indian 
     Health Service and tribal facilities in conjunction with an 
     existing interagency agreement between the Indian Health 
     Service and the General Services Administration:  Provided 
     further, That not to exceed $500,000 may be placed in a 
     Demolition Fund, to remain available until expended, and be 
     used by the Indian Health Service for the demolition of 
     Federal buildings.

            administrative provisions--indian health service

       Appropriations provided in this Act to the Indian Health 
     Service shall be available for services as authorized by 5 
     U.S.C. 3109 at rates not to exceed the per diem rate 
     equivalent to the maximum rate payable for senior-level 
     positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376; hire of passenger motor 
     vehicles and aircraft; purchase of medical equipment; 
     purchase of reprints; purchase, renovation and erection of 
     modular buildings and renovation of existing facilities; 
     payments for telephone service in private residences in the 
     field, when authorized under regulations approved by the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services; uniforms or 
     allowances therefor as authorized

[[Page H482]]

     by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; and for expenses of attendance at 
     meetings that relate to the functions or activities of the 
     Indian Health Service:  Provided, That in accordance with the 
     provisions of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, non-
     Indian patients may be extended health care at all tribally 
     administered or Indian Health Service facilities, subject to 
     charges, and the proceeds along with funds recovered under 
     the Federal Medical Care Recovery Act (42 U.S.C. 2651-2653) 
     shall be credited to the account of the facility providing 
     the service and shall be available without fiscal year 
     limitation:  Provided further, That notwithstanding any other 
     law or regulation, funds transferred from the Department of 
     Housing and Urban Development to the Indian Health Service 
     shall be administered under Public Law 86-121, the Indian 
     Sanitation Facilities Act and Public Law 93-638:  Provided 
     further, That funds appropriated to the Indian Health Service 
     in this Act, except those used for administrative and program 
     direction purposes, shall not be subject to limitations 
     directed at curtailing Federal travel and transportation:  
     Provided further, That none of the funds made available to 
     the Indian Health Service in this Act shall be used for any 
     assessments or charges by the Department of Health and Human 
     Services unless identified in the budget justification and 
     provided in this Act, or approved by the House and Senate 
     Committees on Appropriations through the reprogramming 
     process:  Provided further, That notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, funds previously or herein made available 
     to a tribe or tribal organization through a contract, grant, 
     or agreement authorized by title I or title V of the Indian 
     Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 (25 
     U.S.C. 5321 et seq. (title I), 5381 et seq. (title V)), may 
     be deobligated and reobligated to a self-determination 
     contract under title I, or a self-governance agreement under 
     title V of such Act and thereafter shall remain available to 
     the tribe or tribal organization without fiscal year 
     limitation:  Provided further, That none of the funds made 
     available to the Indian Health Service in this Act shall be 
     used to implement the final rule published in the Federal 
     Register on September 16, 1987, by the Department of Health 
     and Human Services, relating to the eligibility for the 
     health care services of the Indian Health Service until the 
     Indian Health Service has submitted a budget request 
     reflecting the increased costs associated with the proposed 
     final rule, and such request has been included in an 
     appropriations Act and enacted into law:  Provided further, 
     That with respect to functions transferred by the Indian 
     Health Service to tribes or tribal organizations, the Indian 
     Health Service is authorized to provide goods and services to 
     those entities on a reimbursable basis, including payments in 
     advance with subsequent adjustment, and the reimbursements 
     received therefrom, along with the funds received from those 
     entities pursuant to the Indian Self-Determination Act, may 
     be credited to the same or subsequent appropriation account 
     from which the funds were originally derived, with such 
     amounts to remain available until expended:  Provided 
     further, That reimbursements for training, technical 
     assistance, or services provided by the Indian Health Service 
     will contain total costs, including direct, administrative, 
     and overhead costs associated with the provision of goods, 
     services, or technical assistance:  Provided further, That 
     the Indian Health Service may provide to civilian medical 
     personnel serving in hospitals operated by the Indian Health 
     Service housing allowances equivalent to those that would be 
     provided to members of the Commissioned Corps of the United 
     States Public Health Service serving in similar positions at 
     such hospitals:  Provided further, That the appropriation 
     structure for the Indian Health Service may not be altered 
     without advance notification to the House and Senate 
     Committees on Appropriations.

                     National Institutes of Health

          national institute of environmental health sciences

       For necessary expenses for the National Institute of 
     Environmental Health Sciences in carrying out activities set 
     forth in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental 
     Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 
     9660(a)) and section 126(g) of the Superfund Amendments and 
     Reauthorization Act of 1986, $78,349,000.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

            toxic substances and environmental public health

       For necessary expenses for the Agency for Toxic Substances 
     and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in carrying out activities set 
     forth in sections 104(i) and 111(c)(4) of the Comprehensive 
     Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 
     1980 (CERCLA) and section 3019 of the Solid Waste Disposal 
     Act, $74,691,000:  Provided, That notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, in lieu of performing a health assessment 
     under section 104(i)(6) of CERCLA, the Administrator of ATSDR 
     may conduct other appropriate health studies, evaluations, or 
     activities, including, without limitation, biomedical 
     testing, clinical evaluations, medical monitoring, and 
     referral to accredited healthcare providers:  Provided 
     further, That in performing any such health assessment or 
     health study, evaluation, or activity, the Administrator of 
     ATSDR shall not be bound by the deadlines in section 
     104(i)(6)(A) of CERCLA:  Provided further, That none of the 
     funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for 
     ATSDR to issue in excess of 40 toxicological profiles 
     pursuant to section 104(i) of CERCLA during fiscal year 2019, 
     and existing profiles may be updated as necessary.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES

                   Executive Office of the President

  council on environmental quality and office of environmental quality

       For necessary expenses to continue functions assigned to 
     the Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
     Environmental Quality pursuant to the National Environmental 
     Policy Act of 1969, the Environmental Quality Improvement Act 
     of 1970, and Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1977, and not to 
     exceed $750 for official reception and representation 
     expenses, $3,005,000:  Provided, That notwithstanding section 
     202 of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, the 
     Council shall consist of one member, appointed by the 
     President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, 
     serving as chairman and exercising all powers, functions, and 
     duties of the Council.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses in carrying out activities pursuant 
     to section 112(r)(6) of the Clean Air Act, including hire of 
     passenger vehicles, uniforms or allowances therefor, as 
     authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902, and for services authorized 
     by 5 U.S.C. 3109 but at rates for individuals not to exceed 
     the per diem equivalent to the maximum rate payable for 
     senior level positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376, $11,000,000:  
     Provided, That the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation 
     Board (Board) shall have not more than three career Senior 
     Executive Service positions:  Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, the individual 
     appointed to the position of Inspector General of the 
     Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shall, by virtue of 
     such appointment, also hold the position of Inspector General 
     of the Board:  Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
     other provision of law, the Inspector General of the Board 
     shall utilize personnel of the Office of Inspector General of 
     EPA in performing the duties of the Inspector General of the 
     Board, and shall not appoint any individuals to positions 
     within the Board.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Office of Navajo and Hopi 
     Indian Relocation as authorized by Public Law 93-531, 
     $7,400,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That funds provided in this or any other appropriations Act 
     are to be used to relocate eligible individuals and groups 
     including evictees from District 6, Hopi-partitioned lands 
     residents, those in significantly substandard housing, and 
     all others certified as eligible and not included in the 
     preceding categories:  Provided further, That none of the 
     funds contained in this or any other Act may be used by the 
     Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation to evict any 
     single Navajo or Navajo family who, as of November 30, 1985, 
     was physically domiciled on the lands partitioned to the Hopi 
     Tribe unless a new or replacement home is provided for such 
     household:  Provided further, That no relocatee will be 
     provided with more than one new or replacement home:  
     Provided further, That the Office shall relocate any 
     certified eligible relocatees who have selected and received 
     an approved homesite on the Navajo reservation or selected a 
     replacement residence off the Navajo reservation or on the 
     land acquired pursuant to section 11 of Public Law 93-531 (88 
     Stat. 1716).

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development

                        payment to the institute

       For payment to the Institute of American Indian and Alaska 
     Native Culture and Arts Development, as authorized by part A 
     of title XV of Public Law 99-498 (20 U.S.C. 4411 et seq.), 
     $9,960,000, which shall become available on July 1, 2019, and 
     shall remain available until September 30, 2020.

                        Smithsonian Institution

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, as 
     authorized by law, including research in the fields of art, 
     science, and history; development, preservation, and 
     documentation of the National Collections; presentation of 
     public exhibits and performances; collection, preparation, 
     dissemination, and exchange of information and publications; 
     conduct of education, training, and museum assistance 
     programs; maintenance, alteration, operation, lease 
     agreements of no more than 30 years, and protection of 
     buildings, facilities, and approaches; not to exceed $100,000 
     for services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; and purchase, 
     rental, repair, and cleaning of uniforms for employees, 
     $739,894,000, to remain available until September 30, 2020, 
     except as otherwise provided herein; of which not to exceed 
     $6,917,000 for the instrumentation program, collections 
     acquisition, exhibition reinstallation, and the repatriation 
     of skeletal remains program shall remain available until 
     expended; and including such funds as may be necessary to 
     support American overseas research centers:  Provided, That 
     funds appropriated herein are available for advance payments 
     to independent contractors performing research services or 
     participating in official Smithsonian presentations.

[[Page H483]]

  


                           facilities capital

       For necessary expenses of repair, revitalization, and 
     alteration of facilities owned or occupied by the Smithsonian 
     Institution, by contract or otherwise, as authorized by 
     section 2 of the Act of August 22, 1949 (63 Stat. 623), and 
     for construction, including necessary personnel, 
     $303,503,000, to remain available until expended, of which 
     not to exceed $10,000 shall be for services as authorized by 
     5 U.S.C. 3109.

                        National Gallery of Art

                         salaries and expenses

       For the upkeep and operations of the National Gallery of 
     Art, the protection and care of the works of art therein, and 
     administrative expenses incident thereto, as authorized by 
     the Act of March 24, 1937 (50 Stat. 51), as amended by the 
     public resolution of April 13, 1939 (Public Resolution 9, 
     Seventy-sixth Congress), including services as authorized by 
     5 U.S.C. 3109; payment in advance when authorized by the 
     treasurer of the Gallery for membership in library, museum, 
     and art associations or societies whose publications or 
     services are available to members only, or to members at a 
     price lower than to the general public; purchase, repair, and 
     cleaning of uniforms for guards, and uniforms, or allowances 
     therefor, for other employees as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 
     5901-5902); purchase or rental of devices and services for 
     protecting buildings and contents thereof, and maintenance, 
     alteration, improvement, and repair of buildings, approaches, 
     and grounds; and purchase of services for restoration and 
     repair of works of art for the National Gallery of Art by 
     contracts made, without advertising, with individuals, firms, 
     or organizations at such rates or prices and under such terms 
     and conditions as the Gallery may deem proper, $144,202,000, 
     to remain available until September 30, 2020, of which not to 
     exceed $3,620,000 for the special exhibition program shall 
     remain available until expended.

            repair, restoration and renovation of buildings

       For necessary expenses of repair, restoration and 
     renovation of buildings, grounds and facilities owned or 
     occupied by the National Gallery of Art, by contract or 
     otherwise, for operating lease agreements of no more than 10 
     years, with no extensions or renewals beyond the 10 years, 
     that address space needs created by the ongoing renovations 
     in the Master Facilities Plan, as authorized, $23,000,000, to 
     remain available until expended:  Provided, That contracts 
     awarded for environmental systems, protection systems, and 
     exterior repair or renovation of buildings of the National 
     Gallery of Art may be negotiated with selected contractors 
     and awarded on the basis of contractor qualifications as well 
     as price.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

                       operations and maintenance

       For necessary expenses for the operation, maintenance and 
     security of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
     Arts, $24,490,000.

                     capital repair and restoration

       For necessary expenses for capital repair and restoration 
     of the existing features of the building and site of the John 
     F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, $16,800,000, to 
     remain available until expended.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

                         salaries and expenses

       For expenses necessary in carrying out the provisions of 
     the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Act of 1968 (82 Stat. 1356) 
     including hire of passenger vehicles and services as 
     authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $12,000,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2020.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

                    National Endowment for the Arts

                       grants and administration

       For necessary expenses to carry out the National Foundation 
     on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, $155,000,000 
     shall be available to the National Endowment for the Arts for 
     the support of projects and productions in the arts, 
     including arts education and public outreach activities, 
     through assistance to organizations and individuals pursuant 
     to section 5 of the Act, for program support, and for 
     administering the functions of the Act, to remain available 
     until expended.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

                       grants and administration

       For necessary expenses to carry out the National Foundation 
     on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, $155,000,000 to 
     remain available until expended, of which $143,700,000 shall 
     be available for support of activities in the humanities, 
     pursuant to section 7(c) of the Act and for administering the 
     functions of the Act; and $11,300,000 shall be available to 
     carry out the matching grants program pursuant to section 
     10(a)(2) of the Act, including $9,100,000 for the purposes of 
     section 7(h):  Provided, That appropriations for carrying out 
     section 10(a)(2) shall be available for obligation only in 
     such amounts as may be equal to the total amounts of gifts, 
     bequests, devises of money, and other property accepted by 
     the chairman or by grantees of the National Endowment for the 
     Humanities under the provisions of sections 11(a)(2)(B) and 
     11(a)(3)(B) during the current and preceding fiscal years for 
     which equal amounts have not previously been appropriated.

                       Administrative Provisions

       None of the funds appropriated to the National Foundation 
     on the Arts and the Humanities may be used to process any 
     grant or contract documents which do not include the text of 
     18 U.S.C. 1913:  Provided, That none of the funds 
     appropriated to the National Foundation on the Arts and the 
     Humanities may be used for official reception and 
     representation expenses:  Provided further, That funds from 
     nonappropriated sources may be used as necessary for official 
     reception and representation expenses:  Provided further, 
     That the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts 
     may approve grants of up to $10,000, if in the aggregate the 
     amount of such grants does not exceed 5 percent of the sums 
     appropriated for grantmaking purposes per year:  Provided 
     further, That such small grant actions are taken pursuant to 
     the terms of an expressed and direct delegation of authority 
     from the National Council on the Arts to the Chairperson.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

                         salaries and expenses

       For expenses of the Commission of Fine Arts under chapter 
     91 of title 40, United States Code, $2,771,000:  Provided, 
     That the Commission is authorized to charge fees to cover the 
     full costs of its publications, and such fees shall be 
     credited to this account as an offsetting collection, to 
     remain available until expended without further 
     appropriation:  Provided further, That the Commission is 
     authorized to accept gifts, including objects, papers, 
     artwork, drawings and artifacts, that pertain to the history 
     and design of the Nation's Capital or the history and 
     activities of the Commission of Fine Arts, for the purpose of 
     artistic display, study, or education:  Provided further, 
     That one-tenth of one percent of the funds provided under 
     this heading may be used for official reception and 
     representation expenses.

               national capital arts and cultural affairs

       For necessary expenses as authorized by Public Law 99-190 
     (20 U.S.C. 956a), $2,750,000.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic 
     Preservation (Public Law 89-665), $6,440,000.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the National Capital Planning 
     Commission under chapter 87 of title 40, United States Code, 
     including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
     $7,948,000:  Provided, That one-quarter of 1 percent of the 
     funds provided under this heading may be used for official 
     reception and representational expenses associated with 
     hosting international visitors engaged in the planning and 
     physical development of world capitals.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

                       holocaust memorial museum

       For expenses of the Holocaust Memorial Museum, as 
     authorized by Public Law 106-292 (36 U.S.C. 2301-2310), 
     $59,500,000, of which $1,715,000 shall remain available until 
     September 30, 2021, for the Museum's equipment replacement 
     program; and of which $4,000,000 for the Museum's repair and 
     rehabilitation program and $1,500,000 for the Museum's 
     outreach initiatives program shall remain available until 
     expended.

                Dwight d. Eisenhower Memorial Commission

                         salaries and expenses

       For necessary expenses of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial 
     Commission, $1,800,000, to remain available until expended.

                 women's suffrage centennial commission

       For necessary expenses for the Women's Suffrage Centennial 
     Commission, as authorized by the Women's Suffrage Centennial 
     Commission Act (section 431(a)(3) of division G of Public Law 
     115-31), $1,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                   world war i centennial commission

                         salaries and expenses

       Notwithstanding section 9 of the World War I Centennial 
     Commission Act, as authorized by the World War I Centennial 
     Commission Act (Public Law 112-272) and the Carl Levin and 
     Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
     for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), for necessary 
     expenses of the World War I Centennial Commission, 
     $7,000,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That in addition to the authority provided by section 6(g) of 
     such Act, the World War I Commission may accept money, in-
     kind personnel services, contractual support, or any 
     appropriate support from any executive branch agency for 
     activities of the Commission.

                                TITLE IV

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     (including transfers of funds)

                      restriction on use of funds

       Sec. 401.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall be available for any activity or the publication or 
     distribution of literature that in any way tends to promote 
     public support or opposition to any legislative proposal on 
     which Congressional action is not complete other than to 
     communicate to Members of Congress as described in 18 U.S.C. 
     1913.

[[Page H484]]

  


                      obligation of appropriations

       Sec. 402.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.

                 disclosure of administrative expenses

       Sec. 403.  The amount and basis of estimated overhead 
     charges, deductions, reserves or holdbacks, including working 
     capital fund and cost pool charges, from programs, projects, 
     activities and subactivities to support government-wide, 
     departmental, agency, or bureau administrative functions or 
     headquarters, regional, or central operations shall be 
     presented in annual budget justifications and subject to 
     approval by the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate. Changes to such estimates 
     shall be presented to the Committees on Appropriations for 
     approval.

                          mining applications

       Sec. 404. (a) Limitation of Funds.--None of the funds 
     appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to this Act 
     shall be obligated or expended to accept or process 
     applications for a patent for any mining or mill site claim 
     located under the general mining laws.
       (b) Exceptions.--Subsection (a) shall not apply if the 
     Secretary of the Interior determines that, for the claim 
     concerned (1) a patent application was filed with the 
     Secretary on or before September 30, 1994; and (2) all 
     requirements established under sections 2325 and 2326 of the 
     Revised Statutes (30 U.S.C. 29 and 30) for vein or lode 
     claims, sections 2329, 2330, 2331, and 2333 of the Revised 
     Statutes (30 U.S.C. 35, 36, and 37) for placer claims, and 
     section 2337 of the Revised Statutes (30 U.S.C. 42) for mill 
     site claims, as the case may be, were fully complied with by 
     the applicant by that date.
       (c) Report.--On September 30, 2020, the Secretary of the 
     Interior shall file with the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations and the Committee on Natural Resources of the 
     House and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of 
     the Senate a report on actions taken by the Department under 
     the plan submitted pursuant to section 314(c) of the 
     Department of the Interior and Related Agencies 
     Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-208).
       (d) Mineral Examinations.--In order to process patent 
     applications in a timely and responsible manner, upon the 
     request of a patent applicant, the Secretary of the Interior 
     shall allow the applicant to fund a qualified third-party 
     contractor to be selected by the Director of the Bureau of 
     Land Management to conduct a mineral examination of the 
     mining claims or mill sites contained in a patent application 
     as set forth in subsection (b). The Bureau of Land Management 
     shall have the sole responsibility to choose and pay the 
     third-party contractor in accordance with the standard 
     procedures employed by the Bureau of Land Management in the 
     retention of third-party contractors.

             contract support costs, prior year limitation

       Sec. 405.  Sections 405 and 406 of division F of the 
     Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 
     (Public Law 113-235) shall continue in effect in fiscal year 
     2019.

          contract support costs, fiscal year 2019 limitation

       Sec. 406.  Amounts provided by this Act for fiscal year 
     2019 under the headings ``Department of Health and Human 
     Services, Indian Health Service, Contract Support Costs'' and 
     ``Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs and 
     Bureau of Indian Education, Contract Support Costs'' are the 
     only amounts available for contract support costs arising out 
     of self-determination or self-governance contracts, grants, 
     compacts, or annual funding agreements for fiscal year 2019 
     with the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the Indian Health 
     Service:  Provided, That such amounts provided by this Act 
     are not available for payment of claims for contract support 
     costs for prior years, or for repayments of payments for 
     settlements or judgments awarding contract support costs for 
     prior years.

                        forest management plans

       Sec. 407.  The Secretary of Agriculture shall not be 
     considered to be in violation of subparagraph 6(f)(5)(A) of 
     the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 
     1974 (16 U.S.C. 1604(f)(5)(A)) solely because more than 15 
     years have passed without revision of the plan for a unit of 
     the National Forest System. Nothing in this section exempts 
     the Secretary from any other requirement of the Forest and 
     Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (16 U.S.C. 1600 et 
     seq.) or any other law:  Provided, That if the Secretary is 
     not acting expeditiously and in good faith, within the 
     funding available, to revise a plan for a unit of the 
     National Forest System, this section shall be void with 
     respect to such plan and a court of proper jurisdiction may 
     order completion of the plan on an accelerated basis.

                 prohibition within national monuments

       Sec. 408.  No funds provided in this Act may be expended to 
     conduct preleasing, leasing and related activities under 
     either the Mineral Leasing Act (30 U.S.C. 181 et seq.) or the 
     Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.) 
     within the boundaries of a National Monument established 
     pursuant to the Act of June 8, 1906 (16 U.S.C. 431 et seq.) 
     as such boundary existed on January 20, 2001, except where 
     such activities are allowed under the Presidential 
     proclamation establishing such monument.

                         limitation on takings

       Sec. 409.  Unless otherwise provided herein, no funds 
     appropriated in this Act for the acquisition of lands or 
     interests in lands may be expended for the filing of 
     declarations of taking or complaints in condemnation without 
     the approval of the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations:  Provided, That this provision shall not 
     apply to funds appropriated to implement the Everglades 
     National Park Protection and Expansion Act of 1989, or to 
     funds appropriated for Federal assistance to the State of 
     Florida to acquire lands for Everglades restoration purposes.

                        timber sale requirements

       Sec. 410.  No timber sale in Alaska's Region 10 shall be 
     advertised if the indicated rate is deficit (defined as the 
     value of the timber is not sufficient to cover all logging 
     and stumpage costs and provide a normal profit and risk 
     allowance under the Forest Service's appraisal process) when 
     appraised using a residual value appraisal. The western red 
     cedar timber from those sales which is surplus to the needs 
     of the domestic processors in Alaska, shall be made available 
     to domestic processors in the contiguous 48 United States at 
     prevailing domestic prices. All additional western red cedar 
     volume not sold to Alaska or contiguous 48 United States 
     domestic processors may be exported to foreign markets at the 
     election of the timber sale holder. All Alaska yellow cedar 
     may be sold at prevailing export prices at the election of 
     the timber sale holder.

                    prohibition on no-bid contracts

       Sec. 411.  None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
     available by this Act to executive branch agencies may be 
     used to enter into any Federal contract unless such contract 
     is entered into in accordance with the requirements of 
     Chapter 33 of title 41, United States Code, or Chapter 137 of 
     title 10, United States Code, and the Federal Acquisition 
     Regulation, unless--
       (1) Federal law specifically authorizes a contract to be 
     entered into without regard for these requirements, including 
     formula grants for States, or federally recognized Indian 
     tribes; or
       (2) such contract is authorized by the Indian Self-
     Determination and Education Assistance Act (Public Law 93-
     638, 25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.) or by any other Federal laws that 
     specifically authorize a contract within an Indian tribe as 
     defined in section 4(e) of that Act (25 U.S.C. 450b(e)); or
       (3) such contract was awarded prior to the date of 
     enactment of this Act.

                           posting of reports

       Sec. 412. (a) Any agency receiving funds made available in 
     this Act, shall, subject to subsections (b) and (c), post on 
     the public website of that agency any report required to be 
     submitted by the Congress in this or any other Act, upon the 
     determination by the head of the agency that it shall serve 
     the national interest.
       (b) Subsection (a) shall not apply to a report if--
       (1) the public posting of the report compromises national 
     security; or
       (2) the report contains proprietary information.
       (c) The head of the agency posting such report shall do so 
     only after such report has been made available to the 
     requesting Committee or Committees of Congress for no less 
     than 45 days.

            national endowment for the arts grant guidelines

       Sec. 413.  Of the funds provided to the National Endowment 
     for the Arts--
       (1) The Chairperson shall only award a grant to an 
     individual if such grant is awarded to such individual for a 
     literature fellowship, National Heritage Fellowship, or 
     American Jazz Masters Fellowship.
       (2) The Chairperson shall establish procedures to ensure 
     that no funding provided through a grant, except a grant made 
     to a State or local arts agency, or regional group, may be 
     used to make a grant to any other organization or individual 
     to conduct activity independent of the direct grant 
     recipient. Nothing in this subsection shall prohibit payments 
     made in exchange for goods and services.
       (3) No grant shall be used for seasonal support to a group, 
     unless the application is specific to the contents of the 
     season, including identified programs or projects.

           national endowment for the arts program priorities

       Sec. 414. (a) In providing services or awarding financial 
     assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and the 
     Humanities Act of 1965 from funds appropriated under this 
     Act, the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts 
     shall ensure that priority is given to providing services or 
     awarding financial assistance for projects, productions, 
     workshops, or programs that serve underserved populations.
       (b) In this section:
       (1) The term ``underserved population'' means a population 
     of individuals, including urban minorities, who have 
     historically been outside the purview of arts and humanities 
     programs due to factors such as a high incidence of income 
     below the poverty line or to geographic isolation.
       (2) The term ``poverty line'' means the poverty line (as 
     defined by the Office of Management and Budget, and revised 
     annually in accordance with section 673(2) of the Community 
     Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C.

[[Page H485]]

     9902(2))) applicable to a family of the size involved.
       (c) In providing services and awarding financial assistance 
     under the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act 
     of 1965 with funds appropriated by this Act, the Chairperson 
     of the National Endowment for the Arts shall ensure that 
     priority is given to providing services or awarding financial 
     assistance for projects, productions, workshops, or programs 
     that will encourage public knowledge, education, 
     understanding, and appreciation of the arts.
       (d) With funds appropriated by this Act to carry out 
     section 5 of the National Foundation on the Arts and 
     Humanities Act of 1965--
       (1) the Chairperson shall establish a grant category for 
     projects, productions, workshops, or programs that are of 
     national impact or availability or are able to tour several 
     States;
       (2) the Chairperson shall not make grants exceeding 15 
     percent, in the aggregate, of such funds to any single State, 
     excluding grants made under the authority of paragraph (1);
       (3) the Chairperson shall report to the Congress annually 
     and by State, on grants awarded by the Chairperson in each 
     grant category under section 5 of such Act; and
       (4) the Chairperson shall encourage the use of grants to 
     improve and support community-based music performance and 
     education.

                  status of balances of appropriations

       Sec. 415.  The Department of the Interior, the 
     Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service, and the 
     Indian Health Service shall provide the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate 
     quarterly reports on the status of balances of appropriations 
     including all uncommitted, committed, and unobligated funds 
     in each program and activity.

                      prohibition on use of funds

       Sec. 416.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
     of the funds made available in this Act or any other Act may 
     be used to promulgate or implement any regulation requiring 
     the issuance of permits under title V of the Clean Air Act 
     (42 U.S.C. 7661 et seq.) for carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, 
     water vapor, or methane emissions resulting from biological 
     processes associated with livestock production.

                 greenhouse gas reporting restrictions

       Sec. 417.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
     of the funds made available in this or any other Act may be 
     used to implement any provision in a rule, if that provision 
     requires mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from 
     manure management systems.

                          funding prohibition

       Sec. 418.  None of the funds made available by this or any 
     other Act may be used to regulate the lead content of 
     ammunition, ammunition components, or fishing tackle under 
     the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.) or 
     any other law.

                        contracting authorities

       Sec. 419.  Section 412 of Division E of Public Law 112-74 
     is amended by striking ``fiscal year 2019'' and inserting 
     ``fiscal year 2020''.

                      extension of grazing permits

       Sec. 420.  The terms and conditions of section 325 of 
     Public Law 108-108 (117 Stat. 1307), regarding grazing 
     permits issued by the Forest Service on any lands not subject 
     to administration under section 402 of the Federal Lands 
     Policy and Management Act (43 U.S.C. 1752), shall remain in 
     effect for fiscal year 2019.

                          funding prohibition

       Sec. 421. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act 
     may be used to maintain or establish a computer network 
     unless such network is designed to block access to 
     pornography websites.
       (b) Nothing in subsection (a) shall limit the use of funds 
     necessary for any Federal, State, tribal, or local law 
     enforcement agency or any other entity carrying out criminal 
     investigations, prosecution, or adjudication activities.

        forest service facility realignment and enhancement act

       Sec. 422.  Section 503(f) of the Forest Service Facility 
     Realignment and Enhancement Act of 2005 (16 U.S.C. 580d note; 
     Public Law 109-54) is amended by striking ``2018'' and 
     inserting ``2019''.

                     use of american iron and steel

       Sec. 423. (a)(1) None of the funds made available by a 
     State water pollution control revolving fund as authorized by 
     section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300j-
     12) shall be used for a project for the construction, 
     alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public water system 
     or treatment works unless all of the iron and steel products 
     used in the project are produced in the United States.
       (2) In this section, the term ``iron and steel'' products 
     means the following products made primarily of iron or steel: 
     lined or unlined pipes and fittings, manhole covers and other 
     municipal castings, hydrants, tanks, flanges, pipe clamps and 
     restraints, valves, structural steel, reinforced precast 
     concrete, and construction materials.
       (b) Subsection (a) shall not apply in any case or category 
     of cases in which the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency (in this section referred to as the 
     ``Administrator'') finds that--
       (1) applying subsection (a) would be inconsistent with the 
     public interest;
       (2) iron and steel products are not produced in the United 
     States in sufficient and reasonably available quantities and 
     of a satisfactory quality; or
       (3) inclusion of iron and steel products produced in the 
     United States will increase the cost of the overall project 
     by more than 25 percent.
       (c) If the Administrator receives a request for a waiver 
     under this section, the Administrator shall make available to 
     the public on an informal basis a copy of the request and 
     information available to the Administrator concerning the 
     request, and shall allow for informal public input on the 
     request for at least 15 days prior to making a finding based 
     on the request. The Administrator shall make the request and 
     accompanying information available by electronic means, 
     including on the official public Internet Web site of the 
     Environmental Protection Agency.
       (d) This section shall be applied in a manner consistent 
     with United States obligations under international 
     agreements.
       (e) The Administrator may retain up to 0.25 percent of the 
     funds appropriated in this Act for the Clean and Drinking 
     Water State Revolving Funds for carrying out the provisions 
     described in subsection (a)(1) for management and oversight 
     of the requirements of this section.

                             midway island

       Sec. 424.  None of the funds made available by this Act may 
     be used to destroy any buildings or structures on Midway 
     Island that have been recommended by the United States Navy 
     for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places (54 
     U.S.C. 302101).

                 john f. kennedy center reauthorization

       Sec. 425.  Section 13 of the John F. Kennedy Center Act (20 
     U.S.C. 76r) is amended by striking subsections (a) and (b) 
     and inserting the following:
       ``(a) Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is 
     authorized to be appropriated to the Board to carry out 
     section 4(a)(1)(H), $24,490,000 for fiscal year 2019.
       ``(b) Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be 
     appropriated to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and 
     (G) of section 4(a)(1), $16,800,000 for fiscal year 2019.''.

local cooperator training agreements and transfers of excess equipment 
                       and supplies for wildfires

       Sec. 426.  The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to 
     enter into grants and cooperative agreements with volunteer 
     fire departments, rural fire departments, rangeland fire 
     protection associations, and similar organizations to provide 
     for wildland fire training and equipment, including supplies 
     and communication devices. Notwithstanding 121(c) of title 
     40, United States Code, or section 521 of title 40, United 
     States Code, the Secretary is further authorized to transfer 
     title to excess Department of the Interior firefighting 
     equipment no longer needed to carry out the functions of the 
     Department's wildland fire management program to such 
     organizations.

                             infrastructure

       Sec. 427. (a) For an additional amount for ``Environmental 
     Protection Agency--Hazardous Substance Superfund'', 
     $43,000,000, of which $38,000,000 shall be for the Superfund 
     Remedial program and $5,000,000 shall be for the Superfund 
     Emergency Response and Removal program, to remain available 
     until expended, consisting of such sums as are available in 
     the Trust Fund on September 30, 2018, as authorized by 
     section 517(a) of the Superfund Amendments and 
     Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and up to $43,000,000 as a 
     payment from general revenues to the Hazardous Substance 
     Superfund for purposes as authorized by section 517(b) of 
     SARA.
       (b) For an additional amount for ``Environmental Protection 
     Agency--State and Tribal Assistance Grants,'' for 
     environmental programs and infrastructure assistance, 
     including capitalization grants for State revolving funds and 
     performance partnership grants, $670,000,000 to remain 
     available until expended, of which--
       (1) $300,000,000 shall be for making capitalization grants 
     for the Clean Water State Revolving Funds under title VI of 
     the Federal Water Pollution Control Act; and of which 
     $300,000,000 shall be for making capitalization grants for 
     the Drinking Water State Revolving Funds under section 1452 
     of the Safe Drinking Water Act;
       (2) $30,000,000 shall be for grants for small and 
     disadvantaged communities authorized in section 2104 of the 
     Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (Public 
     Law 114-322);
       (3) $25,000,000 shall be for grants for lead testing in 
     school and child care program drinking water authorized in 
     section 2107 of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the 
     Nation Act (Public Law 114-322);
       (4) $15,000,000 shall be for grants for reducing lead in 
     drinking water authorized in section 2105 of the Water 
     Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (Public Law 
     114-322).
       (c) For an additional amount for ``Environmental Protection 
     Agency--Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program 
     Account'', $53,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     for the cost of direct loans, for the cost of guaranteed 
     loans, and for administrative expenses to carry out the 
     direct and guaranteed loan programs, of which $3,000,000, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2020, may be used for 
     such administrative expenses:  Provided, That these 
     additional funds are available to subsidize gross

[[Page H486]]

     obligations for the principal amount of direct loans, 
     including capitalized interest, and total loan principal, 
     including capitalized interest, any part of which is to be 
     guaranteed, not to exceed $6,100,000,000.

                  policies relating to biomass energy

       Sec. 428.  To support the key role that forests in the 
     United States can play in addressing the energy needs of the 
     United States, the Secretary of Energy, the Secretary of 
     Agriculture, and the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency shall, consistent with their missions, 
     jointly--
       (1) ensure that Federal policy relating to forest 
     bioenergy--
       (A) is consistent across all Federal departments and 
     agencies; and
       (B) recognizes the full benefits of the use of forest 
     biomass for energy, conservation, and responsible forest 
     management; and
       (2) establish clear and simple policies for the use of 
     forest biomass as an energy solution, including policies 
     that--
       (A) reflect the carbon-neutrality of forest bioenergy and 
     recognize biomass as a renewable energy source, provided the 
     use of forest biomass for energy production does not cause 
     conversion of forests to non-forest use;
       (B) encourage private investment throughout the forest 
     biomass supply chain, including in--
       (i) working forests;
       (ii) harvesting operations;
       (iii) forest improvement operations;
       (iv) forest bioenergy production;
       (v) wood products manufacturing; or
       (vi) paper manufacturing;
       (C) encourage forest management to improve forest health; 
     and
       (D) recognize State initiatives to produce and use forest 
     biomass.

                      clarification of exemptions

       Sec. 429.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to require a permit for the discharge of dredged or 
     fill material under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act 
     (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) for the activities identified in 
     subparagraphs (A) and (C) of section 404(f)(1) of the Act (33 
     U.S.C. 1344(f)(1)(A), (C)).

                       small remote incinerators

       Sec. 430.  None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to implement or enforce the regulation issued on 
     March 21, 2011 at 40 CFR part 60 subparts CCCC and DDDD with 
     respect to units in the State of Alaska that are defined as 
     ``small, remote incinerator'' units in those regulations and, 
     until a subsequent regulation is issued, the Administrator 
     shall implement the law and regulations in effect prior to 
     such date.

                            recreation fees

       Sec. 431.  Section 810 of the Federal Lands Recreation 
     Enhancement Act (16 U.S.C. 6809) shall be applied by 
     substituting ``October 1, 2020'' for ``September 30, 2019''.
       Sec. 432. (a) None of the funds appropriated or otherwise 
     made available under this Act may be used by the Department 
     of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency, the 
     Forest Service, the Indian Health Service, or the Smithsonian 
     Institution to acquire telecommunications equipment produced 
     by Huawei Technologies Company, ZTE Corporation or a high-
     impact or moderate-impact information system, as defined for 
     security categorization in the National Institute of 
     Standards and Technology's (NIST) Federal Information 
     Processing Standard Publication 199, ``Standards for Security 
     Categorization of Federal Information and Information 
     Systems'' unless the agency has--
       (1) reviewed the supply chain risk for the information 
     systems against criteria developed by NIST to inform 
     acquisition decisions for high-impact and moderate-impact 
     information systems within the Federal Government;
       (2) reviewed the supply chain risk from the presumptive 
     awardee against available and relevant threat information 
     provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other 
     appropriate agencies; and
       (3) in consultation with the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation or other appropriate Federal entity, conducted 
     an assessment of any risk of cyber-espionage or sabotage 
     associated with the acquisition of such system, including any 
     risk associated with such system being produced, 
     manufactured, or assembled by one or more entities identified 
     by the United States Government as posing a cyber threat, 
     including but not limited to, those that may be owned, 
     directed, or subsidized by the People's Republic of China, 
     the Islamic Republic of Iran, the Democratic People's 
     Republic of Korea, or the Russian Federation.
       (b) None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
     available under this Act may be used to acquire a high-impact 
     or moderate impact information system reviewed and assessed 
     under subsection (a) unless the head of the assessing entity 
     described in subsection (a) has--
       (1) developed, in consultation with NIST and supply chain 
     risk management experts, a mitigation strategy for any 
     identified risks;
       (2) determined, in consultation with NIST and the Federal 
     Bureau of Investigation, that the acquisition of such system 
     is in the vital national security interest of the United 
     States; and
       (3) reported that determination to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     in a manner that identifies the system intended for 
     acquisition and a detailed description of the mitigation 
     strategies identified in (1), provided that such report may 
     include a classified annex as necessary.
       Sec. 433.  Within available funds, not later than 180 days 
     after the date of enactment of this Act, the Comptroller 
     General of the United States shall issue a report on efforts 
     by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the 
     Environmental Protection Agency relating to the removal of 
     lead-based paint and other hazardous materials, which shall 
     include--
       (1) a description of direct removal efforts by the 
     Department of Housing and Urban Development and the 
     Environmental Protection Agency;
       (2) a description of education provided by the Department 
     of Housing and Urban Development and the Environmental 
     Protection Agency to other Federal agencies, local 
     governments and communities, recipients of grants made by 
     either entity, and the general public relating to the removal 
     of lead-based paint and other hazardous materials;
       (3) a description of assistance received from other Federal 
     agencies relating to the removal of lead-based paint and 
     other hazardous materials; and
       (4) any best practices developed or provided by the 
     Department of Housing and Urban Development and the 
     Environmental Protection Agency relating to the removal of 
     lead-based paint and other hazardous materials.
       Sec. 434. (a) Within available funds for the National 
     Forest System, the Secretary of Agriculture shall conduct an 
     inventory and evaluation of certain land, as generally 
     depicted on the map entitled ``Flatside Wilderness Adjacent 
     Inventory Areas'' and dated November 30, 2017, to determine 
     the suitability of that land for inclusion in the National 
     Wilderness Preservation System.
       (b) The Chief of the Forest Service shall submit to the 
     Committees on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, 
     Appropriations, and Energy and Natural Resources of the 
     Senate the results of the inventory and evaluation required 
     under subsection (a).

         addressing pediatric cancer rates in the united states

       Sec. 435. (a) Report Identifying Geographic Variation of 
     Types of Pediatric Cancer.--Using funds appropriated under 
     the heading ``Toxic Substances and Environmental Health'' for 
     the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services, not later than 180 
     days after the date of enactment of this Act, shall submit to 
     the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of 
     the Senate, the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate, 
     the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of 
     Representatives, and the Committee on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives, a report that provides details on 
     the geographic variation in pediatric cancer incidence in the 
     United States, including--
       (1) the types of pediatric cancer within each of the 10 
     States with the highest age-adjusted incidence rate of cancer 
     among persons aged 20 years or younger;
       (2) geographic concentrations of types and prevalence of 
     pediatric cancers within each such State, in accordance with 
     Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines; and
       (3) an update on current activities related to pediatric 
     cancer, including with respect to carrying out section 399V-6 
     of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 280g-17).
       (b) Support for States With High Incidence of Pediatric 
     Cancer.--Using funds appropriated under the heading ``Toxic 
     Substances and Environmental Public Health'' for the Agency 
     for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the Secretary of 
     Health and Human Services may conduct public outreach, in 
     collaboration with State departments of health, particularly 
     in the 10 States with the highest age-adjusted incidence rate 
     of cancer among persons aged 20 years or younger, to improve 
     awareness by residents, clinicians, and others, as 
     appropriate, of possible contributing factors to pediatric 
     cancer, including environmental exposures, in a manner that 
     is complementary of, and does not conflict with, ongoing 
     pediatric cancer-related activities supported by the 
     Department of Health and Human Services.
       (c) Privacy.--The Secretary of Health and Human Services 
     shall ensure that all information with respect to patients 
     that is contained in the reports under this section is de-
     identified and protects personal privacy of such patients in 
     accordance with applicable Federal and State privacy law.

                         explanatory statement

       Sec. 436.  The explanatory statement regarding division A 
     of H.R. 21, printed in the Congressional Record on January 3, 
     2019, and submitted by the Chair of the Committee on 
     Appropriations, shall have the same effect with respect to 
     allocation of funds and implementation of this Act as if it 
     were a joint explanatory statement of a committee of 
     conference.

   compensation for federal employees furloughed during a government 
                                shutdown

       Sec. 437. (a) Employees furloughed as a result of any lapse 
     in appropriations beginning on or about December 22, 2018 and 
     ending on the date of enactment of this Act shall be 
     compensated at their standard rate of compensation, for the 
     period of such lapse in appropriations, as soon as 
     practicable after such lapse in appropriations ends.
       (b) For purposes of this section, ``employees'' means any 
     Federal employees whose salaries and expenses are provided in 
     this Act.

[[Page H487]]

       (c) All obligations incurred in anticipation of the 
     appropriations made and authority granted by this Act for the 
     purposes of maintaining the essential level of activity to 
     protect life and property and bringing about orderly 
     termination of Government functions, and for purposes as 
     otherwise authorized by law, are hereby ratified and approved 
     if otherwise in accord with the provisions of this Act.

states, territories, possessions and other federal grantees impacted by 
                         a government shutdown

       Sec. 438. (a) If a State (or another Federal grantee) used 
     State funds (or the grantee's non-Federal funds) to continue 
     carrying out a Federal program or furloughed State employees 
     (or the grantee's employees) whose compensation is advanced 
     or reimbursed in whole or in part by the Federal Government--
       (1) such furloughed employees shall be compensated at their 
     standard rate of compensation for such period;
       (2) the State (or such other grantee) shall be reimbursed 
     for expenses that would have been paid by the Federal 
     Government during such period had appropriations been 
     available, including the cost of compensating such furloughed 
     employees, together with interest thereon calculated under 
     section 6503(d) of title 31, United States Code; and
       (3) the State (or such other grantee) may use funds 
     available to the State (or the grantee) under such Federal 
     program to reimburse such State (or the grantee), together 
     with interest thereon calculated under section 6503(d) of 
     title 31, United States Code.
       (b) For purposes of this section, the term ``State'' and 
     the term ``grantee,'' including United States territories and 
     possessions, shall have the meaning given such terms under 
     the applicable Federal program under subsection (a). In 
     addition, ``to continue carrying out a Federal program'' 
     means the continued performance by a State or other Federal 
     grantee, during the period of a lapse in appropriations, of a 
     Federal program that the State or such other grantee had been 
     carrying out prior to the period of the lapse in 
     appropriations.
       (c) The authority under this section applies with respect 
     to any period in fiscal year 2019 (not limited to periods 
     beginning or ending after the date of the enactment of this 
     Act) during which there occurs a lapse in appropriations with 
     respect to any department or agency of the Federal Government 
     receiving funding in this Act which, but for such lapse in 
     appropriations, would have paid, or made reimbursement 
     relating to, any of the expenses referred to in this section 
     with respect to the program involved. Payments and 
     reimbursements under this authority shall be made only to the 
     extent and in amounts provided in advance in appropriations 
     Acts.
       This Act may be cited as the ``Department of the Interior, 
     Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2019''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The bill shall be debatable for 1 hour, 
equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member 
of the Committee on Appropriations or their respective designees.
  The gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. McCollum) and the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Calvert) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Minnesota.


                             General Leave

  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include 
any extraneous material on the measure under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Minnesota?
  There was no objection.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, I yield myself as much time as I may 
consume.
  I rise today in support of H.R. 266, the fiscal year 2019 Department 
of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act.
  Today is the 21st day of the Trump shutdown, and the damage it 
inflicts on the families and communities across this country continues 
to grow.
  More than 800,000 Federal workers are without pay, and today will be 
the first missed paycheck for those families. Many of our civil 
servants are working without pay, and telling them that they have to 
file for unemployment is outrageous and it is wrong.
  Today, Democrats are offering this bill that provides critical funds 
to reopen the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection 
Agency, Indian Health Service, and other important agencies.
  Our national parks, America's crown jewels, are under threat. This 
administration continues to allow visitors to enter as if everything is 
normal.
  Our Park Service does not have the funding to ensure visitor safety, 
address the most basic standards of cleanliness, and protect park 
assets.
  Joshua Tree National Park is experiencing significant damage because 
there are not enough rangers to stop off-road driving in the park. New 
tracks are being cut into the sensitive landscape, and many of Joshua's 
trees, the precious namesake of this park, have been destroyed.
  Just this past week, the Department of the Interior announced an 
illegal plan to force parks to start redirecting funds from entry fees. 
Now, those fees are designated for capital improvement projects, and 
now they will be used to clean toilets.
  There is no substitute for the park system's annual operation budget 
of $2.5 billion. As I said, lasting damage is being done to our 
national parks, and their long-term upkeep is being compromised.
  We must ensure public safety and protect our pristine spaces; and 
that is why I am calling on the National Park Service to close all 
parks until the government reopens.
  Congress needs to pass this bill to fully fund and staff and protect 
our national parks. Passing this bill will allow the Forest Service to 
get back to work on critical activities, like hazardous fuel 
management. That work needs to happen now in order to prevent 
wildfires.
  The Environmental Protection Agency's mission is to protect human 
health and the environment, but the Trump shutdown has furloughed more 
than 13,000 employees, stopping inspections at drinking water systems, 
stopping inspections at hazardous waste management facilities, and 
stopping inspections at chemical facilities. This places the health of 
the American people and their communities in jeopardy.
  The Trump shutdown is particularly threatening to the health and 
safety of our Native American brothers and sisters. Once again, we have 
failed to meet our treaty responsibilities to Tribal nations. Basic 
services like health clinics, Tribal justice services, and food 
assistance for seniors, are being put at risk for nearly 1.9 million 
Americans throughout Indian Country.
  Approximately 54 percent of the Indian Health Service budget goes to 
Tribal organizations to run their own programs. During the Trump 
shutdown, critical programs in Indian Country run by Tribal 
organizations stop. This includes the Domestic Violence Prevention 
Initiative, the Indian Children's Program, the Suicide Prevention 
Program, and Alcohol and Substance Abuse Programs.
  Native American Lifelines is an example of a healthcare program that 
is under contract with the Indian Health Service. Clinics focus on care 
for the needy and the elderly, and I am outraged to report that, as of 
today, these remarks that I deliver, well, those clinics have been 
forced to close, and they will not be able to continue to coordinate 
care for their patients, like the 80-year-old woman who depends on 
Native American Lifelines to help her manage her type 2 diabetes.
  It is time to reopen the government. The Interior bill before us was 
drafted by the Senate, passed overwhelmingly with a bipartisan vote of 
92-6.
  This bill also should be familiar to everyone as it was part of a 
six-bill package that passed overwhelmingly on the House floor with 
bipartisan votes last week. This bill provides $35.9 billion, which is 
$601 million over the fiscal year 2018-enacted bill. It maintains 
funding for nearly every agency at or above the fiscal year 2018-
enacted level, including the Environmental Protection Agency.
  It is important to note, however, this bill does not contain any new 
partisan riders.
  Now, clearly, I would have written things differently, especially 
with regard to funding for Indian Country. However, this bill will 
immediately open up the Department of the Interior, the EPA, and other 
agencies, and give us a path forward to end the Trump shutdown.
  Last year, Congress had the opportunity to pass the bill negotiated 
by the Conference Committee, but Republican leadership controlled the 
floor and they chose not to finish their work.
  And then we thought there was an agreement to keep the government 
open while the issues of homeland security were being worked out. 
Senator McConnell brought the continuing

[[Page H488]]

resolution to the floor of the Senate and it passed unanimously. But 
Speaker Ryan, along with President Trump, decided to shut down the 
government, and Congress went home.
  Now, nearly 800,000 employees are without a paycheck today, and 
Democrats are doing everything that we can to quickly pass a bipartisan 
bill to reopen the government. We need to finish last year's work so 
that we can move forward to serve the American people in 2019. So I 
urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support this bill.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to H.R. 266, the Democratic 
proposal for funding the Department of the Interior, the Environmental 
Protection Agency, and related agencies for the remainder of fiscal 
year 2019.
  This bill is almost entirely a Senate product. As such, it ignores 
the bipartisan priorities of the House and, perhaps even worse, it 
abdicates congressional responsibility under the Constitution to keep 
the executive branch in check.
  Before I get into the details of the bill, however, I want to take a 
moment to congratulate my friend and colleague, Betty McCollum, for her 
appointment as the new chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee 
on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies.
  She has been a tireless advocate for programs under the jurisdiction 
of this subcommittee, a firm but fair overseer of agency operations, a 
tough negotiator and, above all, a good friend. She will be an 
outstanding chair. I wish her well, and I look forward to working with 
her in both of our new capacities.

  Madam Speaker, over the past year, Ms. McCollum and I worked in 
collaboration to write a bill representing the needs and priorities of 
the House. We held nine budget oversight hearings, including four 
hearings with nearly 80 Tribal leaders regarding programs that honor 
treaty rights promised to our Native American brothers and sisters.
  We wrote a bill that accommodated, in some shape or form, roughly 93 
percent of all House Member requests, regardless of party. On top of 
that, when the bill came to the House floor, 70 amendments were debated 
and 50 were adopted.
  And when told to begin negotiating the House-passed bill last year, 
we defended it against competing priorities in the Senate. We came 
together on numerous topics to write report language directives that 
maintain a check on the executive branch.
  I am extremely proud of our work. We are so close to a final product. 
We shouldn't be throwing it all away with the bill before us today, a 
bill that the Senate has already said it will not consider and the 
President will not sign.
  Let me highlight just a few of the House priorities missing in this 
product which concern me the most, and which are likely to concern our 
colleagues on both sides of the aisle.
  First and foremost, the bill leaves behind all congressional report 
language directives. These directives are critical for keeping the 
executive branch in check. These directives are also the conduit 
through which the concerns of our constituents back home are heard 
directly by agency officials at the highest levels.
  All of our colleagues in the House who have worked with their 
constituents and worked with the Appropriations Committee over the past 
year to craft these directives understand the effort that went into 
them and the impact they have on people's lives back home. The bill 
before us today throws that away, all that important work.
  We included language to protect the California WaterFix from 
frivolous lawsuits in order to move forward a water supply project that 
is critically important to my constituents. By taking up this Senate 
bill, I am prevented from even fighting for my constituents.
  But this isn't about my priorities; this is about all of the 
bipartisan priorities of the House of Representatives that are flushed 
away by rubber-stamping the Senate bill.
  The bill provides $12 million less than last year's House-passed bill 
for the U.S. Geological Survey's natural hazards research and early 
warning system, the earthquake system, and $21 million less for the 
Forest Service and Department of the Interior to clear dead and dying 
trees from our forests in order to prevent more catastrophic wildfires 
like the kind we experienced in my own State of California.

                              {time}  0930

  These ounce-of-prevention programs save lives and save money. With so 
many fires, earthquakes, volcanoes, and other natural disasters in 
recent years, these programs should be a higher funding priority than 
they are in this bill.
  Additionally, this bill provides $77 million less than the House 
Republican bill for EPA's WIFIA, brownfields, and Superfund remedial 
programs. These programs provide regulatory relief, leverage Federal 
dollars, improve water infrastructure, and spur economic development.
  Instead, this bill increases funding for EPA regulatory programs. In 
many parts of the country, particularly agricultural States, EPA 
regulations and additional red tape are a bipartisan concern.
  Even popular EPA grant programs, like the diesel emission reduction 
grants, DERA, and targeted airshed grants, were significantly reduced 
in this bill.
  The DERA and targeted airshed grants are essential to my home State 
of California, where air quality remains one of our biggest concerns. 
My State and constituents rely on these grant programs to help improve 
air quality and public health by accelerating the replacement of older 
engines with new, cleaner engines.
  For our National Park System, the bill before us today falls $27 
million short of the House-passed level for park operations and 
reducing the maintenance backlog. With park visitation on the rise, 
this is no time to cut corners on the budget.
  This bill also lacks important reforms for implementation of the 
Endangered Species Act, and it lacks the funding needed to prevent the 
sage grouse from being listed. Failure to prevent a listing will hurt 
local economies in 11 Western States and undermine our Nation's energy 
security.
  This bill is almost $10 million below last year's House-passed bill 
in funding for historic preservation grants, including civil rights 
grants and grants to underserved communities.
  The House felt so strongly about these programs that it added $5 
million in multiple amendments on the House floor last year. Why would 
we give up all that funding by acceding to the Senate?
  Last, but certainly not least, this bill falls $160 million short of 
last year's House-passed bill in funding treaty obligations to American 
Indians and Alaska Natives through the Department of the Interior and 
the Indian Health Service.
  Earlier this week, USA Today was the latest news agency to run a 
front page article on the sad state of healthcare in Indian Country, 
which is funded mostly through the Indian Health Service in this bill. 
Funding for the Indian Health Service in this bill is $135 million 
below last year's House-passed level.
  For an Indian health system that already is rationing the kind of 
healthcare that most of us take for granted, every dollar makes a 
difference in the quality of life of one of our fellow Americans whose 
ancestors paid in advance with their lives and their land to guarantee 
that the Federal Government would care for the health of their 
descendants. Properly funding this obligation is not optional.
  The House heard from nearly 80 tribal leaders in hearings last year 
about the importance of funding these programs. Let's not turn our 
backs on them now, acceding to the Senate position.
  Madam Speaker, for these reasons and others, I am strongly opposed to 
this bill, H.R. 266, and I urge my colleagues on both sides of the 
aisle to stand up for their constituents' priorities and oppose the 
bill as well.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, I couldn't agree more with my colleague 
and the former chair. When we were developing the bill, we had a much 
superior product as we came out of conference committee.

[[Page H489]]

  But it is time to move forward. Speaker Ryan did not bring that to 
the floor. We must move forward and begin our work, our important work, 
on 2020.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 2\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from New 
York (Mrs. Lowey), the chairwoman of the full Appropriations Committee.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Speaker, the Trump shutdown is now in its 21st day. 
It is outrageous that more than 800,000 Federal employees are going 
without pay, many of them while they are still working, and the 
American people are being denied vital services, all because of 
President Trump's demands for a wasteful border wall.
  The bill before us today would reopen the Environmental Protection 
Agency, Department of the Interior, and other critical agencies, such 
as the Indian Health Service and the Chemical Safety and Hazard 
Investigation Board.
  The Trump shutdown has suspended cleanups of hazardous materials and 
delayed lifesaving rulemaking to keep toxic chemicals like methylene 
chloride out of American homes.
  The Trump shutdown threatens the enduring natural beauty and 
conservation efforts of our national parks as trash piles up and the 
safety of visitors is in question.
  Public health and safety should not be political bargaining chips.
  House Democrats have passed bills to open the government, but the 
President and the Senate Republicans continue to obstruct and delay 
instead of working with us to get the people's business done.
  The solution to this crisis is simple: pass the bills where we can 
agree and extend funding for Homeland Security for a month to allow 
time for negotiation on border security and immigration policy.
  Madam Speaker, I hope that my colleagues across the Capitol come to 
their senses and stop this ridiculous Trump shutdown.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield as much time as she may consume 
to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Granger), the ranking member of the 
Appropriations Committee.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I rise today in opposition to H.R. 266.
  Unfortunately, moving this bill across the House floor will not 
resolve the partial government shutdown, as the President has said he 
will not sign this bill into law.
  It is the job and responsibility of Congress to appropriate funds. We 
must come together to find a solution that will reopen the government 
and fund border security. We need a compromise that represents the will 
of both Chambers and the American people.
  By considering the Senate-passed version of the appropriations bill, 
we are eliminating House Members' involvement in the process. This bill 
in particular ignores 93 percent of all House Member requests that were 
included in our bill, including the 50 amendments that were adopted on 
the floor.
  This appropriations bill for the Interior Department fails to include 
the $12 million that House Members provided to U.S. Geological Survey 
programs, like the earthquake early warning system that saves lives.
  It also reduces the amount of funds available to clear dead and dying 
trees from forests, to help prevent the kind of devastating wildfires 
we saw this year, by $21 million.
  We have heard a lot about the National Park Service during this 
shutdown. This bill reduces funding for our national parks by $27 
million.
  These are just a few of the priorities of the House that are not 
included in this bill before us today.
  Madam Speaker, Republicans stand ready and willing to negotiate with 
our friends on the other side of the aisle on legislation that includes 
priorities of both parties and both Chambers. That is how this 
legislative body and our system of government are designed to work.
  Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague from California, Mr. Calvert, for 
his efforts today and over the last several months to ensure that the 
House's voice is heard in this debate.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Lee), a member of the Appropriations Committee.
  Ms. LEE of California. Madam Speaker, let me thank Chairwoman 
McCollum for her leadership on this issue as we try to get the 
government open.
  Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of the fiscal year 2019 
Interior appropriations bill, which provides $35 billion to partially 
reopen the government.
  Now, this bill would also reopen our beautiful national parks and the 
Smithsonian museums. The situation in our parks right now, it is just 
not acceptable. Sixteen thousand Park Service employees are not 
working. Let me repeat that: 16,000 employees. The National Park 
Service is losing $400,000 a day from this shutdown, while uncollected 
garbage is piling up.
  Madam Speaker, this is horrible. It is ridiculous.
  We need this bill to reopen our parks, our museums, and our visitors' 
centers right away, and we need to pass this bill to keep visitors safe 
and end the furlough of law enforcement personnel in our national 
parks.
  Madam Speaker, these closings are impacting every district in our 
Nation. Near my own district, for example, in the beautiful bay area, 
Muir Woods had to close this week.
  In addition to wreaking havoc on Federal workers' lives, their 
families, their children, and their livelihoods, this Trump shutdown is 
also having an effect on tourism and the economy.
  So I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this bill and ``yes'' to 
reopening the government. The public deserves this. The Federal workers 
deserve this. Contractors deserve this. The parks and our museums 
should be open for visitors to visit, and we need to get this 
government working again.
  Madam Speaker, I thank, again, Chairwoman Betty McCollum for yielding 
me time.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Alabama (Mr. Aderholt).
  Mr. ADERHOLT. Madam Speaker, I thank Ranking Member Calvert for 
yielding and for his leadership on this bill that we passed back in 
December.
  Unfortunately, as you know, I am rising, Madam Speaker, in opposition 
of H.R. 266.
  What we have before us today, however, is yet another Democrat 
appropriations bill that fails to reflect the House priorities. This 
time, it ignores 93 percent of all the House Member requests that were 
included in the House bill and in the report.
  I would like to point out just a few of the many House Member 
priorities that were addressed in the House Republican Interior and 
environment bill that are not addressed in this current bill.
  Compared to the House Republican bill, this bill reduces funding for 
hazardous fuel reduction projects by $21 million. It also reduces 
funding for operation and maintenance of the National Park System by 
$27 million. It does not include any of the Endangered Species Act 
reforms, which are absolutely necessary for the law to work in a 
practical way.
  Therefore, Madam Speaker, rather than spending our time debating 
Senate-passed legislation, which fails to reflect any House priorities, 
I ask that the Democrats come to the negotiating table so we can secure 
our border, so we can keep America safe, and so we can resolve this 
partial shutdown that we are now entering on its 21st day.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to oppose this bill.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, the time to pass the 2019 bill was 
December of last year. We need to move forward. My priority is to get 
the government open, to get it back working for the American people, 
and to have the Federal employees who are working so hard and those who 
are forced to be home to have a paycheck.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. 
Wasserman Schultz), who is the chair-designee of the Military 
Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Subcommittee of 
the Appropriations Committee.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for 
yielding.
  Madam Speaker, I rise today to urge my colleagues to support this 
appropriations bill, which provides funding for the Department of the 
Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency, and related agencies.

  This bill would provide vital funding for water infrastructure, State 
drinking water systems, national parks, and

[[Page H490]]

Everglades restoration projects. Yet we have been locked in a 
nonsensical shutdown because President Trump continues to insist on his 
ineffective and offensive border wall scheme.
  While the President throws a tantrum, people are suffering and our 
environment is suffering.
  Many of us have seen the pictures of the piles of garbage. Our 
environment cannot withstand this onslaught. They are overflowing in 
many of our national parks.
  Our national parks are the crown jewels of our Nation's natural 
heritage. In 2017, the National Park System drew more than 330 million 
visits, including more than 10 million in my home State of Florida.
  These visits are not just from Americans, but also from people all 
around the world who came to see the natural wonders America has to 
offer.
  In 2017, national parks contributed $35.8 billion to the Nation's 
economy and $613 million to Florida's economy, and they supported 
306,000 jobs nationwide. Yet, today, many are closed or short-staffed, 
and a diminished law enforcement presence puts the well-being of 
visitors and wildlife at risk.
  This is not the only major consequence of President Trump's and 
congressional Republicans' efforts to block funding for the shuttered 
agencies that would be restored by this legislation.
  EPA has stopped making inspections of drinking water systems, 
hazardous waste management sites, and chemical facilities. During the 
last long shutdown in 2013, EPA stopped inspecting more than 1,200 
sites of environmental importance and concern.
  Now more than ever, we need the EPA to provide rigorous guidance and 
support for State drinking water agencies.

                              {time}  0945

  No one knows this more than the residents of Flint, Michigan, whose 
water is still not safe to drink. And closer to my home, Floridians in 
Ocala face the contamination of their water by harmful fire retardants 
used at the nearby fire college. Halting inspections leaves communities 
like these more vulnerable. These cuts can truly impact the people we 
are elected to serve.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote for this bill so that the 
Senate can once again pass it and the government can be reopened.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
Idaho (Mr. Simpson), the former chairman of the committee.
  Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from California, my 
good friend, for yielding and for the job that he has done as chairman 
of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee in the 
past.
  Let me begin by saying that we all want the government to reopen--all 
on this side, all on that side. We don't agree with this shutdown. I 
also want strong border security, and I know you all want strong border 
security. We disagree about how to get there.
  These can both be accomplished with a little word called 
``compromise.'' I heard everybody throw around that word quite a bit 
and then go back to their hardened positions and forget what a 
compromise is. So I looked it up in the dictionary, because I thought 
maybe I was mistaken about what a compromise is.
  The dictionary says it is ``a settlement of differences by mutual 
concessions; an agreement reached by adjustment of conflicting or 
opposing claims, principles, et cetera, by reciprocal modification of 
demands.''
  We can't call for a compromise and then go back to our hardened 
positions and say: ``I want everything I want, and you get nothing you 
want.''
  This bill is not a compromise. If you would bring up the compromised 
conference bills between the House and the Senate, you would have my 
support, but that is not what this is. This is the Senate bill.
  We have a conference bill between the House and the Senate that was 
prepared to be brought to the floor last year and never made it. Bring 
up that conference report.
  Unfortunately, by adopting just the Senate bill, we might not even 
have a House Chamber. Why have a House Chamber if all we are going to 
do is adopt whatever the Senate decides to do?
  This bill, as has been mentioned, reduces funding by $160 million 
from the House bill for Indian Country, and has a:
  $21 million reduction from the House bill for hazardous fuels 
reduction that prevents catastrophic wildfires;
  $23 million reduction from the House bill in sage-grouse funding, 
which is vital to keeping the species off of the endangered species 
list;
  $27 million reduction from the House bill for national parks funding, 
which is needed to solve the maintenance backlog; and
  $12 million reduction from the House bill for the Water 
Infrastructure Finance Act, which is critical to financing community 
water projects, given the enormous backlog that exists for our water 
system.
  The bill also leaves out vital report language directives from the 
House bill that were carefully crafted to represent House Members' 
priorities, both Republican and Democratic priorities. They are being 
totally ignored with this legislation.
  In the end, we all know that this isn't going anywhere. This is just 
a game. And I have got to tell you, Mr. Speaker, I am tired; I am tired 
of the finger-pointing, the name-calling, and the games we are playing.
  I know that on the Democratic side of the aisle you are getting phone 
calls by the hundreds, if not thousands, from your constituents who 
say: Don't give in to Trump; don't give in to any border security wall 
or fencing or whatever.
  We are getting the same phone calls on our side, who say: Don't you 
vote for anything that doesn't have Trump's border wall in it.
  The uncomfortable thing is that, occasionally, as elected 
Representatives, we are called upon to lead, regardless of the 
consequences; and I have to say, we have all failed, all of us, and for 
that, I am very, very sorry.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I have a rhetorical question, and that 
would be: If we had been able to bring the continuing resolution to the 
floor, if we would have been able to get the President to sign it, 
would that have given us the breathing space to bring back the 
conference committee reports and would the President have signed it? I 
have not heard the President offer that as a solution.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from Maine (Ms. 
Pingree), a member of the Appropriations Committee, who proudly serves 
on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee.
  Ms. PINGREE. Mr. Speaker, I thank our future chair for yielding me 
the time. I appreciate it.
  Mr. Speaker, I consider it a privilege to sit on the Interior, 
Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee, where we fund agencies 
and departments that are important not only nationwide, but especially 
in my home State of Maine. So it is particularly heartbreaking to be 
here today urging my colleagues to reopen these agencies as we open a 
21st day of an unnecessary government shutdown.
  Today marks the first day that many Federal Government employees will 
go without a paycheck. There are over 1,100 Federal workers and their 
families in Maine alone. These include families at Maine's Acadia 
National Park and the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, the USGS 
research centers and the air and water program officers at the EPA. 
This shutdown has made life extremely difficult for these workers and 
these families, and it has halted the critical duties that they 
perform.
  This bill funds vital programs that we use every day to protect our 
resources, to learn about the environment, and to connect Americans to 
our national treasures.

  So far, the administration has used accounting gimmicks to give the 
appearance that these parks and agencies remain open, but you can't 
hide the real consequences of this shutdown. For example, at our 
national parks, there have been reports of habitat destruction, 
injuries, and even deaths since the beginning of the shutdown.
  We don't need gimmicks. We need to reopen the government. Despite the 
President's refusal to do his job, I am proud that we are doing ours in 
Congress by moving these appropriations bills forward to reopen the 
government.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge all of my colleagues to support the American 
taxpayer, to support Federal workers and

[[Page H491]]

their families, and to support the vital environmental programs that 
are funded in this bill. Please vote ``yes'' on H.R. 266 and end the 
shutdown.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from 
Oklahoma (Mr. Cole), my friend.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I thank my friend not only for yielding, but 
for his distinguished 4 years as the chairman of the Interior, 
Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee. I want to congratulate 
my good friend, the former ranking member and now the new chairman of 
the House Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee as 
well. They worked very well together over the last several years. I 
know they will continue to work well together, and I know that we will 
continue to do good work on that committee.
  Mr. Speaker, to quote the great baseball player and American 
philosopher, Yogi Berra: ``It's deja vu all over again.''
  We considered this bill last week. The Senate told us at the time 
that if we sent it to them, they weren't going to take it up; and the 
President said, by the way: I am not going to sign it.
  So what are we doing this week? We are sending the exact same bill. 
The Senate has told us the exact same thing, and the President has told 
us the exact same thing.
  If anybody thinks this is accomplishing anything, it is not. Quite 
frankly, we should be embarrassed as Members of the House of 
Representatives to bring this bill to the floor.
  There is not a single speaker in this Chamber today who had a single 
thing to do with anything in this bill--no appropriator, nobody--
totally a Senate product. So every speaker who gets up and talks about 
how important this is, literally, had nothing to do with writing it. As 
a matter of fact, in many cases, they had to give up things that they 
succeeded in getting into the House bill, both Democrats and 
Republicans.
  I think, frankly, candidly, honestly, any of us would admit the House 
bill and the conference product that was finished is a much better bill 
than this. If we are going to bring something to the floor where we 
disagree, why don't we at least bring something we are proud to bring 
here.
  Nobody should be proud to bring a bill that actually cuts what the 
House did in Indian healthcare by $135 million.
  Nobody should be proud to bring a bill to the floor that cuts $26 
billion out of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which we all agreed on, 
collectively, and were concessions, frankly, that we were going to win 
in the course of a conference.
  So the bill is an embarrassment, and the outcome is going to be 
predictable. The Senate is not going to pick it up. The President would 
not sign it if it were sent to him.
  So we have wasted an entire week. We have wasted the week because our 
friends can't sit down and split the difference, which, by the way, the 
President offered us in December. He asked for $5 billion. He told the 
negotiators: I will take $2.5 billion.
  Splitting the difference is usually a definition of compromise. 
Instead, we hurtled on into a government shutdown that nobody in this 
Chamber wanted, but we have a standoff at the top level.
  I don't think anybody particularly looks good in this: the President, 
the Senate, and certainly not the House. I would hope after we go 
through this charade--and it is a total charade--that we get back to 
work. If we are going to present something here, let's at least present 
something we are proud of and that we actually participated in writing.
  Again, this will end another sad week in this Chamber. I urge the 
majority to get to work. Produce something that a Senate that is of the 
other party will pass and that a President will sign. If you don't, you 
are not governing.
  To just be immovable and then point fingers as if other people are 
responsible, people who actually offered you a compromise to split the 
difference in December that would have avoided the entire shutdown, I 
think the responsibility is pretty clear as to who brought the 
government to a close, and that is our friends' failure to sit down and 
negotiate seriously with the United States Senate and with the 
President of the United States.
  Mr. Speaker, I will oppose this measure and certainly will look 
forward to voting against it in the hope that we will eventually get 
back to the product that we wrote and produced and would actually serve 
the American people better than this piece of legislation.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, as I asked a rhetorical question earlier: 
If the President would say, ``I am going to do a short CR; I will sign 
it; we are going to let the conference committee refile their bills for 
2019 to open up the rest of the government, get the people back to 
work, and get the paychecks back into those families' hands; and while 
we are doing that, we will negotiate the Homeland Security bill,'' I 
would be all for that, but I have not heard that come from the 
President of the United States.
  So today, Mr. Speaker, I bring a bill to bring paychecks back to 
people who don't deserve to be pawns in this government shutdown.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. 
Hoyer), the Democratic Majority Leader.

  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding. I think 
this is my first time in a long time of having a magic 1 minute, so I 
have some things to say.
  I was on the Appropriations Committee for 23 years. I came here in 
1981. Between 1981 and 1995, we had 10 shutdowns. Those 10 shutdowns 
averaged 1.9 days a shutdown. The longest one was 3 days. They were 
because of differences, not because of a strategy.
  In 1995, Newt Gingrich adopted shutting down government as a 
strategy, as a taking hostage not only of Federal employees, but taking 
hostage of the American Government and taking hostage of everyone who 
is served on a daily basis by the Federal Government. The reason I know 
it is a strategy is because it has happened a number of times.
  The next one, long-term, was in 2013, when Ted Cruz, a United States 
Senator, came over here and talked to a number of Members and said: 
Unless the President will repeal the Affordable Care Act, we are not 
going to fund the government. In other words, unless the President 
didn't take healthcare away from Americans, the Republicans would take 
government services away from Americans and hold hostage the Government 
of the United States.
  And now, just a few years later, ladies and gentlemen, the 
Republicans have again taken hostage not only 800,000 people who work 
for the Federal Government, expecting them to work for no pay to 
protect our borders, to protect our seas, to protect our food, and so 
they have taken hostage the Government of the United States one more 
time.
  So we have a crisis, but the crisis is not at the border. There is a 
challenge at the border, and we need to make our border secure. We are 
for that.

                              {time}  1000

  The proposal the President made in a campaign speech which got a lot 
of roars all the times he gave it was: We need a wall, a big wall, a 
wall along the whole border, a wall that the Mexican Government will 
pay for. It was total campaign rhetoric and demagoguery. It was not a 
policy.
  And I agree with my friend from Idaho. Mr. Simpson is the former 
speaker of the Idaho House. The far right in his party ran a candidate 
against him a few elections ago and they got beaten badly. Thank 
heavens for that; thanks to the judgment of voters in Idaho.
  I agree with my friend,  Tom Cole, in part. But if he were here--
unfortunately, he has left the floor--but I would say to  Tom Cole: Mr. 
Cole, as you ended the Congress with your side in charge, you rejected 
a bill from the United States Senate, passed with unanimous consent, 
that would have opened up all of government.
  And you rejected that bill because the President told you to put $5.6 
billion in the bill, which you knew--and I am sorry,  Tom Cole is not 
on the floor because he says, you know, this bill is not going to 
pass--which you knew would not pass the United States Senate, but you 
sent it anyway. Why? Because the President of the United States told 
you to do so.
  Let me remind all of us that we are a coequal branch of government. 
We are the Article I branch of government. We are the policymakers of 
government, not to sit as stooges and be told

[[Page H492]]

by the President of the United States: If you don't do what I want, 
what I tell you to do, I won't sign the bill.
  Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday night, the President went on television and 
tried to argue that the American people should continue to endure a 
painful government shutdown until Democrats give in on funding for a 
border wall that has bipartisan opposition. Democrats and Republicans 
alike--not all--oppose this $5.7 billion waste of money on a physical 
wall along the border.
  Representative Will Hurd--now, who is Will Hurd? He is a Republican 
Member of the Congress of the United States. He is a Member of the 
Congress of the United States from Texas. He represents a district 
which has more border than any other district in America. What does he 
say?

       Building a wall is the most expensive and least effective 
     way to secure the border.

  But the President of the United States says: You don't do that, I am 
not playing. And because he is not playing, none of you are playing.
  I say to my Republican friends: How sad. You were not elected by your 
constituents to do what Donald Trump tells you to do. You were elected 
by your constituents to do what is best for them and their country.
  Senator Lindsey Graham, a friend of the President, a Republican, and 
a Senator from South Carolina said this:

       The border wall is probably not a smart investment.

  But the President has told Lindsey Graham: You are not for my wall, I 
am not for your bill, and I won't sign it. And I am going to shut down 
government.
  One person is responsible for shutting down government. Donald Trump. 
Most of the people he shut down and is not paying, they don't have a 
dad they can go to and say: Give me some money, dad. Maybe he doesn't 
know that experience.
  Opposing a new barrier, Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick 
Mulvaney--listen to me, my Republican friends--said in 2015:

       You go under. You go around. You go through. What they need 
     is more manpower, more technology, and more willingness to 
     enforce the law as it exists today.

  He said that in 2015. Not a wall. More manpower, more technology, 
more willingness. That is essentially what Will Hurd said.
  Senator Ron Johnson, one of the most conservative Senators in the 
United States Senate said he always thought that the President's wall 
was a ``metaphor.''
  Now, if it is a metaphor for security, we are in, because we 
Democrats want a border that is secure; that does not allow people who 
are not authorized to come into the United States. We want to be sure 
that the people, the criminals that bring drugs into the United States 
are caught and prevented from doing so, and that people who traffic in 
human lives are caught and stopped. We are for that.
  When the President was at the border he said that Democrats don't 
care about crime. They don't care about human trafficking. That is 
baloney. It is a lie. It is unworthy of a President of the United 
States to make such an assertion.
  Senator John Cornyn of Texas said:

       I don't think we are just going to be able to solve border 
     security with a physical barrier, because people can come 
     under, around it, and through it.

  That is why so many Republicans said the wall is not the answer. 
Ranking Member Michael McCaul--now he is the ranking member of the 
Foreign Affairs Committee, I tell my Republican friends, Mr. Speaker--
but he was chairman of the Homeland Security Committee when he said 
this:

       A 30-foot concrete wall is a very expensive proposition and 
     there are a lot of other things we can be doing technology-
     wise to make it a smarter border that is more effective and 
     more cost efficient.

  So don't accuse the Democrats because they are against the wall of 
being against border security. Your Republican leaders don't believe 
that, so they ought to stop saying it.
  They are among the Republicans and Democrats who believe we need a 
smarter, more comprehensive strategy to improve border security; not 
just building a physical wall with taxpayer money.
  President Trump said over, and over, and over, and over, and over 
again that Mexico was going to pay for this wall. God knows how any 
American voters believed that. Now, of course, not surprisingly, he 
admits that is not going to happen.
  So let's discuss border security, which is important to Democrats and 
Republicans alike. Let's sit down and figure out how best to do it. 
That is a debate on policy.
  But, by the way, my Republican colleagues did not bring the homeland 
security and the border security issue to the floor until December 20, 
11\2/3\ months after they took control--or they were in control, 
because it was the last of the session. So they waited 11 months and 20 
days to bring this critical issue to the floor. My, my, my.
  Now they shut down the government if we don't do it their way. This 
is a debate on policy, not politics. That is why I quoted so many 
Republicans. There is no reason to maintain a dangerous and costly 
government shutdown while that debate occurs.
  Let's end this shutdown right now and turn to the real discussion 
about border security without holding hostage America's workers, their 
families, and the people they serve, all of our constituents. Let's 
have a vote in the Senate which I believe would reopen government.
  Leader McConnell has a responsibility to do so. Leader McConnell has 
a responsibility to the Senate and to his oath of office to the 
Constitution and to the country. He swore no oath to President Trump. 
None of us swear an oath to the President of the United States. We 
swear an oath to the Constitution, to preserve and protect and serve 
our people.
  On August 24, 2014, Senator McConnell said this: ``I am the guy that 
gets us out of shutdowns. ``Shutdowns,'' he said--this is Senator 
McConnell--``is a failed policy.''
  That is what Mr. Simpson said. That is what Mr. Cole, I know, 
believes. I have talked to him about it. I hope every Member here 
believes that. So my plea is to stop pursuing it as a strategy.
  Remember, 10 shutdowns averaged 1.9 days. Your shutdowns, 21 days, 16 
days, and now we are going to have the longest shutdown in history, 
because you have taken captive the Government of the United States. How 
sad that it is us who are the enemy of the Government of the United 
States.
  Senator McConnell, I hope, will bring bills to the floor to open up 
the government as he did in December when he sent a bill here and you 
would not take it up, my Republican friends, when you were in charge. 
You were the leaders. You rejected that bill that would have funded 
government, kept government open, kept serving the American people. 
But, no, you took a hostage, and the government is shut down.
  The Democratic-led Congress is doing its part. The first day we came 
here, we passed a bill that was exactly like the Senate's bill. So one 
could assume that the bill they had passed, when they got it back, 
would, in fact, pass. And the homeland security we did for a short time 
so we could continue negotiations in a positive way without having 
hostages being taken.
  Last week, we passed a package of funding bills for fiscal year 2019, 
a continuing resolution for the Department of Homeland Security, in 
order to reopen government and end the Trump shutdown. The Trump 
shutdown. The Trump shutdown.
  If Trump said to Senator McConnell: Yes, I will sign the bill; the 
bills would be passed by the United States Senate. No one disputes 
that.
  If Trump said to the House Members here, Mr. Speaker, that he would 
sign, they would pass the bill. Trump articulated at the White House 
that he would not open government until we agreed to do what he wanted 
to do. That is not democracy. That is despotism.
  Because Leader McConnell was refusing to bring up our package of 
appropriation bills, the very same bills written by the Republican 
Senate, as has so often been said--and I would prefer that they were 
bipartisan bills--we are now sending him each of the bills 
individually.
  On Wednesday, we passed a bill that would, among other things, reopen 
the IRS so taxpayers can get their refunds. They paid in more than they 
owed and they ought to get it back and they

[[Page H493]]

ought to get it back in a timely fashion. But the folks who process the 
refunds are not being allowed to come to work.
  Yesterday, we passed the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and 
Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act which will 
continue nutrition assistance for those facing hunger, and reopen 
programs helping farmers in rural America. Many of you represent rural 
farmers, and they are relying on payments from the Department of 
Agriculture to sustain them, and they are not getting them.
  Yesterday, we also passed the Transportation, Housing and Urban 
Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act to restore safety 
to air travel and keep low-income Americans from losing rental housing 
assistance. I don't think there is any Republican that wants to see 
people out on the street because they couldn't make their rent because 
they didn't get their payment from the Federal Government.
  Today, we are bringing this Department of the Interior, Environment, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations bill to the floor to reopen 
America's National Parks and restore services to Native Americans and 
Tribal communities.
  I want to thank the gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. McCollum) for the 
leadership that she has shown and the work that she has pursued to 
bring this bill to the floor. I ask my colleagues on both sides of the 
aisle to vote on the merits of this bill, and I hope that many 
Republicans will join us.
  If Members are for reopening government, vote ``yes.'' If you vote 
``no,'' you are for continuing this Trump shutdown.
  I hope Leader McConnell listens to his Senators. Senator Susan 
Collins said this on the House-passed bills last Thursday.

       It would be great to have them signed into law because 
     there is not great controversy over them and at least we 
     would be getting those workers back to work.

                              {time}  1015

  Senator Cory Gardner, Republican from Colorado, added: ``We should 
continue to do our jobs and get the government open.''
  I agree, Mr. Speaker.
  Hopefully, when we vote today, we will have in mind the 800,000 
people who are not getting paid, half of whom are working. Hopefully, 
we will have in mind all those who are looking for a tax return, all 
those who are looking for a supplemental nutrition payment so they can 
put food on their tables, all those who are looking to make sure they 
can settle on their house because FHA is operating, and all those who 
need a visa extension or something of that nature.
  Hopefully, we will be thinking of them, not just the small-bore 
politics of: If you don't do what I say, I won't play.
  Vote for this bill. Send it to the Senate.
  Mr. Speaker, I say to Senator McConnell to put it on the floor, pass 
it, and send it to President Trump.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Lujan). Members are reminded to avoid 
engaging in personalities toward the President.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume 
to point out that leaders in the Border Patrol want a barrier as a part 
of securing the border. Most people the majority leader mentioned are 
also in favor of a barrier as part of securing the border, as that is 
something that acts like, using a football metaphor, an offensive line. 
It slows people down in order for technology and people at that point 
to pick up people who are coming into this country illegally with drugs 
or otherwise illegal activity.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman 
from Ohio (Mr. Joyce).
  Mr. JOYCE of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to highlight some of my 
concerns with H.R. 266.
  As a Representative from the great State of Ohio, I know full well 
how important it is to provide programs that ensure we are protecting 
our natural resources and preserving them for future generations.
  One of the greatest natural resources and economic powerhouses we 
have in the United States and for the world, for that matter, is the 
Great Lakes system, which my district is lucky enough to have a portion 
of. The lakes provide more than 35 million people with drinking water. 
They support more than 3,500 species of plants and animals. Studies 
have shown that 1.5 million jobs are directly connected to these five 
lakes, generating $62 billion in wages. That is why I have fought so 
long and so hard for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.
  As Members of this House, we have a responsibility to properly 
represent the people who sent us here to fight for their priorities and 
needs. Unfortunately, this bill falls far short of fulfilling that 
responsibility. The fact is, there is bipartisan, bicameral report 
language that would not go into effect if the bill before us were 
signed into law.
  It leaves out important language to reduce the growth of harmful 
algal blooms, which have been recorded in every State and have become a 
concern nationwide. In fact, in 2014, a harmful algal bloom in Lake 
Erie affected the drinking water for more than 500,000 people in 
Toledo, Ohio.
  The bill also leaves out language encouraging the EPA to fund 
research grants that help promote scientific progress toward preventing 
and controlling harmful algal blooms. It doesn't include language to 
help both rural and urban communities control nutrients in their 
watersheds. It doesn't include language about working to understand the 
risks of exposure to toxins that result from harmful algal blooms. 
These toxins can come through our drinking water and can be extremely 
harmful to humans.
  In the end, this bill does not include the priorities that many 
Members fought for to help their constituents. It does not include 
language that supports programs that impact Ohio, as well as many other 
States across the country. I cannot in good faith support legislation 
that does not treat our Great Lakes as the national treasure they are 
or invest in them to the fullest extent.
  Mr. Speaker, please stand with me today in sending a message to 
protect our Great Lakes. I urge my colleagues to oppose this bill in 
its current form. We can do much better than this. We, as Members of 
the House, must not abdicate our responsibility to craft these spending 
bills in the best interest of our constituents.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I also hail from one of the Great Lakes 
States. The funding in the Senate bill and the House bill for the Great 
Lakes was identical. So at least in this portion of the funding, it was 
equal for both the House and the Senate.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from California (Mr. 
Huffman), who is a member of the House Natural Resources Committee.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding, and I 
rise today in support of this bill to reopen our national parks and end 
the Trump shutdown.
  Over the last 3 weeks, the conditions in our national parks have 
reached unacceptable and unsafe levels as park employees are furloughed 
without pay and forced to keep quiet about the ongoing damage.
  Here is what some of it looks like: dirty diapers, coffee cups, and 
burrito wrappers. That is just the start of what Congresswoman Jackie 
Speier and I saw this past weekend as we joined volunteers for a trash 
cleanup at the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which we both 
represent. It took only a few minutes for us to fill two 32-gallon 
trash cans with waste.
  We may soon have enough trash building up in our national parks to 
build a wall.
  Is that the idea, Mr. Trump? Is that the backup plan, to have our 
parks, park visitors, and our professional park staff pay for the wall 
you said Mexico would pay for?
  Mr. Speaker, the damage from the Trump shutdown does not end there. I 
have more than 25 federally recognized Tribes in my district. Each of 
those communities faces serious financial insecurity as a result of 
this shutdown. I refuse to stand by as Indian Country suffers, as our 
national parks suffer, and as millions of Americans suffer, so that 
Donald Trump can pretend he is building a medieval border wall.

  We need the House and Senate to pass the Interior appropriations 
bill. We need the President to sign it to prevent further degradation 
of our public

[[Page H494]]

lands and protect the health and safety of Tribal communities.
  This government does not belong to Donald Trump. It belongs to the 
American people. It is time to reopen the government.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge a ``yes'' vote.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to direct their remarks 
to the Chair.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from the great State of Utah (Mr. Stewart).
  Mr. STEWART. Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by stating the 
obvious, if I could, when my Democratic colleagues call this bill a 
compromise.
  This bill is a lot of things, but a compromise it is not. It takes 
away everything we have done for the last year--everything we have done 
for the last year--and, poof, it is gone. It throws it away.
  There is an old saying in the House: It is not the opposing party 
that is the enemy; it is the Senate.
  This is a great illustration of this. As a member of the 
Appropriations Committee, it pains me that my colleagues on the other 
side of the aisle have effectively removed my constituents from this 
process by just accepting the Senate bill. Every Member of the House 
and our constituents have been silenced in this. We are not represented 
at all.
  Not only has the Democratic majority ignored this body's role in 
creating this budget, they are throwing away hundreds of hours of 
hearings, of markups, and of floor time, again, as we are fighting for 
our constituents. We passed a bill. The House has done our work. Let me 
say it again: The House has done our work.
  If this was a serious effort by our friends on the other side to open 
the government, then they would pass our House bill again. Then it 
would go to the Senate, and we would reconcile those two bills.
  Let's consider some of the things that have been thrown away, poof, 
magically gone in a puff of smoke: money for fighting wildfires; money 
for our Indian brothers and sisters, including for hospital staffing; 
money for road maintenance, so that children can go to school; and 
money for our national parks for deferred maintenance. The list goes on 
and on.
  I ran for Congress because I wanted to represent my district. This 
bill is my district; 70 percent of my district is owned by the Federal 
Government.
  How can I just sit by and say that my constituents will have no voice 
in this bill or in this appropriations process at all?
  Finally, my friends on the other side know these bills don't stand a 
chance of actually becoming law. They know that. The Senate won't take 
these up. The President has said he won't sign it.
  Mr. Speaker, if you want to talk compromise, then let's actually try 
to do that. Let us take where we are and let us take where the Senate 
is and try to bring them together. That, Mr. Speaker, is compromise.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume 
to say, once again, I am sorely disappointed that, before the end of 
December and before the new Congress came into being, some of the 
suggestions here were to move forward with conference committee 
reports, to bring them to the floor, to work with the President. Now 
that we have the new Congress sworn in, for the President to say: You 
get those conference committee reports going. We will do a continuing 
resolution to keep government open. We will negotiate the Homeland 
Security bill off to the side--but there is silence. There is no 
commitment. Quite frankly, I don't know if the President would change 
his mind again, if he did agree to that.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Washington (Mr. 
Kilmer), who is a member of the Appropriations Committee and serves on 
the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee.
  Mr. KILMER. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this bill, which will 
restore funding for the Department of the Interior, for the Forest 
Service, and for the Environmental Protection Agency, because it is 
simply wrong for Federal workers to be held hostage. It is wrong for 
people who depend on these agencies to be held hostage as a negotiating 
tactic on a completely unrelated policy issue.
  The region I represent has more than 600,000 acres of Federal 
forests. It is the home to Olympic National Park, one of the crown 
jewels of the National Park System. And it overlooks the iconic Puget 
Sound. So I am speaking today on behalf of the hundreds of Federal 
workers who protect and manage these natural resources, from park 
rangers to timber sale specialists to water quality monitors, who have 
gone unpaid for almost 3 weeks.
  But this isn't just about those Federal workers who have lost their 
pay. I am also here to speak on behalf of the communities that depend 
on these Federal resources, gateway communities like my hometown where 
I grew up, Port Angeles, Washington, where the economy depends on park 
visitors who come in and eat at local restaurants, stay in local 
hotels, and gas up their cars; remote towns like Forks that count on 
the Forest Service to maintain roads; Tribal communities like Taholah 
that rely on resources from the Indian Health Service to support their 
local health clinic; and cities like Tacoma that trust the 
Environmental Protection Agency to protect the quality of their air and 
their water.
  Congress should end this shutdown now so that Federal workers can 
receive the pay that they have earned for serving us and so that our 
communities can again count on the government to provide taxpayers with 
the services that they fund, services that belong to everyone in this 
country.
  This bill is a responsible way forward. It has already passed the 
Senate with the support of 92 Senators, including Majority Leader 
McConnell. Congress should not wait another day to pass this bill and 
reopen these agencies, so I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes.''

  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I point out to my friend from the State of 
Washington that the earthquake warning system that we both worked on is 
below the House number by $9.4 million. So that is unfortunate.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. 
Westerman).
  Mr. WESTERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from California for 
yielding and for his hard work in putting together an appropriations 
product of the House, which is a far cry from what this bill is. It is 
not a product of the House. It is more like something you would get 
from the bill of the month club. It has none of the House priorities 
that have been debated here.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to think about the number 85. Eighty-five 
people perished in the Camp fire last year in California. The blaze 
destroyed an entire community, burned 14,000 homes, and left hundreds 
of other Americans injured or homeless. Adding to that, the Camp fire 
was just one of thousands of blazes that burned 9 million acres across 
the country last year.
  Let's face the facts. More and more Americans are living closer to 
our Nation's forests. These forests are becoming sicker, drier, and 
overstocked with flammable materials. When the temperatures rise and 
the arid winds blow, we have seen firsthand how these unhealthy forests 
become objects of mass destruction.
  The U.S. Forest Service now estimates that there are at least 43 
million homes in the wildland-urban interface. That is the part of our 
country where forests and communities intersect. This is a major 
increase from the 31 million homes that were located there less than 20 
years ago.
  Meanwhile, millions of acres of public land are at a high or severe 
risk of wildfire. Like Paradise, California, some of these acres 
directly threaten the communities and the Americans who live nearby.
  Mr. Speaker, the notion that Congress would lower the level of 
hazardous fuels reduction in the wake of all this is outrageous. At a 
base level, the government must protect its citizens, and hazardous 
fuels reduction is designed to remove the tinder that fuels these 
deadly blazes. However, this version of the Interior appropriations 
bill drops $21 million out of the hazardous fuels reduction account.
  Mr. Speaker, we should be investing more on hazardous fuels reduction 
and sound forest management, not less. Forest management is the 
essential component in protecting Americans who live next to our 
Nation's forests,

[[Page H495]]

again, forests that are getting drier and deadlier with each passing 
year.
  Further hazardous fuels reduction leads to all sorts of environmental 
and economic benefits. In addition to protecting American lives, proper 
forest management leads to cleaner water, more rural jobs, and less 
carbon in the atmosphere.

                              {time}  1030

  I am all for fiscal soundness, but, Mr. Speaker, cutting the 
hazardous fuels money is illogical. It is like saying we prefer a pound 
of cure over an ounce of prevention. While we may save money up front, 
the American people are going to have to pay more over the long term as 
taxpayers foot the bill to put out these blazes and property owners 
have their homes and assets incinerated.
  In closing, we should be investing in protecting lives and property 
and being good stewards of our environment. Lowering the hazardous 
reduction fuels account accomplishes the exact opposite, failing the 
thousands of Americans who live in and around our forests.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I think the gentleman and I would both be concerned. I 
quote from one of President Trump's tweets: ``Billions of dollars are 
sent to the State of California for forest fires that, with proper 
forest management, would never happen. Unless they get their act 
together, which is unlikely, I have ordered FEMA to send no more money. 
It is a disgraceful situation in lives and money.''
  Mr. Speaker, I would just like to note that the bill that we will 
pass today, hopefully shortly, will provide $1.76 million more than 
House Republicans passed last year for the Department of the Interior 
wildland fire management and $26 million more for the U.S. Forest 
Service for wildland fire management.
  Mr. Speaker, I think we should all grieve for loss of life and loss 
of property for those who have been impacted by our wildland fires.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. 
Grijalva), the chair of the House Natural Resources Committee.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to add my voice of support 
for the Interior appropriations bill to fund the government.
  Trump's ongoing government shutdown has damaged our economy, our 
national parks, and our public lands. This damage that we see is not an 
inevitable outcome; this is directly Republican-inflicted damage.
  Trump and his enablers seem happy to let this shutdown slow our 
economy, hurt Indian Country, and put our national parks and public 
lands at risk indefinitely.
  It shouldn't be hard for our Republican colleagues to choose between 
funding normal government operations or continuing to make people 
suffer for the Trump ego and obsession.
  This bill is nearly identical to the legislation that already passed 
the Senate 92-6. It reopens vital agencies and returns our national 
parks to normal business. This means we can clean up the trash and 
repair the damage that has been done through this shutdown.
  Opposing this bill encourages Trump to keep holding Americans hostage 
to his delusional demands.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Will the gentleman yield for a question?
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I gladly yield to the gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. 
McCollum).
  Ms. McCOLLUM. As you know, Mr. Chairman, I feel as strongly as you do 
about the health and protection of our public lands. In your view, as 
chairman of the committee that oversees the Interior Department, is the 
administration protecting the quality of our public lands during this 
shutdown?
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Reclaiming my time, the administration has not done 
enough to protect public safety or the quality of our public lands 
during this shutdown. New roads have been bulldozed through protected 
land in Joshua Tree National Park because staff was not there to 
prevent it. Hikers have been injured and had to rely on volunteers to 
carry them to safety. We all heard about the trash piling up at 
precious sites across this country.
  Every day, we see more damage to our public lands, and that involves, 
also, the vandalism and looting on protected areas, cultural areas, and 
historic resources in our public lands and parks. I haven't seen any 
serious willingness from the administration to end this shutdown and 
get back to normal operations.
  Ironically, the permitting for gas, oil, and mining continues, 
unabated, at the expense of the public taxpayers and employees and, of 
course, our public lands and parks. Though the permitting process in 
the refuge and in other parts of New Mexico and Oklahoma continues 
unabated, this is one part of this shutdown that was not affected at 
all.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Will the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva) yield 
once more?
  Mr. GRIJALVA. I yield to the gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. 
McCollum).
  Ms. McCOLLUM. I agree with my colleague that this administration, 
when it comes to public lands, is making matters worse, not better, by 
choosing to keep some parks open during the Trump shutdown. This 
political attempt to minimize the consequences of the shutdown will 
only result in further damage to our national treasures and place the 
safety of visitors at risk.
  Using funds from fee collections to provide operations support to the 
parks hurts the parks in two ways: This small funding stream cannot 
replace the $2.5 billion we provide for park operations each year that 
ensures the safety of visitors, maintains clean and orderly park 
operations, and safeguards park assets. Redirecting these funds away 
from their intended purpose delays the capital improvements needed to 
sustain our parks for our future.
  Because of this, I join the gentleman in urging the President to 
close the parks for the remainder of this Trump shutdown or, better 
yet, to sign this bill into law so that our parks can open fully and 
safely.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Mr. Speaker, reclaiming my time, I am very grateful for 
my friend's, Representative McCollum's, leadership on this issue and 
for the tireless efforts of the Appropriations chair and Speaker 
Pelosi. They are working on behalf of the people to fund and reopen 
this government.

  I want to make one particular note. While the harm to our parks has 
been noted, the damage to Indian Country is less documented and, in 
many cases, much more personal and devastating.
  According to a January 1 New York Times report, the shutdown has 
trapped members of the Navajo Nation in their homes due to unplowed 
roads in remote areas and has put many Tribal members and their 
families in severe economic stress.
  Law enforcement officers continue working without pay because they 
are Federal employees. Similar scenarios are reported and are playing 
out in Tribal land across this Nation.
  The National Council of Urban Indian Health found that 62 percent of 
the Urban Indian Health Centers will need to cancel programs or cease 
offering services if the shutdown continues. That process has already 
begun.
  Today, I launched an online tool for Americans to share their stories 
of how the Trump shutdown impacts their lives. I ask them to share 
their experience of being furloughed, forced to work without pay, and 
turned away from visiting public lands and denied essential services. 
Trump and his supporters need to listen to these stories. I encourage 
everyone to speak out on social media with the hashtag my shutdown 
story.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, I have served on the Appropriations Committee for a long 
time, and I am proud of the work that we have been able to accomplish 
in a bipartisan and bicameral manner, which is the history of the 
Appropriations Committee.
  Unfortunately, the Senate bill before us today forces us to choose 
between abdicating our constitutional obligations and underfunding 
important programs in a way that is unacceptable to me and my 
constituents. I am afraid this is a bad precedent, and I hope that this 
does not happen in the future: we just accept whatever the Senate 
determines is the proper path forward.
  I am disheartened by the Democrats' closed process that throws our 
bipartisan House priorities and will neither

[[Page H496]]

secure our borders nor reopen the government. Rather than passing bills 
to score political points, I urge my friends on the other side of the 
aisle to work with us to find a solution that reflects the will of the 
House, will pass in the Senate, and will be signed by the President.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record two articles dealing with the 
administration's illegal use of taking fees to keep our parks and 
refuges open.

                     [From the Hill, Jan. 6, 2019]

House Panel To `Demand Answers' on Interior's Move To Use Visitor Fees 
                           To Keep Parks Open

                  (By Miranda Green and Timothy Cama)

       The House Natural Resources Committee intends to 
     investigate the Trump administration's decision to dip into 
     visitor fees to keep parks open, the panel's chairman warned 
     Sunday.
       Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) said that his committee--which 
     oversees Interior--has plans to look into the legality of the 
     decision, saying the shutdown has done ``terrible damage'' to 
     the U.S.
       ``President Trump and his advisors apparently just woke up 
     to the fact that the shutdown they created several weeks ago 
     has done terrible damage to our country,'' Grijalva said in a 
     statement Sunday.
       ``This is not how a rational president behaves, and the 
     Natural Resources Committee will demand answers about whether 
     these moves are legally justified.''
       The National Park Service (NPS) announced to staff Sunday a 
     plan to dip into ``entrance, camping, parking and other fees 
     collected from park visitors'' to pay staff to assist in 
     urgent maintenance needs at a number of national parks 
     overburdened by visitors during the recent government 
     shutdown.
       ``As the lapse in appropriations continues, it has become 
     clear that highly visited parks with limited staff have 
     urgent needs that cannot be addressed solely through the 
     generosity of our partners,'' Daniel Smith, NPS deputy 
     director, said in a statement obtained by The Hill.
       Smith said he and acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt 
     developed the plan to ``address the maintenance and 
     sanitation issues that have arisen at a number of highly 
     visited parks.''
       ``We are taking this extraordinary step to ensure that 
     parks are protected, and that visitors can continue to access 
     parks with limited basic services,'' the statement read.
       Bernhardt signed a memorandum Saturday to use the fees 
     known as Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act money, The 
     Washington Post reported.
       Jonathan Jarvis, who led the Park Service under President 
     Obama from 2009 to 2017, slammed the strategy as a 
     ``significant departure'' from how the agency has 
     historically used the money parks.
       ``Since [the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act's] 
     original passage, it's always been interpreted by the Park 
     Service as not available for operations,'' said Jarvis, who 
     worked in the agency for more than three decades, including 
     as director of the Pacific West region.
       ``This is a significant departure. It wasn't even a 
     consideration during the 16-day shutdown when I was 
     director,'' he said, referring to the 2013 shutdown. ``That's 
     eating your seed corn.''
       Jarvis worried that using the fee money in this way would 
     take it away from park maintenance, which has a backlog 
     nearing $12 billion across the country.
       Jarvis had officials close parks entirely during the 2013 
     shutdown, despite criticisms from Republicans and others. 
     He's been highly critical of the Trump administration's 
     strategy to keep them open with little to no staff.
       ``It sends a particular message that they don't really care 
     about the resource, and probably increasingly, they don't 
     seem to care about the visitor either,'' he said. ``They only 
     seem to care about the bad press that they're getting.''
       The gates to most U.S. national parks were left open under 
     the most recent shutdown, which has extended since Dec. 22. 
     While visitors have been able to access parks, many services 
     including bathrooms and trash pick-up was suspended as 
     government employees were kept home. That's created a number 
     of headaches across the country at highly visited parks where 
     trash is piling up, bathrooms are at capacity and visitors 
     aren't being watched by experts.
       At least one park, Joshua Tree National Park in California, 
     was shuttered due to ``health and safety concerns.''
       While in the past access to national parks has been 
     restricted during a shutdown due to safety concerns, former 
     Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke made keeping parks up a 
     priority during his tenure.
       During the last shutdown last January, Zinke told reporters 
     the parks shouldn't be used as a bargaining chip in shutdown 
     negotiations.
       ``Our public lands and our monuments really belong to the 
     people and not the government,'' he told CNN.
       He said however, ``by law'' Interior wasn't allowed to 
     provide clean up services to parks.
       ``Law enforcement is still there. But things like cleaning 
     the bathrooms . . . and telling the story of our parks, which 
     is important--that side of it, while the `Schumer shutdown' 
     is in, by law we're not able to provide those services,'' 
     Zinke said, mentioning the GOP label for the shutdown at the 
     time.
       In an interview earlier this week Zinke told The Associated 
     Press that the public should ``Pitch in, grab a trash bag and 
     take some trash out.''
       Zinke's last day at Interior was Jan. 2. He resigned from 
     the agency in December amid multiple ethics investigations.
       However, Interior's plan to dip from the fee pot was laid 
     out clearly in its 2019 shutdown contingency plan, which 
     read: ``Parks that collect fees under the Federal Lands 
     Recreation Enhancement Act (FLREA) will utilize available 
     retained recreation fees balances to provide basic visitor 
     services in a manner that maintains restrooms and sanitation, 
     trash collection, road maintenance, campground operations, 
     law enforcement and emergency operations, and staffing 
     entrance gates as necessary to provide critical safety 
     information.''
       Spokesmen for Interior and NPS did not return requests for 
     comment.
       Critics are questioning the legality of Interior's decision 
     to use the park fees, money that is assigned by Congress to 
     pay for other federal expenses, including the department's 
     multibillion-dollar maintenance backlog.
       Theresa Pierno, president of the National Parks 
     Conservation Association, called NPS's action the equivalent 
     of stealing.
       ``Instead of working to reopen the federal government, the 
     administration is robbing money collected from entrance fees 
     to operate our national parks during this shutdown,'' she 
     said in a statement.
       ``It's incredibly concerning that the Acting Interior 
     Secretary is putting political pressure on Superintendents to 
     keep parks open at the expense of parks' long-term needs and 
     protection.''
       Out of the 418 park units across the country, 165 collect 
     fees, and they took in $285.2 million in fiscal year 2017, 
     according to a report last year by the Congressional Research 
     Service. Usually, at least 80 percent of that revenue has to 
     stay with the park that took it in, and the rest can go to 
     other parks.
       At least one group, the National Park Hospitality 
     Association, applauded the agency's fee strategy. The 
     organization represents companies that operate businesses in 
     parks, like gift shops, restaurants and lodging.
       ``NPHA has actively supported visitor fee retention by 
     federal recreation providers and use of collected funds for 
     visitor-related purposes,'' Scott Socha, the group's chairman 
     and president for parks and resorts at Delware North Cos., 
     said in a statement.
                                  ____




                     [PBS News Hour, Jan. 9, 2019]

 Government Restaffs Wildlife Refuges During Shutdown To Allow Hunters 
                                 Access

                         (By Ellen Knickmeyer)

       Washington.--The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is 
     directing dozens of wildlife refuges to return to work to 
     make sure hunters and others have access despite the 
     government shutdown, according to an email obtained Wednesday 
     by The Associated Press.
       The partial restaffing of 38 wildlife refuges is angering 
     wildlife groups, who accuse the Trump administration of 
     trying to minimize the public impact of the more than two-
     week-old shutdown to limit the political blowback for 
     President Donald Trump. Trump and Democrats in Congress are 
     locked in a dispute over Trump's demand for billions of 
     dollars for a wall on the southern U.S. border.
       In an email sent Tuesday afternoon, Margaret Everson, 
     principal deputy director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, 
     cites ``opportunities, including hunting'' that are being 
     lost in the shutdown.
       Everson advises in the email that 38 wildlife refuges 
     around the country will bring back some furloughed staff 
     using carryover funds.
       ``While many of our refuges have remained accessible, but 
     not staffed, the extended lapse in federal appropriations is 
     impacting both our ability to serve the public and to protect 
     natural resources under our care in some places,'' Everson 
     wrote.
       ``For the next 30 days, using previously appropriated 
     funds, we will bring back a limited number of employees to 
     resume work on high priority projects and activities that 
     support the Service's mission and meet the public's desire 
     for access to Refuge lands,'' Everson said in the email.
       Everson did not immediately respond to an email from the AP 
     seeking comment.
       The shutdown has forced federal agencies to stop paychecks 
     for hundreds of thousands of government employees, limiting 
     government services to only the most pressing, such as 
     Transportation Security Administration workers providing 
     security at airports without pay.
       Unlike as in some past shutdowns, the Interior Department--
     which oversees both wildlife refuges and national parks--
     initially had directed national parks to stay open but with 
     little staffing, leading to pile-ups of uncollected garbage 
     and human waste in parks. The National Park Service over the 
     weekend said some parks could start using visitor fees to 
     staff during the shutdown.
       On Wednesday, the National Wildlife Refuge Association, the 
     Coalition to Protect America's National Parks and the U.S. 
     Fish and Wildlife Service Retirees Association

[[Page H497]]

     urged the Trump administration to keep national parks, 
     wildlife refuges and other public lands closed to the public 
     during the shutdown.
       ``It is simply impossible to steward these shared American 
     treasures properly, leaving thousands of lands and waters 
     accessible to the public with no staff on site, even for an 
     emergency,'' the groups wrote in a letter.
       Desiree Sorenson-Groves of the National Wildlife Refuge 
     Association criticized the partial restaffing of some 
     wildlife refuges.
       ``If it wasn't essential to have these refuges open for the 
     past three weeks, how is it essential now?'' she asked. The 
     bottom line was the Trump administration was trying to ``make 
     this less painful to the American public,'' she said.
       According to the email, the wildlife refuges being 
     restaffed include Oklahoma's Wichita Mountains, scene of an 
     annual winter elk hunt. The other national refuges staffing 
     up again stretch from the Midway Atoll in Hawaii to Florida's 
     Merritt Island.

  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, responsibility of funding the government 
is one of Congress' most important duties. Republicans failed to meet 
this obligation, and they have allowed President Trump to peddle chaos.
  The Trump shutdown is creating uncertainty for families, businesses, 
and communities. More than 800,000 employees are not getting paid 
today. For that, I am deeply heartsick. Vital services are being 
disrupted and small businesses are being forced to lay off employees.
  Democrats are ready to end the Trump shutdown. The Interior bill has 
already received bipartisan support from the Senate. After this House 
bill passes, Senate Republicans will have a choice: pass their own bill 
and end the shutdown, or reject it and keep the government closed.
  On Monday, the National Governors Association sent a letter asserting 
``a Federal Government shutdown should not be a negotiating tactic.'' I 
agree with the Governors. I am sure that Federal employees whose 
paychecks are being withheld today feel the same way.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to 
support this bill, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate has expired.
  Pursuant to House Resolution 28, the previous question is ordered on 
the bill.
  The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?
  Mr. CALVERT. In its current form, yes.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Calvert moves to recommit the bill H.R. 266 to the 
     Committee on Appropriations with instructions to report the 
     same back to the House forthwith with the following 
     amendments:
       Page 2, line 14, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $6,000,000)''.
       Page 3, line 8, after the dollar amount, insert ``(reduced 
     by $6,000,000)''.
       Page 46, line 23, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $6,000,000)''.
       Page 47, line 4, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $6,000,000)''.
       Page 86, line 24, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $15,000,000)''.
       Page 87, line 6, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $15,000,000)''.
       Page 88, line 16, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(reduced by $15,000,000)''.

  Mr. CALVERT (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from California?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
California is recognized for 5 minutes in support of his motion.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, the bill under consideration has $21 
million less for a major House priority than what was included in the 
fiscal year 2019 Interior and Environment bill passed in the last 
Congress. I am talking about doing more to prevent and stop 
catastrophic wildfires.
  For the past 4 fiscal years, the House has prioritized funding to 
improve our national forests and other Federal forestland through the 
Department of the Interior's and the Forest Service's hazardous fuels 
reduction programs. These programs use methods such as thinning, 
prescribed burns, and removing underbrush to help unhealthy forests 
return to a healthy condition.
  In fiscal year 2018, Congress provided $614 million for these 
programs. Last year, the House-passed bill increased that amount by $30 
million for fiscal year 2019. The bill before us today, H.R. 266, only 
provides a $9 million increase. My motion to recommit will fix this 
major problem and save lives.
  The increase is offset by a reduction in the Bureau of Land 
Management's deferred maintenance account and the Forest Service's 
capital improvement and maintenance account. These infrastructure 
programs received significant increases in fiscal year 2018, and they 
have a large carryover balance.
  Mr. Speaker, my bottom line is that I cannot support a bill that does 
less to prevent catastrophic wildfires. My home State of California 
experienced deadly and record-setting wildfires last year. I was with 
the President; former Governor Brown and current Governor Newsom; our 
minority leader; and our colleague, Congressman LaMalfa, in Paradise 
late last year. In 2017, I also visited Santa Rosa with my colleague 
from the northern part of the State, Congressman  Mike Thompson. The 
devastation I saw was indescribable and heartbreaking.
  While we can and should continue to debate what more needs to be done 
to improve the health of our Nation's forests, I am proud that the 
Interior and Environment Subcommittee, on a bipartisan and bicameral 
basis, has led the way.
  The subcommittee successfully negotiated a forest management reform 
package and fire-borrowing fix as part of the fiscal year 2018 omnibus 
appropriations bill. It allowed for more on-the-ground forest 
management activities. These are the activities that prevent the 
natural cycle of fires from exploding into terrible conditions.

                              {time}  1045

  It provided smarter budgeting for wildfire suppression costs. The 
budgeting reforms go into effect in fiscal year 2020.
  I am certain that the new chair on the Interior, Environment, and 
Related Agencies Subcommittee, my distinguished colleague and friend 
from Minnesota, looks forward to that. It has been a pleasure to work 
with her as partners on the forest management and wildland fire 
budgeting issues.
  Yet, there is more that we need to do. Today we can start by 
supporting this motion. It will send a strong message to the Senate 
that they should focus on this issue. More importantly, it will show 
Californians and other Americans affected by wildfire that the House is 
doing something about this problem.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support the motion, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to this motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Minnesota is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, it is with great reluctance that I read 
again the tweet by the President of the United States:
  ``Billions of dollars are sent to the State of California for forest 
fires that, with proper forest management, would never happen. Unless 
they get their act together, which is unlikely, I have ordered FEMA to 
send no more money. It is a disgraceful situation in lives and money.''
  That was the President of the United States.
  Mr. Speaker, I don't even know where to begin with regards to the 
President's recent threat to block disaster response funds to 
Californians struggling to restore their lives, to get back in their 
homes, after the devastating fires of last year, so I am going to spend 
the rest of my time directly responding to this motion.
  I think we can all agree, every single one of us, that preventing 
wildfires is important, and my colleague and I just disagree on the 
best path forward. I believe that the best path forward is to reopen 
the government so the U.S. Forest Service can get back to work on the 
activities that prevent wildfires, critical activities like the 
hazardous fuel program that should be going on right

[[Page H498]]

now if we want to prevent fires this coming year.
  Additionally, again, I would like to note that the bill that we 
should pass today provides $1.7 million more than the House Republicans 
passed last year for the Department of the Interior Wildland Fire 
Management program and $227 million more for the U.S. Forestry Service 
in wildland fire management.
  Responsibly funding the Federal Government is one of the most 
important duties of Congress. This previous majority failed to do so 
with the most basic task of keeping the lights on.
  Here we are, day 9 of the 116th Congress. We Democrats are ready to 
reopen the Federal agencies that have been shut down by President 
Trump.
  This legislation has already garnered strong support--strong 
bipartisan support, I would add--in the Senate. We need to ensure that 
the Federal Government is open and that it is working for the American 
people and that our Federal employees get the paychecks they deserve.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.
  Mr. CALVERT. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this question will be postponed.

                          ____________________