COASTAL AND OCEAN ACIDIFICATION STRESSORS AND THREATS RESEARCH ACT OF 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 94
(House of Representatives - June 05, 2019)

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[Pages H4318-H4325]
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 COASTAL AND OCEAN ACIDIFICATION STRESSORS AND THREATS RESEARCH ACT OF 
                                  2019

  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill (H.R. 1237) to amend the Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act of 2009 to establish an Ocean Acidification 
Advisory Board, to expand and improve the research on Ocean 
Acidification and Coastal Acidification, to establish and maintain a 
data archive system for Ocean Acidification data and Coastal 
Acidification data, and for other purposes, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 1237

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Coastal and Ocean 
     Acidification Stressors and Threats Research Act of 2019'' or 
     the ``COAST Research Act of 2019''.

     SEC. 2. PURPOSES.

       (a) In General.--Section 12402(a) of the Federal Ocean 
     Acidification Research and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 
     3701(a)) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1)--
       (A) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking 
     ``development and coordination'' and inserting ``coordination 
     and implementation'';
       (B) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``acidification on 
     marine organisms'' and inserting ``acidification and coastal 
     acidification on marine organisms''; and
       (C) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``establish'' and all 
     that follows through the semicolon and inserting ``maintain 
     and advise an interagency research, monitoring, and public 
     outreach program on ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification;'';
       (2) in paragraph (2), by striking ``establishment'' and 
     inserting ``maintenance'';
       (3) in paragraph (3), by inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification'' after ``ocean acidification''; and
       (4) in paragraph (4), by inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification that take into account other environmental and 
     anthropogenic stressors'' after ``ocean acidification''.
       (b) Technical and Conforming Amendment.--Section 12402 of 
     the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act 
     of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3701(a)) is amended by striking ``(a) 
     purposes.--''.

     SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

       Section 12403 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3702) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``of the Earth's oceans'' 
     and all that follows before the period at the end and 
     inserting ``and changes in the water chemistry of the Earth's 
     oceans, coastal estuaries, and waterways caused by carbon 
     dioxide from the atmosphere and the breakdown of organic 
     matter'';
       (2) in paragraph (3), by striking ``Joint Subcommittee on 
     Ocean Science and Technology of the National Science and 
     Technology Council'' and inserting ``National Science and 
     Technology Council Subcommittee on Ocean Science and 
     Technology'';
       (3) by redesignating paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) as 
     paragraphs (2), (3), and (4), respectively;
       (4) by inserting before paragraph (2), as so redesignated, 
     the following new paragraph:
       ``(1) Coastal acidification.--The term `coastal 
     acidification' means the combined decrease in pH and changes 
     in the water chemistry of coastal oceans, estuaries, and 
     other bodies of water from chemical inputs (including carbon 
     dioxide from the atmosphere), freshwater inputs, and excess 
     nutrient run-off from land and coastal atmospheric pollution 
     that result in processes that release carbon dioxide, acidic 
     nitrogen, and sulfur compounds as byproducts which end up in 
     coastal waters.''; and
       (5) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(5) State.--The term `State' means each State of the 
     United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of 
     Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the 
     Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands of the United 
     States, and any other territory or possession of the United 
     States.''.

     SEC. 4. INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP.

       Section 12404 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3703) is amended--
       (1) in the heading, by striking ``subcommittee'' and 
     inserting ``working group'';
       (2) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``Joint Subcommittee on 
     Ocean Science and Technology of the National Science and 
     Technology Council shall coordinate Federal activities on 
     ocean acidification and'' and insert ``Subcommittee shall'';
       (B) in paragraph (2), by striking ``Wildlife Service,'' and 
     inserting ``Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
     Management, the Environmental Protection Agency, the 
     Department of Agriculture, the Department of State, the 
     Department of Energy, the Department of the Navy, the 
     National Park Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the 
     National Institute of Standards and Technology, the 
     Smithsonian Institution,''; and
       (C) in paragraph (3), in the heading, by striking 
     ``Chairman'' and inserting ``Chair'';
       (3) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``, including the 
     efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
     Administration to facilitate such implementation'' after ``of 
     the plan'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification'' after ``ocean acidification''; and
       (ii) in subparagraph (B), by inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification'' after ``ocean acidification'';
       (C) in paragraph (4), by striking ``; and'' and inserting a 
     semicolon;
       (D) in paragraph (5)--
       (i) by striking ``developed'' and inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification developed''; and
       (ii) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``and 
     coastal acidification; and''; and
       (E) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(6) ensure that each of the Federal agencies represented 
     on the interagency working group--
       ``(A) participates in the Ocean Acidification Information 
     Exchange established under paragraph (5); and
       ``(B) delivers data and information to support the data 
     archive system established under section 12406(d).'';
       (4) in subsection (c), in paragraph (2)--
       (A) by inserting ``, and to the Office of Management and 
     Budget,'' after ``House of Representatives''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``the interagency 
     research'' and inserting ``interagency strategic research'';
       (5) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d); and
       (6) by inserting after subsection (b) the following:
       ``(c) Advisory Board.--
       ``(1) Establishment.--The Chair of the Subcommittee shall 
     establish an Ocean Acidification Advisory Board.
       ``(2) Duties.--The Advisory Board shall--
       ``(A) not later than 180 days before the Subcommittee 
     submits the most recent report under subsection (d)(2)--
       ``(i) review such report;
       ``(ii) submit an analysis of such report to the 
     Subcommittee for consideration in the final report submitted 
     under subsection (d)(2); and
       ``(iii) concurrently with the Subcommittee's final 
     submission of the report under subsection (d)(2), the 
     Advisory Board shall submit a copy of the analysis provided 
     to the Subcommittee to the Committee on Commerce, Science, 
     and Transportation of the Senate, the Committee on Science, 
     Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives, and 
     the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of 
     Representatives;
       ``(B) not later than 180 days before the Subcommittee 
     submits the most recent strategic research plan under 
     subsection (d)(3) to Congress--
       ``(i) review such plan;
       ``(ii) submit an analysis of such plan and the 
     implementation thereof to the Subcommittee for consideration 
     in the final strategic research plan submitted under 
     subsection (d)(3); and
       ``(iii) concurrently with the Subcommittee's final 
     submission of the strategic research plan under subsection 
     (d)(3), the Advisory Board shall submit a copy of the 
     analysis provided to the Subcommittee to the Committee on 
     Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, the 
     Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of 
     Representatives, and the

[[Page H4319]]

     Committee on Natural Resources of the House of 
     Representatives;
       ``(C) provide ongoing advice to the Subcommittee and the 
     interagency working group on matters related to Federal 
     activities on ocean acidification and coastal acidification;
       ``(D) advise the Subcommittee and the interagency working 
     group on--
       ``(i) efforts to coordinate research and monitoring 
     activities related to ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification; and
       ``(ii) the best practices for the standards developed for 
     data archiving under section 12406(e);
       ``(E) publish in the Federal Register a charter;
       ``(F) provide the Library of Congress with--
       ``(i) the charter described in subparagraph (E);
       ``(ii) any schedules and minutes for meetings of the 
     Advisory Board;
       ``(iii) any documents that are approved by the Advisory 
     Board; and
       ``(iv) any reports and analysis prepared by the Advisory 
     Board; and
       ``(G) establish a publicly accessible web page on the 
     website of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
     Administration, that contains the information described in 
     clauses (i) through (iv) of subparagraph (F).
       ``(3) Membership.--The Advisory Board shall consist of 24 
     members as follows:
       ``(A) 2 representatives of the shellfish and crab industry.
       ``(B) 1 representative of the finfish industry.
       ``(C) 1 representative of seafood processors.
       ``(D) 3 representatives from academia, including both 
     natural and social sciences.
       ``(E) 1 representative of recreational fishing.
       ``(F) 1 representative of relevant nongovernmental 
     organizations.
       ``(G) 6 representatives from relevant State, local, and 
     Tribal governments.
       ``(H) 1 representative from the Alaska Ocean Acidification 
     Network.
       ``(I) 1 representative from the California Current 
     Acidification Network.
       ``(J) 1 representative from the Northeast Coastal 
     Acidification Network.
       ``(K) 1 representative from the Southeast Coastal 
     Acidification Network.
       ``(L) 1 representative from the Gulf of Mexico Coastal 
     Acidification Network.
       ``(M) 1 representative from the Mid-Atlantic Coastal 
     Acidification Network.
       ``(N) 1 representative from the Pacific Islands Ocean 
     Observing System or similar entity representing the island 
     territories and possessions of the United States in the 
     Pacific Ocean, and the State of Hawaii.
       ``(O) 1 representative from the Caribbean Regional 
     Association for Coastal Ocean Observing or a similar entity 
     representing Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
       ``(P) 1 representative from the National Oceanic and 
     Atmospheric Administration shall serve as an ex-officio 
     member of the Advisory Board without a vote.
       ``(4) Appointment of members.--The Chair of the 
     Subcommittee shall--
       ``(A) appoint members to the Advisory Board (taking into 
     account the geographical interests of each individual to be 
     appointed as a member of the Advisory Board to ensure that an 
     appropriate balance of geographical interests are represented 
     by the members of the Advisory Board) who--
       ``(i) represent the interest group for which each seat is 
     designated;
       ``(ii) demonstrate expertise on ocean acidification or 
     coastal acidification and its scientific, economic, industry, 
     cultural, and community impacts; and
       ``(iii) have a record of distinguished service with respect 
     to ocean acidification or coastal acidification, and such 
     impacts;
       ``(B) give consideration to nominations and recommendations 
     from the members of the interagency working group and the 
     public for such appointments; and
       ``(C) ensure that an appropriate balance of scientific, 
     industry, and geographical interests are represented by the 
     members of the Advisory Board.
       ``(5) Term of membership.--Each member of the Advisory 
     Board--
       ``(A) shall be appointed for a 5-year term; and
       ``(B) may be appointed to more than one term.
       ``(6) Chair.--The Chair of the Subcommittee shall appoint 
     one member of the Advisory Board to serve as the Chair of the 
     Advisory Board.
       ``(7) Meetings.--Not less than once each calendar year, the 
     Advisory Board shall meet at such times and places as may be 
     designated by the Chair of the Advisory Board, in 
     consultation with the Chair of the Subcommittee and the Chair 
     of the interagency working group.
       ``(8) Briefing.--The Chair of the Advisory Board shall 
     brief the Subcommittee and the interagency working group on 
     the progress of the Advisory Board as necessary.
       ``(9) Federal advisory committee act.--Section 14 of the 
     Federal Advisory Committee Act shall not apply to the 
     Advisory Board.''.

     SEC. 5. STRATEGIC RESEARCH PLAN.

       Section 12405 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3704) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by striking ``acidification'' each place it appears and 
     inserting ``acidification and coastal acidification'';
       (B) in the first sentence--
       (i) by inserting ``, and not later than every 5 years 
     thereafter'' after ``the date of enactment of this Act'';
       (ii) by inserting ``address the socioeconomic impacts of 
     ocean acidification and coastal acidification and to'' after 
     ``mitigation strategies to''; and
       (iii) by striking ``marine ecosystems'' each place it 
     appears and inserting ``ecosystems''; and
       (C) in the second sentence, by inserting ``and 
     recommendations made by the Advisory Board in the review of 
     the plan required under section 12404(c)(2)(B)(i)'' after 
     ``subsection (d)'';
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``and social sciences'' 
     after ``among the ocean sciences'';
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``impacts'' and 
     inserting ``impacts, including trends of changes in ocean 
     chemistry,'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (B)--

       (I) by striking ``improve the ability to assess the'' and 
     inserting ``assess the short-term and long-term''; and
       (II) by striking ``; and'' at the end and inserting a 
     semicolon;

       (iii) by amending subparagraph (C) to read as follows:
       ``(C) provide information for the--
       ``(i) development of adaptation and mitigation strategies 
     to address the socioeconomic impacts of ocean acidification 
     and coastal acidification;
       ``(ii) conservation of marine organisms and ecosystems; and
       ``(iii) assessment of the effectiveness of such adaptation 
     and mitigation strategies; and''; and
       (iv) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
       ``(D) improve research on--
       ``(i) ocean acidification and coastal acidification;
       ``(ii) the interactions between and effects of multiple 
     combined stressors including changes in water chemistry, 
     changes in sediment delivery, hypoxia, and harmful algal 
     blooms, on ocean acidification and coastal acidification; and
       ``(iii) the effect of environmental stressors on marine 
     resources and ecosystems;'';
       (C) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) in subparagraph (F), by striking ``database 
     development'' and inserting ``data management'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (H) by striking ``and'' at the end; 
     and
       (iii) by adding at the end the following new subparagraphs:
       ``(J) assessment of adaptation and mitigation strategies; 
     and
       ``(K) education and outreach activities;'';
       (D) in paragraph (4), by striking ``set forth'' and 
     inserting ``ensure an appropriate balance of contribution in 
     establishing'';
       (E) in paragraph (5), by striking ``reports'' and inserting 
     ``the best available peer-reviewed scientific reports'';
       (F) in paragraph (6)--
       (i) by inserting ``and coastal acidification'' after 
     ``ocean acidification''; and
       (ii) by striking ``of the United States'' and inserting 
     ``within the United States'';
       (G) in paragraph (7), by striking ``outline budget 
     requirements'' and inserting ``estimate costs associated for 
     full implementation of each element of the plan by fiscal 
     year'';
       (H) in paragraph (8)--
       (i) by inserting ``and coastal acidification'' after 
     ``ocean acidification'' each place it appears;
       (ii) by striking ``its'' and inserting ``their''; and
       (iii) by striking ``; and'' at the end and inserting a 
     semicolon;
       (I) in paragraph (9), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (J) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(10) describe monitoring needs necessary to support 
     potentially affected industry members, coastal stakeholders, 
     fishery management councils and commissions, non-Federal 
     resource managers, and scientific experts on decision-making 
     and adaptation related to ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification.'';
       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)(C), by striking ``surface'';
       (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification'' after ``ocean acidification'' each place it 
     appears;
       (C) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) by striking ``input, and'' and inserting ``inputs,'';
       (ii) by inserting ``, marine food webs,'' after ``marine 
     ecosystems''; and
       (iii) by inserting ``, and modeling that supports fisheries 
     management'' after ``marine organisms'';
       (D) in paragraph (5), by inserting ``and coastal 
     acidification'' after ``ocean acidification''; and
       (E) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(6) Research to understand related and cumulative 
     stressors and other biogeochemical processes occurring in 
     conjunction with ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification.''; and
       (4) by striking subsection (e) and inserting the following:
       ``(e) Advisory Board Evaluation.--Not later than 180 days 
     before a plan is submitted to Congress, the Subcommittee 
     shall provide the Advisory Board established under section 
     12404(c) a copy of the plan for purposes of review under 
     paragraph (2)(B)(i) of such section.
       ``(f) Publication and Public Comment.--Not later than 90 
     days before the strategic research plan, or any revision 
     thereof, is submitted to Congress, the Subcommittee shall 
     publish the plan in the Federal Register and provide an 
     opportunity for submission of public comments for a period of 
     not less than 60 days.''.

     SEC. 6. NOAA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION ACTIVITIES.

       Section 12406 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3705) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by inserting 
     ``coordination,'' after ``research, monitoring,'';

[[Page H4320]]

       (B) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) in subparagraph (B)--

       (I) by inserting ``including the Integrated Ocean Observing 
     System and the ocean observing assets of other Federal and 
     State agencies,'' after ``ocean observing assets,''; and
       (II) by inserting ``and agency and department missions, 
     prioritizing the location of monitoring instruments, assets, 
     and projects to maximize the efficiency of resources and to 
     optimize understanding of socioeconomic impacts and ecosystem 
     health'' after ``research program'';

       (ii) in subparagraph (C)--

       (I) by striking ``adaptation'' and inserting ``adaptation 
     and mitigation''; and
       (II) by inserting ``and supporting socioeconomically 
     vulnerable communities and industries'' after ``marine 
     ecosystems'';

       (iii) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``its impacts'' and 
     inserting ``their respective impacts'';
       (iv) in subparagraph (F), by striking ``monitoring and 
     impacts research'' and inserting ``research, monitoring, and 
     adaptation and mitigation strategies''; and
       (v) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
       ``(G) research to improve understanding of the effect of--
       ``(i) other environmental stressors on ocean acidification 
     and coastal acidification;
       ``(ii) multiple environmental stressors on living marine 
     resources and coastal ecosystems; and
       ``(iii) adaptation and mitigation strategies to address the 
     socioeconomic impacts of ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification.'';
       (C) in paragraph (2), by striking ``critical research 
     projects that explore'' and inserting ``critical research and 
     education projects that explore and communicate''; and
       (D) in paragraphs (1) and (2), by striking 
     ``acidification'' each place it appears and inserting 
     ``acidification and coastal acidification''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new subsections:
       ``(c) Relationship to Interagency Working Group.--The 
     National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall serve 
     as the lead Federal agency responsible for coordinating the 
     Federal response to ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification, by--
       ``(1) leading the interagency working group in implementing 
     the strategic research plan under section 12405;
       ``(2) coordinating monitoring and research efforts among 
     Federal agencies in cooperation with State, local, and Tribal 
     government and international partners;
       ``(3) maintaining an Ocean Acidification Information 
     Exchange described under section 12404(b)(5) to allow for 
     information to be electronically accessible, including 
     information--
       ``(A) on ocean acidification developed through or used by 
     the ocean acidification program described under section 
     12406(a); or
       ``(B) that would be useful to State governments, local 
     governments, Tribal governments, resource managers, 
     policymakers, researchers, and other stakeholders in 
     mitigating or adapting to the impacts of ocean acidification 
     and coastal acidification; and
       ``(4) establishing and maintaining the data archive system 
     under subsection (d).
       ``(d) Data Archive System.--
       ``(1) Management.--The Secretary, in coordination with 
     members of the interagency working group, shall provide for 
     the long-term stewardship of, and access to, data relating to 
     ocean acidification and coastal acidification by establishing 
     and maintaining a data archive system that the National 
     Center for Environmental Information uses to process, store, 
     archive, provide access to, and incorporate to the extent 
     possible, such data collected--
       ``(A) through relevant federally-funded research; and
       ``(B) by a Federal agency, State agency, local agency, 
     Tribe, academic scientist, citizen scientist, or industry 
     organization.
       ``(2) Existing global or national data assets.--In 
     establishing and maintaining the data archive system under 
     paragraph (1), the Secretary shall ensure that existing 
     global or national data assets (including the data assets 
     maintained by the National Centers for Environmental 
     Information, the Integrated Ocean Observing System, and other 
     existing data systems within Federal agencies) are 
     incorporated to the greatest extent possible.
       ``(e) Standards, Protocols, and Procedures.--With respect 
     to the data described in subsection (d), the Secretary, in 
     coordination with members of the interagency working group, 
     shall establish and revise as necessary the standards, 
     protocols, or procedures for--
       ``(1) processing, storing, archiving, and providing access 
     to such data;
       ``(2) the interoperability and intercalibration of such 
     data;
       ``(3) the collection of any metadata underlying such data; 
     and
       ``(4) sharing such data with State, local, and Tribal 
     government programs, potentially affected industry members, 
     coastal stakeholders, fishery management councils and 
     commissions, non-Federal resource managers, and academia.
       ``(f) Dissemination of Ocean Acidification Data and Coastal 
     Acidification Data.--The Secretary, in coordination with 
     members of the interagency working group, shall disseminate 
     the data described under subsection (d) to the greatest 
     extent practicable by sharing such data on full and open 
     access exchanges, including the Ocean Acidification 
     Information Exchange described in section 12404(b)(5).
       ``(g) Requirement.--Recipients of grants from the National 
     Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration under this subtitle 
     that collect data described under subsection (d) shall--
       ``(1) collect such data in accordance with the standards, 
     protocols, or procedures established pursuant to subsection 
     (e); and
       ``(2) submit such data to the data archive system under 
     subsection (d), in accordance with any rules promulgated by 
     the Secretary.''.

     SEC. 7. NSF OCEAN ACIDIFICATION ACTIVITIES.

       Section 12407 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3706) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``ocean acidification'' each place it 
     appears and inserting ``ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification'';
       (2) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1)--
       (i) by striking ``continue'' and all that follows through 
     ``which shall'' ;
       (ii) by striking ``proposals for research'' and inserting 
     ``proposals for the researching''; and
       (iii) by striking ``its impacts'' and inserting ``their 
     respective impacts'';
       (B) in paragraph (1), by striking ``marine ecosystems'' and 
     inserting ``ecosystems'';
       (C) in paragraph (2), by striking ``; and'' at the end and 
     inserting a semicolon;
       (D) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) by striking ``and its impacts'' and inserting ``and 
     their respective impacts''; and
       (ii) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``; 
     and''; and
       (E) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(4) adaptation and mitigation strategies to address 
     socioeconomic effects of ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification.''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(d) Requirement.--Recipients of grants from the National 
     Science Foundation under this subtitle that collect data 
     described under section 12406(d) shall--
       ``(1) collect data in accordance with the standards, 
     protocols, or procedures established pursuant to section 
     12406(e); and
       ``(2) submit such data to the Director and the Secretary, 
     in accordance with any rules promulgated by the Director or 
     the Secretary.''.

     SEC. 8. NASA OCEAN ACIDIFICATION ACTIVITIES.

       Section 12408 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3707) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``ocean acidification'' each place it 
     appears and inserting ``ocean acidification and coastal 
     acidification'';
       (2) in subsection (a), by striking ``its impacts'' and 
     inserting ``their respective impacts''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(d) Requirement.--Researchers from the National 
     Aeronautics and Space Administration under this subtitle that 
     collect data described under section 12406(d) shall--
       ``(1) collect such data in accordance with the standards, 
     protocols, or procedures established pursuant to section 
     12406(e); and
       ``(2) submit such data to the Administrator and the 
     Secretary, in accordance with any rules promulgated by the 
     Administrator or the Secretary.''.

     SEC. 9. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       Section 12409 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
     and Monitoring Act of 2009 (33 U.S.C. 3708) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``subtitle--'' and all 
     that follows through paragraph (4) and inserting the 
     following: ``subtitle $30,500,000 for each of the fiscal 
     years 2020 through 2024.''; and
       (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``subtitle--'' and all 
     that follows through paragraph (4) and inserting the 
     following: ``subtitle $20,000,000 for each of the fiscal 
     years 2020 through 2024.''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Johnson) and the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Lucas) each 
will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.


                             General Leave

  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks 
and to include extraneous materials on H.R. 1237, the bill now under 
consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Texas?
  There was no objection.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I rise in support of H.R. 1237, the COAST Research Act of 2019. Our 
Nation is facing an invisible but growing threat: ocean acidification. 
For the last 200 years, the oceans have soaked up about one-third of 
the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from the burning of fossil 
fuels causing the oceans to become more acidic.
  The science is clear. As spelled out in the Fourth National Climate 
Assessment and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special 
Report, ocean acidification is causing the chemistry of the oceans to 
change at an unprecedented rate.
  Ocean acidification makes it more difficult for shelled organisms 
like oysters, mussels, clams, and corals to build their shells and 
skeletons and has potentially devastating effects on marine ecosystems.
  The effects of ocean acidification are already being seen and felt 
today in our coastal communities around the Nation.
  Congress acted and passed the Federal Ocean Acidification Research 
and Monitoring Act in 2009, which catalyzed research and monitoring 
efforts

[[Page H4321]]

to better understand ocean acidification and its impacts. While this 
bill has successfully increased our understanding of ocean 
acidification, the Federal investment in research has been relatively 
small compared to the size of the problem.

                              {time}  0915

  H.R. 1237 updates and reauthorizes our Federal ocean acidification 
response and expands the scope of the Federal efforts on this important 
issue.
  H.R. 1237 also designates the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration as the lead Federal agency, which formalizes the 
leadership role it has played in conducting ocean acidification 
research and monitoring over the last decade.
  Ocean acidification threatens the vitality of our coastal economies. 
We need to get ahead of the problem of ocean acidification before it 
causes even greater economic harm to our coast. We need to have a much 
better understanding of ocean acidification in order to mitigate and 
adapt to its effects.
  H.R. 1237, along with the three other ocean acidification bills being 
considered today, offers a path toward solutions. If we don't act now, 
we risk going down an irreversible path.
  June is World Oceans Month, and I see no better time for the U.S. 
House of Representatives to pass legislation to support the health of 
the oceans than now.
  I want to take a brief moment to recognize the efforts of the sponsor 
of the bill, the gentlewoman from Oregon (Ms. Bonamici). She has been a 
champion of this issue during her time here in the House and has been 
relentless in her efforts to authorize this program.
  Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record letters from Earthjustice, Ocean 
Conservancy, the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing 
Systems, the Integrated Ocean Observing System Association, and the 
Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association in support of this bill.

                                                 Earthjustice,

                                                     June 4, 2019.
     Re Earthjustice supports H.R. 1237, the Coastal and Ocean 
         Acidification Stressors and Threats Research Act of 2019.

     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Congresswoman Bonamici: On behalf of our supporters 
     and staff nationwide, we are writing to voice our strong 
     support for the Coastal and Ocean Acidification Stressors and 
     Threats (COAST) Act of 2019 (H.R. 1237). Ocean acidification 
     is a serious global threat, as our oceans calibrate our 
     atmosphere and maintain the conditions that have supported 
     human life for millennia. This vital legislation leads us 
     towards solutions that secure our ecosystems, our economies, 
     and our health.
       Ocean acidification has devastated coastal communities by 
     eroding the sources of their livelihood and protection 
     against ocean events. Acidic waters imperil everything from 
     cod larvae and lobsters, to plankton and coral reefs. The 
     process acidification sets into motion will cause 
     increasingly expensive damage on scales larger than we've 
     already seen in our Pacific Northwest shellfish farms. 
     Americans will take the hit, either in the grocery store, 
     or--for coastal regions--in their jobs and their homes. 
     However, immediate action can halt plunging pH levels and 
     promote resilience in changing temperatures.
       The COAST Research Act jumpstarts ocean recovery and helps 
     communities cope with ocean acidification by updating the 
     Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act 
     (FOARAM) to face current threats. Funding FOARAM through 2023 
     ensures we don't backslide in protecting ourselves against 
     ocean acidification, just as the danger is increasing. 
     Incorporating the best available data on the full effects of 
     ocean acidification, including socioeconomic and regional 
     variations, ensures our national response to the problem 
     works for the whole nation. Establishing an advisory board 
     that represents and coordinates the diverse stakeholders 
     impacted by ocean acidification ensures interests at all 
     level--including industry, recreation, and conservation--are 
     accounted for in federal action.
       Bipartisan support for the COAST Research Act speaks to the 
     seriousness of the problem and the efficiency of this 
     proposed solution. Neither Democrats nor Republicans are 
     willing to watch our blue economy dissolve in increasingly 
     acidic waters. Both parties support urgent action to 
     stabilize our oceans and fortify them against future changes. 
     This bill provides the funding and strategy to do just that.
       Without action, our ocean ecosystems and dependent 
     economies may be barren by the end of this century. Congress 
     has the opportunity to reverse this trend and keep our coasts 
     and oceans vibrant and bountiful. We greatly appreciate your 
     leadership in crafting the bill that can make such reversal 
     possible.
           Sincerely,

                                             Marjorie Mulhall,

                                   Legislative Director for Lands,
     Wildlife, and Oceans, Earthjustice.
                                  ____



                                            Ocean Conservancy,

                                Washington, DC, February 27, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Bonamici: On behalf of Ocean 
     Conservancy, please accept this letter of support for H.R. 
     1237, the Coastal and Ocean Acidification Stressors and 
     Threats (COAST) Research Act of 2019. Americans depend on a 
     healthy ocean, and ocean acidification threatens millions of 
     jobs and livelihoods, cultures, and ways of life, from the 
     Pacific Northwest's shellfish industry to Florida's coral 
     reef tourism. We believe the COAST Research Act strengthens 
     our nation's investments in ocean and coastal acidification, 
     and we are proud to offer our support for this legislation.
       From coast to coast, ocean acidification is having a broad 
     range of impacts on the health of our ocean and coastal 
     communities. Coastal industries are continuing to face the 
     reality of an increasingly acidic ocean. In 2017, researchers 
     at Oregon State University recorded some of the highest 
     levels of ocean acidification in the world off the coast of 
     the Pacific Northwest. Additionally, 63% of test sites on the 
     west coast experienced levels of acidification known to cause 
     commercial oyster production failures. From the Atlantic to 
     the Pacific, ocean and coastal acidification has had 
     extensive biological and socioeconomic impacts.
       In 2009, Congress recognized the urgent need for federal 
     investments in ocean acidification research and monitoring, 
     and subsequently passed the Federal Ocean Acidification 
     Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act of 2009. FOARAM 
     established the federal government's work on ocean 
     acidification by creating the NOAA Ocean Acidification 
     Program and an interagency working group on ocean 
     acidification. Much of our knowledge and understanding of 
     ocean acidification that has emerged in the last decade can 
     be credited to the federal funding authorized by FOARAM. The 
     law's authorization, however, expired in 2012, and there are 
     changes that can be made to further improve our ability to 
     understand acidification in the open ocean as well as in the 
     coastal zone.
       We believe the COAST Research Act will help our nation and 
     coastal communities better prepare for the effects from ocean 
     and coastal acidification. Thank you for your leadership on 
     this issue, and we look forward to working with you to craft 
     solutions for our changing ocean environment.
           Sincerely,

                                          Sarah Cooley, Ph.D.,

                                     Director, Ocean Acidification
     Program, Ocean Conservancy.
                                  ____

                                          Northwest Association of
                             Networked Ocean Observing Systems,   
                                    Washington, DC, March 7, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington DC.
       Dear Congresswoman Bonamici: As the Director of the 
     Northwest Association of Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), I 
     write in support of the Coastal and Ocean Acidification 
     Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act.
       NANOOS provides access to near-real time observations, 
     forecasts, and other tools that can be used to observe water 
     properties in the Salish Sea and the coastal waters off 
     Washington and Oregon. NANOOS can only serve our stakeholders 
     via NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), which 
     links together Federal agencies with our collective of local 
     universities, government agencies, tribes, nonprofits, and 
     industry organizations who collect quality oceanographic and 
     meteorological data from moorings, buoys, and satellites from 
     across the Pacific Northwest region. But our resources are 
     limited and this COAST Research Act would help to highlight 
     the payoff investments can make.
       In the Pacific Northwest, we know that ocean acidification 
     is an issue already, as witnessed by the difference that 
     monitoring water chemistry has made to shellfish growers. We 
     know that impacts from ocean acidification may affect 
     shellfish harvesters, fishermen, resource managers, and 
     tribal and other coastal communities. NANOOS' work with IOOS 
     and NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program have been instrumental 
     in aiding adaptation.
       The COAST Research Act will enhance these and other efforts 
     to understand, monitor, and manage the nation's ability to 
     respond and adapt to ocean acidification. NANOOS will be 
     better able to meet the needs of our stakeholders if this Act 
     is passed.
       My thanks for your leadership and insights.
           Sincerely,
                                                       Jan Newton,
     NANOOS Executive Director.
                                  ____



                                             IOOS Association,

                                                    March 5, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Congresswoman Bonamici: On behalf of the Integrated 
     Ocean Observing System

[[Page H4322]]

     (IOOS) Association and its national network of eleven coastal 
     observing systems, I write to support the Coastal and Ocean 
     Acidification Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act.
       NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) links 
     together Federal agencies and eleven Regional Associations 
     (RAs) to design and to operate regional observing systems to 
     provide timely and reliable data and information on our 
     oceans, coasts, and Great Lakes. Coastal acidification is 
     becoming an even more pressing concern for many of our 
     stakeholders and users, such as shellfish growers, shellfish 
     harvesters, fishermen, resource managers, and coastal 
     communities.
       The impacts of coastal acidification vary, and each system 
     must be tailored to the unique situation of the region. The 
     IOOS RAs work closely with NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program 
     to understand the regional context, to deploy and operate 
     sensors, support the data that can detect and monitor 
     acidification to support and improve warnings and alerts and 
     to provide for the sharing and integration of data.
       The COAST Research Act will enhance these and other efforts 
     to understand, monitoring and manage the nation's ability to 
     respond and adapt to ocean acidification. The Act does this 
     be expanding the Advisory Board to include representatives of 
     the variety of industries and stakeholder impacted by ocean 
     acidification, expanding the strategic plan for research and 
     monitoring, and expanding the role of the Federal agencies 
     for addressing ocean acidification.
           Sincerely,
                                           Ella (Josie) Quintrell,
     Director.
                                  ____

                                           Pacific Coast Shellfish


                                          Growers Association,

                                                    March 9, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Bonamici: On behalf of the members of 
     Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association (PCSGA), I am 
     submitting this letter of support for H.B. 1237, the Coastal 
     and Ocean Acidification Stressors and Threats (COAST) 
     Research Act of 2019. Shellfish growers were the first 
     community to call attention to the problems associated with 
     ocean acidification when, in 2007, they experienced sever 
     oyster larvae mortality in two out of three major west coast 
     shellfish hatcheries. Since then, PCSGA has engaged in 
     several local, state, and federal efforts and initiatives to 
     ensure a future for this historic industry.
       Shellfish farming on the west coast began in the late 
     1800's, fueled the California Gold Rush and was the reason 
     for the development of many coastal towns. Today, PCSGA 
     proudly represents 120 shellfish farms in Alaska, Washington, 
     Oregon, California and Hawaii which farm mussels, clams, 
     oysters and geoduck. Our members not only produce 
     sustainable, healthy, food, but also provide significant 
     ecosystem services such as aquatic habitat and water 
     filtration, and support thousands of family-wage jobs within 
     rural coastal communities.
       For nearly a decade, the shellfish industry has benefited 
     from NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program and the Integrated 
     Ocean Observing System (IOOS), both of which relate to the 
     Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) 
     Act of 2009. These programs and the directives within FOARAM 
     have influenced the way shellfish growers operate their farms 
     among the uncertainty of changing ocean conditions. 
     Historically, growers only consulting their tide charts. Now, 
     growers rely upon a variety of real-time data and tools to 
     understand the ocean changes and adapt methods and practices 
     which allow them to continue farming in a productive and 
     profitable manner. There much work ahead of us and much yet 
     to learn. COAST Research Act provides an essential pathway 
     forward.
       We are excited by the intent of COAST Research Act and the 
     opportunities it provides. Not only is it a reasonable follow 
     up to FOARAM but it also allows us to continue asking 
     questions and seek innovative approaches to mitigate the 
     impacts related to ocean acidification.
       Thank you very much for your leadership on this and for 
     your commitment to ensuring the long-term health of our 
     coastal and marine areas upon which shellfish growers depend.
           Respectfully,
                                               Margaret A. Pilaro,
                                               Executive Director.

  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I strongly support this bipartisan 
bill, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 1237, the COAST Research Act 
of 2019. This bipartisan legislation would reauthorize and modernize 
ocean acidification research and monitoring programs.
  Ocean acidification is the result of a gradual decrease in pH in 
ocean chemistry. A small shift in pH can have a serious effect on 
marine ecosystems, including shellfish habitat, coral reefs, and 
fisheries habitat.
  Congress recognized the need for a better understanding of the cause 
and the effects of ocean acidification by passing the Federal Ocean 
Acidification Research and Monitoring Act of 2009. This legislation 
created a framework for science organizations such as NOAA and the 
National Science Foundation to dedicate resources to studying the 
phenomenon. This program provided valuable information to the 
scientific community to better understand what caused ocean 
acidification and how to begin addressing this issue.
  H.R. 1237 reauthorizes and modernizes those efforts by updating the 
strategic plan governing the Federal Government's research efforts, 
strengthening cooperation among scientific agencies. It designates NOAA 
as the lead agency for coordinating Federal efforts for addressing the 
Federal response to ocean acidification. Additionally, the bill 
clarifies that all federally funded research conducted in connection 
with the program is to be made publicly available.
  This bill is the result of years of work in building a consensus 
among stakeholders, ranging from ocean conservation groups and 
sportsmen to coastal communities, about how best to address this 
problem moving forward.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support this bill, and I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as she may 
consume to the gentlewoman from Oregon (Ms. Bonamici).
  Ms. BONAMICI. Mr. Speaker, I thank Chairwoman Johnson for yielding 
time, also for her leadership on the committee, and I thank Chairwoman 
Johnson and Ranking Member Lucas for their support of this legislation.
  I rise today in support of the Coastal and Ocean Acidification 
Stressors and Threats, or COAST, Research Act, my bipartisan bill to 
expand scientific research and monitoring of ocean and coastal 
acidification.
  According to the Fourth National Climate Assessment, catastrophic 
carbon dioxide concentrations are now higher than at any time in the 
last 3 million years. Approximately one-third of the carbon dioxide in 
the atmosphere dissolves into our oceans and estuaries, causing them to 
become more acidic.
  In addition to atmospheric carbon dioxide, our oceans, estuaries, and 
coastal waterways are absorbing chemical inputs and excess nutrient 
runoff from land and coastal pollution.
  Our understanding of the long-term consequences of changes in water 
chemistry on our marine ecosystem is still limited, but we do know that 
ocean and coastal acidification make it difficult for marine organisms 
to build their shells and skeletal structures. Some finfish, including 
endangered salmon in the Pacific Northwest, lose their sense of smell 
that they use for identifying prey, reproducing, and navigating their 
habitats.
  Ocean acidification events are only projected to become more intense, 
longer, and increasingly common, especially on the Pacific Coast.
  The COAST Research Act would improve scientific research on ocean and 
coastal acidification in the context of other environmental stressors 
and direct Federal agencies to assess adaptation and mitigation 
strategies. Importantly, the bill also expands the definition of ocean 
acidification to include estuaries and to recognize mechanisms that 
cause changes in coastal chemistry.
  As chair of the Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification, 
NOAA is already leading interdisciplinary efforts to expand our 
understanding of changing ocean conditions. This bill would designate 
NOAA as the lead Federal agency responsible for implementing the 
Federal response to ocean and coastal acidification. This is a 
pragmatic response to calls for an interdependent national ocean 
acidification program office and recommendations from a September 2014 
Government Accountability Office report.
  Ocean acidification research is still in its infancy, and the best 
way to mitigate its effects is through regionally coordinated 
scientific research. The COAST Research Act directs NOAA to maintain a 
data archive system to process, store, archive, and provide access to 
data on ocean and coastal acidification from federally funded research, 
including existing global or national datasets and research from

[[Page H4323]]

State and local agencies, Tribes, academic scientists, citizen 
scientists, and industry organizations.
  Additionally, the COAST Research Act would increase our understanding 
of the socioeconomic effects of ocean and coastal acidification and 
engage stakeholders. The bill creates an advisory board comprised of 
representatives of the shellfish and crab industry; finfish industry; 
seafood processors; recreational fishing; academia; nongovernmental 
organizations; State, local, and Tribal governments; and regional 
coastal acidification networks. This regionally balanced group will 
advise the interagency working group on ocean and coastal acidification 
research and monitoring activities.
  Our oceans and estuaries are facing the brunt of our inaction to 
reduce anthropogenic carbon emissions. We know that even if carbon 
dioxide emissions are halted today, many of the effects for our oceans 
will continue to occur over the course of the next few decades.
  The COAST Research Act will support vulnerable communities, 
industries, and coastal and ocean managers by strengthening research on 
how they can best prepare and, when possible, adapt to ocean and 
coastal acidification. Oregon's shellfish industry and researchers at 
Oregon State University have collaborated on ocean acidification 
mitigation strategies that have helped the shellfish industry survive. 
Their research demonstrates what is possible when we invest in science 
and research to help coastal communities adapt to climate change.

  Our oceans and estuaries are resilient, and we can help them heal, 
but we cannot afford to wait any longer. This is National Ocean Month 
and Capitol Hill Ocean Week, a good time to act to help protect the 
oceans and our planet.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to close by thanking, again, my colleagues, 
Representative Young, Representative Posey, and Representative Pingree, 
for their leadership on this issue. I truly appreciate the support from 
my fellow House Oceans Caucus and Congressional Estuary Caucus co-
chairs. I also want to, again, thank Chairwoman Johnson and Ranking 
Member Lucas for their support.
  Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record letters from the Oregon 
Coordinating Council on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia and Oregon 
State University in support of the COAST Research Act.

         The Oregon Coordinating Council on Ocean Acidification 
           and Hypoxia,
                                                    March 8, 2019.
     Re Coastal and Ocean Acidification Stressors and Threats 
         (COAST) Research Act.

     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Bonamici: As the Co-Chairs of the State 
     legislatively mandated, Oregon Coordinating Council on Ocean 
     Acidification and Hypoxia (or ``Oregon OAH Council''), we 
     appreciate the opportunity to provide you with a letter of 
     strong support for the Coastal and Ocean Acidification 
     Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act. Addressing 
     intensifying ocean acidification (OA) conditions here in 
     Oregon, as well as across the United States, is critical to 
     our Nations understanding of larger impacts from CO2 
     emissions.
       Oregon is among the first places in the world to observe 
     direct impacts of ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH), due 
     to our unique geographic and oceanographic context, putting 
     our fragile marine ecosystem at risk. Our coastal economies 
     rely on our vibrant marine ecosystem. Our nearshore waters 
     are home to sport and commercial fisheries, all of the 
     State's mariculture operations, and contain critical nursery 
     grounds for economically important species including 
     rockfish, oysters, salmon, pink shrimp, and Dungeness crab. 
     Oregon is not alone in experiencing the impacts from OA or 
     hypoxia. Through actions such as those in the COAST Research 
     Act we must act together as Americans to develop solutions 
     for our coastal communities, economies, and ecosystems to 
     prepare for future conditions.
       In the coming years, the Oregon OAH Council will continue 
     to take a thoughtful, collaborative, science-based approach 
     to developing recommendations to address OAH in our state and 
     beyond. Through further investments and initiatives, Oregon 
     and the United States will benefit from adaptation and 
     mitigation measures and will model to the world how to 
     develop actionable solutions for OA adaptation and 
     mitigation.


 the oregon oah council has identified three urgently needed strategic 
actions, which directly align with objectives within the coast research 
                                  act.

       (1) Monitoring of key oceanographic and biological 
     indicators of impacts from OAH.
       At the same time that OA has been impacting our coasts, 
     oxygen-depletion is on the rise; Oregon and much of the West 
     coast has seen several seasons in a row with extended periods 
     of hypoxia in our coastal waters. The Oregon OAH Council is 
     encouraged that the COAST Research Act identifies the need to 
     strengthen investments in OA research and monitoring in the 
     context of other environmental stressors. Ocean acidification 
     and hypoxia are compounding stressors for a wide range of 
     marine animals, and as such must continue to be studied 
     together. Through the COAST Research Acts reauthorization of 
     funding of NOAA, NSF, and NASA, much needed resources will be 
     made available to researchers across the United States to 
     continue to expand our knowledge of OAH. The Oregon OAH 
     Council also supports the initiative of the COAST Research 
     Act to create data processing, storage, and archive 
     facilities to provide for the long-term stewardship and 
     standardization of data. By creating a central repository for 
     OAH data it provides governments, scientists, and industry 
     better access to the information need to inform their 
     mitigation and adaption planning. Only by maximizing our 
     current data and filling our knowledge gaps of OAH, can we as 
     a Nation begin to be able to piece together for solutions for 
     our coastal communities.
       (2) Projects or programs that promote coastal economic and 
     ecosystem resilience to OAH.
       Fisheries and aquaculture are central to our history, are 
     enjoyed by Americans across the nation year-round, and remain 
     key to many of Oregon's coastal economies today. Yet, the 
     future sustainability of these marine resources and 
     communities' ability to rely on them, are uncertain in the 
     face of significant ocean changes, including OAH, and 
     uncertain in the face of our current state of preparation to 
     adapt to those changes over time. This is why the Oregon OAH 
     Council supports activities and initiatives that promote 
     resilience to increased OAH conditions, for both human 
     communities and ecosystems. The COAST Research Act also 
     stresses the importance of increasing our understanding of 
     the socioeconomic effects of OA by expanding federal research 
     to assess adaptation and mitigation strategies. There will be 
     costs of inaction relative to CO2 mitigation and the United 
     States has an obligation to relieve these costs wherever 
     possible for our citizens.
       (3) Tools and strategies to increase awareness of OAH 
     science, impacts and solutions.
       As the impacts of OA intensify, it is going to be vitally 
     important for our Nation to identify and advance 
     opportunities to raise awareness of and communicate OAH 
     science, impacts, and mitigation solutions. This is why the 
     Oregon OAH Council is encouraged by the fact that the COAST 
     Research Act recognizes the need to address the effects of OA 
     on estuaries and integrate research, monitoring, and 
     adaptation strategies. By integrating OA causes and effects, 
     it better demonstrates the complexity of this climate issue, 
     and provides a clearer message to communities. The Oregon OAH 
     Council also supports the COAST Research Act establishment of 
     an Advisory Board to increase coordination among 
     stakeholders, including members of industry, to work with 
     State and Federal governments to improve coordination. 
     Recognizing the importance of a broad membership, our Oregon 
     OAH Council includes members from industry, academia and 
     state government agencies. For the benefit of our marine 
     ecosystem and the human communities that rely on a healthy 
     marine ecosystem, the Nation's adaptation and mitigation 
     approaches to OA should include successful communication of 
     new science, monitoring, and adaptation strategies.
       As Co-Chairs of the Oregon OAH Council, we appreciate the 
     opportunity to provide you with a letter of strong support 
     for the COAST Research Act. The strategic investment and 
     coordination opportunities outlined in this act are 
     meaningful and will make a difference in our understanding of 
     OAH science, impacts, and solutions. Through passage of this 
     Act and the subsequent investment in science, adaptation and 
     communications, the United States will demonstrate meaningful 
     action in fighting OA and the global challenges of climate 
     change, and preparing our citizens and economies for the 
     changes ahead.
       Thank you for your consideration of these comments.
           Sincerely,
     John Barth, Ph.D.,
       Co-Chair, Oregon OAH Council, Executive Director, Marine 
     Studies Initiative, Oregon State University.
     Caren Braby, Ph.D.,
       Co-Chair, Oregon OAH Council, Marine Resources Program 
     Manager, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
                                  ____

         Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President, 
           Oregon State University,
                                     Corvallis, OR, March 8, 2019.
     Re H.R. 1237--The COAST Research Act of 2019.

     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Bonamici: We write to offer Oregon 
     State University's strong support for H.R. 1237, the COAST 
     Research Act of 2019.

[[Page H4324]]

       As marine habitats face new and daunting pressures 
     threatening their sustainability, the COAST Research Act 
     identifies the growing need for strategic and robust 
     investments in ocean acidification (OA) research, monitoring 
     and stakeholder collaboration.
       Oregon State University is committed to interdisciplinary 
     approaches to address the national and global challenges 
     facing our oceans and coast communities. OSU has a deep 
     history of global leadership in oceanography and engages in 
     nationally ranked oceanographic monitoring programs and 
     world-leading OA research. Further, the university recognizes 
     that Oregon's estuaries and coastal regions are home to some 
     of the world's most productive ecosystems and economically 
     vital shellfish farms.
       The university is encouraged that the COAST Research Act 
     expands the definition of OA to include coastal and estuarine 
     systems, and identifies OA as being affected by a combination 
     of factors, including hypoxia. The university believes that 
     by expanding federal definitions of OA and by increasing 
     funding opportunities, researchers and managers will be able 
     to best utilize resources to find solutions to address OA.
       The university also is encouraged that this legislation 
     recognizes the need for federal engagement to continue 
     important investments. Doing so will enhance the integration 
     of OA research, monitoring and adaptation strategies across 
     principal federal research agencies, including the National 
     Science Foundation, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric 
     Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space 
     Administration.
       Oregon State University understands that effective and 
     collaborative partnerships and communication are essential 
     for our state and nation to find adaptive and mitigation 
     solutions to address OA. For example, the proposal to 
     establish an Ocean Acidification Advisory Board will be 
     essential for facilitating the important work still to be 
     done.
       The world's ocean belongs to everyone, and ocean health is 
     critical to our future. In the coming decades, it will be 
     essential for the nation and its universities to work 
     collaboratively to improve and sustain the health of our 
     oceans. Doing so, we will assure human wellness, 
     environmental health and economic prosperity for future 
     generations.
       In closing, Oregon State University believes that the COAST 
     Research Act proposes new strategic tools to expand 
     understanding and address the problems facing our oceans and 
     coastal communities.
           Sincerely,
     Edward Feser,
       Provost and Executive Vice President.
     Irem Tumer,
       Interim Vice President for Research.

  Ms. BONAMICI. Mr. Speaker, I urge all of my colleagues to support 
this bill.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Posey), my colleague not only on the 
Science, Space, and Technology Committee, but on the Financial Services 
Committee, ever thoughtful and ever strong spirited.
  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding and his 
kind remarks.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 1237, the COAST Research Act, 
of which I am an original cosponsor.
  Those of us who live on the coast understand that the coast is an 
essential part of our lives. In my own State of Florida, approximately 
80 percent of the population lives along the coast. About 6 million 
people work in our coastal communities and produce nearly $280 billion 
a year in wages and contribute over $700 billion in gross domestic 
product.
  Today, we face uncertainty about the sustainability and the 
resilience of our coasts. Parts of our coast have come under assault 
from the ocean itself, even before anyone imagined anything about sea 
level rise.
  Acidification presents uncertainties in the ocean and could pose 
severe effects to the biodiversity of our marine wildlife.
  Along the Space Coast, we have seen a recent plague of algal blooms 
that foul our estuaries and threaten our economy. It is serious and it 
is heartbreaking.
  The message is clear: We need to take care of our precious coast so 
that we can continue to enjoy the lifestyle and the economic well-being 
that we all cherish.
  We must work with the Federal Government in the interest of improving 
our coastal resilience. That is why I have joined Congresswoman Suzanne 
Bonamici in directing NOAA to pick up the role of leading research for 
coastal acidification.
  Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record four letters of support for the 
COAST Research Act from the following organizations: the Consortium for 
Ocean Leadership, the Surfrider Foundation, the Pacific States Marine 
Fisheries Commission, and the Northwest fisheries groups.

                              Consortium for Ocean Leadership,

                                    Washington, DC, March 1, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Congresswoman Bonamici: On behalf of the Consortium 
     for Ocean Leadership (COL), which represents our nation's 
     leading ocean science, research, and technology organizations 
     from academia, industry, and aquariums, I am writing to 
     express support for the Coastal and Ocean Acidification 
     Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act (H.R. 6267). 
     America relies on our ocean and coastal communities for our 
     basic individual needs as well as our overall security and 
     prosperity. Keeping these environments, and therefore their 
     communities, safe from the myriad threats associated with 
     ocean acidification is paramount to our ocean security. COL 
     applauds the COAST Research Act in its mission to strengthen 
     existing ocean acidification initiatives and introduce new 
     strategies to better understand and manage this environmental 
     stressor.
       Ocean acidification, which occurs as the ocean absorbs 
     higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, 
     threatens the health of the entire ocean. As corals, 
     shellfish, and many types of plankton struggle to create and 
     maintain their shells or exoskeletons in more acidic waters, 
     ocean food webs are disrupted. This, in turn, threatens the 
     crucial balance in many ecosystems, as well as our own food 
     security, and jeopardizes the stability of those whose 
     livelihoods depend on a healthy ocean. Combatting the causes 
     and mitigating the effects of ocean acidification requires 
     sustained congressional support and interagency 
     collaboration, as well as engagement from stakeholders in the 
     private sector and academia. I strongly commend the COAST 
     Research Act's commitment to advancing ocean acidification 
     research and monitoring efforts, as well as promoting 
     cooperation among stakeholder groups.
       I offer my sincere thanks to you, Congresswoman Bonamici, 
     along with Congresswoman Chellie Pingree and Congressmen Don 
     Young and Bill Posey, for your bipartisan efforts to help us 
     better understand ocean acidification and improve overall 
     ocean health by strengthening federal investments in the 
     research and increasing monitoring of changing ocean 
     conditions. Our lives and our future may well depend on it.
           Respectfully,

                                            Jonathan W. White,

                                                 RADM (Ret.), USN,
     President and CEO.
                                  ____



                                         Surfrider Foundation,

                                      Clemente, CA, March 7, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     Washington, DC.
     Re Support for Coastal and Ocean Acidification Stressors and 
         Threats (COAST) Research Act.

       Dear Honorable Congresswoman Bonamici: On behalf of 
     Surfrider Foundation's 160 Chapters and student clubs and our 
     250,000 supporters, activists and members worldwide, we write 
     to express our enthusiastic supports for Coastal and Ocean 
     Acidification Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act. The 
     Surfrider Foundation (Surfrider) is a non-profit grassroots 
     organization dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of our 
     world's oceans, waves and beaches.
       As climate change continues to impact our ocean and coast, 
     local communities need to plan ahead to better understand and 
     plan for a changing climate. Ocean acidification (OA) is 
     particularly concerning for Surfrider. The current 
     understanding of ocean acidification impacts on ocean and 
     estuarine ecosystems is inadequate and must be improved to 
     fully prepare for and adapt to changing environmental 
     conditions and manage our natural resources in nearshore 
     locations. In addition, more integration and coordination is 
     needed between local, state, and national entities to ensure 
     adequate scientific research and investments in related 
     topics such as nutrient loading, hypoxia, ocean 
     acidification, and harmful algae bloom research and other 
     observational systems are targeted to meet coastal 
     communities' needs.
       Surfrider is particularly pleased to see the legislation 
     focuses on adaptation strategies for ocean acidification and 
     expands the definition of ocean acidification to include 
     estuaries. In addition, we are pleased to see that the bill 
     would expand the Interagency Working Group's strategic 
     research plan to also address socioeconomic effects of ocean 
     and coastal acidification and assess adaptation and 
     mitigation strategies.
       Furthermore, establishing an Advisory Board to increase 
     coordination among stakeholders, and requiring NOAA to 
     facilitate an Interagency Working Group's strategic research 
     plan, that coordinates monitoring and research efforts among 
     federal and local agencies and stakeholders is critical to 
     ensure success of this important piece of legislation.
       Thank you for introducing such important legislation.
           Sincerely,

                                        Stefanie Sekich-Quinn,

                                     Surfrider Foundation, Coastal
                                             Preservation Manager.

                                               Charlie Plybon,

                                             Surfrider Foundation,
                                            Oregon Policy Manager.

[[Page H4325]]

     
                                  ____
                                             Pacific States Marine


                                         Fisheries Commission,

                                      Portland, OR, March 4, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Bonamici: The Pacific States Marine 
     Fisheries Commission has a standing resolution adopted by the 
     Commissioners to support and encourage new funding should be 
     identified to augment coastwide research and monitor changing 
     ocean conditions, harmful algal blooms, and ocean 
     acidification.
       We have had an opportunity to review the Coastal and Ocean 
     Acidification Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act. The 
     bill would reauthorize the Federal Ocean Acidification 
     Research and Monitoring Act to continue funding research 
     through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
     and the National Science Foundation. The bill would designate 
     NOAA as the lead federal agency in the coordination of the 
     federal response to ocean acidification. The bill also 
     broadens the program to include marine estuaries.
       The bill, as introduced, strengthens the federal research 
     programs that focus on ocean acidification. West Coast and 
     Alaska ocean stakeholders are already feeling the 
     socioeconomic impacts of ocean acidification. We view ocean 
     acidification research as an important ongoing federal 
     responsibility in seeking to address the negative impacts to 
     these stakeholders. Pacific States therefore supports the 
     your efforts and that of other Members of the Ocean Caucus in 
     seeking to expeditiously move the Coast Research Act through 
     the House of Representatives.
           Regards,
                                                     Randy Fisher,
     Executive Director.
                                  ____

                                                   March 10, 2019.
     Hon. Suzanne Bonamici,
     House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Representative Bonamici: From coast to coast, ocean 
     acidification is having a broad range of impacts on the 
     health of our ocean and coastal communities. Coastal 
     industries are continuing to face the reality of an 
     increasingly acidic ocean. In 2017, researchers at Oregon 
     State University recorded some of the highest levels of ocean 
     acidification in the world off the coast of the Pacific 
     Northwest. Additionally, 63 percent of test sites on the west 
     coast experienced levels of acidification known to cause 
     commercial oyster production failures.
       Our Pacific Northwest economies, our recreational and 
     commercial fishing, and shellfish industry as well as our 
     great northwest tourism economy--all depend on a healthy 
     ocean. And because we are already seeing the effects of ocean 
     acidification, we support your efforts and we support H.R. 
     1237, the Coastal and Ocean Acidification Stressors and 
     Threats (COAST) Research Act of 2019.
       Much of our knowledge and understanding of ocean 
     acidification that has emerged in the last decade can be 
     credited to the federal funding authorized by Federal Ocean 
     Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act of 2009. 
     FOARAM established the federal government's work on ocean 
     acidification by creating the NOAA Ocean Acidification 
     Program and an interagency working group on ocean 
     acidification. FOARAM's authorization expired in 2012. The 
     COAST Research Act amends FOARAM to further improve our 
     ability to understand acidification in the open ocean as well 
     as in the coastal zone.
       We support the COAST Research Act and believe it will help 
     our coastal communities better prepare for the effects from 
     ocean and coastal acidification. Thank you for your 
     leadership to strengthen the nation's focus and investment in 
     oceans and coastal acidification.
           Sincerely,
     Lyf Gildersleeve,
       Owner, Flying Fish Company--Sustainable Seafood.
     Grant Putnam,
       President, Northwest Guides and Anglers Association.
     Liz Hamilton,
       Executive Director, Northwest Sportfishing Industry 
     Association.
     Joseph Bogaard,
       Executive Director, Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition.
     Greg Block,
       Executive Director, Sustainable Northwest.
     David Moskowitz,
       Executive Director, The Conservation Angler.
     Kurt Beardslee,
       Executive Director, Wild Fish Conservancy.
     Guido Rahr,
       Executive Director, Wild Salmon Center.

  Mr. POSEY. Mr. Speaker, we must not fail to preserve the 
sustainability and resilience of our coastal resources, our 
environments, and our economies.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to support the COAST Research Act.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I would simply urge the passage of 
this bill, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LUCAS. Mr. Speaker, I urge a ``yes'' vote, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Johnson) that the House suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, H.R. 1237, as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill, as amended, was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________